web analytics
The Standard
Advertising

Democracy is not the problem

Written By: - Date published: 8:50 am, November 23rd, 2012 - 47 comments
Categories: democratic participation, labour - Tags:

During the Labour conference, Armstrong patronisingly wrote “delegates were so blinded and so intoxicated by the prospect of securing a say in the election of future leaders that they did not think through the consequences”. Old Tories hate democracy. But it’s disappointing that Garner made the same mistakes. Democracy doesn’t weaken, it strengthens – ask the Greens.

Every year, every single year, the Greens co-leaders face a vote on their leadership from party delegates. It doesn’t require a caucus trigger, it doesn’t just happen once every three years. And it isn’t destabilising. In fact, it’s stabilising because any leadership challenger has one legitimate time a year to make that challenge. No stab in the back coups in the Greens. Actually, no coups at all. The Greens’ leaders have been putting their leadership on the line year after year for 22 years without a leadership spill.

In fact, that’s how any society you might be part of works. You go along to the AGM and the office-holders are voted on. Occasionally, there’s a challenge and its resolved one way or the other. If the chairmanship of the Waikikimaukau Golfers Association can be decided thusly, why can’t the leadership of the organisations at the heart of our democracy?

As for the claim that a newly elected Prime Minister could be spilled – please, get real. A leader who leads you to victory is like a minor deity. Are all those newly-minted ministers and first time MPs who have their jobs mainly thanks to the success of one person going to turn around and sack that person? In reality, the vote would be another chance for the new PM to bask in success as the caucus and party cheer them.

Launching a coup is a very, very serious thing that MPs don’t do lightly. If you can’t get a definite 40% in caucus against Labour’s weakest leader since Palmer (and at least Palmer was authoritative on constitutional stuff), how are you going to get 40% against a newly victorious PM? Can you name me a time, ever, when the caucus, let alone the party, of a newly elected PM would have voted them out within 3 months of winning? … except Bolger?

The problem with Labour’s reforms isn’t that they are too democratic, it’s that they’re not democratic enough. They’ve gone with a model where caucus is a gatekeeper and then over-powered in the actual vote. This will be used by the old guard to shield Shearer and themselves from the views of their own party. The Green co-leaders have no such protection, and it means they can never turn their backs on their members.

If Shearer has turned over a new leaf and is now strong and dynamic, then he will give the party the opportunity to vote on his leadership in February. But I bet the anti-democratic old guard won’t let him. And isn’t that more destabilising in the long-run?

47 comments on “Democracy is not the problem”

  1. MikeD 1

    “Caucus must control its own destiny.”

    What a bunch of authoritarian crap. No wonder the gallery could only view the outpouring of democracy on Saturday through the usual frame of the caucus leadership spill. Party democracy is entirely foreign to them.

  2. Craig Glen Eden 2

    So true James the labour members should get a vote every year in my view. This February we should just have a vote Members caucus unions all have a vote for who we want as leader. The events of the last few days show exactly why its needed, who ever wins gets my support until the membership vote at the next conference.

  3. mike 3

    You’ll note that the author has pointed out that ‘Greens co-leaders face a vote on their leadership from party delegates.” That’s right, delegates. You’re saying ‘we should just…all have a vote for who we want as leader’. A sort of talkback forum which drives people into warring factions and inevitably makes for sore losers who needle constantly. Yeah just what we need.

    • weka 3.1

      I was under the impression that when people talk about the members having a vote, they’re talking about delegates, not the whole membership having a vote each.

      • Craig Glen Eden 3.1.1

        Why should it be just delegates. If its good enough for every Joe citizen to have a vote on who the Government should be or who the Mayor should be why shouldn’t every member have a say? Oh hang on dont tell me, the delegates know more than the party members, surely not.

        • weka 3.1.1.1

          Actually I think it might be all the members in the new Labour system – ts commenters were talking about a postal vote the other day. Maybe someone could clarify.

          In the Greens it’s delegates that vote. I’d rather not have the party leader decided by a popularity contest, which I think is what happens with ‘everyone’ having a vote (it’s how we choose govts and look how that works). I’m sure this is mitigated by the fact that people bothering to vote in a political party leadership vote will most likely be well informed of the issues and people involved. Maybe.

          Using regional delegates means that members need to get involved in their region, and take part in the decision making processes there. It makes it more robust IMO. But then teh Greens highly value democracy and so we don’t see the same degree of skuldugery that you get in Labour.

          • Craig Glen Eden 3.1.1.1.1

            Do you want democracy or not if you are arguing that Democracy is floored fine but you cant argue that delegates should vote and that some how thats a better form of democracy than one person one vote with out giving a logical reason. If we want to be an engaging social democratic Party we need to make sure every one has a say not just the special people with special powers.

          • Colonial Viper 3.1.1.1.2

            In the Greens it’s delegates that vote. I’d rather not have the party leader decided by a popularity contest, which I think is what happens with ‘everyone’ having a vote (it’s how we choose govts and look how that works)

            Hang on a sec.

            The way I understand it, the Green party delegates MUST vote as their electorate membership tells them, and must declare the vote they cast to that membership so that they are accountable.

            That means you don’t get this bullshit which happened with Labour in Dec – members clearly telling their MPs to vote one way or another, and the MPs just going off on their merry way doing whatever they like, never having to explain to their membership what they actually did do.

            Secondly, people who become members of a political party are people who are interested enough in NZ democracy to get involved with how it works, and to participate at a level that 95% of people do not bother with these days. So members should have a real say, unless of course the party leans towards a more authoritarian perspective where only a selected elite within the party numbering less than 100 essentially have all the say.

            Now you might like that better, but consider how well its worked for Labour so far.

        • toad 3.1.1.2

          The Green electorate organisations select their delegates at electorate meetings which every member in the electorate is entitled to attend and vote a few weeks before the Conference. Delegates are not usually free to vote according to their personal preference. Most electorates bind their delegates to vote for a particular candidate when the leadership is contested (subject to something extraordinary happening, like their preferred candidate withdrawing or making an absolute arse of himself or herself between the electorate meeting and the Conference).

          • alex 3.1.1.2.1

            And a good system it is too. Members are enfranchised and have a real say, but its also efficient and manageable on the Conference floor.

    • Pascal's bookie 3.2

      A sort of talkback forum which drives people into warring factions and inevitably makes for sore losers who needle constantly.

      Quoted for Iron.

  4. ad 4

    Shearer is 2 votes away from the magic block of 22. And he will get it within 2 weeks. There will be no vote in February for the members.

    “If Shearer has turned over a new leaf and is now strong and dynamic, then he will give the party the opportunity to vote on his leadership in February.”

    There is no locial progression in this sentence. They are not related clauses. Shearer has been rewarded for being “strong and dynamic” by unnecessarily ruining the career of one of his best MPs. The accumulation and exercise of power is far more attractive and rewarding than the instability of democracy.

    • Tom Gould 4.1

      It was more of a ‘career hari kari’ than a ‘ruining’ and 100 per cent of the Caucus seems to agree.

    • Slartibartfast 4.2

      ” The accumulation and exercise of power is far more attractive and rewarding than the instability of democracy.”

      And yet this is exactly what he accused Cunliffe of!

      “Mr Shearer was asked what Mr Cunliffe had done specifically. He responded that Mr Cunliffe had attempted to promote his own interests above those of the party. ” – Press statement.

      Classic tactics.

    • Colonial Viper 4.3

      Shearer is 2 votes away from the magic block of 22. And he will get it within 2 weeks. There will be no vote in February for the members.

      That’s an awesome crystal ball you have there.

      I’m glad none of the MPs at the caucus meeting were upset with how this whole affair has been stage (mis)managed. And that none of the MPs had any concerns with being expected to simple be “Yes Men” and “Yes Women” under Shearer’s leadership. And that none of the MPs were miffed at being required to swear fealty and reveal their “secret” (LOL) caucus vote 3 months ahead of time or be considered “traitors”.

      Because if any of those things had happened, well, MPs might have more questions over Shearer’s leadership style, not less.

      • the sprout 4.3.1

        Exactly. Shearer’s mammoth stuff up in his handing of Cunliffe, which saw him go from hero to zero in less than 24hrs, will be giving most of the caucus even more doubts about Shearer.

        • David H 4.3.1.1

          Speech ? What leaders speech, was help over the weekend? And I’ll bet most people can’t remember what he said. and the 2012 conference will now be known for Shearer’s folly, and demise?

  5. Tom Gould 5

    “Ask the Greens”? Why ask a fringe minority single issue party how to govern a country? They have had MPs in Parliament for 16 years now and have nothing to show for it, unless you count the number of ‘meetings’ they have held to talk about what someone else should do, or the number of press releases also talking about what someone else should do?

    • weka 5.1

      :roll:
      “Ask the Greens”? Why ask the third biggest, and now mainstream, political party in NZ on how to govern a country? They’ve had MPs in Parliament for 16 years now and have developed policy around many important issues, not just environmental ones. They have achieved many things, not least of which is keeping environmental issues on the table and in the public view. They’ve also influenced environmental and social policy within other parties and thus government. This year they’ve been core in the movement to assets in public ownership.
      http://www.greens.org.nz/policy
       

    • Lanthanide 5.2

      Surely the presence of Green MPs has reduced the other parties’ share of the seats that they might have otherwise won, so the Green MPs have directly influenced the government?

      What if National in the last election and this election didn’t need a coalition? What if Labour didn’t need to string along Dunne / Peters because they had larger numbers themselves?

      Incredibly naive and blinkered view you take, Tom.

    • Tracey 5.3

      Have you just woken up Mr Van Winkle? What an absurd summary of Greens impact on politics and society.

    • alex 5.4

      Well they managed to push a National government into acting on home insulation, especially in low income houses. Yes, thats right, thanks to pressure from the Greens a National government did something for poor people. That is a pretty fantastic achievement I would say.

    • Dr Terry 5.5

      TG. How “green” you are!

  6. Just more of the rightwing establishment leaping to the defence of Shearer.
    No suprises there mate.

  7. David H 7

    Just a thought here.

    Everyone here has seen Shearer in a press conference. But has anyone noticed the jolly looking rotund man with a bland smile on his face???? No, it’s not DPF. It’s Grant Robertson mentally killing him self laughing, and waiting (in vain) to fill Shearers shoes. But Robertson who I saw described by one journalist as a “Dullard” has I feel all the appeal of an un`lanced boil on the rear.

  8. Bill 8

    Because I don’t want to cross post, I’ll link to this argument on what I’ll just state here – healthy democracy cannot ever exist in an environment that is fundamentally anti-democratic.

    Damn. I think weka might be right about linking two pages over on a thread. Anyway, I was trying to link to comment 23.1 on the ‘A Good Time to Join Labour’ post

  9. Colonial Viper 9

    Old Tories hate democracy.

    Actually, traditional Tory voters very much like democracy. Tht’s why they always vote. The neoliberals and crony capitalists however are another question – they love cartel behaviour.

  10. Tracey 10

    I was concerned at how disinterested our leader appeared at meeting one of the most inspiring supporters of democracy in the last century. I thought his animation while talking to business people spoke volumes compared to his apparent boredom at meeting aung san suu kyi. Never too tired to be excited about money.

  11. gobsmacked 11

    Anyone for evidence?

    Let’s do what Duncan Garner apparently can’t. Look beyond these shores, to what really happens, instead of making stuff up.

    All around the world, political parties in dozens of democracies have to address this basic issue. And all around the world, parties have developed a variety of internal systems which don’t leave everything in the hands of a few MPs. And yet, they still manage to run governments.

    Except Australia. Is that a model to follow? A faction-ridden ALP and Tony Abbott. Hmmm.

    I suppose the rest of the World is Foreign and Doesn’t Count. They don’t understand politics like we do. David Cameron and Ed Milliband should bow down to the Political Editor of TV3 … he understands their jobs so much better.

    Duncan must be getting ready for his new job as talkback host. Bugger the facts, just rant.

  12. John Chapman 12

    In response to Mike. The Greens have branch debates before their annual AGM and usually mandate the delegate to vote for the branch choice. There is also a voting option of ‘Non of the above’. Its a matter for the membership not the caucus or delegates who makes up the Co-leadership.

    • weka 12.1

      Do Labour delegates get to vote for what they want rather than their constituency?

      • Colonial Viper 12.1.1

        usually the delegates will be instructed on how to vote by their LEC or branch. Certain votes delegates will be given discretion on…”get to Conference, talk to the people involved, vote the way you think best”.

      • Te Reo Putake 12.1.2

        I went representing the views of my LEC and I voted accordingly. I trust all the other delegates did the same.

  13. Why 13

    I thought democracy was based on 1 person equals 1 vote. Why should a democratic party be different than the democratic government it hopes to rule?

    If the Leader cannot convince the members that they are up for the job, then they are not.

  14. Ron 14

    I dislike the delegates voting and watching how the Greens managed to elect the current incumbents would much prefer all members having a say in the election of a leader.
    In addition I think that party list is very important and should be open to all members to vote on.
    That would do more with one stroke to being democracy into NZ Politics than anything else I can think of.

    • George D 14.1

      In the Greens the electoral list is party member ranked, rather than delegate ranked. Though the list is then adjusted (in a fairly transparent fashion) to ensure that gender equity is maintained (50%), and that no region, age group, or other demographic is overly represented. This occasionally means bumping someone up or down one. There’s healthy internal debate about this process, and no question that if the membership wanted it differently, they’d vote on it at the next AGM and make it happen differently.

  15. Jenny 15

    The Greens’ leaders have been putting their leadership on the line year after year for 22 years without a leadership spill.

    JAMES HENDERSON

    Maybe it’s time they started.

    With a current leadership that seems set on continuing the policy of Climate Change Ignoring that they pursued in the last elections. The Green Party deliberately traded principal for electoral advantage.

    Will they do so again?

  16. Here’s the thing.
    Ken Livingstone first came to power because London Labour did a similar thing. A change in rules saw him roll somebody who spearheaded the campaign, who was palatable to the electorate. This happened within days of Labour taking charge of Brent council, a similar event occurred in the same decade in Liverpool.
    Whilst I applaud the new found enthusiasm amongst Labour grass root activism I fully expect Labour to do the same thing.
    If Labour ever win another election it will be with a non offensive leader and then the nutters on the fringes will roll him in short order and place somebody with no chance of actually fronting and winning a campaign into the captains seat.
    A recruitment drive for membership is pointless unless more than half the membership have a grasp on reality and then you will only get 40% of the vote.
    Competence and popularity become secondary to dirty deals and scheming. Something the Caucus and union bosses have masters degrees in.
    You would be better off all joining the greens and trying to bring the commies and hippies in that party to heel.

    • Polish Pride 16.1

      “You would be better off all joining the greens and trying to bring the commies and hippies in that party to heel.”

      Especially those hippies eh. I mean seriously, imagine wanting to live in a world without War….
      They must really be a bunch of raving loons!

Important links

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

1 2 3 7

  • Time for NZ to prohibit the killing of great apes
    That ban was widely hailed, and spurred efforts in other countries to get similar bans. However, apes are still being exploited, abused and killed, both in captivity and in the wild. Examples of cruelty, neglect and abuse abound. Apes are… ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers MP
    20 hours ago
  • Auckland building consents: Tragic
    The only word to describe the latest building consent figures for Auckland is ‘tragic’, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “Whatever the Government is doing to address the Auckland housing crisis, it is clearly not working. ...
    21 hours ago
  • A whiff of a new biosecurity scandal?
    A pest which could create havoc for New Zealand’s horticulture and agriculture sector must be as much a focus for the Government as hunting out fruit flies, Labour’s Biosecurity spokesperson Damien O’Connor says. “While the Ministry for Primary Industries is… ...
    24 hours ago
  • Government shrugs off health sector crisis
    Despite new evidence showing that cuts to health spending are costing lives the Government continues to deny the sector is struggling, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. “Health services in New Zealand are in crisis. ...
    2 days ago
  • Parata lowered the bar for failing charter school
    When Hekia Parata became aware that the Whangaruru charter school was experiencing major problems her first action was to drop standards by reducing the number of qualified teachers they had to employ, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins has revealed. “Hekia… ...
    2 days ago
  • National not being straight about the economy
    John Key and Bill English need to be straight with New Zealanders about the damage their failure to diversify the economy is doing, after new figures show export growth plunged due to a collapse in dairy exports, says Grant Robertson.… ...
    2 days ago
  • Mind the Gap
    This week the International Monetary Fund released a report on the wider economic value in closing the gender pay gap. When even the bastions of free-market economics start to raise concerns about gender pay gaps, we have to realise how… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    2 days ago
  • Labour will hold National to parental leave promise
    Labour will hold National to its promise to increase the support given to new parents of premature, multiple birth and babies born with disabilities, Labour’s paid parental leave campaigner Sue Moroney says. "I am naturally disappointed that after battling for… ...
    3 days ago
  • It was all just pillar talk
    Steven Joyce’s confession that he can no longer guarantee a pillar-free design for the New Zealand International Convention Centre shows the Government has abandoned its dream of creating an ‘iconic’ ‘world-class’ structure, says Labour Economic Development spokesperson David Clark. “Steven… ...
    3 days ago
  • Australians move on offshore speculators
    John Key might want to have a quiet word with Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott about Canberra's just-announced crack down on offshore speculators when he visits New Zealand this week, Labour's Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says."Tony Abbott's centre right government… ...
    3 days ago
  • Government at odds on overseas driver crashes
    National backbencher Jacqui Dean has spoken out about overseas driver crashes, putting herself at odds with Prime Minister John Key who is on record as saying it’s not a big issue, Labour’s Transport spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “I’m not surprised… ...
    3 days ago
  • Human Rights and the Palestine Crisis
    Last week I heard two Palestinians speak at Wellington events about the ongoing crisis in their country. Samar Sabawi spoke to a full house about the history of Palestine and gave us a lucid and disturbing account of the situation… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    3 days ago
  • Time to take real care of our kids
    An Amnesty International report has once again criticised New Zealand’s track record on looking after our kids, Labour’s Children’s spokesperson Jacinda Ardern says. The annual report, which looks at global human rights abuses highlights not only the fact that high… ...
    3 days ago
  • John Key wrong about Labour’s war vote
    John Key’s desperate claims that the former Labour Government didn’t put combat troop deployment to a Parliamentary vote are simply wrong, Labour’s Defence spokesperson Phil Goff says. “It was disgraceful that the Prime Minister ran rough shod over democracy and… ...
    3 days ago
  • Māori language bill needs work
     It is clear that the first draft of the Māori Language Bill was about structures and funding rather than the survival of te reo Māori, Labour’s Māori Development Spokesperson Nanaia Mahuta says.  “Labour is pleased that the Minister of Māori… ...
    3 days ago
  • Report proves troubled school shouldn’t have opened
    The long-awaited release of an Education Review Office report into Northland’s troubled Whangaruru charter school proves it should never have been approved in the first place, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “This report identifies problems with absenteeism and disengaged… ...
    4 days ago
  • Reply to PM’s statement on deploying troops to Iraq
    “The decision of any Government to send troops to a conflict zone is a very serious one, and it is right that this House takes time to consider it, to debate it, and, ideally, to vote on it, but we… ...
    4 days ago
  • Minister must take action on death trap slides
    Workplace Relations Safety Minister Michael Woodhouse must take urgent action to ensure inflatable amusement rides don’t become death traps for children, Labour’s spokesperson on Labour Relations Iain Lees-Galloway says. “No one wants to stop kids having fun, but horror stories… ...
    4 days ago
  • Manus Island and the New Zealand Government
    This week the Greens have participated in awareness activity about Manus Island, the refugee camp on an island in Papua New Guinea where Australia dumps asylum seekers. John Key says that he has every confidence in the Australian Government’s claim… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    1 week ago
  • Election Inquiry – Getting accessible voting on the agenda
    James Shaw has been doing a series of blogs on the Election Inquiry into last year’s general election.  I thought this was a great opportunity to raise an issue very dear to me – accessible voting. Last year’s general election… ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers MP
    1 week ago
  • RMA changes no solution to Christchurch housing
    Housing will continue to be a big issue in 2015. The latest Consumer Price Index, released last month, shows both good news and bad news on the housing front. After years of being the most expensive place to build a… ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage MP
    1 week ago
  • Saving kokako in South Auckland’s Hunua Ranges
    It is amazing that you can hear the song of the endangered North Island kokako in South Auckland’s Hunua Ranges, less than 50 kms from the central city. A heavy schedule of policy workshops at the Green Party’s Policy… ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Let’s not turn a blind eye to human rights
    The Cricket World Cup has just opened in New Zealand, and it’s an opportunity for us to shine on the world stage. International sport can be a chance for us to build relationships with other countries, and examine what it… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Its Just Not Cricket
    This week it was my privilege to work with Sri Lankan Tamil communities in this country and host Australian journalist and human rights advocate Trevor Grant. I knew a bit about Trevor from his biography but I didn’t know just… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Time for NZ to #BeCrueltyFree
    The Government is about to progress the final stages of the Animal Welfare Amendment bill. This will be our last opportunity to get changes made to improve the bill to ensure a better outcome for animals. I have put forwards… ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers MP
    2 weeks ago
  • We want access!
    Access to buildings is a big issue for many New Zealanders. It looks like that, due to the hard work and persistence of people in the disability community, the Government may finally be starting to take access to buildings seriously.… ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Greens call on Super Fund to divest from fossil fuels
    The Green Party today called on the New Zealand Superannuation Fund (the Fund) to divest from fossil fuels, starting immediately with coal. The call was accompanied with a new report, Making money from a climate catastrophe: The case for divesting… ...
    GreensBy Russel Norman MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Young Kiwis’ housing crisis
    Shelter is a fundamental human need along with food, water and clean air. All humans need adequate shelter; it’s a human right. Warm, safe, stable accommodation is critical for young people to be able learn and grow and just be.… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    2 weeks ago
  • On the River Patrol in Te Tai Tokerau
    Last Wednesday, I went on a tour of some of Northland’s rivers with  Millan Ruka from Environmental River Patrol as he monitored water quality throughout Te Tai Tokerau. The dry conditions meant we couldn’t use the boat but we visited… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Opening of Parliament 2015
    Russel NormanOpening of Parliament Speech February 2015 Tēnā koutou Tēnā koutou Tēnā koutou katoa. A brief history of climate change What a summer! It's been hot, even here in Wellington, hotter than any summer I can remember. All… ...
    GreensBy Russel Norman MP
    3 weeks ago

  • Politicians’ pay increases
    “An increase of 3.5% in the minimum wage compared with 5.5% increase for politicians is appalling. It is another example of the wealthy looking after themselves and showing no regard for the poor” says Peter Malcolm, National Secretary of Income… ...
    17 hours ago
  • Invade Mexico for Guacamole Reserves Instead
    #WagePeaceNZ, founded yesterday, along with all 7 of its Twitter followers, demands that New Zealand invade Mexico for its Guacamole reserves in lieu of sending 143 troops to Iraq. ...
    17 hours ago
  • Australian Prime Minister to thank New Zealand fire crews
    The contribution of more than 400 New Zealand firefighters in helping battle bushfires across the Tasman over the past 14 years will be acknowledged tomorrow during a visit by Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott to an Auckland fire station. ...
    18 hours ago
  • A simple question for Winston Peters: Where do you live?
    "Winston Peters has set a new record, being economical with the truth only hours into his campaign," claims Northland ACT candidate Robin Grieve. ...
    18 hours ago
  • Northland doesn’t need yesterday’s man
    "It's great that Winston Peters is finally taking an interest in Northland. But frankly we don’t need yesterday’s ideas from yesterday’s men in our region," ACT Northland candidate Robin Grieve said today. ...
    18 hours ago
  • Children’s Day – 365 days a year
    Barnardos wants New Zealanders to celebrate Children’s Day on 1 March, and to recognise the effort it takes to raise great kids over all 365 days of the year. ...
    19 hours ago
  • Will MPs Put Taxpayers’ Money Where Their Mouth is?
    The Taxpayers’ Union is calling the bluff of MPs and has written to each one asking whether they will be accepting the backdated pay increases announced yesterday. Taxpayers’ Union Executive Director, Jordan Williams, says: ...
    21 hours ago
  • Fonterra Sneaks Round The Corner
    Fonterra’s subsidiary Glencoal has put its plans for an open cast mine on SH2 at Mangatangi on hold indefinitely. The local community is celebrating. They worked very hard with submissions on all the impacts of coal mining that you are… ...
    22 hours ago
  • How Free Is Free Speech?
    How Free Is Free Speech: Do we recommend unconstrained freedom of expression? The Chief Human Rights Commissioner, David Rutherford, will be In Conversation with Noel Cheer at St Andrew’s on The Terrace, Wellington on Tuesday 3 March 2015 from 12:15pm… ...
    22 hours ago
  • No military deployment in Iraq: Nationwide peace vigils
    Peace vigils calling for increased humanitarian assistance and diplomatic support for Middle East peace processes, and opposing the military deployment to Iraq, will be held around the country at 5pm on Thursday, 5 March, coordinated by Peace Movement ...
    23 hours ago
  • Message of Nationwide Day of Action :‘TPPA? No Deal!’
    “An amazing 22 towns and cities across New Zealand have rallied to the call for a nationwide day of action against the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) on 7 March”, according to Chantelle Campbell who is coordinating the national events ...
    23 hours ago
  • New Group Against Amalgamation
    A group of Wellingtonians have launched a campaign to resist the Greater Wellington Regional Council’s scheme to amalgamate Wellington’s existing councils. The group, Best Little Capital, has been formed by Wellingtonians Michael Moughan and Digby ...
    1 day ago
  • Stark contrast between benefit increase & MPs’ pay rise
    Stark contrast between benefit increase & MPs’ pay rise Media release Friday 27 February 2015 Earlier this week Social Development Minister Anne Tolley announced that benefits will increase by 0.51% on 1 April. Yesterday MPs were granted a 5.5% ...
    1 day ago
  • Sensible Sentencing challenges MPs to refuse pay rise
    “I realise this will take courage and we extend an open challenge to all MPs – or any MP from any party – to have the courage to be the first to stand up and publicly denounce this nonsense and… ...
    1 day ago
  • Labour Party President Elected
    Labour Party President Elected Nigel Haworth has been elected as Labour Party President following a vote conducted among the constituent organisations and elected representatives of the Party. This follows the resignation of Moira Coatsworth in December 2014. ...
    1 day ago

Removed at the request of The Daily Blog.
Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere