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Climate Change arguments in a GIF

Written By: - Date published: 6:30 pm, December 22nd, 2009 - 65 comments
Categories: climate change - Tags:

Information is Beautiful recently produced the image below summarizing the various arguments between about climate change. Click on the image to see the full version. hat-tip: Open Parachute

65 comments on “Climate Change arguments in a GIF”

  1. toad 1

    Pity I can’t read it with my screen resolution.

    Sure it is good (almost everything at The Standard is) but no readable evidence to evaluate.

    Ah, click on it once, it then appears on the LHS, and click on it again.

    Then you get a ful-screen mage hat you can read.

    And it makes sense. Just a bit of a mission to get there.

  2. BLiP 2

    Doesn’t matter how simple you make it for the denialists, they will still deny, deny deny.

    • toad 2.1

      Because the science doesn’t count, BLiP. The ideology is all that matters.

      So just ignore the evidence, coz they have Jesus and/or Hayek on their side.

      • BLiP 2.1.1

        Ironic that if Jesus was alive today it would be the denialists most likely to crucify him.

        • Andrei 2.1.1.1

          3 And as he sat upon the mount of Olives, the disciples came unto him privately, saying, Tell us, when shall these things be? and what shall be the sign of thy coming, and of the end of the world?

          4 And Jesus answered and said unto them, Take heed that no man deceive you.

          5 For many shall come in my name, saying, I am Christ; and shall deceive many.

          6 And ye shall hear of wars and rumours of wars: see that ye be not troubled: for all these things must come to pass, but the end is not yet.

          7 For nation shall rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom: and there shall be famines, and pestilences, and earthquakes, in divers places.

          8 All these are the beginning of sorrows.

          9 Then shall they deliver you up to be afflicted, and shall kill you: and ye shall be hated of all nations for my name’s sake.

          10 And then shall many be offended, and shall betray one another, and shall hate one another.

          11 And many false prophets shall rise, and shall deceive many.

          12 And because iniquity shall abound, the love of many shall wax cold.

          13 But he that shall endure unto the end, the same shall be saved.

          14 And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come.

          • quenchino 2.1.1.1.1

            Religion without reason becomes mere superstition.

            Science without faith becomes mere materialism.

            Science is how we discover the nature of this world, faith is how we are informed of the nature of the next… and while each is a different domain, there is but One Creator and One Reality… therefore in their innermost core, science and religion must be in harmony with each other.

            • Ron 2.1.1.1.1.1

              Religion without Reason is superstition? Religion IS without reason. By definition. Religion relies on faith. A “belief”. There’s no reason involved.

          • lprent 2.1.1.1.2

            Yep, you can find something in the bible or koran or any of the books of religion to fit any occasion.

            Those particular verses have been used extensively from Constantines time since for a variety of purposes.

            You should read about their use when the black death was crossing Europe… Not only did they have a ongoing natural disaster happening. They also had people of faith spending more time clustering together providing a perfect focus for disease transmission listening to those exact verses.

            They often then went down the road to help make verse 9 become true by way of pogrom. Jews were notorious for washing too often, so didn’t get the death quite as often. There is some really nasty history associated with those verses.

      • Gooner 2.1.2

        Science isn’t about evidence Toad.

        You fail.

  3. you warming idiots are the deniers. Still run around as if CRU emails did not get released. GW is the new religion, so you dorks are the luddites.

    [lprent: Yeah right. I guess you don’t know much science. ]

  4. Andrei 4

    Denialists?

    The only people in denial are those that still go along with this fraud.

    I’m afraid the so called ” scientific consensus” has been manufactured and the whole of science not only “climate science” is in for a big shake-up and re-think.

    Nobody will call themselves a “climate scientist” in the future because the very term will have become synonymous with “charlatan”.

    If it wasn’t for the fact that vested interests – an unholy alliance between left-wing politicians, quick buck con artists and bankers these fraudsters would have been nailed already.

    Its one of the most disgraceful episodes in the history of science my friends.

    • quenchino 4.1

      Which is more likely Andrei? The documented unholy alliance between wealthy coal and energy companies and proven fraudsters like Fred Singer (he who ran the same FUD campaign defending tobacco company interests for decades)… or a conspiracy between thousands of independently tenured scientists in hundreds of institutions all over the world?

      Yet even when your side unethically hacks into thosuands of private emails going back a decade or so, the best you can do is quote mine a small handful of misleading phrases… all of which have rational explanations totally different to the lying spin that has been put on them. The CRU hack is in fact a huge dissapointment to you… for all the insane hyperbole that has been spewed over the media and net… there really was nothing useful to you at all. Was there?

      All the drivel we read from you is just non-stop unsupported assertions. At every science point you have been proven wrong and wrong again. Yet it means nothing to you… because you are not interested in science, or even the truth. All you are here for is to spread uncertainty, doubt and lies.

      Why the hell should The Standard continue to provide a platform for such a lying, febrile moron as yourself?

      • grumpy 4.1.1

        quenchino, you are very vocal in always calling for those who outdebate you to be banned, the last gasp of someone who’s point of view can no longer be sustained.

        Don’t you realise that if The Standard took your advice it would become even more irrelevant, descending even further from the exchange of views it provides at present?

        [lprent: Exactly, it’d wind up like the sewer with mass bullying by an in-group and bugger all info from debate. As it is, people mainly have to worry about Irish and I and our wee mildly inconsistent banning quirks. Most people figure out how not to attract our immoderate moderation attentions eventually. ]

        • quenchino 4.1.1.1

          First of all you neither you nor Andrei are debating. Not even close, all you are doing is trolling with unsupported drivel.

          Secondly, it is you guys who come here to The Standard and make these stupid, wrong headed statements. If you want to say that sort of mindless dreck, there are plenty of little denier dens where you can go and giggle and chortle among yourselves. If you go back there I promise to leave you alone.

          If on the other hand you show the slightest sign of engaging some intelligence, bring some actual information to the debate, or ask some honest questions… you’ll get a civil response from me. If you post trash I’ll go for you.

      • Andrei 4.1.2

        I don’t have a “side” quenchino.

        I believe in scientific rigor.

        For example when I see a least squares regression fitted to stochastic time series (as in the notorious NIWA graphic) I ask myself – how was the start point chosen because I know that by careful choice of end points a line of almost any desired slope can be produced – convincing to the naive but a sure sign pseudo science to the informed.

        And when I read a scientific paper one of the most important elements is the error estimates because these give you the bounds of any estimated quantity e,g. the estimated average temperature rise over the past 100 years in New Zealand. And if the error calculations are missing or fuzzy, (what we call in the trade hand waving as opposed to rigorous analysis) again alarm bells ring.

        Now you may rail about the demands for scientific rigor but if you have an hypothesis in science that you wish to prove it is up to you to make the case not up to the skeptics (and science at its very heart is supposed to be skeptical) to disprove it.

        Sorry ’bout that

        • quenchino 4.1.2.1

          I don’t have a “side’ quenchino.

          Blatant lie. You are a denier.

          I believe in scientific rigor.

          Another blatant lie. I’ve never seen the slightest hint of ‘scientific rigour’ from you. You are a total stranger to science, and the only rigor about you is your fixed thinking.

          I ask myself how was the start point chosen because I know that by careful choice of end points a line of almost any desired slope can be produced

          Psuedo science flim-flam meant to sound impressive to non-statisticians. What you are saying is perfectly well understood by anyone analysing time series.

          Hilarious enough of course in a more basic form this is exactly the same howler made by all those nitwits who cherry pick 1998 as a starting point to try and claim that it’s been cooling since then.

          And when I read a scientific paper one of the most important elements is the error estimates because these give you the bounds of any estimated quantity

          Error estimates seem to present in many of the papers I’ve read… more misdirection.

          Now you may rail about the demands for scientific rigor

          What you mean by this is that you feel free to play games shuffling the goal-posts about. Seen that from you before.

          • Andrei 4.1.2.1.1

            Tell you what quenchino

            Why don’t you show me the error analysis for the famous NIWA chart and the regression line that is on it.

            It must exist it is good science after all – so lets see it

            • quenchino 4.1.2.1.1.1

              Of course you pose a question you already know the answer to. Instead I’ll point you at a more useful, generalised answer. Try this thread for an introduction to dealing with errors in noisy data and the problems involved with curve fitting.

              • Andrei

                That is NOT the error estimates for the NIWA graphic!

                That is a pitiful attempt to divert into a discussion of the perils of curve fitting.

                Try again

        • prism 4.1.2.2

          Hey Andrei you “believe in scientific rigor’ then what can we do if its really important to ameliorate the results of conditions revealed by science?

    • Pascal's bookie 4.2

      Yeah, it’s just like evolution.

      • grumpy 4.2.1

        Face it, AGW is dead – killed off by the exposure of the very people responsible for the scaremongering.

        It has joined swine flu, Y2K, SARS etc. etc. ….. and saved us from the ENRON carbon trading market.

        • quenchino 4.2.1.1

          Face it grumpy, you are a fool.

          • grumpy 4.2.1.1.1

            and you, quenchino have already lost both the argument and your relevance.

          • quenchino 4.2.1.1.2

            And you are a moron who hasn’t said anything worthwhile ever.

            “Lost the argument”… ha.. there never was one.

            (I can keep this up all night …see how far it gets you. )

            • grumpy 4.2.1.1.2.1

              WE shall see. If, as Al Gore says, the polar ice cap has vanished in 5 years, I will be more than happy to say that you were a visionary, ahead of your time. If, on the other hand……….

              • quenchino

                What do you mean by ‘vanished’?

                There will always be Arctic ice in the winter for the foreseeable future, so if we take you statement at literal face value.. no-one is going to take your bet on.

                In order to make a valid threshold you need to specify some lower limit, like multi-season ice reduced to 15% coverage at the end of the summer season.. by a certain date.

                Alternately you might want to rummage through this post from Tamino which gives a reasoned , statistically based method for determining how many years of noisy data is needed to before we can be confident about the underlying trend.

              • grumpy

                Really, quenchino, then someone had better tell Al,

      • toad 4.2.2

        Don’t you mean Creation Sciene?

  5. BC 5

    Grumpy, it is in fact you who have lost relevance. You troll around these forums espousing your descredited and unsubstaniated views whilst attacking sensible contributers. Your actions are childish and obviously the product of a weak mind.

    You also say that quenchino has lost the argument. It certainly doesn’t appear that way from my persepective. Andrei has been utterly refuted in every respect.

    I suggest you take a walk along to Kiwiblog where your ignorance will be welcomed and celebrated.

  6. Wow

    Really good summary and the Trolls have not addressed one matter raised in the summary. So which part is lies, which part is conspiracy, and why is the consensus of so many scientific brains wrong?

    Quoting “the email” will not do it.

    • grumpy 6.1

      What idiot organised the Copenhagen conference to coincide with the worst cold snap in years?

      How come the worlds greatest climatologists didn’t see this coming and organised it elsewhere – such as Alice Springs. The outcome may have been better for them.

      • mickysavage 6.1.1

        Grumpy

        Classic denialist tripe.

        It is really hot in city X therefore the globe as a whole is not warming.

        Are you being serious?

        When talking about localised effects why do you not talk about the North Pole which is disappearing, the South Pole that is turning itself into icebergs or Greenland that is melting?

      • quenchino 6.1.2

        Grumpy,

        Heavy snow is not synonymous with cold temperatures. In fact snow occurs when especially saturated moist air is lifted very rapidly over the top of a cooler air stream.

        The cooler stream needs not be especially cold, just sufficiently dense and well organised enough to lift the warmer moist air high enough so that the adiabatic cooling is rapid enough to supercool the water, so that it freezes rather than liquifies. Well I simplify a lot… but the essential point is that snowfall is not a sign of low temperatures as such… rather the sudden meeting of warm wet and cold denser airstreams.

    • Ag 6.2

      You don’t get it, MS.

      They don’t have to address any matter in the summary or anything else that climate scientists come up with. To assume so is to assume that they are playing the same game as the AGW side, which is the game of reasoned arguments backed up with evidence.

      The deniers are not playing that game. They do not care about the evidence, but only in preventing any form of enforced action to reduce carbon emissions. That means nothing you say matters to them. Nothing at all.

      The pro-AGW people are essentially stupid in thinking that this is a debate they can “win” in the normal way that debates are “won”.

      It is not a debate. It is a political struggle over whether carbon emissions are to be subject to international regulation. You cannot win on “the facts”. The issue will only be won when the deniers are cast out of the political process.

      Remember why the Americans lost in Vietnam? It was because they assumed that they were fighting the war the way that wars were supposed to be fought. But the North Vietnamese weren’t fighting that war. They were fighting to win.

      By attempting to win on the science alone, the pro AGW side are making exactly the same mistake as the Americans did in Vietnam. How stupid do you have to be not to understand that?

      If you want to beat the deniers, you have to show them that there will be consequences for their actions. If you don’t, they’ll just keep denying.

      Do you have the guts to do that?

  7. Gooner 7

    Really good summary and the Trolls have not addressed one matter raised in the summary. So which part is lies, which part is conspiracy, and why is the consensus of so many scientific brains wrong?

    Mickey, how can one argue an image that is headed “scientific consensus”?

    There is no consensus. There is no such thing as “settled science”. And Science is not about evidence, as claimed by Toad.

    There are three reasons why it is impossible to even start to debate.

    • quenchino 7.1

      There is no consensus.

      Keep telling yourself this nonsense if it comforts you, but the IPCC process is probably the most formally exhaustive and detailed consensus process in the whole of human history.

      • mickysavage 7.1.1

        Apart from the time scientists decided that the world was not flat and that the sun did not rotate around the earth. I bet there were trolls back then too!

        • BLiP 7.1.1.1

          Mostly religious, too.

        • QoT 7.1.1.2

          They probably found inscriptions on urns saying “I’ve just repeated Erastothenes’ trick of estimating the distance to Alexandria” and told anyone who might listen about how this PROVED the earth was flat and it was all just the deceptions of a cadre of round-earthers funded by the secretive summer solstice celebration conglomerates.

  8. How about a poll of climatologists. What percentage of them do not believe in human induced climate change?

    • Roger 8.1

      According to a 22nd Jan 2009 poll, 97% of climatologists believe in human induced climate change. Apparently that leaves 3% that the skeptics here obviously believes is a significant percentage. The same poll showed that petroleum geologists were the most skeptical at 47% believing in human induced climate change followed by 64% for meteorologists. The analysis by poll conducter Peter Doran, University of Illinois at Chicago associate professor of earth and environmental sciences includes this about meteorologists;

      “Most members of the public think meteorologists know climate, but most of them actually study very short-term phenomenon.”

      and this about the result among climatologists;
      “They’re the ones who study and publish on climate science. So I guess the take-home message is, the more you know about the field of climate science, the more you’re likely to believe in global warming and humankind’s contribution to it.”

      and the following conclusion;
      “the debate on the authenticity of global warming and the role played by human activity is largely nonexistent among those who understand the nuances and scientific basis of long-term climate processes.”

      • SHG 8.1.1

        Since when has consensus been a part of the scientific method?

        • lprent 8.1.1.1

          consensus is always part of science.

          Elimination of the impossible laves the possible visible. You get broad agreement about what is conclusively disproved. A few people stay to chip around the edges of the impossible looking for flaws. Most move on to look at the possible.

          The difference with the climate change debate is that we’ve had a whole pile of quacks pile in with their equivalent of perpetual motion machines.

          There are a few climatologists, earth scientists, and geologists amongst the skeptics side – a very few of whom are doing science rather than just reviewing other peoples work.

          The vast majority of skeptical ‘scientists’ are people who are simply untrained to look at the relevant science and the vagaries of deep time. Physicists, chemists, meteorologists, etc generally contribute very little because they simply have too short-term focus or expect to get reasonably accurate results from a very chaotic system.

          Of course there are loony lords, scientific mercenaries like Singer, and various ‘institution’ fronts for the polluters.

          Trying to make sense of all of this are the CCDs and skeptics. Their biggest hassle is the conflict between what they want to believe (being able to burn without consequence), and the hard facts of climate being a delicate balance between different forces. Around the anglo world, they usually take the easier option of denying that they have to change their lifestyle (curiously it is a lot less noisy outside of the anglo states).

          So they listen to quacks rather than studying the science.

    • Roger 8.2

      According to a 22nd Jan 2009 poll, 97% of climatologists believe in human induced climate change. Apparently that leaves 3% that the skeptics here obviously believes is a significant percentage. The same poll showed that petroleum geologists were the most skeptical at 47% believing in human induced climate change followed by 64% for meteorologists. The analysis by poll conducter Peter Doran, University of Illinois at Chicago associate professor of earth and environmental sciences includes this about meteorologists;

      “Most members of the public think meteorologists know climate, but most of them actually study very short-term phenomenon.”

      and this about the result among climatologists;
      “They’re the ones who study and publish on climate science. So I guess the take-home message is, the more you know about the field of climate science, the more you’re likely to believe in global warming and humankind’s contribution to it.”

      and the following conclusion;
      “the debate on the authenticity of global warming and the role played by human activity is largely nonexistent among those who understand the nuances and scientific basis of long-term climate processes.”

  9. Bill 9

    The corporatists and deniers and servants? Kill them. Kill them all and come back alone.

    With apologies to you know who.

    • gitmo 9.1

      On the -3rd day of XMAS the Standard gave to me the commenter known as Bill showing his true colours quite terriyingly.

      • Bill 9.1.1

        You never listened to Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry then? His lyrics.

        Don’t know why you’d find him terriying (sic)

        • gitmo 9.1.1.1

          Well at least we have a clearer idea of your position on how to get rid of capitalism……. you really would have been in your element back in 1917.

          • Bill 9.1.1.1.1

            As I have said previously, abandon it Gitmo. That’s how it’s gotten rid of.

            As I guess you are referring to events in Russia when you speak of 1917, I’ve always reckoned the Bolshevics would have shipped me off to Siberia if I hadn’t escaped abroad by 1921.

            Anyway.

  10. tsmithfield 10

    The arguments for the skeptics shown above are really strawman arguments. This is because most serious skeptics actually accept that CO2 is a greenhouse gas and that human induced CO2 is affecting the environment.

    The main debate now is about how sensitive the climate is to these changes.

    I would be more interested in seeing the arguments for both sides for climate sensitivity addressed instead of some old debunked arguments that have been dredged up and summarily disposed of.

    • lprent 10.1

      That was why I put this post up. Best summary of most of the known arguments in a short format that I’ve seen.

      The sensitivity is a quite a different issue simply because the science hasn’t been developed to look into the future, and we’ve never seen or measured what happens during large climate shifts.

      We’re peering back into deep time at past events beyond the the relatively stable last 10,000 years to when there have been significant climate shifts – that has been the art of paleo-climatology for the last couple of hundred years. Meteorology has been the study of modern weather patterns. But climatology has only been spanning the two for the last 30 years. But it is a big jump between paleo events and then looking for the precursor events in the modern world (which are largely wiped in the record for past events).

      The best known guesses are in the IPCC reports. They are very conservative because they focus on what is known in the modern world rather than what is inferred from paleo-climates. In other worlds they focus on the climate that we have now rather than the rapid shifts that are visible in the past.

      The problem is that we are causing a sustained rapid shift in the atmosphere that is faster than anything we’ve observed in the past. Slower changes of that type are associated with vast changes in paleo-climates. These are the type of changes that cause mass-extinctions, especially of top animal species in their eco-systems – like us. However the paleo-climate shift patterns cause and effect is too undeveloped to put into a IPCC report. There is a lot of effort going on to look at likely possibilities, but that takes time to extract – typically decades for observation.

      The real question you should be asking is – how much risk do you find acceptable?

    • Andrei 10.2

      You want to discuss sensitivity – Here is a good paper on it

      Enjoy

      • lprent 10.2.1

        Interesting. If that is corroborated then it will cause a small shift in the models for direct radiative cooling for the tropical seas.

        Now they have to get some good data outside of the tropics. That is where most of the effects of climate change manifest. And see if the same thing happens on land surfaces in the tropics and elsewhere

        As per normal most of the paper was about instrumentation biases and cleaning up the data. Perhaps the fools that thought ‘climategate’ was important should read some actual science papers.

    • NickS 10.3

      @tsmithfield
      Except they’re not, you’ve only got to hang around the climate blog comment threads, or forums, to see many of the arguments mentioned in the gif used. Or just go to micro-Watts blog and see the same old moronic arguments spun time and time again.

      Bit like evolutionary biology actually, where the “sceptics” make the same tired old claims again, and again and again, aka “P.A.R.T.T’s”

  11. Daveosaurus 11

    Personally, I’ve always been skeptical of climate change, but the denialist camp are driving me away with their reliance on spin, sophistry, obfuscation, rhetoric, lies, conspiracy theories and even, in at least one case, blood libel, rather than finding any actual science to back up their case.

    • lprent 11.1

      I describe it as the ‘con’ pattern of smoke, mirrors and hidden objectives.

      I was also a skeptic – 30 years ago. That was when I was doing earth sciences and the theory was very raw and young with little backing evidence and tested explanations of causal effect. They managed to dig up enough evidence and support theories by the early 90’s to convince me there was an issue. By the late 90’s they dug up enough to scare me. This decades research is rapidly shifting me to terror.

  12. SJ Hawkins 13

    Well eventually one side or the other is going to be correct, and that should be the end of the matter.
    Personally I have no cause to worry, I live on a hill, I can afford higher costs for power, petrol and food etc, and frankly I like warmer weather.
    If anyone else is worried they should really do something about it. Al Gore clearly isn’t worried, look at his carbon footprint.
    Geez, there probably isn’t a problem, so stop worrying and enjoy your life!

  13. tc 14

    Yup, I can afford bigger power bills, live high up and have plenty of sunblock and water for the extended summers/droughts we’ll have.

    Being intelligent and independant I have all the excuses lined up for my grandkids when they ask…why have your generation left the planet like this knowing what you did.

    Job Done, sleep peacfully, not my problem. Blame the politicians……lunch on the company powerboat everyone.

  14. enny 15

    Information is Beautiful recently produced the image below summarizing the various arguments between about climate change. Click on the image to see the full version. hat-tip: Open ParachuteFinden Sie eine große Sammlung von animierten Gifs, Cliparts, grafiken, animationen in verschiedenen Kategorien zu Gifs.de

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    As we near the end of Plastic Free July I’m nearing the conclusion of my Say No To Plastic Bag tour when I will have completed all 30 of my public meetings. The campaign was designed to work with community… ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche MP
    5 days ago
  • Minister must take responsibility for problem gambling debacle
    The Government’s handling of the Problem Gambling Foundation’s axing in a cost-cutting exercise has been ham-fisted and harmful to some of the most vulnerable people in society, Associate Health Labour spokesperson David Clark says.“Today’s court ruling overturning the axing of… ...
    5 days ago
  • Labour will not support TPP if it undermines NZ sovereignty
    The Labour Party will not support the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement unless key protections for New Zealanders are met, Opposition leader Andrew Little says.“Labour supports free trade. However, we will not support a TPP agreement that undermines New Zealand’s sovereignty. ...
    5 days ago
  • Coleman can’t ignore latest warnings
    Resident doctors have advised that a severe staffing shortage at North Shore Hospital is putting patients’ lives at risk, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. “They say a mismatch between staffing levels and patient workloads at North Shore has… ...
    5 days ago
  • ACC must remove barriers to appeals
    The Government must prioritise removing barriers to justice for ACC claimants following a damning report by Acclaim Otago, Labour’s ACC spokesperson Sue Moroney says. “ACC Minister Nikki Kaye must urgently scrap her flawed plan to remove claimant’s right to redress… ...
    6 days ago
  • Six months’ paid parental leave back on the agenda
    Six months’ paid parental leave is back on the agenda and a step closer to reality for Kiwi parents after Labour’s new Member’s Bill was pulled from today’s ballot, the Bill’s sponsor and Labour MP Sue Moroney says. “My Bill… ...
    6 days ago
  • Sole parents at risk of having no income
    New requirements for sole parents to undertake a reapplication process after a year is likely to mean a large number will face benefit cancellations, but not because they have obtained work, Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni says. “Increasing numbers… ...
    6 days ago
  • Juking the Welfare Stats Again
    Last week the government’s major initiative to combat child poverty (a paltry $25 increase) was exposed for what it is, a lie. The Government, through the Budget this year, claims to be engaging in the child poverty debate, but instead,… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    6 days ago
  • OCR rate cut a result of flagging economy
    The Reserve Bank's decision to cut the Official Cash Rate to 3 per cent shows there is no encore for the so-called 'rock star' economy, says Labour's Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson.   "Today's interest rate cut comes off the back… ...
    6 days ago
  • Reboot to an innovation economy, an Internet economy and a clean economy
    In my short 33 years on this planet we’ve seen phenomenal technological, economic and social change, and it’s realistic to expect the next 33 will see even more, even faster change. You can see it in the non-descript warehouse near… ...
    GreensBy Gareth Hughes MP
    6 days ago
  • Bill that puts the environment into the EPA passes first hurdle
    A Bill that puts the environment squarely into legislation governing the Environmental Protection Authority passed its first reading today, says Meka Whaitiri.  “I introduced this member’s bill as the current law doesn’t actually make protecting the environment a goal of… ...
    6 days ago
  • Key’s KiwiSaver deception exposed
    KiwiSaver statistics released today expose John Key's claim that the cutting of the kickstart payment "will not make a blind bit of difference to the number of people who join KiwiSaver” to be duplicitous, says Labour Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson.  “Official… ...
    7 days ago
  • Minimum Wage Amendment Bill to protect contractors
    All New Zealanders should be treated fairly at work. Currently, the law allows non-employment relationships to be used to get around the minimum wage. This is unfair, says Labour MP David Parker. “The Minimum Wage (Contractor Remuneration) Amendment Bill, a… ...
    7 days ago
  • Bill raises bar to protect Kiwi farmland
    The Government’s rubber-stamping of every one of the nearly 400 applications from overseas investors to buy New Zealand farm land over the last three years proves tougher laws are needed, Labour MP Phil Goff says. “In the last term of… ...
    7 days ago
  • Costly flag referendum should be dumped
    John Key must ditch the flag referendum before any more taxpayer money is wasted, Opposition Leader Andrew Little says. “Millions of dollars could be saved if the Prime Minister called a halt to this hugely expensive, and highly unpopular, vanity… ...
    7 days ago
  • Nats letting Serco off scot free
    Government members have prevented Parliament’s Law and Order select committee from getting answers out of a senior Serco director about the fight clubs being run at Mt Eden prisons, says Labour’s Corrections Spokesperson Kelvin Davis. “At today’s Law and Order… ...
    7 days ago
  • Charter school experiment turns into shambles
    The National Government’s charter school experiment has descended into chaos and it’s time for Hekia Parata to stop trying to cover up the full extent of the problems, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “The Education Minister must release all… ...
    7 days ago
  • Disconnect between rates and income must be fixed
    Local Government New Zealand’s 10 Point Plan is a chance to stop the widening chasm between the rates some households are charged and their ability to pay, Labour’s Local Government spokesperson Su’a William Sio says. “There is a huge disconnect… ...
    1 week ago
  • Parole and ‘surviving the first year’
    “Intensive psychological treatment and early release to parole is far more effective at reducing reoffending among high risk prisoners than serving out the full prison sentence.” That’s reportedly the finding of Surviving the First Year, a recently-released study into Corrections’… ...
    GreensBy David Clendon MP
    1 week ago
  • Parole and ‘surviving the first year’
    “Intensive psychological treatment and early release to parole is far more effective at reducing reoffending among high risk prisoners than serving out the full prison sentence.” That’s reportedly the finding of Surviving the First Year, a recently-released study into Corrections’… ...
    GreensBy David Clendon MP
    1 week ago
  • If it’s good enough for Lake Taupō…
    Nick Smith supports helping farmers transition away from dairying and agrees we must set nitrogen caps that limit the number of animals on farms. He says this strategy is “world leading”. However we need action and pressure from him, on to… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    1 week ago
  • The importance of swamp kauri for climate research
    As early as 2010, international climate scientists were expressing concern at the rate of ancient swamp kauri extraction in Northland. Swamp kauri provides one of the best sources in the world for measuring climate fluctuations over the last 30,000 years.… ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage MP
    1 week ago
  • Govt needs to heed warnings on med students
    The Government is being urged to act on advice it has received about the negative impact its seven year study cap will have on hundreds of medical students, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. “The 7EFTS lifetime limit unfairly disadvantages… ...
    1 week ago
  • Ministers at sea over overseas buyers register
    The Prime Minister and three of his ministers are at odds over the collection of information about offshore speculators buying our houses and seem to be making things up as they go, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “John Key… ...
    1 week ago
  • Time for Key to ditch the King Canute routine
    With the economic mood in New Zealand souring, it is time for John Key to admit reality and drop the King Canute approach, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson.  “John Key is claiming that 95 per cent of the economy… ...
    1 week ago
  • Botched contract leads to charter school rort
    A botched Government contract has allowed an Auckland charter school to double dip by getting funding for students it has accommodated for free, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “Information received by Labour through written Parliamentary questions show the Ministry… ...
    1 week ago
  • Flawed system costs $3 million and counting
    New figures obtained* by Labour show the Government’s shambolic ACC car registration levy system has cost more than $3 million to implement and the costs are set to escalate, Labour's ACC spokesperson Sue Moroney says. “That’s $3 million that could… ...
    1 week ago
  • Radio NZ facing death by 1000 cuts
    The National Government’s seven year funding freeze on Radio New Zealand has put its vital public broadcasting services in serious jeopardy, Labour’s Broadcasting spokesperson Clare Curran says. "The axing of 20 jobs at our only publicly funded broadcaster shows the… ...
    1 week ago
  • Trades funding cut short-sighted
      Short-sighted funding cuts could lead to fewer school students learning trades, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. "Schools are now being financially penalised for enrolling students in trades academies. They could lose teachers and school management positions as a… ...
    1 week ago
  • The rock star economy is well out of tune
    The bad news is mounting for the economy with job ads falling in June, suggesting employment is taking a hit, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “ANZs Job Ads data shows job advertising fell 0.6 per cent in June and is… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Treasury latest to withhold Saudi sheep scandal information
    The Labour Party will today lodge a complaint with the Ombudsman after the Treasury became the latest government department to withhold information on the Saudi sheep scandal. Labour’s Trade and Export Growth spokesperson David Parker says the Government has been… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Calls to extend life-saving training
    The Government must ensure all health sector workers are not only be trained to routinely check for medical identification bracelets but have access to critical online patient information, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. “The tragic death of an 80-year-old… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Making business tax more flexible
    Labour is launching a new proposal to give businesses more flexibility and control over when they pay their tax, Opposition Leader Andrew Little announced today. “Today I am launching a discussion document to give businesses the option of paying their… ...
    2 weeks ago

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