web analytics
The Standard

An interesting result

Written By: - Date published: 9:20 am, August 22nd, 2010 - 36 comments
Categories: australian politics - Tags:

Australia is about to enter a new era in politics. They appear to have a hung parliament this morning according to the Sydney Morning Herald.

With three-quarters of the vote counted, Labor, which began the night with a notional 88 seats, had lost a confirmed 18 seats, including the seat of Melbourne to the Greens candidate Adam Bandt and most likely the Tasmanian seat of Denison to an independent, Andrew Wilkie.

Labor clawed back only two seats from the Liberals in Ms Gillard’s home state of Victoria McEwen and La Trobe giving it a net loss of 16, leaving Labor sitting on a total of 72.

But another two Labor seats were in doubt and the ABC analyst Antony Green was early today predicting Labor to finish with 72 seats, Tony Abbott’s Coalition 73, one Green and four independents.

If the Liberals won all outstanding seats, there is a slim chance they could govern in their own right.

The three incumbent independents, all former National Party members Bob Katter, Tony Windsor and Rob Oakeshott will be joined on the crossbench by Mr Wilkie, a former intelligence officer who fell out with the former Howard government over the Iraq war. Both he and Mr Bandt would be more disposed to siding with Labor.

The three former Nationals were non-committal last night and Mr Windsor warned that if stable government could not be achieved, “we may all end up back at the polls”.

There was obviously dissatisfaction with Labour, which seems to have gone to the Greens

The drift of votes to the Greens killed Labor. Its primary vote fell 5.3 percentage points from the 2007 election to 38.1 per cent while the Coalition’s primary vote rose 1.6points to 43.7 per cent.

The Greens had a 3.8 per cent swing to receive 11.8 per cent.

It looks to me like the Aussies could do with a better electoral system. That 11.8% resulted in one seat in the 150 seat lower house, although they did better in the upper house.

Because of the preferential voting system in Australia and the use of secondary votes, the electoral position is more confused than the primary vote indicates.

Late last night, the national two-party-preferred swing against Labor from 2007 was 2.6 per cent. Labor led the Coalition by 50.5 per cent to 49.5 per cent.

I’d expect to get some creative constitutional principles from the coalition over the next few days. But it looks like it will come down to who the crossbench MP’s decide to support.

36 comments on “An interesting result”

  1. Outofbed 1

    And not forgetting the Greens hold the balance of power in the senate
    Shame they haven’t got PR in the lower house though, Greens with 11% of the vote and only one seat
    that doesn’t seem right somehow
    Still a seat in the UK parliament and now one in OZ. All in all another good election for the Greens!

    • lprent 1.1

      Yes, I forgot to mention the senate except indirectly….

      The senate balance causes major problems for the Coalition in running (rather than forming) a government. Quite simply the Greens would have a problem because the policies they espouse in their primary areas are in direct conflict with the Liberals. That means that deals with them will be difficult because the Libs will push blame for not following policies loved by their supporters on to the greens. It would be a poison chalice.

      I’m pretty sure that the Greens can make a workable deal with Labour with some ministerial posts. However it will be pretty hard in a party that has enough hassles managing its own factions.

  2. gingercrush 2

    Would you see 11% under proportional representation?

    I think there are pros and cons to Australia’s electoral system. In the lower house the member that represents the electorate has the support of at least 50% of that electorate population. Votes that go to minor parties end up redistributed when preferences are counted. Meaning the vote itself isn’t wasted.Something I believe we should implement in New Zealand albeit in a simpler form.

    The senate is more proportional though I’m not a huge fan of STV systems. I think it adds too much complication in how you rank candidates and have found it particularly useless in regards to Health Board selections. And would be extremely pissed off if it ever came into Christchurch City Council selections.But it does provide a check to undemocratic aspects of Australia’s electoral system. Though it also places a lot of power in party hands and play a too active role on election day.

  3. Draco T Bastard 3

    It looks to me like the Aussies could do with a better electoral system.

    STV = FPP in drag

    It’s not a truly proportional system. Of course, neither is MMP but it is better.

    • ghostwhowalksnz 3.1

      Its not a proportional system. Except for the senate on a state wide basis
      You need 50% of the votes to win and when you dont the preferences of the losing candidates are distributed until someone does

  4. ghostwhowalksnz 4

    The Greens didnt ‘win’ a seat. They came second in Melbourne. However Liberal preferences mean they will very likely end up with more votes.
    I would consider the Greens national share of the vote to be lower if there wasnt a preferential system. After all most Green voters would have put Labour 2nd,

  5. ZB 5

    The Australian electoral system is deeply flawed. If you vote for a major party you get one
    vote. But if you vote for a fringe party you get to vote, and vote, and vote until you get
    to vote for a major party – false illusion of consent for the process! Worse because they
    are forced to the polls what was once a vote plus dissent is now consent from the people.
    When voter numbers drop in other
    countries the governments are weaken, apathy creates a rump of dissent that could be
    harnessed by a mass movement. This cannot happen in Australia. So all in all, there
    is little way a third party can get momentum to unseat the two major parties from
    a mass movement.

    You could even get a flatline vote, where everyone likes a candidate and puts
    them second after three other candidates who are evenly split. At the first count
    the candidate everyone favors gets dropped and the three diametrically opposed
    candidates each have a third of the votes. Couple this with the illusion effect of
    having you preferences churned to decide the winner and you get the impression
    you are consenting to an extreme candidate, even when most like their second
    choice but voted for a divisive candidate in the first round. So as the
    votes are counted, the second preferences might as well have not have been
    cast! So much for being a fair system!

    The incumbents rule in OZ – the system is so convoluted that the two major
    parties are easily nobbled by ‘wealth’ Australia.

    • ghostwhowalksnz 5.1

      There is so much wrong with what you are saying its hard to start. All voters have to rank all candidates in order.
      All it means is that to get 50% to win the minor candidates are eliminated, but not their voters.
      In Melbourne seat the Labour candidate has the most votes , the Green candidate is 2nd, the Liberals 3rd. No one has 50%. The liberal preferences most likely will go to Greens as they would have been ranked above labour.
      Even the most nut case candidate has to be ranked by all the voters

      • ZB 5.1.1

        A,B,C and D are candidates. 1201 people are voting.
        400 vote A, B, C and D, they all hate D.
        400 vote B, D, C and A, they all hate A.
        400 vote D, A, C and B, they all hate B.
        Everyone likes C.
        Candidate C votes for himself, C, A, B, D, he hates A,B and D.

        So guess who wins? A does! more people hate A than any other candidate
        and everyone likes C! WTF

  6. ghostwhowalksnz 6

    As goes the UK so goes Australia.
    Doesnt look good for national getting 50% or more of the party vote, unless they fudge the system a bit……

  7. Olwyn 7

    Like many elections these days, the voting pattern in Australia shows deep disenchantment with what Joe Bageant calls “the hologram” and Plato called the cave. The disenchantment is particularly strong with the left, because traditionally they are the party associated with social justice and challenging the status quo. The hologram, however, is so far able to dictate the limits of social justice, as if the world economic structure functioned with the inevitability of weather. In fact the right now have nowhere legitimate left to go, unless you count extreme privation and oppression as legitimate, while the left equivocate away at some imaginary point called the centre, looking for minor victories to crow about that will impress voters without upsetting the hologram. The greens, whether rightly or wrongly, give the impression of being outside of the hologram. Whether this is true, and if it is whether it will stay true if they are in the position to take effective action remains to be seen. However, at the moment, the independents, as well as the Greens in the senate, will almost certainly be placed under huge pressure to support Abbot in forming a government, as happened with the lib-dems in England. Unless Labour is lucky enough to end up one or two seats ahead.

    Anti-spam word: drawn

    • RedLogix 7.1

      The Hologram:

      It, in Bageant’s case, is something he likes to call “the hologram,” a Matrix-like construct of corporate misdirection and media complicity whereby average American Joes and Joleens are persuaded to subjugate their own best interests to the prerogatives of a rigged economy that views them as nothing more than consumer grist for the global money mill.

      The Man, in short, keeps the working man down, and the working man — so easily distracted by NASCAR, Bud Light and attack ads — is happily complicit in his own exploitation. Her too.

      Interestingly…Joe is in Christchurch early Sept:

      http://www.joebageant.com/joe/2010/08/joes-book-tour.html

  8. Santi 8

    Australia in the hands of the lunatic Greens? How awful!

    • Zaphod Beeblebrox 8.1

      No worse- in the hands of Tony Abbott and Bob Katter

      • millsy 8.1.1

        Or Julia herself for that matter. If you really want to be honest.

      • Fisiani 8.1.2

        Being a centre-right voter in NZ I can really easily identify with Australian Labor. 90 day trials ok, national standards in education ok. private schools ok mining ok feeling good about yourself ok. The list goes on and on.

        • loota 8.1.2.1

          9% employer super contribution ok? Increasing education spend 86% in the last 3 years ok? Strong progressive tax system with a top marginal income tax rate of 45% ok? No GST on food ok?

          Why Fisiani you are a good guy after all, I had you pegged all wrong.

          • Zaphod Beeblebrox 8.1.2.1.1

            Actually Howard did all of those things as well. When he tried to do his only right wing act (work choices) he got shot down in flames. Its easier to co-opt your oponents agenda than implement your own sometimes.

            I get both your points, however- Aussie is lot more conservative socially, but does have a socially egalitarian economic streak.

    • Outofbed 8.2

      I am not a loony. Why should I be tarred with the epithet ‘loony’ merely because I have a pet halibut?

      • Luxated 8.2.1

        Marcel Proust had an ‘addock! So if you’re calling the author of ‘A la recherche de temps perdu’ a loony, I shall have to ask you to step outside!

  9. Claudia 9

    “It looks to me like the Aussies could do with a better electoral system.”

    You seem to be forgetting Gillard’s credibility problem after breaking a number of agreements to do with Rudd’s leadership, and both Gillard’s and Rudd’s culpability in caving in on climate change issues in what is probably the driest country on earth.

    http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=22203

    One also has to mention the increasingly assertive role of major mining companies, possibly implicit in Howards NT ‘intervention’. Rudd’s apology to indigenous people in Australia may have been perceived as threatening their plans.

    I doubt we will ever know. What matters now is the realpolitik of global recession.

    One upside, I think, is that the needs of rural Australia may be adressed outside the straightjacket of the party system.

    I hope. Porkbarelling is not unknown in the bush.

    http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/politics/trust-biggest-loser-on-election-menu-20100821-13a47.html

  10. ZakC 11

    what I don’t see about this Election is what it is that marks out Abbott as a “hero” according to former PM Howard. Yes, in terms of the Liberal party/coalition, but in respect of Australia the only thing that springs to one’s ear is what a loud mouth..

    Does loud mouthery make for aussie heroes these days..?

    Otherwise a genuine question, so c’mon guys give this one a go…

    • Luxated 11.1

      Does loud mouthery make for aussie heroes these days..?

      Well the Aussie media tend to hand out the ‘hero’ title with packets of chips.

      I’d say your assessment of all mouth no substance is largely correct.

      • loota 11.1.1

        Well the Aussie media tend to hand out the ‘hero’ title with packets of chips.

        Uh, I think you mean crisps. Packet of crisps.

        • Luxated 11.1.1.1

          I considered saying crisps, but I reconsidered as the word isn’t used that much these days. Functionally the same thing.

          • Carol 11.1.1.1.1

            I grew up in NZ calling the cold stuff in sealed packets, “chips”. Then I went to England and found that they called the cold stuff “crisps”, and “chips” was reserved for the hot variety. So, as far as I’m aware “chips” is the Kiwi word for it.

  11. ZB 12

    Katter could swipe a number of politicians to form a partner party with Labor?

    Why work with five candidates, when the coalition is a meld of
    parties that could go their own way?

  12. Sanctuary 13

    Three things stand out for me from the Australian election campaign. One is Tony Abbott – I would guess his reactionary conservative social attitudes would make him pretty much unelectable in this country, and highlights just how much more a conservative society Australia is compared to New Zealand.

    Secondly, the Aussie voting system is seriously broken – 11% of voters get ONE MP? The The Nationals with 3.86% get seven seats? What sort of democracy is that?

    Finally, reading a lot of the coverage the truly awesome depth of Australian racism is starkly laid out. Unreconstructed rednecks are still out and proud, and the hatred and loathing of a few thousands of boat people is astonishing. John Howard will be judged harshly by hisotry for creating and pandering to a white racist constituency.

    • Zaphod Beeblebrox 13.1

      According to exit polls, 18% of voters felt that what to do with 1,000 illegals who arrive by boat (50,000 arrive illegally by plane each year and 300K arrive legally) was the most important issue for voters. How can you even try to argue with such ignorance.

    • RobertM 13.2

      No, I think your wrong. Australia for the most part is more liberal, probably not the bush, NT or Queensland, but generally. Abbott is somewhat more flexible and intelligent than the left her can bring itself to believe. After all he came out for sex. Howard and Abbott effectively gave the equivalent of family support to l9 year old solo mothers who enjoy a free sex life. Abbotts campaign promise of lengthy paternal leave was far more generous than here. The Howard Government was prepared to generously support young mothers regardless of their status. Cullen, Maharey and Clark were always more interested in the fundamentalist vote in Mt Roskill, the catholic vote in Southland and the provincial vote in Hastings and Rotorua. I know I might be sexist, but the australian male vote likes his women politician to be a bit of a cougar. There’s a trace of that in Gillard and bit more in Julie Bishop the Liberal deputy. Far more than here it seems to me that australian women politicians have to be conventionally sexually attractive. If there not or appear past in like Carmen Lawrence and Julie Bishop there likely to take a hard fall. That may suggest sexism to New Zealander. But surely New Zealand is a more sexist society when it seems to penalise you in New Zealand ploitics if you are an sexually attractive women or an active herosexual.
      Surely the reason for the exodus to Australia( other than Queensland) is that intelligent New Zealanders want more privacy and hetrosexual freedom, away from the repression of New Zealands working class and rural male population and a lesser number of resentful spinsters and housewives.

      • RobertM 13.2.1

        I meant to say that Carmen Lawrence and Cheryl Kernot, took a hard fall politically because they were no longer good looking or youthful enough to appeal to the Aussie electorate. It was a bit of a typo. Julie Bishops political future will be interesting and I’m sure she will be a major power in a Abbott cabinet, but she may be a few years too old to be a leadership contender for the liberals in the harsh lights of the Australian public and media. Actually Bishop impresses me as a politician and I am somehow failing to be suffiently gallant- but Abbott is the right leader for this decade and it will be interesting to see if Malcolm Bligh Turnbull stays on board.

        • Zaphod Beeblebrox 13.2.1.1

          Lawrence got caught out misspeaking in a court case. I really liked her- very good premier, probably a bit left even for Labor. No way would she have supported George W in Iraq. Kernot was possibly a bit too left as well- also couldn’t deal with the factional system (sleeping with Gareth- bad move!)
          Gillard’s no wallflower- but smart and pragmatic and tough! I think she will survive.
          Julie Bishop- she’s very loyal too. Deputy to Nelson, Turnbull and now Abbott conveniently changing loyalty just as the vote is taken to change leader.
          You’ve obviously never seen her interviewed by kerry O’Brien- spouts the Libs attack points well but a bit lacking in ideas IMO.

          Disagree about who’s more progressive- check out Gillard’s and abbott’s answers regards gay marriage. Also check out the racially motivated Cronulla riots in 2006.
          Can’t see NZ using SAS to board refugee boats.

  13. prism 14

    I was wondering what had happened to the snooping on the internet legislation that was mooted in Oz by Labour. I was alarmed at the scope and possibilities for wide censorship with the options the pollies would give themselves to extend the criteria. And then anything Oz does our pollies are likely to recite ‘Me too’.

    Here are a couple of links for those who are interested. Wikipedia says that the bill hasn’t been drafted as at June 2010. This would have been under Kevin Rudd’s watch. Will Julia pick this up? Will Labour be the governing party even?
    IMO it’s worth getting rid of Rudd if it stops this type of creeping state watch tactics.
    wikipedia
    and
    wikileaks
    Also at 23/7/2010
    Broadband

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Forestry death guilty plea proves case for reform
    A logging company’s guilty plea over the death of one of their workers proves the need to strengthen health and safety laws, Labour’s spokesperson for Labour Issues Iain Lees-Galloway says. Charles Finlay was killed in July 2013 when he was… ...
    20 hours ago
  • Daughter for the Return Home
    Christchurch East MP Poto Williams who hails from the Cook Islands, will be returning this week as part of the Cook’s celebrations on becoming self-governing 50 years ago.  Her family background is connected to the northern Cooks, the islands of… ...
    21 hours ago
  • Tiwai Point welcomed but strategy needed
    The  news that Tiwai Point Aluminium smelter will remain open is good news for the 800 workers at the plant and the people of Southland, but points to a need for a comprehensive regional development strategy, Opposition leader Andrew Little… ...
    1 day ago
  • Stalled TPP chance for wider discussion
    Failure to get the TPP agreement across the line gives New Zealanders an opportunity to put more pressure on the Government not to sign away our sovereignty, Opposition leader Andrew Little says.“New Zealand land, dairy and medicines are up for… ...
    3 days ago
  • Will poor TPP dairy outcome stop National selling out our homes?
    After failing to protect the right to stop foreign speculators buying our houses it’s clear the Government is not going to get wins on dairy in their TPP negotiations either, Labour’s Trade and Export spokesperson David Parker says. “Labour has… ...
    4 days ago
  • Feeling aspirational
    Yesterday the Rich List showed the number of people who have over 50 million of wealth had increased by another 15 people since last year. Collectively this group are now worth 55 billion, an increase of over 7% since last… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    4 days ago
  • Feeling aspirational
    Yesterday the Rich List showed the number of people who have over 50 million of wealth had increased by another 15 people since last year. Collectively this group are now worth 55 billion, an increase of over 7% since last… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    4 days ago
  • Feeling aspirational
    Yesterday the Rich List showed the number of people who have over 50 million of wealth had increased by another 15 people since last year. Collectively this group are now worth 55 billion, an increase of over 7% since last… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    4 days ago
  • Bennett’s legacy a test for Tolley
    Former Social Development Minister Paula Bennett has been thrown under the bus by her successor after its been suggested that Ms Bennett gave the green light to an ‘unethical’ observational study of high-risk children, Labour Children’s spokesperson Jacinda Ardern says.… ...
    4 days ago
  • Submission to Greater Christchurch Earthquake Recovery: Transition to Rege...
    Thank you for the opportunity to contribute to the Draft Transition Recovery Plan on behalf of the New Zealand Labour Party.  It is important that the citizens of Canterbury have a voice in the governance of the next step of… ...
    4 days ago
  • Troubled school wanted $25,000 dollars to fence farm
    The troubled Whangaruru charter school asked Hekia Parata for $25,000 to fence the school farm at the expense of spending on teaching, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “This unbelievable revelation comes hard on the heels of Hekia Parata’s decision to… ...
    5 days ago
  • Troubled school wanted $25,000 dollars to fence farm
    The troubled Whangaruru charter school asked Hekia Parata for $25,000 to fence the school farm at the expense of spending on teaching, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “This unbelievable revelation comes hard on the heels of Hekia Parata’s decision to… ...
    5 days ago
  • Government report on sexual & family violence a good first step
    Yesterday the Government released the cabinet paper on progress on the work programme of the Ministerial Group on Family Violence and Sexual Violence. Along with the Human Rights Commissioner and Women’s Refuge, I really welcome the report. I’m relieved that… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    5 days ago
  • Government report on sexual & family violence a good first step
    Yesterday the Government released the cabinet paper on progress on the work programme of the Ministerial Group on Family Violence and Sexual Violence. Along with the Human Rights Commissioner and Women’s Refuge, I really welcome the report. I’m relieved that… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    5 days ago
  • Prisoner voting disqualification and the Bill of Rights Act
    In 2010, National rammed the Electoral (Disqualification of Sentenced Prisoners) Amendment Bill through Parliament. Paul Quinn’s Member’s Bill existed because Paul Quinn thought anyone who’d been imprisoned was a serious offender, and serious offenders had ‘forfeited’ their right to vote.… ...
    GreensBy David Clendon MP
    5 days ago
  • Mainfreight ‘appalled’ by Government’s rail madness
    The Government has been given a serve by New Zealand-based international trucking and logistics firm Mainfreight which says it lacks a national transport strategy, and has treated rail badly, Labour's Transport spokesperson Phil Twyford says. The company has told shareholders it… ...
    6 days ago
  • National’s Health and Safety Reform Bill: less safety and fewer rights at...
    The New Zealand Council of Trade Unions is embarking on a campaign to fight the changes that weaken the Health and Safety Reform bill. As part of the campaign the CTU has organised vigils with the display of 291 crosses… ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche MP
    6 days ago
  • All options need to be put on meat sector table
    Farmers must be given every assurance that all potential risks have been considered before Silver Fern Farms opens its door to foreign equity, Labour’s Primary Industries spokesperson Damien O’Connor says. “The ongoing saga involving the meat sector and amalgamation has… ...
    6 days ago
  • Flag the referendum if 50% or more don’t vote
    Labour has moved to have the second flag referendum canned if the first attracts fewer than half the eligible number of voters, Opposition Leader Andrew Little says. “John Key has already wasted more than $8 million on his vanity project… ...
    6 days ago
  • 90,000 cars reclassified in botched ACC ratings
    New figures obtained by Labour show the ACC Minister’s botched motor vehicle levy system has resulted in 90,000 vehicles having to be reclassified so far – at a cost of $6 million, Labour’s ACC spokesperson Sue Moroney says. “Nikki Kaye’s… ...
    6 days ago
  • Brutal health cuts confirmed, crucial services suffer
    Chronic under-funding by National has seen the health budget slashed by $1.7 billion in just five years, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. A report by Infometrics, commissioned by Labour, shows health funding has been cut in four of the… ...
    7 days ago
  • Meth ring under Serco’s nose
    The news that two Serco inmates have been arrested for helping to run a methamphetamine ring from prison should be the final straw and see their contract cancelled, says Labour’s Corrections Spokesperson Kelvin Davis. “National has stood by Serco despite… ...
    7 days ago
  • Ministers failing women and their own targets
    New figures showing just five Ministers have met the Government’s own reduced targets for appointing women to state sector boards is evidence National is failing Kiwi women, Labour’s Women’s Affairs spokesperson Sue Moroney says. “The Ministry for Women’s 2015 Gender… ...
    7 days ago
  • Charges up for some as funding up for grabs
    A proposal being considered by the Government would see some people having to pay more for health care and district health boards forced to fight amongst themselves to fund regional health services, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says “Information leaked… ...
    1 week ago
  • Stop experimenting on kids
    The trouble with the Charter school model is that it is a publicly funded experiment on children. The National Government has consistently put its desire to open charter schools ahead of the safety of the children in them, ignoring repeated… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    1 week ago
  • Bank puts the squeeze on mid Canterbury farmers
    News that an unnamed bank in Ashburton has put a receiver on notice over financially vulnerable farmers will send a chill through rural New Zealand, says Labour’s Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson. “The Government needs to work with  New Zealand’s banks… ...
    1 week ago
  • Key is trading away New Zealand land and homes
    John Key yesterday admitted what National dishonestly refused to confirm in Parliament last week – he is trading away New Zealand’s right to control who buys our homes and land, says Opposition leader Andrew Little. “The Prime Minister must now… ...
    1 week ago
  • Razor gang takes scalpel to health
    Plans by the Government to take a scalpel to democratically elected health boards are deceitful and underhand, coming just months after an election during which they were never signalled, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says “Leaked documents reveals a radical… ...
    1 week ago
  • Spin lines show a department in chaos
    Corrections Spin Doctors sending their place holder lines to journalists instead of responding to serious allegations shows the scale of chaos at the department over the Serco scandal, says Labour’s Corrections Spokesperson Kelvin Davis. “As more and more serious allegations… ...
    1 week ago
  • Court ruling shows law should never have been passed
    A High Court ruling that a law banning prisoners from voting is inconsistent with a properly functioning democracy should be a wake-up call for the Government, Labour’s Justice spokesperson Jacinda Ardern says. In an unprecedented ruling Justice Paul Heath has… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Judicial Review Gamble Pays Off for Problem Gambling Foundation
    Congratulations are due to the Problem Gambling Foundation (PGFNZ) who have won their legal case around how the Ministry of Health decided to award their contracts for problem gambling services to another service provider. Congratulations are due not just for… ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Environmental Protection Agency appoints GE advocate as new CEO
    This week, the Environmental Protection Authority Amendment Bill passed its first reading in Parliament. The Bill puts protection of the environment into the core purpose of the Environmental Protection Authority. This month, Dr Allan Freeth, the former Chief Executive of… ...
    GreensBy Steffan Browning MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Charanpreet Dhaliwal death demands genuine health and safety reform
    The killing of a security guard on his first night on the job is exactly the kind of incident that National’s watered-down health and safety bill won’t prevent, says Te Atatu MP Phil Twyford. The coronial inquest into 22-year-old Charanpreet… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Arbitrary sanctions hit children hardest
    Increasing numbers of single parents are being penalised under a regime that is overly focussed on sanctions rather than getting more people into work, Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni says. “Figures, obtained through Parliamentary questions show 3000 more sanctions,… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Hekia just won’t face the facts
    Hekia Parata’s decision to keep troubled Whangaruru Charter school open despite being presented with a catalogue of failure defies belief, goes against official advice and breaks a Government promise to close these schools if they were failing, says Labour’s Education… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • No more silent witnesses
    Yesterday I attended the launch of a new initiative developed by and for Asian, Middle eastern and African youth to support young people to name and get support if there is domestic violence at home. The impact on children of… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Single Use Plastic Bags campaign – Some wins and some green-washing
    As we near the end of Plastic Free July I’m nearing the conclusion of my Say No To Plastic Bag tour when I will have completed all 30 of my public meetings. The campaign was designed to work with community… ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Single Use Plastic Bags campaign – Some wins and some green-washing
    As we near the end of Plastic Free July I’m nearing the conclusion of my Say No To Plastic Bag tour when I will have completed all 30 of my public meetings. The campaign was designed to work with community… ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Minister must take responsibility for problem gambling debacle
    The Government’s handling of the Problem Gambling Foundation’s axing in a cost-cutting exercise has been ham-fisted and harmful to some of the most vulnerable people in society, Associate Health Labour spokesperson David Clark says.“Today’s court ruling overturning the axing of… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour will not support TPP if it undermines NZ sovereignty
    The Labour Party will not support the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement unless key protections for New Zealanders are met, Opposition leader Andrew Little says.“Labour supports free trade. However, we will not support a TPP agreement that undermines New Zealand’s sovereignty. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Coleman can’t ignore latest warnings
    Resident doctors have advised that a severe staffing shortage at North Shore Hospital is putting patients’ lives at risk, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. “They say a mismatch between staffing levels and patient workloads at North Shore has… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • ACC must remove barriers to appeals
    The Government must prioritise removing barriers to justice for ACC claimants following a damning report by Acclaim Otago, Labour’s ACC spokesperson Sue Moroney says. “ACC Minister Nikki Kaye must urgently scrap her flawed plan to remove claimant’s right to redress… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Six months’ paid parental leave back on the agenda
    Six months’ paid parental leave is back on the agenda and a step closer to reality for Kiwi parents after Labour’s new Member’s Bill was pulled from today’s ballot, the Bill’s sponsor and Labour MP Sue Moroney says. “My Bill… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Sole parents at risk of having no income
    New requirements for sole parents to undertake a reapplication process after a year is likely to mean a large number will face benefit cancellations, but not because they have obtained work, Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni says. “Increasing numbers… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Juking the Welfare Stats Again
    Last week the government’s major initiative to combat child poverty (a paltry $25 increase) was exposed for what it is, a lie. The Government, through the Budget this year, claims to be engaging in the child poverty debate, but instead,… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    2 weeks ago
  • OCR rate cut a result of flagging economy
    The Reserve Bank's decision to cut the Official Cash Rate to 3 per cent shows there is no encore for the so-called 'rock star' economy, says Labour's Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson.   "Today's interest rate cut comes off the back… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Reboot to an innovation economy, an Internet economy and a clean economy
    In my short 33 years on this planet we’ve seen phenomenal technological, economic and social change, and it’s realistic to expect the next 33 will see even more, even faster change. You can see it in the non-descript warehouse near… ...
    GreensBy Gareth Hughes MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Bill that puts the environment into the EPA passes first hurdle
    A Bill that puts the environment squarely into legislation governing the Environmental Protection Authority passed its first reading today, says Meka Whaitiri.  “I introduced this member’s bill as the current law doesn’t actually make protecting the environment a goal of… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Key’s KiwiSaver deception exposed
    KiwiSaver statistics released today expose John Key's claim that the cutting of the kickstart payment "will not make a blind bit of difference to the number of people who join KiwiSaver” to be duplicitous, says Labour Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson.  “Official… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Minimum Wage Amendment Bill to protect contractors
    All New Zealanders should be treated fairly at work. Currently, the law allows non-employment relationships to be used to get around the minimum wage. This is unfair, says Labour MP David Parker. “The Minimum Wage (Contractor Remuneration) Amendment Bill, a… ...
    2 weeks ago

Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere