web analytics
The Standard
Advertising

I thank Margaret Thatcher …

Written By: - Date published: 9:03 am, April 9th, 2013 - 313 comments
Categories: activism, class war, democracy under attack, democratic participation, feminism, poverty, privatisation, socialism, uk politics - Tags: ,

… for her major contribution to my political education.

I lived in London during the entire time Thatcher was prime minister.  It was a time of major change;

of intensive, collective anti-Thatcher political action;

of street riots;

of international conflicts;

of turmoil;

of increasing divisions;

of the restructuring of the workplace, the economy, society and popular culture;

of the growth of individualism and the commercialisation of individual identifications;

of increasing extremes between rich and poor;

of the dismantling of the welfare state, of increasing poverty;

and for those on the left, sometimes there were times of fun, personal and political achievements and hope

– but, above all it was a time when the “neoliberal” right extended and consolidated its networks of power, influence, inhumane agenda, misleading PR, and political platform.  We continue to live with its legacy.

When I arrived in England in the late 70s, the left wing discourses were quite dominant in the media and in face-to-face-interactions.  The left seemed on the rise, and the future was there for the taking. It was part of the successful development of policies for a fairer world, with less poverty, more social justice and more opportunities for all to lead financially and socially secure, and fulfilling lives.

The left wing grassroots networks continue to operate strongly in opposition in the beginning of the 80s.  However, Thatcher set out to dismantle such socialist networks in the cities, and gradually, through a rafter of inter-related initiatives, they  were dismantled.

I recall the first New Year ’s Eve after Thatcher’s Tories were elected to government.  The snow was on the ground outside.  A group of us were sitting around despondently contemplating a future under (what we naively thought may be only one or two terms).  One of our group tried to positively energise us.  He argued that we should use the Tory time in power as an impetus for action and change.   However, over time I learned that successfully opposing the power of the elites needs more that earnest will and effort.

I remember that, in the early 80s, each time we went up to the centre of London, we saw the appalling sight of increasing numbers of people sleeping on the pavements, in doorways, and populating the Bull Ring under Waterloo Station and beside the National Film Theatre.  I recall the students (in my classes) and their families struggling to survive while the MSM touting the great British economic revival.  I remember going past burnt out cars, boarded up windows, and coach loads of waiting uniformed police in backstreets, and the helicopters buzzing overhead at night during the 1980s Brixton riots (I lived nearby).

The-Brixton-riots-in-1981-007

Brixton Riots 1981

I remember the support from feminists, gays and other groups for the miners during their strikes; the day trips to tramp through the mud, and pee in the bushes at Greenham Common and being uplifted by the sight of the protests living in their makeshift camps.

Greenham Common

I remember the reports of IRA, bombings around London; the massive anti-Nazi League demonstrations and rallies (begun before Thatcher became PM);

Anti-Nazi league rally Victoria Park 1978

Anti-Nazi league rally Victoria Park 1978

the industrial actions I participated in as part of the teachers unions, including leafleting in shopping centres, joining large demonstrations and rallies, work-to-rule periods; the poll tax riots, and the on-going opposition to Thatcher’s wars on the poor, waged on behalf of the elites.

But, above all, I remember, that no matter what the opposition groups tried – no matter how widespread the criticism of Thatcher and her government seemed to be on the ground, Thatcher kept on being elected again and again.  I remember the depths of my anger and frustration, and the way I came to see Thatcher as pure evil.

Thatcher and her government have left a long and deep legacy.  It continues to have an impact on life here in NZ, as well as in the UK.  The “neoliberal” revolution has done much lasting damage to many lives.  Nevertheless, in spite of the failure of “neoliberalism”, evident with the Global Financial crisis and its aftermath, it is a long time dying.

My memories of the time are diverse, personal and extensive. Ultimately, the main thing I learned from Thatcher is that action, political will, and policies based in sound evidence and humane values is not enough.  In order to work towards a more inclusive, fairer world without poverty and destructive divisions, there is a need to find a way to counter the extensive networks, power and reach of the “neoliberal” elites.

313 comments on “I thank Margaret Thatcher …”

  1. One Anonymous Knucklehead 1

    Well said again Karol.

  2. Well put Karol.

    I had the equivalent experience in New Zealand during the Muldoon years. He damn near wrecked the country and we are still feeling the effects now.

    Your snapshot reinforces strongly the damage the right does when it is in power and how we owe it to our countries and the world to make sure that progressives are in power.

    • prism 2.1

      ms
      And being Right means you’re never wrong.

    • Enough is Enough 2.2

      I think Thatcher’s time is more analogous to Roger Douglas’ reign of terror as opposed to Muldoons. Muldoon cared about the working poor. Douglas never did.

      • xtasy 2.2.1

        Enough is Enough –

        In all honesty, I doubt whether Muldoon “cared” about the working poor. Wages for low paid were not great then, no different to today.

        He would have feared the unions, who then were as worker representatives still able to wield some power in New Zealand.

        Roger Douglas and his supporters within the New Zealand Labour party started the destruction of the workers’ rights in NZ, same as the selling off of assets, the endless privatisation, and with that and other measures the transfer of wealth and incomes from the middle class and poor to the top.

        “Pissing upstairs” was their economic practice, rather than letting it “trickle down”, as they claimed it would do. And the Nats swiftly realisised their “opportunities” after that, taking power and letting Ruth Richardson, Shipley and the rest continue the agenda even more ruthlessly in the 1990s.

        And there lies one major difference, the tories started the neo lib right wing capitalist reforms in the UK, a “seized” and soul betraying Labour Party in NZ started the same here.

        To this day Labour has not “recovered” from this, and the years under Clark were only held in power, due to endless compromises to big business and the right wing lobbies.

        • Enough is Enough 2.2.1.1

          Yeah I agree xtasy.

          I was trying to covey that on the terror scale Douglas wins over Muldoon and is therefore closer to Thatcher

        • Populuxe1 2.2.1.2

          The Reserve Bank counselled Muldoon that the dollar should be devalued. Muldoon ignored the advice because he believed it would hurt poor New Zealanders in the medium term, and in June 1984 announced the snap election mentioned above which, as predicted, caused an immediate run on the dollar. How is that “not caring”?

          • xtasy 2.2.1.2.1

            Populuxe1: Muldoon was caring more for the ones that had substantial funds in bank accounts and invested in other ways, than the average worker just paying their weekly rent, mortgage and living costs, that is as far his “caring” would have gone!

            A lower dollar could have assisted exporters by the way, but he did not “care” about that then.

            • Populuxe1 2.2.1.2.1.1

              Actually, I think you’ll find that at the time there was a great social emphasis on saving in New Zealand, and the gap between rich and poor was far narrower then than at any other time – something reinforced by state economic protectionism, price and wage freezes, universal employment, and a robust welfare state (for which Muldoon had the utmost respect). The “average worker” in New Zealand from 1978-1981was not what you seem to think it was.

              • ghostrider888

                Muldoon did the best he could under the circumstances.

              • xtasy

                Well, Pop, when I was working in a stores job during the last year Muldoon was in power, here in Auckland, my pay was barely enough to pay rent, food and transport. And I met many others in similar circumstances. Perhaps you need to read up on history or talk to people who actually worked and lived at that time in rather ordinary jobs? Thinking is nice, but thinking does not always mean that what is thought is or was reality.

                • Populuxe1

                  I was there. Still better than under Key. Much MUCH better than Rogernomics and Ruthenasia. Stop projecting.

      • Murray Olsen 2.2.2

        I’d say Thatcher was a combination of the worst of Douglas with the worst of Muldoon. The main similarity I see with Muldoon is that they were both so bad that huge social movements against them formed and expanded, only to be coopted and neutralised by the respective Labour Parties that were elected in later.

    • Draco T Bastard 2.3

      I had the equivalent experience in New Zealand during the Muldoon years. He damn near wrecked the country and we are still feeling the effects now.

      And then the 4th Labour government got in and truly got the wrecking ball rolling.

    • The Gormless Fool formerly known as Oleolebiscuitbarrell 2.4

      He [Muldoon] damn near wrecked the country and we are still feeling the effects now.

      He did, didn’t he. And his programme? Government directly involved in the economy by owning whatever it happened to inherit and building any new thing it thought (stupidly, as it turned out) might take off synthetic fuel plants, urea plants, magic bean plants. High rates for benefits by today’s standards. Subsidies for favoured sectors of the economy. An awards system for wages. Heavy regulation of prices and wages. You needed a special exemption to move goods by road. Tariffs to protect local manufacturers.

      What is it that readers here didn’t like about that platform?

      • Colonial Viper 2.4.1

        Muldoon was a visionary mildly ahead of his time, that’s all.

        • Smith 2.4.1.1

          …I’m lost for words.

          “Muldoon was a visionary” said nobody in NZ, ever!

          Happy to quote CV as the first Kiwi to use those two words in the same sentence though. :)

        • xtasy 2.4.1.2

          After many gin and tonics, or scotches on ice, we may all be “visionary”, kind of.

  3. Pete 3

    I’m not going to be crass because I’m not British and I was only a child in the 80s, but I do lament the influence her politics have had even on our distant shores. The divisiveness, the striver vs skiver framing of discourse. The idea that there is no society at all. The outlook that she and her fellow travellers embraced only serves the elites and not the public at large.

    May she rest in peace.

  4. Rosie 4

    That was a moving account of your experience of the Thatcher years Karol. It was quite sad reading it and seeing from your perspective that no matter what, Thatcher always won.

    I was listening to Radio Active this morning and that’s how I heard the news of Thatcher’s death. The breakfast show DJ was a child in Thatchers England and has grown up despising her influence and the effects of her policies. Already they have played a tribute to her:

    The classic Bela Lugosi’s dead by Bauhaus

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OKRJfIPiJGY

    In the meantime Shonkey shows the love

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/europe/8524540/Former-British-PM-Thatcher-dies

    Elsewhere in the real world: is that the sound champagne corks I hear popping?

  5. Wayne 5

    Ah well Karol, well this is your perspective. I was also in the UK for much of her premiership and have a quite different recollection of the impact of Mrs Thatcher on British society.

    In fact she was the reason for my first Conservative vote in 1983 (I had been in the Labour Party till then).

    The reason was she was the first political leader who said the Soviet Union could be defeated in our lifetimes, by the force of ideas of freedom. Up till then the view was that “peaceful co existence” would be a permanent state.

    I also recall a Britian that by 1979 was beset by strikes, was ossified, had a huge amount of nationalized industires going nowhere (remember BMC cars!), and which was pining for a lost past. The IMF had to be called in and that was huge shock.

    So Margaret Thatcher was a breath of fresh air. Yes, she had to crash through, but most Britons knew that was essential.

    And I can say most Britons, since she won three elections with big margins. People liked the freeing up of the economy, they like the lower taxes, they liked buying their council house, they were pleased to see the power of unions curtailed. And by the mid to late 1980’s Britian had a dynamic and progressive economy, pretty much due to her reforms.

    Labour was not electable until they (actually Blair) recognised why people voted Conservative in four succesive elections.

    Actually a lesson here. You have to accept and indeed adopt some of the policies of your opponents if they have kept beating you on those issues. For instance the Nats have accepted ERA (by and large). And I say this as the author of the 90 day Bill, which is the shortest trial period in any developed economy – so hardly a radical move to the right!

    • One Anonymous Knucklehead 5.1

      It’s time for your reality check.

      1979 – 43.9%

      1983 – 44.9%

      1987 – 42.3%

      1992 – 41.9%

      So, no, you can’t say “most”. Just another day on Planet Wingnut.

    • Hi Wayne,

      And here’s a Guardian interactive of her popularity and unpopularity during her ‘reign’.

      ‘Most’ is a rare beast during that time. Remember that in the UK it’s FPP.

    • karol 5.3

      Yes, I recall well the winter of discontent. I recall the rubbish bags piling up on Clapham Common near where I lived. I recall the train strikes while snow was falling or lying on the ground. My main method of transport was motorbike. I remember having to motorcycle from one side of London to the other, for work and study, with the snow hitting my visor and decreasing my visions. I remember my hands going numb, and crying with pain as they un-thawed when I got inside.

      Wayne, you are just repeating the official version of what happened, and why, as increasingly promoted by Thatchers minions and fans int he MSM. i also saw the underbelly of poverty and struggle that was the result of Thatcherism for many, that usually didn’t get reported in the MSM.

      The winter of discontent was not the beginning of the rise of “neoliberalism”. It was the result of a struggle between right and left, when the forces that came to be labeled “neoliberal” or “neo-conservative” were gathering their forces, energising their networks, in order to pull back gains made by the left, including by the unions. David Harvey has written about his extensive examination of the conditions that led up to such things of the Winter of Discontent, in his book, A Brief history of Neoliberalism.

      Sure there were problems. But the right was pushing the late 1970s UK Labour government in the direction it wanted. So the government got into a struggle to contain the unions, which resulted int he strikes of 1979.

      I recall Bryan Gould (kiwi who became a Labour MP in the UK) saying that, when he started working at the City of London (UK financial heart), he was appalled to see how people there were working to undermine the UK Labour government. Can’t find a direct quote of that right now, but here Gould gives background to the problems and wrong-directions of the UK in the 70s.

      Sure manufacturing needed restructuring. However, Thatcher dismantled UK manufacturing in favour of building up the UK as a financial centre, via the City of London. This set up the conditions that inevitably lead to UK economic decline with the bursting of their bubble during the 2008 GFC. Many of the middle classes certainly did well in the boom times of the bubble. Now many are facing insecurity and uncertainty. And the UK no longer has a strong manufacturing base to fall back on.

      • Wayne 5.3.1

        Karol, Remember I was there, so I am not just going on “an official version of what happened”. This is my recollection. I appreciate it is different to yours, because I looked at the same events as you from a different perspective. But then isn’t that the nature of politics.

        However, you have noted why the winter of discontent was so aggravating to people, who shortly thereafter were going to be able to show their displeasure through their vote. And your own analysis of that time, it seems to me, shows that union power had got completely out of balance.

        Incidentally I was always surprised that Byran Gould left Britian so soon after Tony Blair had become leader. Bryan was a major figure in Labour at that time. Presumably he had been told by Blair that he had no future in a Blair administration. But did Blair really have that power? (Isn’t the Cabinet voted for by the Caucus). After all Tony Blair had quite a few people of the left side of Labour in his administration. I guess it is all in Bryans book, which I should read.

        • karol 5.3.1.1

          Individual perspectives – yes. But that is why I also referred to a more comprehensive examination of the full spectrum of events, etc, in David Harvey’s book. The facts support my perspective. But it’s also a matter of underlying values – left values vs right values, mostly.

          Bryan Gould was disillusioned with the UK Labour Party when john Smith was leader: ie before Blair’s leadership or his time as PM, as mentioned on Gould’s wikipedia page.

      • Harry Young 5.3.2

        The general poverty you describe came about BEFORE 1979, because of the power afforded to the unions by Labour and the weak Edward Heath Conservative government.
        Unlike you I was in England through the sixties and seventies, so I saw it develop.
        The unions held us all to ransom for inflated wages for the few, in uneconomic subsidised industries.
        It’s true that manufacturing diminished, like it has in NZ – because of cut price wages in developing economies, not because of UK governments.

        • xtasy 5.3.2.1

          Harry Young:

          So I presume they had “cut price wages” then in Germany and a few other industrialised countries in Europe?

          The truth is that is total nonsense, and that those other countries did a lot better than the UK in those years, maintaining core industries, by modernising, improving productivity and efficiency by COOPERATING with strong unions there, rather than trying to stifle and suppress them, as the so class conscious employers and conservative political establishment in Britain did.

          Somewhere your comment does not fit with reality.

          German companies still make cars, machinery, chemical products, medicines, computer equipment, lab and medical instruments, and the list goes on. Strange that, aye?

          • One Anonymous Knucklehead 5.3.2.1.1

            +1

          • Populuxe1 5.3.2.1.2

            Except that there is a demand for German engineering cars because they make them really well, and none of them are state owned, so I fail to see the analogy.

            • xtasy 5.3.2.1.2.1

              Strange that, British cars were also known to be well made at some stage.

              • Populuxe1

                Not really. Aside from expensive high end luxury stuff like Rolls Royce, they are mostly crappy – Land Rover being a case in point. The market for Jaguar and Austen Martin was almost entirely dependant on the James Bond Franchise. The mIni Cooper in no way compares with the Volkswagon.

                • felix

                  “The market for Jaguar and Austen Martin was almost entirely dependant on the James Bond Franchise.”

                  WTF does that even mean? That the cars were good but because they were driven by James Bond they don’t count? They were either good or they weren’t, and you were supposed to be arguing that they weren’t FFS.

                  • Populuxe1

                    Oh how sweet – you do realise that 90% of a Bond film is basically an ad for British luxury consumer goods, don’t you?

                    • ghostrider888

                      and some fairly scrummy women

                    • felix

                      No ghostrider, those women were in a Bond film so according to Pop they don’t count.

                    • ghostrider888

                      well, they counted to me; pussy galore Miss Money Penny (i know, i used that one when i was, umm, was, let me see now…rustles through old Fleming paperbacks, oh yes, when i was fnjckg :) )

          • Harry Young 5.3.2.1.3

            The common market was rigged in favour of France and Germany and sucked the lifeblood out of the UK. We also had massive overpopulation through unskilled immigration, an underskilled workforce and lack of investment through high taxes, a legacy of the Wilson years . Germany had maintained their lead in engineering since Hitlers slave labour days. Simple as that. Without Thatcher, we would have been finished.

            • prism 5.3.2.1.3.1

              “Without Thatcher, we would have been finished.”
              Who would have been finished Harry Young? Are you a Brit from the Thatcher sector?

            • xtasy 5.3.2.1.3.2

              Harry Young – what a load of rubbish!

              The UK always gained from the EU membership, having had access to large continental markets, but the problem may have been, with the limited range of products the made, they may not have used that opportunity.

              Since GB joined the EU they always insisted on special terms and deals, giving them extra benefits.

              They dumped NZ as a primary, guaranteed supplier in 1973, not for just some fancy reasons, they had real economic interests in joining the EU.

              • prism

                And when Brits joined the EU they didn’t carry their outlying connections like NZ with them like France did with theirs. The French territories in the Pacific were and probably still included in the EU structure as part of France.

    • Colin 5.4

      I fully support Waynes viewvof events as I was also in Britain at the time
      For some it is trendy to attack anyone who promotes freedom and opportunity depite
      The abject failure of socialism

      • Colonial Viper 5.4.1

        Not “trendy”

        Opposing the elite serving neoliberalism that Thatcher represented is an important activity and one which has gone on for decades.

        The abject failure of socialism

        It’s done quite well in NZ.

    • Emilio Zapata 5.5

      If you are actually Wayne Mapp, may I take this an opportunity to tell you to go fuck yourself to the utmost , as I have myself worked in places where your law has been taken advantage of to the nth degree. Usually against young or otherwise vulnerable employees who are either naive to the fact that their rights were ever otherwise or in such precarious positions that they dare not speak out.

      All the while the employers have seen fit to purge away like there’s no tomorrow and I have not seen this resulting in many of these people finding fresh employment elsewhere. They are usually forced in the meantime to approach an increasingly hostile and dysfunctional Work & Income department. Which is of course geared towards denying them benefits for losing scarce jobs, often driven by arbitrary KPIs* beyond their control and sending them back out into an equally scarce job market in a vicious circle.

      You’re content to throw human beings on the scrap heap regardless of the consequences to them or their families and due to your bloated privilege you’ll never have to see what can happen and a result and if confronted will hide like all you bastards do if held to account.

      So in conclusion:

      If you’re really Wayne Mapp: I hope one day against all odds you don’t know where your next meal is coming from. Might seem inconceivable to you now but you never know, and I hope your fellow humans show you more mercy than you have shown to your fellow citizens in your entire wretched existence.

      If you’re pretending to be Wayne Mapp: That’s a really odd fetish you’ve got there.

      *I’m willing to bet that Work & Income have KPIs too, and they’re probably geared towards getting people off the benefit or denying them it regardless of the social outcome.

  6. prism 6

    I heard Michael Howard saying that Thatcher had saved Britain from a cold shower. She should have stuck to the traditional family business – thatching. Well I also heard that she died at the Ritz – way to go! -when I go I want to go like Maggie.

  7. Shaz 7

    +Many Karol A great reminisce. If thanks are the order of the day – wonderfully ironical and tongue firmly wedged in cheek – then I thank Margaret Thatcher for clarifying my parents belief that ” war and the threat of war changes everything”. I’d not really understood what they meant but in the lead-up to the Falklands conflict the instant jingoism that was whipped up, the ugliness of pro-war sentiments , being called a traitor for opposing the invasion and seeing young colleagues reporting to the army recruitment centres in shows of bravado to say nothing of the popularity that the Falklands War brought in its wake for what was at that time a deeply unpopular government was an education that will never leave me.

  8. prism 8

    lprent
    I clicked my edit button twice before I got the box to work in and now the right hand list shows two posts but I still have just the one, now edited. Strange. (And now the second entry is still there and I have a third entry as a result of putting this. Who knows I might yet apparently take over the whole site with prisms. Confusing.)

  9. Gosman 9

    Thatcher’s greatest legacy Is she continues to get up the noses of hard core leftists like Karol over 20 years after she left power. She would be pleased by this I suspect.

    • felix 9.1

      Much as you’d like to make this about personality, the fact is that her policies and philosophies are still hurting ordinary people.

      • Gosman 9.1.1

        There are many millions who welcomed her influence in places like Eastern Europe which were freed from brutal left wing dictatorships under her watch.

        • Pascal's bookie 9.1.1.1

          Shame she opposed the re-unification of Germany because she was afraid of Kohl though. You have to mention that when making your point, or it’s a bit of a lie really.

          • Gosman 9.1.1.1.1

            What does that have to do with her opposition to Soviet control and oppression in Eastern Europe?

            • felix 9.1.1.1.1.1

              What does any of it have to do with getting up peoples’ noses?

              • Gosman

                And once again ‘Whoosh!’ off on a tangent goes felix. Have a nice trip felix old boy.

                • felix

                  Actually you’re the one who keeps changing the subject Gos, presumably because it has dawned on you how absurd your first comment is.

                  Remember? About Thatcher’s greatest hits?

                • felix

                  ps that whooshing sound you keep hearing? It’s not tangents.

            • Pascal's bookie 9.1.1.1.1.2

              “opposition to Soviet control and oppression in Eastern Europe” is a pretty low bar mate.

              Shame she couldn’t reach opposing south american death squads or supporting the reunification of Germany

            • ghostrider888 9.1.1.1.1.3

              give us an apartment in the former East Germany anyday; many lamented the passing of the “bloc” and who is charge of heating now?

        • felix 9.1.1.2

          lolz, she freed “many millions” but apparently getting “up the noses of ordinary people like Karol” is a greater accomplishment.

          Says it all.

          • Gosman 9.1.1.2.1

            Yep, that means she significantly altered the world’s culture via a demoratic platform that a certain type of person is still annoyed enough to get upset with her even after over a generation has passed since she had any real influence. That is a pretty darn impressive accomplishment in my view.

            • felix 9.1.1.2.1.1

              You’re completely misrepresenting the reasons ordinary people have for being glad to see the back of her.

              It has nothing to do with “demoratic platforms”.

              You also totally fail to understand her “influence” if you think it no longer impacts ordinary people.

            • rosy 9.1.1.2.1.2

              “she significantly altered the world’s culture via a demoratic platform”
              Democratic platforms like those she supported in Chile, South Africa, Iraq and Indonesia…?

              I think you’re thinking her anti-communist rhetoric came with a belief that a liberal democracy was the alternative.

        • Murray Olsen 9.1.1.3

          Strange how a lot of those Eastern Europeans and their children are nostalgic for the “good old days.” They know they were sold a lemon, and for most of them, their lives are much worse. Of course, the Communist Party apparatchiks who handed themselves all the state industry did pretty well. In Abramov’s case, well enough to buy Helena Bay, although RWNJs might think that were a good thing because it’ll stop the local iwi denying kiwis their birthright.
          The people Suharto killed have no opinion on the matter, nor do those murdered by Pinochet’s goons.

  10. Walter 10

    As the Great Lady Thatcher said so correctly The only party to vote for is the Conservative party, because all labour governments sell the hard working tax payers out to dry while providing every thing from housing to food for the non working. no wonder every country thats had a labour government was broke at the end of their term.

    She was a great prime Minister and her place in history is set in stone, she sorted the scum of unions and the policys of the left which never work.

    • Rob 10.1

      Yes , unfortunatly the political organisations that use the word Labour (in both the UK and NZ), gave up on that particular working segment many many years ago.

    • johnm 10.2

      Walter
      Your comment is Rubbish.

    • prism 10.3

      Walter
      [Thatcher] was a granite prime Minister because her heart was set in stone
      (she sorted the unions and the policys of the left which were working well.)

      FIFY

    • Ben Clark 10.4

      every country thats had a labour government was broke at the end of their term
      Err, like the Clark government getting government debt down to a net zero with a surplus in each of its 9 years? Meaning we had money for English to use in this recession…

      The government that got us into dangerous debt (that Clark/Cullen managed to pay off) was Muldoon.

      Unfortunately reality doesn’t have much impact on your comment…

      • Colonial Viper 10.4.1

        Err, like the Clark government getting government debt down to a net zero with a surplus in each of its 9 years?

        What you also need to add was that Cullen allowed massive increases in private debt over that exact same time frame, effectively taking money injected into the economy by the private banks, to pay down the public debt.

        • Colonial Viper 10.4.1.1

          And yes, unemployment was low and wages grew during that time. But incomes did not grow faster than housing unaffordability, as houses got pumped higher and higher by ever increasing levels of mortgage debt provided by the banks.

          • Rob 10.4.1.1.1

            Yeah I generally agree with you CV. I would also add that the quality and type of employment dropped as manufacturing roles went off shore and were replaced with more burger flipping and coffee making hospo roles as well.

        • xtasy 10.4.1.2

          CV – this matter with the increase in private debt cannot simply be blamed on the former Labour led government, I feel. In part, yes, but the “middle class”, who wanted to buy a home, who wanted to gain on the gravy train house price rises, who in smaller numbers also “invested” in extra dwellings to let out, and who were quite comfy to be “addicted” to have more flush credit to spend on new home entertainment technology, on a new car, on an overseas holiday, they pushed the situation to where it ended.

          Had Cullen put a sudden brake on to slow this, the outcry would have been great, and they would have gone in droves to National, to get tax cuts and so forth.

          Part of the problem of the left is, they have to deal with the mentality in people that former Labour governments also nurtured, by falling for the right wing free market, capitalist ideology, that we can all achieve things we aspire to, simply by being thrifty, hard working, speculating, competing, investing and so on. That is what people did, more so than ever since the mid to late 1980s, and hence they as voters vote for governments perpetuating this idiotic dream, which resembles on a small scale the American Dream.

          Wake people up, but when they are “addicts” to consumerism, self indulgence and striving gains and more gains over others less able, they will play up and destroy any sensible plan by sabotaging it. Common sense is no longer the common aspiration and behaviour, I am afraid.

    • One Anonymous Knucklehead 10.5

      Walter, yawn: I appreciate your need to show your hatred, but do you have to tell lies while you’re doing it?

      For the link-averse, the graph shows NZ govt. debt to GDP ratio between 2001 and 2010. It shows the good job the fifth Labour government did of reducing debt.

      • Rob 10.5.1

        Why dont you just show a chart of just net debt rather than one showing an index against GDP . NZ actually went into recession (3 quaters of declining GDP) before GFC started. Your chart flaws your argument because even if Net debt had stayed constant the decline in GDP would elevate your chart.

        • One Anonymous Knucklehead 10.5.1.1

          Why don’t you back up your assertions with a reputable source if you’re so sure about them?

          • Rob 10.5.1.1.1

            Back up what. Your chart shows an increase in debt as an index of GDP. Its quite simple that during the GFC our GDP fell, there forte even if net debt had remained constant your index chart would show an increase.

            You based your debate on net debt . Show a net debt chart by year and dont confuse it as an index on GDP.

  11. One Anonymous Knucklehead 11

    …the extensive networks, power and reach of the “neoliberal” elites.

    Xtasy’s comment on Open Mike is timely.

  12. Te Reo Putake 12

    Spontaneous celebrations break out all over Britain:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2013/apr/08/margaret-thatcher-death-party-brixton-glasgow

    And an update on isthatcherdeadyet which has caused death threats on twitter, apparently:

    http://www.isthatcherdeadyet.co.uk/

    And a wistful one from Robert Wyatt:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6T9qp9XbRY

  13. Olwyn 13

    “In order to work towards a more inclusive, fairer world without poverty and destructive divisions, there is a need to find a way to counter the extensive networks, power and reach of the “neoliberal” elites.” Amen to that!

    We do need to find a way of countering, or at least effectively confronting, the neo-liberal model championed by Thatcher. The new stability that I think even she expected did not happen. Instead, with the levers of power in very few hands, the neo-lib revolution goes on and on, with more and more cruelty, and more and more people being deemed surplus to requirements. Hence we get comments like Walter’s one above: on the one hand Labour governments spend the tax-payer’s money on free food and housing for the non-working, and on the other, Thatcher sorted out the “scum” of the unions. If Thatcher had not sorted out “the scum of the unions” there would be much less call for free food and housing. Get it Walter? In one short comment you would deny people both living wages and handouts in the absence of living wages.

  14. freedom 14

    A man eminently qualified to speak on the issue of Margaret Thatcher says it all
    http://sphotos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/11676_10151561069412744_1687900975_n.jpg

  15. Sanctuary 15

    But it was all for the good, for she made sure the newspapers were published on time. Or something like that, if you read Russell Brown.

    What the anti-worker right fail to grasp when discussing Britain’s long industrial decline is that union opposition to change didn’t come from nowhere. The optimism of the working class in late 1940s and through the 50s and 60s was ultimately eroded by implacable class hostility from the upper classes in the UK. If the British unions were reluctant to adopt new technology, then the hopelessly incompetent British mangerial class were the most culpable in the development iof that attitude. The seeds of British competitive decline were sown a century before the strikes at Wapping, when the British elites stopped investing in industry and became usurers and landlords. The general decadence and incompetence of the British upper classes coupled with above all a desire to fight class war to the bitter end rather than accept the working class as equals in decision making in the new post Beveridge British state is what led directly to situations like the one Brown describes at Wapping. The response of British workers in industry to the hostility of the the upper classes – suspicion, patch protection, artisan production methods, etc was a reaction to the general class war waged on them by a failed leadership elite, and was not a primary cause of industrial decline or general class conflict.

    All Thatcher did was wage an all-out class war, and she did indeed win her round. But nothing is forever, including the North Sea oil which has since the 1970s paid for the fools paradise the hollowed out British economy has become.

  16. millsy 16

    Thatcher destroyed the living standards of millions of British, and made millions more homeless.

    She sold off vital infrastructure, leaving even millions more struggling with high power and water bills, and wrecked public, collective and mutually owned institutions, for the sake of individual greed. (Though she left rail privatisation for her successor to deal with), her smashing of the unions left Britons in low wage dead end jobs, needing tax credit top ups to cover living cost, and public housing was badly run down as her policy allowing tenants to buy their council flat, barred councils from using the proceeds to buy more housing.

    Like Reagan in the US, Douglas here, Hawke and Howard in Aus, she presided over the transfer of vast amounts of wealth to the right, at the expense of everyone else.

    [r0b: Deleting some of the more personal comments.]

    The unions could have quite easily smashed her like they did those who came before her, but it appears that they never really held together (I suppose they underestimated her as well).

    • karol 16.1

      I agree with most of what you say, millsy. But not the bit on the unions. I was a member of the NUT (Natioanl Union of Teachers) and involved in on-going anti-Thatcher policies, industrial action. the union was strong and could have gone on indefinitely with our campaign. But, in the end, Thatcher’s government brought in a law to outlaw our industrial action. And the media worked for her too. I was on a major national demonstration of massive proportions, that stopped London – and it did not get one bit of coverage in the MSM.

      This is why I say, we have to find a way to deal with the massive reach of the power elites. Whatever we tried, Thatcher’s mob found a way of countering. Ditto for the massive support the miners got.

      Maybe the union strategies weren’t the best, and they need to learn new methods. But the will and effort was not lacking.

      PS: So pleased to see Helen Kelly is continuing fighting the union corner, with her posts, including her one on TS today.

      • millsy 16.1.1

        From what I understand, the shotfirers union refused to take part in the strike, and I think a few miners in Nottingham were promised that their jobs would be retained if they kept working.

      • wyndham 16.1.2

        The MSM being largely Rupert Murdoch I presume ?

    • fender 16.2

      [r0b: Deleting some of the more personal comments.]
      +1

      Roger Douglas should go to her funeral and jump in the hole with her.

      • Walter 16.2.1

        Sir Roger Douglas was a labour minister after all , the Left forgets this.

        • felix 16.2.1.1

          I don’t think I’ve ever met a leftie who forgot this.

          • Matthew Hooton 16.2.1.1.1

            Data please

            • xtasy 16.2.1.1.1.1

              READ HERE on the Standard!

            • felix 16.2.1.1.1.2

              Sure Matthew. Number of lefties I think I’ve met who forgot this: 0

              Now let’s get back to your claim that Thatcher didn’t increase the level of inequality in Britain.

        • prism 16.2.1.2

          Walter
          Go play in your sandpit you naive twit. Those who understand Labour and politics know about Douglas and his travelling companions, did you all see Michael Basset with Susan Wood the other day? You’re a wally Walter, your remarks just reveal your ignorance.

        • fender 16.2.1.3

          Nobody forgets Roger Douglas used Labour to enter parliament where it then became apparent he was no lefty, hence the reason he went on to become a founding member of the pathetic ACT party, and it’s first leader.

          It’s only the right that seem to suffer memory problems, like the current PM and his tea party dropkick John Banks have proven over and over again.

          • chris73 16.2.1.3.1

            Memory lapses and politicians…like the current Labour leader?

            • felix 16.2.1.3.1.1

              No, like John Key who forgot the fucking Springbok tour, moron.

            • fender 16.2.1.3.1.2

              Was wondering which wingnut would bring up the Shearer bank account, should have known it would be our very own black-heart hero. You would have a valid point if Shearer was in fact a lefty.

              You should be with your whaleoil mates in circle-jerk bereavement today.

          • Joe Bloggs 16.2.1.3.2

            …It’s only the right that seem to suffer memory problems…

            Oh that’s absolutely classic fender! Your sense of dramatic irony knows no bounds!!!

            Lest we forget the forgotten bank account held by Shearer

          • Walter 16.2.1.3.3

            Both Banks and shearer have alot in common, whats good for one and all that.

            Thats why labour will lose the next election.

            • One Anonymous Knucklehead 16.2.1.3.3.1

              Memo to Walter.

              New Zealand’s electoral system is called “Mixed Member Proportional”, or MMP. It allows for a more representative parliament, and often results in “coalition governments”, such as those seen between 1996 and the present day.

            • ghostrider888 16.2.1.3.3.2

              ahhhh, Walter hottle bottle.

  17. johnm 17

    The 80s UK was defined primarily by the North Sea oil Bonanza giving cover to the backward policies of an ignorant egomaniac called Thatcher.

    @ Wayne “And by the mid to late 1980′s Britian had a dynamic and progressive economy, pretty much due to her reforms.” Thatcher oversaw the dismantling of British manufacturing and the replacement of NeoLiberal financialisation based on the City of London now recognised at the World’s centre of financial fraud.
    The dynamic and progressive economy was courtesy of the North Sea Oil Bonanza which covered her destruction in a flow of black gold; now it’s running out the UK is in the Sh*t. She began an even greater shift towards inequality and class difference. She began the whole Neoliberal nightmare in the UK. She supported the dictator Pinochet and the murder of Allende and rubbed shoulders with the dementia idiot Reagan who began a similar great leap backwards in the U$- That country is now a shell of its former strength except for the military.

    One woman, who gave her name as Claire, said:
    “That woman made my youth a misery. I think that she was to blame for most of the ills of society. And most of the things that poor people and ill people are now being blamed for were her fault.”

    Another demonstrator said: “She started the whole neo-liberal madness we’re all suffering from now.
    http://www.itv.com/news/update/2013-04-08/revellers-in-brixton-celebrate-thatchers-death/

    http://www.socialistworker.co.uk/art/32952/Margaret+Thatcher%3A+a+brutal+ruling-class+warrior+is+dead

    Arguably, on the other hand, without the oil revenues the Thatcher junta would not have been able to afford millions unemployed. Her and her successors, Major, Blair and Brown, have helped ensure this by avoiding doing anything sensible with the money, like the Norwegians have. But I’m sure you know that already.

    And, as I said above, without the oil Thatcher et al would have had a hard time paying for all the people she put on the dole with her magic monetary policy.

    • chris73 17.1

      “That woman made my youth a misery. I think that she was to blame for most of the ills of society. And most of the things that poor people and ill people are now being blamed for were her fault.”
      – No, we are responsible for own happiness not the government

      “Thatcher junta”
      – Junta, really?

      • prism 17.1.1

        chris73 That’s the line that alcoholics follow – take responsibility for one’s own happiness however you may have to search for it.

      • Te Reo Putake 17.1.2

        Yep, Thatcher Junta was a common term in the eighties. It was a play on the name given to the military dictatorship in Argentina.

    • johnm 17.2

      Some English opinions:

      I agree totally with all the red arrow comments. How can people forget what his woman did to destroy this country. The mess we have now the benefit culture,the greedy fat cat bankers, huge utility bills, no apprentiships or council houses, she sold this country down the river.

      Can I remind posters that now, in 2013, Britain is completely, totally and utterly bankrupt (more so than places like Greece). Can I also remind posters of the kind of society that Britain has become over the last 30 years. That’s all the legacy of Margaret Thatcher.

      Thatcher helped turned Great Britain to what it is going to be 3rd World Britain.

      How soon they forget……….Remember the term WET!….anyone who disagreed with her was wet…….she swept away all opposition and created a government of poodles….we are still paying the price !!!!!I do not believe she was deliberately evil…but she was woefully ill-informed !!!!!!!

      Nice one, George. True to form, Thatcher dies in luxury at the Ritz Hotel – how many old people have died of the cold because they can’t afford the ever increasing utility bills, brought about by her privatisation? And how many are dying due to the sanctions regime?

      the SUS laws; the anti trade union laws; the Brixton riots; Miners Strike; the sinking of the Belgrano; the Poll Tax; 4 million unemployed; The Battle of the Bean Field; the Criminal Justice Act;the destruction of industries; the sell off of our services; selling off council houses without replacing them: she filled the coffers of CEOs and the banks, unleashing a culture of greed; the sense of hopelessness that led to Tony Blair; and setting the stage for the economic strife we are experiencing now.

      Margaret Thatcher and mass murderer Pinochet. Friends Reunited.

      She destroyed this country’s strong exports, changed the face of the economy forever from being a producing one to one reliant on others and primarily services based. And she ruined millons of lives with her policies. Yes, she deserves all the hate.

      Many of today’s problems are attributable to Thatcher’s period in office. The sale of Council Houses at knock-down prices, Privatisation of Gas, Water and Electricity, Encouraging dole claimants to register sick so she could massage the unemployment figures and allowing companies to take lengthy pension holidays, thus creating a huge deficit for future pension claimants. This on top of the destruction of Manufacturing and Mining communities. She exposes Cameron’s maxim of us all ‘being in it together’ as a sham, with her, ‘There’s no such thing as community’. Possibly the worst Prime Minister this country has had until Cameron took the helm.

      I would just like to say a few words on behalf of the victims of Margaret Thatcher’s policies: Where there was harmony they brought discord – social and class division, miners strike, public sector cuts, increased wealth gap between haves and have nots. Where there was truth they brought error – poll tax, unemployment figures, Falklands war, deregulation of the banking industry leading to casino style derivative banking, council house sales. Where there was faith they brought doubt – economic policies, university student loans. And where there was hope they gave despair – privatisation of publicly owned state run assets, giving employers pension contribution holidays and using employee pension funds to pay redundancies, homeless and homelessness greatly worsened by councils being banned from replacing sold council housing stock, more poverty, closure of heavy industries such as car manufacturing, steel, ship building and coal mining industries and outsourcing offshoring jobs overseas

      • johnm 17.2.1

        “She decimated our basic industries of coal and steel. Shipbuilding virtually disappeared, along with much of heavy engineering. She tried to destroy our free trade unions through repressive legislation, and damn well near succeeded.

        She branded miners fighting for their jobs and communities as “the enemy within”, a foul slur on decent working people and their families for which she will never be forgiven.

        She made mass unemployment respectable, and used it as a tool of government. The dole queues were “a price worth paying” under her regime – once described as “an elected dictatorship” by one of her own ministers.

        She created a new underclass of jobless men, took away their status as breadwinner in the home and forced millions of women back into the workplace so that families could make ends meet. If she was a women’s champion, I am Meryl Streep.

        She sold our basic utilities – gas, water, electricity and telephones – and prices soared. She flogged off the buses and railways, and fares went through the roof.

        She sold off the council houses and built no new ones, so there are now more than two million families on housing waiting lists.

        She enthroned the profit motive, and unleashed the spivs and speculators in the City of London. She surrendered economic policy to the mysterious dark forces of “the market”, which led UK plc into one recession after another that led to the mess where we are today.

        She imposed the hated poll tax on the nation, first in Scotland where she made the Tories unelectable for more than a generation. She then thrust it down the throats of the English, prompting the worst riots in London since the disturbances of the early eighties.

        She took us into war with Argentina over the Falkland Islands , when her popularity ratings were rock bottom, to save an isolated British colony – and her own political face.

        On the back of that operation, she won a cynical landslide in the “khaki election” of 1983.

        Her enthusiasm for war initiated a new era of British militarism that has yet to run its course.

        She hated Europe, shouting “No, No, No!” at every opportunity and made Conservatives think and behave like Little Englanders.

        She took the UK to the sterile margins of the European Union, but in the end the issue did for her premiership.

        As it may well do for her greatest fan, Dodgy Dave Cameron.”

        http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/margaret-thatcher-dead—now-1818150

        • halfcrown 17.2.1.1

          Well said Johnm and Karol. It is good to be reminded what this female has done. I like to remind NZ of the way she support France over the Rainbow warrior as Longey introduce a nuclear free policy.

          One of the casualties of Thatcher was London Transport who had the finest R&D research facilities in the world. Criminal.

    • xtasy 17.3

      johnm

      You are so right about the North Sea oil bonanza, which was one thing that kept the UK economy ticking along somehow, besides of the growing (largely also fraudulent) finance sector, a bit of bio-medical industry and what else remained.

      Now the oil is running out, and despite of investing a lot in alternative energy, the UK economy has run out of steam, as the businesses were asleep at the wheel, or gave up years or decades ago, to produce what other industrialised countries still do.

      You cannot run an advanced economy on “service jobs” where people cut each other’s hair, deliver each other pizzas and so forth.

  18. What bullshit from the RWNJs here.
    Thatcher’s death is neither here nor there. She had to die sometime.
    I would have preferred that she died in the Brighton hotel.
    That would have saved thousands whose lives she shortened with her ruthless policies of attacking workers for 11 years, though no doubt some other rightwing arsehole would have taken her place and used her death to ramp up the police state to smash working class resistance.
    She did massive damage, preparing the ground for the Blairites who continued the work, and now being finished off by the Condems.
    Thatcher will take her proper place in history when British workers throw out the whole capitalist establishment including the Labour Party and set up their own government based on the need of the many not the greed of the few.

    • chris73 19.1

      lol

    • The Gormless Fool formerly known as Oleolebiscuitbarrell 19.2

      I would have preferred that she died in the Brighton hotel.

      Charming.

      • Pascal's bookie 19.2.1

        About as charming as when Bobby Sands, MP, died and parliament declined to attach the traditional condolences to his family when they noted his passing.

        • felix 19.2.1.1

          Please don’t talk about the horrible things she did while people are trying to rewrite her story.

        • NickS 19.2.1.2

          And what did that “tough line” give the UK? More extremism, more deaths and more pain as the fuckheads on both sides exploited the situation.

      • aerobubble 19.2.2

        Its interesting, did anyone die in the Brighten Hotel, or did the spin always make it about her
        near death escape, building a political brand so much more than her actual accomplishments.

        • Pascal's bookie 19.2.2.1

          I think there was a handful of dead, which confirms your point I guess.

        • Te Reo Putake 19.2.2.2

          5 people were killed and many more grievously injured. Bombings are the way cowards fight their battles and the results are rarely the desired outcome. The spin that came from it was that Thatcher was not killed because she was up working (supposedly she only slept 3 or 4 hours a night).

          • Colonial Viper 19.2.2.2.1

            Bombings are the way cowards fight their battles and the results are rarely the desired outcome.

            Please note, assymetric warfare is coming more in fashion, not less.

            • Arfamo 19.2.2.2.1.1

              “Bombings are the way cowards fight their battles and the results are rarely the desired outcome.”

              Agreed. The US should’ve learned that in Vietnam. But they’re still doing it, only now the bombs are attached to the front of missiles fired by drones.

          • Colonial Viper 19.2.2.2.2

            As for killing people like Cowards where on the scale do you rate killing uncharged, undisclosed, unreviewable secretly chosen targets (including civilians) in Iraq, Afghanistan and North Africa, all from comfy chairs in drone control centres in New Mexico and Nevada?

  19. Santi 20

    A true leader died today. One who scared all sort of lefties.

    • Ennui 20.1

      Thought it best as a Lefty to respond in song…..(from the Wizard of Oz)

      And the coroner pronounced her dead
      And through the town the joyous news went running
      The joyous news that the wicked old witch
      Was finally done in

      Ding-dong! The witch is dead.

      ‒ Which old witch?
      ‒ Well, uh,.. the wicked witch!
      ‒ Oh.

      Ding-dong! The wicked witch is dead.
      Oh yeah, happy day
      Wake up you sleepy head,
      Rub your eyes, and get out of that bed.
      Wake up, the wicked witch is dead.

      She’s gone where the goblins go,
      Below, below, below. Yo-ho
      Let’s open up and sing and ring those bells out.
      Sing the news out.

      Ding-dong, the merry-oh, sing it high, sing it low.
      Let them know the wicked old witch is dead!
      Why everyone’s glad,
      She took such a crowning
      Bein’ hit by a house is even worse than drowning
      Let ‘em know the wicked old witch is dead!

  20. tamati 21

    Did the left ever have anyone as influential as MT? Possibly Attlee, but hard to compare her to someone thrown out after a single term. Perhaps Lloyd-George?

  21. Elizabeth Bourchier 22

    Herald Scotland reports Frankie Boyle on Thatcher news:

    “Finally, I get to wear my black suit and tap shoes together.”

  22. xtasy 23

    RIP –

    [r0b: Deleting some of the more personal comments.] dear “Maggie”!

    Sorry, I usually have more respect for the deceased, but Maggie Thatcher is to me one prime example of a person who has shown an excessive amount of arrogance, self centredness, stubbornness, insensitivities, division, lack of common sense, violent suppression of dissent, hatred and lack of respect (especially for the poor, the working, and for those in poor health, who needed state support rather than regimes introduced by the likes of Prof. Mansel Aylward, CMO, DWP).

    She showed her relentless push for getting her will and her lack of sensitivity and diplomacy also during the Falkland War in 1982, which recent relevations show:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/29/world/europe/falklands-war-caused-rare-friction-for-thatcher-and-reagan.html?_r=0

    Margaret Thatcher divided the UK for decades to come, and regrettably even the UK Labour Party under Tony Blair continued some of her despiccable policies, which last to this day, and especially in welfare we see now, that it leads to endless marginalisation, harm and even death.

    Incredibly one former NZ sole parent beneficiary (Paula Bennett, aka “Benefit” or “Bandit”, Minister for Social Welfare) is keen on adopting welfare approaches and work fitness assessments that were started off in the UK under Mansel Aylward, who will be speaking also at a leading annual GP conference in Rotorua in June this year, promoting the “work sets you free” ideology that is now being forced upon as a “medical solution” on NZ medical practitioners.

    She was also opposed to German unification, which brought about a new Europe, as the iron curtain fell. But she had the arrogance, like Reagan as US president, to claim the benefit for having “achieved” this, which is an absurd distortion of the truth, which any informed European who lived through the Cold War and its last years can testify.

    Good riddance, one enemy less, a few more to go!

  23. Walter 24

    My My My dont the Left hate the Truth.

    Even in her Death she still gets the left going, What a bunch of losers.

    The Truth is id rather see part of the state owned assets sold than the tax payers sold out like the left would do.

    • Pascal's bookie 24.1

      Funny how most of the people complaining about true things being said today are righties.

    • Colonial Viper 24.2

      Even in her Death she still gets the left going, What a bunch of losers.

      Nothing wrong with enjoying the passing of an enemy of the people, is there?

  24. r0b 25

    I did my time in Thatcher’s England and I’m no more fan of her than any leftie. But please let’s keep a certain standard of decorum in the comments. I’ve deleted one or two of the more personal attacks already (apologies to the authors – I do understand the anger).

    • Enough is Enough 25.1

      They are personal attacks because she personally destroyed the lives of millions. The gap between rich and poor in britian is extreme due to her.

      Anger is hopefully being replaced with joy today around Britian at the demise of this truly awful human.

      • felix 25.1.1

        While understandable, it’s a mistake to take all the feelings of anger and frustration and tie them to her as an individual.

        Of course she was a horrible person, but that’s neither here nor there. It’s the philosophies and policies she followed that are truly destructive and hurtful, and they’re alive and well right here today.

        This anger at what she did needs to be directed at those who are still doing it.

        edit: Billy Bragg, of course, says it below far better than I.

      • Matthew Hooton 25.1.2

        “The gap between rich and poor in britian is extreme due to her.”

        Due to her???

        Are you mad?

        Are you saying there was no class system in the UK until the grocer’s daughter became PM?

        Whatever criticisms are made of Margaret Thatcher, there is no doubt she stood for greater class mobility than even her Labour predecessors. Which is why the Tory nobility hated her even more than the political left.

        • felix 25.1.2.1

          I presume you’re going to data us up on that Matthew.

          • NickS 25.1.2.1.1

            Methinks you doth ask to much of teh Hooten, for he’s well know to have issues with the terms “data” and “evidence”…

        • karol 25.1.2.2

          Yes, Thatcher was another one who benefited from the post war moves to more equality and more opportunities for those not in the aristocratic elite….. then she helped pull up the ladder.

          • karol 25.1.2.2.1

            To add to my last comment: the working classes began to get more education and have more visibility in public life in the 50s, 60s and 70s. Thatcher’s political generation benefited from that, with the Tory caucus being re-vitalised by MPs from business, entrepreneurial and non-aristocratic backgrounds. It shifted the direction of right wing policies.

            However, as a result of Thatcherite policies, social mobility stalled, as shown in this 2012 Guardian article that examines the data.

            Here’s what the figures show:

            • Britain has some of the lowest social mobility in the developed world – the OECD figures show our earnings in the UK are more likely to reflect our fathers’ than any other country

            • Social mobility hasn’t changed since the 1970s – and in some ways has got worse. For every one person born in the 1970s in the poorest fifth of society and going to university, there would be four undergrads from the top fifth of society. But if you were born in the 1980s, there would be five

            • 24% of vice-chancellors, 32% of MPs, 51% of top Medics, 54% of FTSE-100 chief execs, 54% of top journalists, 70% of High Court judges …went to private school, though only 7% of the population do…

            More at the link.

          • The Pink Postman 25.1.2.2.2

            How true karol. Time and time again the same story .Here in Aotearoa we have Bennett and her mates ..All for Socialism while they are gathering But not for anyone else . Despicable greedy selfish uncaring beings.

        • Enough is Enough 25.1.2.3

          The class system is something just as vile but quite different to what I am talking about.

          Those bankers who sit in their ivory towers on Canary Wharf dont carry a title Matthew. Yet they have a disproportinate amount of the nations wealth.

        • karol 25.1.2.4

          And on the increases in income inequality under Thatcher:

          But the truth is that we are suffering the impact of the massive increases in income inequality under Thatcher, which Blair and Brown have since failed to reverse. In the 1980s the gulf between the top and bottom 20% widened by a full 60% – much the most dramatic widening of income differences on record. Since then there have been only minor fluctuations under Major, Blair and Brown. The result is that the gap between the top and bottom 20% in Britain is twice as big as among our more equal European partners.

        • Murray Olsen 25.1.2.5

          She stood for class mobility the same way Paula Bennett and John Key do. They stand on top of it and crush it. Who wants to be a member of your class, anyway? The working class is the only one I want to belong to.

      • Walter 25.1.3

        No the poor are poor because they want to be poor. They want the state to provide every thing for them.

        Why should we who are better off be made to support the lazy of our country. Only the left could have a policy of a hand me down world were people get rewarded for lazy behavour.

        The Truth is that the facts prove Thatcher was right.

        • Colonial Viper 25.1.3.1

          Wow, how come there were only 80,000 lazy non-working people in this country under Labour, and more than twice that under National?

          You really must think us stupid.

          • xtasy 25.1.3.1.1

            There has been an increase in the ones “perceived to be poor” under National, because National has put them onto their payroll, merely to prove – by supplying the statistics, that there are too many lazy, so the government then had the “justification” to push through the welfare reforms. It is all an agenda, perhaps?!

            That and only that can be the logical conclusion or explanation one can get from Walter’s comment.

            Haha

        • chris73 25.1.3.2

          Its true, its all about the choices people make. Spend money on booze, ciggies and drugs or spend money on an education…

          • One Anonymous Knucklehead 25.1.3.2.1

            Yes, and the GFC and Bill English just bring out the worst choices of all.

            Fish, meet barrel.

          • Arfamo 25.1.3.2.2

            How many people have we heard from who got an education and then had to leave the freakin country to work because they couldn’t even get a job here, even flipping bloody burgers?

            • chris73 25.1.3.2.2.1

              Yeah because what NZ needs is more sociology grads

              • One Anonymous Knucklehead

                [citation needed]

                Like, one that shows that the problem is “too many sociology grads”.

                • Colonial Viper

                  chris73 doesn’t understand that it’s the excess in law, economic and finance grads which have really fucked things up.

          • Walter 25.1.3.2.3

            current unemployment is 7.3 % which is .04 higher than 2007.

            So unemployment is really not that bad under the current government

            • Arfamo 25.1.3.2.3.1

              “unemployment is really not that bad under the current government”

              Give it a try. And being unemployed is much worse under the current government because poverty and the cost of everything has increased.

              • Walter

                The rise in costs is not the governments problem.

                • Arfamo

                  Of course it isn’t dimwit. On their salaries & perks they wouldn’t even notice them. The increases in levies, petrol taxes, gst, and god knows how many other indirect taxes hit the people at the bottom end of the income earning pyramid, not the arsoles at the top. What would you know, you can’t even tell the truth about the official unemployment stats.

                • Te Reo Putake

                  Really? Then why does the Government insist that the Reserve Bank keep inflation in the 1-3% band? Sorry, silly question, Walter, you know best. Do carry on …

            • McFlock 25.1.3.2.3.2

              current unemployment is 7.3 % which is .04 higher than 2007.

              Um – what?
              NZ unemployment went from around 3.5% in 2007 to 6.5-7% currently.

              UK unemployment went from 5% to 8% in the same period (just in case the mention of thatcher threw your source country).

              Got docs for whatever the hell you are talking about?

              • Arfamo

                McFlock, that link to stats dept figures only produces Your session has expired. Please refresh your browser. If the problem persists you can inform the support team using the ‘Contact Us’ button.”

            • One Anonymous Knucklehead 25.1.3.2.3.3

              Walter, as McFlock amply demonstrates, your comment is nonsense. Now, is it a genuine mistake, a deliberate lie, or have you been led astray?

        • One Anonymous Knucklehead 25.1.3.3

          Walter, it’s nice of you to come here and embody the worst sort of low-life prejudice the way you do. It makes it easier to dismiss your opinion.

          As CV points out, according to your delusional bigotry, there are 80,000 more people unemployed since 2008. Obviously the global financial crisis and Bill English just make people want to be poor.

          Oh, and fewer people want to be poor in Finland than anywhere else in the world.

          The fact is you hate your fellow citizens, and it shows.

          • Walter 25.1.3.3.1

            I just dont believe the Tax payer should have to support people who are to lazy to work, yet i accept that in other cases such as unability of jobs, reall sickness then rightly the taxpayer should pay.

            but we have come to far to the left were taxpayers were paying for far to much.

            • One Anonymous Knucklehead 25.1.3.3.1.1

              Please learn the difference between to and too.

              “Far to (sic) much”. According to what measure? If there are far too many sickness beneficiaries, for example, what would you do to reduce their numbers? Order them to be well? A laying on of hands, perhaps?

              Or would you just defame them with a litany of vitriol?

            • muzza 25.1.3.3.1.2

              I’m a tax-payer Walter and I am happy that we have support for those who need it most, despite the facts that support is being dismembered continually.

              I am also ok if some of the support for the vulnerable is so called *benefit fraud*, because the gain is bigger, than any individual rorting that particular system.

              I do not care about the $39m per year estimated *benefit fraud*, I prefer to know the system is there for those who need it, and even some who possibly don’t!

              What I do care about, is the billions, and I mean tens of billions every year of the following.

              1: Dead weight profits going offshore – at the expense of all who pay the bill/use the services
              2: Jobs being exported offshore, to support the profit grab from #1
              3: Corporate subsidies, bail outs and the like – Many more to come
              4: Favorable legislations written by corporations, for corporations, employment subsidies, WFF etc
              5: Accommodation, supplements – Subsidy for landlords
              6: Worlds worst gas/oil/mineral royalty extraction deal – corporate welfare at NZ’s expense
              7: Interest payments on an un-audited foreign debt!
              8: etc, etc , etc

              Do you understand any of what I have written above Walter!

              In case you missed it – I am a tax-payer, and happy to know that I am able to contribute to supporting those vulnerable who need it, and are being screwed over by those who receive the most support of all – The Corporate Welfare Thieves

              • Walter

                Without the Corporate you would not have a job. The fact is Business should make profits and be rewarded for the risk their shareholders take in putting up the investment in the business

                • Arfamo

                  Make profits yes. Make obscene profits at the expense of the lower paid, no. Any government which increases the wealth of the well off by reducing the wealth of the remainder is not a good government.

                • One Anonymous Knucklehead

                  Nice red herring. Did you spawn it yourself or are you just mindlessly repeating right-wing talking points like a silly parrot?

                • muzza

                  Oh lordy, where to begin!

                  No Walter, the corporate sector would not exist because it would not take any risk, if it was not propped up by the tax-payer underwrite, via certainty of tax collection, at national or provincial level.

                  The corporate sector is also propped up by captured regulatory bodies, and corrupted politicians, who allow private corporate entities to control and author NZ legislation, in their own favour!

                  Core infrastructure and services should NOT be private, they should be controlled by the people who those systems are there to support, and who in turn fund the infrastructure/services – Profit has NO place in core services, it costs lives, and promotes inequality and misery!

                  Tell me Walter, do you understand the following

                  1: Monetary Supply
                  2: The myth of scarcity

              • johnm

                Muzza
                100% right. :-)

            • johnm 25.1.3.3.1.3

              Walter you are illiterate. :-(
              dont is don’t. to should be too! you fool! unability should read unavailabilty. reall should real. to should read too. were should read where.
              Learn English you idiot and then come back you rwnj idiot. :-(

        • Arfamo 25.1.3.4

          People who lose their jobs and can’t get another one because there aren’t any don’t “want to be poor”, you idiot. Jesus Christ.

        • Te Reo Putake 25.1.3.5

          I’m with Walter; I’m sick of the lazy of our country. However, my definition of lazy is a little bit more fine tuned than his and almost exclusively involves the rich and their spruikers.

          • johnm 25.1.3.5.1

            Te Reo putake
            The most lazy person in this country is Yankee John off for another holiday to attend Attila the Hens funeral. You are a fool.

        • muzza 25.1.3.6

          Walter – what facts are those champ?

          Look forward to a well thought through explorative journey about those, facts!

        • ghostrider888 25.1.3.7

          ahhhh, Walter hottle bottle.

  25. joe90 26

    “This is not a time for celebration. The death of Margaret Thatcher is nothing more than a salient reminder of how Britain got into the mess that we are in today. Of why ordinary working people are no longer able to earn enough from one job to support a family; of why there is a shortage of decent affordable housing; of why domestic growth is driven by credit, not by real income; of why taxpayers are forced to top up wages; of why a spiteful government seeks to penalise the poor for having an extra bedroom; of why Rupert Murdoch became so powerful; of why cynicism and greed became the hallmarks of our society.

    Raising a glass to the death of an infirm old lady changes none of this. The only real antidote to cynicism is activism. Don’t celebrate – organise!”.

    - Billy Bragg

    http://twitpic.com/ci06yj

    http://uk.blouinartinfo.com/photo-galleries/margaret-thatcher-slideshow#image=0

  26. xtasy 28

    Good grief, Barak, Obama!

    But yes, I suppose the job as a “leader” of a “nation” and international diplomacy enforce certain conduct upon you:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2013/apr/08/margaret-thatcher-dies-tributes-obama

    • Murray Olsen 28.1

      I’d be surprised if Obama didn’t admire Thatcher. He’s hardly a lefty.

      • xtasy 28.1.1

        Murray Olsen – I agree, there is NO true left in the major 2-party set up, playing “musical chairs” in the White House and Congress, in the US. It is on the very margin, and hardly, if at all represented.

        I was just thinking, Obama at least tries to “appeal” to those aspiring for social fairness, which is not what Thatcher stood for. He probably described her as he did, merely as the “global” politician she was (amongst others) at that time, standing up against the “evil” communist east.

  27. outofbed 29

    Anybody in wellington want to join me in celibration drink?

  28. joe90 30

    The lady might not have been for turning but when that solemn procession passes you by, turn your back. Turn your back and, instead, remember the countless millions she gloatingly destroyed in pursuit of yet more wealth for her pals. Turn your back and think of ‘care in the community’; the elderly, the sick, the mentally ill and the infirm treated with all the compassion shown by a fox in a henhouse. Turn your back and remember her victims.

    Turn your back…

    http://sabotagetimes.com/reportage/the-best-way-to-deal-with-margaret-thatchers-legacy-is-to-kill-it/

  29. Thatcher’s legacy and our tasks

    But Thatcher’s legacy is still with us. In terms of the anti-union laws that still cramp and restrain the class-wide solidarity action we need to win. The unions remain reduced in numbers and in shop floor strength. The merger mania by the general secretaries is no replacement for that.

    Unfortunately her heritage still inspires those attacking us. Cameron and Osborne are attempting to complete the job she left undone – destroying the National Health Service, the public education system, and the welfare state. Fighting them is fighting everything she stood for.

    But the year of her death could be a year of rebirth for a fighting labour movement. That would be the best testimonial and tribute to those who fell in the battle against her and her like.

    So it is great to “dance on her grave.” But the job is not finished [rob: deleted]. What a dance that will be.

    http://www.workerspower.co.uk/2013/04/margaret-thatcher-dies-celebrate-agitate-organise/

  30. Matthew Hooton 32

    Karl, obviously I disagree with you but this is a classy post, expressing how you feel without crossing the line into the more disgusting abuse evident elsewhere.

    • felix 32.1

      Yeah, not a dead baby joke in sight. Stay classy, Epsom.

    • xtasy 32.2

      Yes, Matthew, “Karl” (Marx) is kicking back from his grave too, I suppose.

      Or who did you mean with “Karl”???

    • johnm 32.3

      You Matthew Hooton are a rwnj spin shallow ahole go back to radio live and whereever you pathetic shallow piece of something. Don’t scumbag this forum with your lightweight sh*t plse. :-( I really believe that… It’s not SPIN. Sincerity a land you won’t ever know you asslicker! Yankee John has a nice one go there!

  31. Te Reo Putake 33

    Steve Bell’s been on Thatcher’s case for decades now. He’s still as sharp as ever:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cartoon/2013/apr/08/margaret-thatcher-death-steve-bell-cartoon

  32. aerobubble 34

    Thatcher was brought to the fore to lead Britain during the biggest oil glut ever. Her legacy is Britain today, bankrupt. It could have be so different, instead of lining the pockets of a few, rather than creating the now fiscal elite who think they create wealth. Not that the ideal of greater ownership society was a bad one, just where is it? Her own policies failed to achieve her aims! What will history say about her, well, that she failed so convincingly that her flaws were even before her death. But let’s not be too high minded, she was selected by a conservative party who have never had a history of reining in their own greed. A tool at best, a failed revolutionary at worst. Any other path would not have meant socialism, unless of course you believed that Britain would ever have elected Arthur Scargil PM, which is not ever likely. Its more bunkum to her legacy of spin and distortion that even her followers need to exaggerate her importance to the point of absurdity.

  33. johnm 35

    ““Tramp the Dirt Down” ”

    “I could not do it. I believe I spoke for millions. The wicked witch is dead. Tramp the dirt down.”

    George Galloway MP

    House of Commons

    London

    http://redmolucca.wordpress.com/2013/04/08/tramp-the-dirt-down/

  34. asd 36

    Good riddance Maggie.
    You destroyed the hopes, dreams and living standards of millions of people across the western world with your nasty brand of neo-liberalism. [r0b: deleted] with Friedman and Hayek et al for your sins against humanity you f****** traitors.

    • Wayne 36.1

      asd, So the half of all citizens of the UK who voted for her are “f******traitors” Do you believe in democracy?

      • chris73 36.1.1

        Lefties believe in democracy as long as its left wing parties being elected

      • One Anonymous Knucklehead 36.1.2

        “half of all citizens”

        For fucks sake, can’t you morons make your arguments without this relentless mendacity?

      • Te Reo Putake 36.1.3

        “So the half of all citizens of the UK who voted for her are “f******traitors” Do you believe in democracy?”

        The Conservatives never won a majority of the popular vote, Wayne. It’s only their outdated FPP system that allowed her to ‘win’ power.

        • Colonial Viper 36.1.3.1

          Wayne and co. don’t believe in actual democracy so such details escape them

          Also the good old Falklands War was pivotal in returning Thatcher to power.

          • chris73 36.1.3.1.1

            Wayne and co. don’t believe in actual democracy so such details escape them

            – Oh please, according to the left National has no mandate for anything the left don’t want them to do

            Also the good old Falklands War was pivotal in returning Thatcher to power.

            – The people of the Falklands want to remain part of the UK not be part of Argentina, Thatcher had no choice but to do the right thing

            • Populuxe1 36.1.3.1.1.1

              Her resolve during the Falklands Crisis is the only thing I really give her credit for.

            • Te Reo Putake 36.1.3.1.1.2

              Actually, Chris, she had plenty of choice and she was in the minority in her own cabinet. Most preferred the option being pushed by Reagan that an honourable deal be struck to give the Malvinas back to the locals.

              • Arfamo

                She knew what she was doing. She knew jingoism would rescue her from electoral disaster.

              • chris73

                Slight problem being that the locals don’t call it that they call it The Falkland Islands, the locals don’t want to be part of Argentina they want to remain part of the UK and The Falkland Islands are part of the UK so Argentina invaded the UKs territory

                The blame here lies with Argentina not Thatcher

                • Te Reo Putake

                  Sorry, mate, but the Argentinians are the locals. Much as maori are here. History doesn’t start when the union jack first gets run up the flagpole, Chris. And have a look at the map of the world; anywhere the poms drew up the boundaries, there’s been nothing but strife.

                  • chris73

                    What bollix:

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falkland_Islands_sovereignty_referendum,_2013

                    “On a turnout of 92%, 99.8% voted to remain a British territory, with only three votes against”

                  • Populuxe1

                    Argentina starts with Spanish colonists by way of Peru in 1776 and was second only to the USA in terms of being a country of immigration. British sovereignty was established in the Falklands not long after. You are full of shit.

                    • Te Reo Putake

                      Yeah, you didn’t bother looking at the Wiki link did ya? Muppet.

                    • Populuxe1

                      @ Te Reo Putake

                      “Yeah, you didn’t bother looking at the Wiki link did ya? Muppet.”

                      No, I did – it doesn’t contradict anything I have said. In any case, being old enough to remember the Falklands War, out of interest I have read a great many of the histories of both Argentina, the Falklands, and the war itself, from both sides in Sapnish and English, and I really don’t think you have a leg to stand on. The Argentinians certainly didn’t.

                • Arfamo

                  Yes I don’t disagree. The argies were silly to try and grab The Falklands. It was a gift to Thatcher. The British people ended up being shafted by both the Argentine Junta and Thatcher. Still, never mind. Too late to change things, and she went mad in the end.

              • Populuxe1

                Actually the locals were living on the Falklands at the time and since 1833 have wished to remain British. A former Spanish colony illegally and without provocation invaded a sovereign British territory? How is it “honourable” to force people from the previously uninhabited home they have known for generations, or impose on them foreign rule they do not want? That has some very ironic and amusing implications for the status of Maori, donchya think?

                • chris73

                  Something about drawing a long bow comes to mind…

                  • Populuxe1

                    Well Te Reo Putake just more or less said that the rights of the descendants of the first inhabitants of a land don’t matter a shit if some foreign power wants to colonise it.

                    • chris73

                      Wonder what he thinks about Indonesia and Timor and West Papua

                    • Populuxe1

                      “Wonder what he thinks about Indonesia and Timor and West Papua”

                      Or indeed the Palestinians

                    • Te Reo Putake

                      Nope, not even close to what I’m saying. But, then, you know that, eh. The point is that Britain has no ‘right’ to the islands, as they took them by force. Logically, they are part of South America and the nearest country, which also has history on the islands, is modern Argentina. A deal needs to be done.

                    • Colonial Viper

                      Logically, they are part of South America and the nearest country, which also has history on the islands, is modern Argentina. A deal needs to be done.

                      Well you better talk to the Falkland Islanders then.

                      Last I heard all but 3 of them voted to stay with the empire.

                    • Populuxe1

                      “Nope, not even close to what I’m saying. But, then, you know that, eh. The point is that Britain has no ‘right’ to the islands, as they took them by force. Logically, they are part of South America and the nearest country, which also has history on the islands, is modern Argentina. A deal needs to be done.”

                      It’s not that Britain has a “right”, but the Falklanders have the right to remain British if they choose, in which case Britain has an OBLIGATION to protect them.

                      “Logically”? Perhaps you mean geographically – in which case Maori had better fuck off back to Hawaiki, or Taiwan perhaps, because by your argument New Zealand belongs to Australia… As does New Guinea…

                • Te Reo Putake

                  Tell it to the Irish, Pop!

                  • Populuxe1

                    Yeah… but nah. The Irish were more in the position of the Falkland Islanders being colonised by Argentina in the first place. As for the present state of affairs, are you saying Northern Ireland doesn’t have the right to determine it’s own destiny?

  35. Brokenback 37

    To me 2 things stand out about Maggie:

    Along with Ron Raygun , she was successfully installed to head the Western Democratic alliance by the neo-con/fascists who have plagued us all since Mussolini’s days .
    Their politics of greed & plunder have haunted us since that time leading directly to the Wall St wonder world we now have.

    Maggies 2nd ,and most significant claim to infamy, is her decision to use the now standard [akaThatcher method] neo-con tactic when the public finally clicks that they are being rogered royally by thievesRus and starts getting vocal/physical in their objection to such treatment.

    Start A War :

    Her perceived “greatness” has much to do with how with text book precision she :
    Orchestrated one out of nowhere/nothing.
    Grabbed control of the media.
    Revived a basket case economy by demonstrating the effectiveness of British made weaponry and cashing in on the sales bonanza.
    Revived a basket case economy by destroying the British made weaponry owned by Argentina and cashing in on the sales bonanza.
    Revived a basket case economy by demonstrating the total ineffectiveness of British made weaponry[Sheffield class destroyers and Anti missile defence systems] and cashing in on the sales bonanza.

    BUT because of the sinking of the General Belgrano she should have been tried at the Hague for her war crimes and hung 20 years ago
    http://belgranoinquiry.com/

    &Shearers message demonstrates clearly just who is pulling his chain

    • chris73 37.1

      lol

      • Brokenback 37.1.1

        If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it.

        The lie can be maintained only for such time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic and/or military consequences of the lie.
        It thus becomes vitally important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the truth is the greatest enemy of the State.
        Joseph Goebbels

        • chris73 37.1.1.1

          Not being ever so slightly melodramatic are we?

        • One Anonymous Knucklehead 37.1.1.2

          “…wenn du lügst, dann lüge gründlich, und vor allem bleibe bei dem, was du gelogen hast!”

          It sounds so much nicer in German.

        • ghostrider888 37.1.1.3

          Brokeback indeed.

  36. chris73 38

    Yeah, I suppose history means very little to someone as wet behind the ears as you, Chris.

    I also read that:

    “Controversy exists as to who first discovered the Falkland Islands with competing Portuguese, Spanish, and British claims dating back to the 16th century.[13][14] While Amerindians from Patagonia could have visited the Falklands,[15] the islands were uninhabited when discovered by Europeans.[16] The first reliable sighting is usually attributed to the Dutch explorer Sebald de Weert in 1600, who named the archipelago the Sebald Islands, a name they bore on Dutch maps into the 19th century.”

    – Don’t see anything about Argentina in there

    In 1690, Captain John Strong of the Welfare en route to Puerto Deseado was driven off course and reached the Falkland Islands instead, landing at Bold Cove. Sailing between the two principal islands, he called the passage “Falkland Channel” (now Falkland Sound), after Anthony Cary, 5th Viscount Falkland, who as Commissioner of the Admiralty had financed the expedition. The island group takes its English name from this body of water.[18]

    – An englishmen not argentinian

    Disputed islands which the british have governed since 1833 and the locals voted 99.8% to stay with the UK means they’re british…don’t like it well too bad

    • Te Reo Putake 38.1

      Yep, and the Poms are there by conquest, not because they were the original inhabitants. Have a look at a map and tell me which country is nearest to them, Argentina or the UK? Now, I know you are a sensible man, Chris, so why would the UK want to hold onto the islands? Sentiment? Loyalty? Winning elections? Potential oil and gas fields? Fishing rights? Whatever the reason, it’s not because the Falklands are part of England’s green and pleasant land or that the UK government give a toss about the inhabitants. They don’t, but the Falklands remain important for other reasons.

      • chris73 38.1.1

        The islands were uninhabited until settled by Europeans.
        The islands have been governed by the British since 1833.
        The descendants of those settlers voted 99.8% (thats 99.8% on a turn out of 92%) to remian British

        Your argument is: “Have a look at a map and tell me which country is nearest to them, Argentina or the UK?”

        • Te Reo Putake 38.1.1.1

          Yep, it’s not as hard argument to grasp in a post colonial world. For most people, anyway.

  37. tc 39

    “The collectivism she smashed could be over-rated — especially in nostalgia — but what replaced it has been an individualism of diminishing returns.”

    From Guy Rundle at Crikey.

  38. joe90 40

    Perhaps now that Thatcher is dead there’ll be a little light shed on her role in the Hillsborough cover up.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-19584313

    Cracker obit too.

    http://www.newleftproject.org/index.php/site/article_comments/the_death_of_a_class_warrior_margaret_thatcher_1925_2013

    • karol 40.1

      Ah, yes. Hillsborough was one of the sad chapters in the history of Thatcher’s PM-ship. Policing was definitely distinctive under her watch.

  39. feijoa 41

    I used to have a vague feminist notion that the world would be a better place if it was run by women

    Thatcher totally ruined that idea

    • Colonial Viper 41.1

      You must have loved Ruth Richardson and Jenny Shipley.

      • rosy 41.1.1

        +1 Perfect examples of why you can’t judge people by their gender.

        • Colonial Viper 41.1.1.1

          Condaleezza Rice, Christine Lagarde, Hilary Clinton, that bloody racist MP Krarup from Denmark, Anne Coulter…

    • karol 41.2

      I did know one left wing Brit feminist who had difficulties with seeing Thatcher as ground-breaking for feminists.

      But the vast majority of left wing feminists see someone like Thatcher has being damaging to less well off women, and really not doing anything positive for women in general.

    • Colonial Weka 41.3

      feijoa, Thatcher, Shipley and Richardson all eschewed women’s culture to play with the boys. The other women of that time that stayed true to ‘women’s’ ways of doing things left parliament before they got ruined.

      It’s hard to imagine how contemporary Western women would manage if they were able to run the place. Certainly the left/right divide would be massively problematic, and since most women have been raised under patriarchal rule, there would need to be a process of decolonisation. But we do know that societies where women have their own systems and processes for making collective decision intact work pretty well.

      The idea of women running the world is pretty patriarchal though (there is no such thing as the matriarchy) – women wouldn’t run the world, they’d share it ;-)

      (and just in case I’m offending any men here, take it as given that I believe most men do badly under patriarchy as well).

  40. Colin 42

    Funny how people can be in the same place and have an opposite view A case of glass half full or empty Facts help when she became PM unemployment was 13% and when she left it was 5%
    Meanwhile in NZ Labour safe seats have the common denominator of keeping its voters poor
    Thatcher saved Britain at least for a while She was a true leader another league from the Buy a vote mob we have now

  41. freedom 43

    karma sure has an odd sense of humour
    here is how the BBC announced the passing of Margaret Thatcher
    http://postimg.org/image/i32ia98zn

    • rosy 43.1

      lol.

      Because she broke the working class there is also a perfect symmetry in her demise on the day that the coalition cuts are implemented against the precariat and underclass. The growth of the working poor, the disabled poor, increasing inequality and reduced social mobility are her legacy (as are the bankers).

      Great post Karol.

  42. Private Baldrick 44

    fffffffffudge !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  43. marsman 45

    Celebrating the death of an erstwhile tyrant people in Brixton are dancing in the streets, heartening.

  44. big bruv 46

    We should all thank Mrs Thatcher. She showed the rest of the western world how to smash the corrupt unions. The death of the union movement will be her lasting legacy.

    A great lady who left the world in a far better state than she found it.

    • Colonial Viper 46.1

      And now she wants a socialised funeral.

    • The Al1en 46.2

      “We should all thank Mrs Thatcher. She showed the rest of the western world how to smash the corrupt unions. The death of the union movement will be her lasting legacy.”

      In your politically biased mind, perhaps.
      The first call I got from blighty, not ten minutes after the story broke, said nothing good about her or her politics, infact out of the following thirteen calls, all were firmly insulting. Not scientific, sure, but much more so than your bullshit.

      “A great lady who left the world in a far better state than she found it.”

      That’s just words you think will rile, and not really unexpected given your form.
      Truth is she wasn’t a great lady and the blood is on her hands.
      Her infamy against the British people will be her lasting legacy.

  45. johnm 47

    http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/04/09/pers-a09.html

    “Much more can and will be said. But five years on from the 2008 financial crash, with mass austerity the order of the day, any objective appraisal makes clear that Thatcher’s real legacy is the greatest economic and social crisis wrought by capitalism since the first half of the 20th century.

    Nothing whatsoever remains of her stupid and wholly insincere promises of “popular capitalism”, of Britain as a “home-owning democracy” with prosperity for all secured through the “trickle-down” of wealth and the “miracle of the market.” Posterity will record her as having presided over the initial stages of an on-going putrefaction of bourgeois social and political life.”

  46. RedBaronCV 48

    Do you think that Cameron might be silly enough to declare a national day of mourning or something similar?
    Honestly I feel that the Brits deserve to have a day off so that they can, if they wish, mark her passing with some decent demo’s, marches and parties.

  47. johnm 49

    “The Queen Mother of Global Austerity and Financialization”

    http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/04/08/the-queen-mother-of-global-austerity-financialization/

    “The UK became the IMF’s best neoliberal poster child, establishing a comparative advantage in offshore finance in what ultimately would flower as Gordon Brown’s notorious Light Touch that brought about the banking collapses of 2008. In this sense her role was to serve as Britain’s version of Boris Yeltsin, sponsoring the carve-up of centuries of public investment.”

  48. Murray Olsen 51

    I’m always impressed at the number of RWNJs who appear here to post their simplistic rubbish whenever they get excited. I’m less than impressed by their ability to do anything except quote moronic slogans.

    In their eyes, it seems that Thatcher’s greatness comes down to two things:
    1. She hated unions as much as they do.
    2. She sent troops to kill Argentine conscripts shivering in the Falklands or feeling seasick on the Belgrano.

    The fact that she left a Britain which is now, as so aptly described above, a Cyprus without sunshine, seems to not be worth worrying about. It conflicts with their story tales of freedom, hard work, etc, etc. Unless all the trolls are multi-millionaires, I really have to doubt their sanity.

  49. NickS 52

    Got myself a 6 pack of Mac’s Sassy Red to celebrate. Nice n bitter…

  50. johnm 53

    “The flames of hatred: 30 years of loathing for Baroness Thatcher explodes in celebrations of her death. Will funeral now be targeted?

    Violence erupts at death parties across UK as Left marks her death
    Six officers injured in Bristol and Barnardos shop smashed in Brixton
    Glasgow, Liverpool and Derry were also the scene of the Left’s parties
    More parties are now being planned for funeral date of next Wednesday”

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2306165/Margaret-Thatcher-death-parties-The-Lefts-sick-celebration-Brixtons-streets.html

  51. johnm 54

    “Disunited in mourning: police fear Thatcher funeral may turn into security nightmare

    Fears of civil disorder in capital as plans are revealed for partially state-funded ceremonial funeral. Meanwhile lawyers warn against pre-emptive arrests as police scan social media to identify likely protesters”

    “The Met’s first large scale challenge is likely to be an impromptu party which anti-Thatcher protesters are planning for this Saturday in Trafalgar Square – a corner of London forever associated with the moment the former Prime Minister’s power began to crumble as the poll tax protests turned violent. Flyers, some of which have been on websites popular with protest groups since 2004, have long called for a party in the square for the first Saturday after Mrs Thatcher’s death.”

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/disunited-in-mourning-police-fear-thatcher-funeral-may-turn-into-security-nightmare-8566452.html

  52. johnm 55

    “We could go on. Britain was one of the most equal Western European countries before the Thatcherite project began, and is now one of the most unequal. Thatcherism is not just alive and well: it courses through the veins of British political life. The current government goes where Thatcherism did not dare in its privatisation of the NHS and sledgehammering of the welfare state.

    The challenge ahead is the same as it was yesterday: to tear down the whole edifice of Thatcherism, heal Britain of the damage done, and build a country run in the interests of working people. It’s a fight we must all fight. The champagne is on ice until we win it. ”

    http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/owen-jones-thatcherism-was-a-national-catastrophe-that-still-poisons-us-8564858.html

  53. johnm 56

    The Artist Taxi Driver Update on the U$K Austerity Class War :-( . Thatcher Special.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dj4dQbfkoTE&list=UUGThM-ZZBba1Zl9rU-XeR-A&index=5
    I am back…Thatcher is dead, but her tyranny is still alive..I bought a pig

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2y5VKnFgSI&list=UUGThM-ZZBba1Zl9rU-XeR-A&index=4
    **Thatcher Special Edition** BBC Sucks O Cocks News

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-Tcd3q60wI&list=UUGThM-ZZBba1Zl9rU-XeR-A&index=3
    OMFG!! Thatchers funeral..You Pay???? £8Million

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFWC14RQNBA&list=UUGThM-ZZBba1Zl9rU-XeR-A&index=2
    **recalled Parliament Special** BBC Sucks O Cocks News
    “Podgy faced Cameron has just nearly broken down in tears whilst putting Thatcher up there with Lloyd George, Churchill and Attlee. What a soaking wet toss rag he really is.”

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rNKuXosPL4&list=UUGThM-ZZBba1Zl9rU-XeR-A&index=1
    Thatcher Eulogy Live from Houses of Parliament. ” Just heard ATOS have declared Thatcher fit to work.” :-)

    :-( :-( :-( :-( :-( :-( :-( :-( :-( :-( :-( :-( :-(

    • karol 57.1

      Ah, thanks, johnm. It was outside the Ritsy, opposite the old Lambeth Town Hall – been there and abouts way more times than I can count. I lived in nearby areas for many, many years.

  54. johnm 58

    “Thatcherism represents Chicago School fundamentalism writ large. She’s gone. She won’t be missed.

    She launched a corporatist revolution. She headed Britain down a slippery slope toward unfettered predatory capitalism.

    She transferred public wealth to private hands. She privatized British Telecom, British Gas, British Airways, British Steel and other state enterprises.

    She force-fed deregulation. She cut social benefits. She enacted corporate-friendly tax cuts. She cracked down hard on non-believers. She waged war on labor.

    In 1984, she unleashed thousands of truncheon-wielding riot police against striking coal miners. Doing so sent a message. Worker rights no longer mattered. “New realism” became code language. Free market fundamentalism was policy. ” By Stephen Lendman

    http://rense.com/general95/thatch.html

  55. johnm 59

    George Galloway has done a coverage of Thatcher a must see video!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLbFWivsfFE

    “Excellent speech, George. We all need to unite now and stop the impoverishment of the majority of the British people which is happening now, under Cameron.

    “What can we do to fight back when we tried so hard in the 80′s. How do we win? if we don’t win, our children will suffer 19th century poverty levels all over again. This govt has betrayed the sacrifice of those who fought against the nazis. Now we face fascism in our own land”

Links to post

Important links

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Thieving Bastards Steal Big Red Umbrella! Read All About It!
    View from the bach at Leigh Our house in Herne Bay was burgled some years ago. We were woken in the middle of the night by crashing sounds from downstairs.  It requires a really brave person to investigate strange noises...
    Brian Edwards | 31-10
  • Saturday playlist: songs about work
    Every Saturday we’re going to post a couple of music videos, probably on a particular theme, unless we run out of ideas and it just turns into Stephanie spamming us with professional wrestling soundtracks and Nicki Minaj. So, in that...
    On the Left | 31-10
  • Housing; broken promises, families in cars, and ideological idiocy (Part To...
    . . Continued from: Housing; broken promises, families in cars, and ideological idiocy (Part Rua) . Bill English comes clean on National’s intentions for HNZ privatisation . On 14 October, in a report on The Daily Blog, I wrote, In...
    Frankly Speaking | 31-10
  • The Greens are wacky?
    It is a bit like a game of pin the tail on the donkey, the National Government and their supporters are desperately attempting to stick the wacky label on the Greens again, but it is becoming harder to make it...
    Local Bodies | 31-10
  • Novopay Exemplifies National’s Governance
    This National led Government is strong on ideology, weak on process and reluctant to accept responsibility. The Novapay debacle exemplifies all of these well.When questioned about Novopay, National Ministers will never accept full responsibility. Initially the Government blamed Labour because they...
    Local Bodies | 31-10
  • Stuart’s 100 #47: The Forgotten Triangle
    48: The Forgotten Triangle What if the forgotten triangle behind Shortland Street was more than a parking lot? Continuing the series on forgotten or underutilised spaces within the city, the steeply rising wedge of land between Shortland Street, Albert Park...
    Transport Blog | 31-10
  • World News Brief, Friday October 31
    Top of the AgendaTensions Flare in Jerusalem...
    Pundit | 31-10
  • Guest post: Plain English is radical
    @aaronincognito is an anonymous soulless bureaucrat who blogs at fundamentallyuseless.wordpress.com. Despite all the ups and downs of the past few months, there has been one constant in left wing politics: jargon. Regardless of whether Nicky Hager, Judith Collins, or Eminem...
    On the Left | 31-10
  • Long past time
    The Dominion-Post reports that the government is considering wiping past convictions for homosexuality. Good. As a guest-poster to On The Left has recently explained, living with a criminal conviction isn't easy; employers and agencies will simply dump applications from people...
    No Right Turn | 31-10
  • Define Instruments Expands into South Africa
    It’s always great to see companies grow – and Define Instruments recently took their first big leap. The team has followed existing international sales by setting up a South African office. It’s the first of many new overseas offices we hope to...
    Lance Wiggs | 31-10
  • MacLennan on fixing the OIA
    Journalist and lawyer Catriona MacLennan has some suggestions on Fixing Official Information Act Abuses . She identifies three problems with the law: lack of resources to enforce the law; deliberate flouting of the act; and inadequate understanding of the legislation...
    No Right Turn | 31-10
  • All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy
    It's Halloween! Time for a jolly pumpkin to remind everyone that there is chocolate nearby The weather is terrible, and while it can't rain all the time, I suspect there may be an absence of ghosts and ghouls. Whatever shall...
    No Right Turn | 31-10
  • Indistinguishable from totalitarianism
    SF author Charles Stross has a lovely alternate-history thought experiment which demonstrates quite neatly how British surveillance is indistinguishable in practice from totalitarianism. And if you're in any doubt, you've only got to read today's news:The Government is facing calls...
    No Right Turn | 31-10
  • Rate my minister
    Tertiary education minister Steven Joyce wants to introduce a new ranking system, Rate My Qualification, where employers rate tertiary education courses and then students can look up the results. Well perhaps employers should be able rate other things too, such as their ministers....
    Tertiary Education Union | 31-10
  • To the field experiments!
    In the wake of the Stanford / Dartmouth schnozzle this week, this political science article caught my eye: The way your brain reacts to a single disgusting image can be used to predict whether you lean to the left or...
    Polity | 30-10
  • NZ cranks finally publish an NZ temperature series – but their paper’s ...
    You can’t teach old dogs new tricks, it seems — certainly not if they’re gnawing a much loved old bone at the time. The lads from the NZ Climate Science Coalition — yes, the same boys who tried to sue...
    Hot Topic | 30-10
  • West Auckland Network with new interchanges
    Last week Auckland Transport began consultation on the new network for West Auckland. I and many readers were highly critical of it as it seemed to ignore much of the network design philosophy and elements AT are implementing elsewhere and...
    Transport Blog | 30-10
  • This ‘boom’ might save the world – 10 quick facts about r...
    As the world's leading climate scientists finalise the latest and most comprehensive report on climate change and ways to tackle it, a key question is: What is new? What has changed since the release of the UN climate panel's last Assessment Report (AR4) in...
    Greenpeace NZ blog | 30-10
  • A lack of commitment
    New Zealand has finally joined the Open Government Partnership. A requirement of membership is to submit an action plan about how you will improve open government over the next two years. So what's in ours? Sweet fuck-all:Our Action Plan will...
    No Right Turn | 30-10
  • Smartphones are meant to bend
    You’ve no doubt heard of the issues surrounding the newly released iPhone 6, but do […] The post Smartphones are meant to bend appeared first on Connected....
    Potentia | 30-10
  • Tea Party takes on “President Obola”
    OK, so this happened: Theatricality is one of the best ways to shake the sleepwalking public awake. One brave liberty advocate made a bold statement when he donned a Hazmat suit and an Obama mask, and took to the president’s...
    Polity | 30-10
  • CTU welcomes forestry review recommendations
    The CTU is welcoming the today's release of the independent forestry safety review panel findings. "These recommendations must be implemented to ensure that everything possible is done to make forestry safer." CTU President, Helen Kelly said.  Photo:  ...
    CTU | 30-10
  • Herald vs Hosking-in-Herald on teabreaks
    The New Zealand Herald editorial today is distinctly unimpressed with the government’s decision to remove mandated tea breaks for workers: It is a pity that almost the first legislative act of the Government's new term is an act abolishing mandatory...
    Polity | 30-10
  • Forest Safety report first step in making our forests safe to work in
    Our forests are a very dangerous place to work. Between 2008 and 2013 there have been 32 fatalities and more than a thousand serious harm incidents in this industry. The Council of Trade Unions and First union have been doing...
    frogblog | 30-10
  • Ghost Dancing?
    Ghost Dancing circa 1890: With the buffalo effectively exterminated, the material basis for the Native American cultures of the Great Plains was destroyed. The Ghost Dance, it was believed, would reconstitute the basis for an independent indigenous existence. Has the...
    Bowalley Road | 30-10
  • I have seen one future, and it is bleak
    . . Way back in March, 2012,  I wrote this story regarding a march to support striking workers at Ports of Auckland. It appears there was some prescience about some of my observations at the time… . | | 18...
    Frankly Speaking | 30-10
  • WINZ: Bureaucratic Befuddlement and Confustication
    Yeah, I know. Confusticate isn’t a word, unless you’re quoting Urban Dictionary. Definition: This word is the coalescing of the English words “confuse” and “complicate”. It refers to anything of, or relating to the process of being both confused and...
    On the Left | 30-10
  • The idiot
    Here’s why this Steffan Browning/Ebola/Homeopathy thing is a really big deal for the Green Party. (a) Historically they’ve been stereotyped by their opponents as a bunch of nutters (b) The main focus of the party for the past five years –...
    DimPost | 30-10
  • The idiot
    Here’s why this Steffan Browning/Ebola/Homeopathy thing is a really big deal for the Green Party. (a) Historically they’ve been stereotyped by their opponents as a bunch of nutters (b) The main focus of the party for the past five years –...
    DimPost | 30-10
  • Climate change and New Zealand cities
    Environmentalists sometimes have an uneasy relationship with cities. Because they concentrate a lot of people and economic activity in relatively small places, they also concentrate a lot of negative environmental effects. All that concrete, all that energy being consumed, the...
    Transport Blog | 30-10
  • Got a mystery? Just ask John!
    Tuesday, November 24, 2009John Key has learned the identity of the entertainer guilty of an indecency charge through the grapevine of people circumventing the suppression order....
    Pundit | 30-10
  • Shameful attack on all workers
    The Government has passed the Employment Relations Amendment Act slashing the rights of all Kiwi workers. “These changes are shameful. New Zealand now has some of the worst employment protections in the OECD....
    CTU | 30-10
  • Blocked
    It is safe to say before the election last month I was fairly prolific in the blogosphere as we headed to an election. Was it because there was a glimmer of hope for we on this side of the coin?...
    My Thinks | 30-10
  • Blend with the Bruntletts Group Ride
    While Vancourerites Chris and Melissa Bruntlett are here for their Auckland Conversation talk, Generation Zero, Frocks on Bikes and TransportBlog have organised a slow, family friendly ride around the city centre. The map is below. The ride is designed to be self-directed so...
    Transport Blog | 30-10
  • Rawshark – Is she Maori or Pakeha?
    Cameron Slater blamed someone for being behind the hacking of his emails and passing them on to Nicky Hager. And then he named someone he thought was Rawshark. John Key says someone told him who Rawshark is but he ain’t telling. @B3nRaching3r is...
    Te Putatara | 30-10
  • Employment law: it’s toasted
    In an early episode of Mad Men, when the company’s going for the Lucky Strike account, sleazebag antihero Don Draper asks the client exactly how cigarettes are made. They talk through the process, mentioning the tobacco is toasted – and...
    On the Left | 30-10
  • Owners of the wind
    Thirty-odd years ago in the Kingdom of Denmark lived some brave people who disliked nuclear power and loved renewable energy. Determined to keep their country clean and safe, they began building their own wind turbines. Today, thanks to these passionate...
    Greenpeace NZ blog | 30-10
  • Te Wakaputanga – What we did not learn at school
    This week saw the 179th anniversary of the signing of Te Wakaputanga, the Declaration of Independence of the United Tribes of Niu Tireni. Most of us did not learn about this fundamentally critical document at school, we barely learned about...
    frogblog | 30-10
  • NZ goes backwards on gender equality
    It is no coincidence that in the same week New Zealand is singled out for going backwards on child poverty under National,  we’ve also dropped in global rankings for gender equality. In one year New Zealand has dropped from 7th...
    frogblog | 30-10
  • TPPA Bulletin #58
    NATIONAL DAY OF ACTION 8 NOVEMBER 2014 Auckland, Hamilton, Raglan, Tauranga, Rotorua, Gisborne, New Plymouth, Napier, Palmerston North, Levin,Wellington, Nelson, Christchurch, Timaru, Dunedin,Invercargill. REGIONAL UPDATES Auckland (1:00 pm at Aotea Square): speakers include Robyn Malcolm (Actors Equity), Bunny McDiarmid (Greenpeace), Dayle Takitimu...
    NZ – Not for sale | 30-10
  • Seabed mining: drums in the deep
    Out on the Chatham Rise, the ridge jutting into the waters off Christchurch and extending out beyond the Chathams, Chatham Rock Phosphate has a mining permit and is now seeking EPA approval for its project to mine phosphate for fertiliser,...
    Pundit | 30-10
  • CTU Runanga calls on iwi leaders
    Maori workers are calling on iwi leaders to speak out against the employment law changes expected to go through today.“Iwi leaders have previously spoken out when workers in Aotearoa have been under attack, we believe they should do so again...
    CTU | 30-10
  • An unmanaged conflict
    Katherine Rich is a member of the government-appointed Health Promotion Agency, responsible for (as it says on its website) "inspiring all New Zealanders to lead healthier lives". Katherine Rich is also Chief Executive of the New Zealand Food and Grocery...
    No Right Turn | 30-10
  • Robert Fisk
    Isis in Syria: A general reveals the lack of communication with the US - and his country's awkward relationship with their allies-by-default...
    No Right Turn | 30-10
  • A stretch
    This morning the Herald revealed that Kim Dotcom had been convicted and fined for dangerous driving in 2009, but had not declared it on his application for residency. Immigration is now talking about deporting him. So, this is what we...
    No Right Turn | 30-10
  • Tauranga port happy to take the money – but not happy to accept responsib...
    Comments from a Port of Tauranga manager about deaths and injuries in their port during a Radio New Zealand interview are unacceptable....
    MUNZ | 30-10
  • New Ebola Toys for Xmas. Yay?
    From the "too soon?" file, here are two oddly successful exercises in niche marketing. First, the molecularly-sort-of-correct ebola plush toy. Apparently it has sold out: And, of course, the sexy ebola nurse outfit: Ebola, as everyone knows, ignores cleavage. And...
    Polity | 30-10
  • Temporary, discriminatory and an admission of Faliure
    The PM says that the legislation his government proposes to pass under urgency allowing for the confiscation of passports of NZ citizens in order to combat the threat of returning foreign fighters will be “tightly focused” on those traveling to...
    Kiwipolitico | 30-10
  • Climate change harming ocean health
    New Zealand is responsible for one of the largest areas of sea in the world – an area 14 times the size of our land area. The National Government is promising new marine protected areas legislation with a discussion document...
    frogblog | 30-10
  • Experiment-gate update
    Readers may recall the saga around an experimental mailer some Stanford / Dartmouth researchers sent into the state of Montana. In a randomised trial, it provided voters with some added information about two candidates running for a judicial election, and...
    Polity | 30-10
  • James Shaw speaks on the four Bills formerly known as the Accounting Infras...
    The assurance industry is a critical component of our economic framework. The idea that there is a trusted independent watchdog of the public interest underpins investor confidence and ensures financial probity on behalf of our country's leading institutions. New Zealand...
    Greens | 31-10
  • ANZ needs to look after its workers after another super profit
    The ANZ bank needs to acknowledge the super profits it makes are coming at the expense of its workers, the Green Party said today.Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited (ANZ) 2014 full year results show a lift in performance...
    Greens | 31-10
  • James Shaw’s maiden speech
    Tena Koe, Mr Speaker. I would like to take this opportunity to speak a little of the past, the present and the future. The privilege to serve in this Parliament was given to me by all those who gave their...
    Greens | 31-10
  • Feed the kids members bill
    Education is the best route out of poverty. But hungry kids can't learn and are left trapped in the poverty cycle. Let's break that cycle lunchbox by lunchbox. We can feed the country's hungry kids, if we work together.I have...
    Greens | 31-10
  • Feed the kids members bill
    Education is the best route out of poverty. But hungry kids can't learn and are left trapped in the poverty cycle. Let's break that cycle lunchbox by lunchbox. We can feed the country's hungry kids, if we work together.I have...
    Greens | 31-10
  • National’s “Auckland housing boom” a fizzer
    Falling Auckland consent numbers show the Government’s housing policy is going backwards contrary to wild claims by Building and Housing Minister Nick Smith that we are on the cusp of a massive construction boom, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    Labour | 31-10
  • Job losses major blow to Bay community
    Job losses at Wattie’s Hastings plant will hit families and the community hard, Hawke’s Bay-based Labour MP Stuart Nash and MP for Ikaroa-Rawhiti Meka Whaitiri say. “I know a number of the Wattie’s staff and these job losses will be...
    Labour | 31-10
  • Local job losses major blow to Bay community
    Job losses at Wattie’s Hastings plant will hit families and the community hard, Hawke’s Bay-based Labour MP Stuart Nash and MP for Ikaroa-Rawhiti Meka Whaitiri say. “I know a number of the Wattie’s staff and these job losses will be...
    Labour | 31-10
  • Zero tolerance for forestry accidents a must
    The Government must adopt a zero tolerance approach to workplace accidents in the forestry sector to stop people being killed, Labour’s Forestry spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “It is time for the Government and the forestry sector to put an end...
    Labour | 30-10
  • Return to less holidays on the cards?
    John Key needs to lay his cards on the table regarding the Government’s intentions around holiday pay and annual leave entitlements, Labour’s Acting Deputy Leader Annette King says. “A day after National pushed through laws that take away the legal...
    Labour | 30-10
  • Forest Safety report first step in making our forests safe to work in
    Our forests are a very dangerous place to work. Between 2008 and 2013 there have been 32 fatalities and more than a thousand serious harm incidents in this industry. The Council of Trade Unions and First union have been doing...
    Greens | 30-10
  • Catherine Delahunty Speaks on the Employment Relations Amendment Bill
    Kia ora, Mr Assistant Speaker. He mihi nui ki te Whare Paremata. Welcome to the glorious 19th century, dressed up in the not-so-new flexibility-speak. At the final moment of this bill, let us drop the charade. The Government has a...
    Greens | 30-10
  • Ruataniwha Feds refuse to present a balanced view
    A bid to sell the Ruataniwha water project to Hawkes Bay farmers has turned in to an incredibly one sided affair, says Labours spokesperson on Water Meka Whaitiri.  “It’s being promoted as ‘Ruataniwha it’s now or never’ and it promises...
    Labour | 30-10
  • Worker’s rights dealt severe blow with Bill’s passing
    The passing of the Employment Relations Amendment Bill is another blow to workers' rights in New Zealand, the Green Party said today.This afternoon, National's Employment Relations Amendment Bill passed with the support of Act and United Future."This bill will force...
    Greens | 30-10
  • Barriers to reporting sex crimes must go
    Both the Government and police need to take action to ensure that, in future, sexual abuse victims know they will be taken seriously, Labour’s Associate Police spokesperson Kelvin Davis says. “The young women involved in the Roast Busters case, and...
    Labour | 30-10
  • Te Wakaputanga – What we did not learn at school
    This week saw the 179th anniversary of the signing of Te Wakaputanga, the Declaration of Independence of the United Tribes of Niu Tireni. Most of us did not learn about this fundamentally critical document at school, we barely learned about...
    Greens | 30-10
  • NZ goes backwards on gender equality
    It is no coincidence that in the same week New Zealand is singled out for going backwards on child poverty under National,  we’ve also dropped in global rankings for gender equality. In one year New Zealand has dropped from 7th...
    Greens | 30-10
  • Kevin Hague questions the Minister of Health on management of Katherine Ric...
    Is he satisfied that all conflicts of interest that arose by the head of Food and Grocery Council Katherine Rich being a member of the Health Promotion Agency were managed in accordance with the provisions of the Crown Entities Act...
    Greens | 30-10
  • Bennett parks numbers on social housing
    Social Housing Minister Paula Bennett admitted today that well over 1000 families have been subsidised through the accommodation supplement to stay in the Ranui campground, somewhere she has previously described as not the right place for children to be growing...
    Labour | 30-10
  • 50,000 sign petition against anti-worker law
    More than 50,000 Kiwis have signed Labour’s petition against the Government’s scrapping of tea break entitlements, Labour’s Acting Deputy Leader Annette King says. “That’s the equivalent of five people signing our petition every minute for a week. It shows the...
    Labour | 30-10
  • Address in Reply Debate – Dr Kennedy Graham on UN Security Council- 2...
    In the Speech from the Throne last week the Prime Minister identified the usual domestic goals for his Government. I counted 17. They are not my subject today. I wish instead to focus on matters beyond our shores. In the...
    Greens | 30-10
  • Climate change harming ocean health
    New Zealand is responsible for one of the largest areas of sea in the world – an area 14 times the size of our land area. The National Government is promising new marine protected areas legislation with a discussion document...
    Greens | 30-10
  • Key misled public over Jason Ede
    Information contained in a new chapter of the book Key: Portrait of a Prime Minister, that Jason Ede stopped working for the National Party on the night the book Dirty Politics was released, shows Mr Key and senior ministers hid...
    Greens | 29-10
  • Greenpeace report highlights better path for NZ agriculture
    A Greenpeace International report highlights a better way forward for New Zealand agriculture than the GE and chemical mutation technologies supported by Federated Farmers, and the National Government through its research funding packages, the Green Party said today. "This report...
    Greens | 29-10
  • BNZ post record profits while leaving savers vulnerable
    A small part of the $850 million record profit posted by the Bank of New Zealand (BNZ) today needs to be set aside to protect savers' deposits in the future, said Green Party Co-leader Dr Russel Norman today.Dr Norman was...
    Greens | 29-10
  • RBNZ U-turn shows monetary settings were wrong
    The Reserve Bank's U-turn on interest rates today shows monetary policy settings were wrong and New Zealanders have suffered unnecessarily through the loss of jobs and having to pay higher interest rates, the Green Party said today.Reserve Bank Governor Graeme...
    Greens | 29-10
  • Ports must take responsibility for shameful death toll
    Port companies must step up and take responsibility for a shameful toll of seven deaths and 133 serious accidents in the past three years, Labour MP Iain Lees-Galloway says. The frightening figures – released by the Rail, Maritime and Transport...
    Labour | 29-10
  • Please help me get my Feed the Kids Bill to Select Committee
    Last week I took over the Feed the Kids Bill that Hone Harawira had introduced to Parliament. If passed, my Bill will provide government-funded breakfast and lunch in all decile 1 and 2 schools. Hungry kids can’t learn and are...
    Greens | 29-10
  • TVNZ Outsourcing Pasifika and Maori Programmes
    I’ve always been a big fan of our state broadcaster and I’ve particularly liked their range of current events programmes. But after Friday’s announcement that TVNZ will be sacking up to 40 staff by contracting out the Pacific and Maori...
    Greens | 29-10
  • Labour urges iwi leaders to meet with National
    Labour’s Māori Caucus has called on iwi leaders and national Māori organisations to seek urgent meetings with the National Government to directly express their concerns about employment law changes which will harm Māori workers. In an open letter sent today...
    Labour | 29-10
  • ACC’s reputation needs fix, not glitz
    Restoring public trust and confidence in ACC will take a lot more than a new communications strategy or social media blitz, says Labour’s ACC spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway. “Under National, ACC has come to be perceived as insensitive, difficult to deal...
    Labour | 29-10
  • Lessons to be learned from police investigation
    The outcome of the so-called Roast Busters case should not put victims off reporting sexual crimes, Labour’s Acting Deputy Leader Annette King says. “This case has been mishandled from the start. Within days of police initially saying no charges had...
    Labour | 29-10
  • Anti-worker legislation is anti-Pacifica
    The Minister for Pacific Peoples, Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga, will go down in history as being part of a Government that harmed his own people through anti-worker legislation, says Labour’s Pacific Island Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio.  “Pacific people are among...
    Labour | 29-10
  • Five-year tax holiday for overseas tax dodgers
    National has just gifted a five-year tax holiday for foreign companies dodging their tax payments, says Revenue spokesperson David Clark. “Todd McClay has pretended he is doing something about overseas companies dodging their tax duties by joining an international initiative...
    Labour | 29-10
  • Traffic Jam Tax must be given the red light
    Auckland Council’s proposed Traffic Jam Tax could cost some households thousands of dollars a year just to use roads they had already paid for with their taxes and must be rejected, says Labour’s transport and Auckland Issues spokesperson Phil Twyford....
    Labour | 29-10
  • National has chance to show leadership on limos
    The National Party has the opportunity to show leadership by transitioning our vehicle fleet towards renewable electricity when a new contract to supply Government limousines for VIPs goes to tender next month, the Green Party said today. "This is a...
    Greens | 29-10
  • The Māori Party can’t have it both ways over labour laws
    The Māori Party has to fess up over its voting record on the Employment Relations Amendment Bill, says Labour’s Māori Caucus.  “It’s simply not good enough to oppose the bill at the same time  as they helped speed up its progress through...
    Labour | 29-10
  • Equal pay and the aged care sector
    Today the High Court upheld the historic ruling by the Employment Court that our Equal Pay Act could be used to consider work of equal value cases; the government has been telling the UN and ILO that it could for...
    Greens | 29-10
  • Court case perfect opportunity for Government to improve gender pay gap
    If the Government wants to halt New Zealand’s slump in international rankings on the gender pay gap it should act on the court finding that women deserve equal wages, Labour’s Women’s Affairs spokesperson Sue Moroney says. “The World Economic Forum’s...
    Labour | 28-10
  • All Auckland transport options should be considered
    All options for meeting Auckland's transport needs should be considered, including reprioritising the transport budget away from wasteful spending on motorways, the Green Party said today.Auckland mayor Len Brown is today releasing a transport report by the Independent Advisory Board,...
    Greens | 28-10
  • Another report highlights Govt failure on child poverty
    An international report measuring the impact of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) on child poverty rates, showing children in New Zealand have done worse than children in other countries, is further proof the Government needs to urgently take additional steps...
    Greens | 28-10
  • Address and Reply Debate Part 55: Inequality and Disability
    I rise on behalf of the Green Party to talk about inequality and disability.The recent census showed that nearly one in four New Zealanders lives with a disability—up from one in five in the previous census. These figures include some...
    Greens | 28-10
  • Address and Reply Debate Part 55: Inequality and Disability
    I rise on behalf of the Green Party to talk about inequality and disability.The recent census showed that nearly one in four New Zealanders lives with a disability—up from one in five in the previous census. These figures include some...
    Greens | 28-10
  • Child poverty: No more wake-up calls
    A new report which shows the National Government has made no inroads whatsoever into child poverty should do more than just set alarm bells ringing, Labour’s Acting Deputy Leader Annette King says. “UNICEF’s  latest Innocenti Report Card highlights the fact...
    Labour | 28-10
  • Eugenie Sage speaks in the 2014 Address in Reply Debate
    I congratulate you, Assistant Speaker Mallard, as Assistant Speaker and look forward to your knowledge, your fairness, and your light touch in being a referee of proceedings in this House. I congratulate also the other Assistant Speaker, Lindsay Tisch; the...
    Greens | 28-10
  • James Shaw’s Maiden Speech
    Tena Koe, Mr Speaker. I would like to take this opportunity to speak a little of the past, the present and the future. The privilege to serve in this Parliament was given to me by all those who gave their...
    Greens | 28-10
  • Govt airs real views on public broadcasting
    An admission by the Government that it is happy to experiment with Pacific and Maori audiences shows just how weak its vision for public broadcasting in New Zealand is, Labour’s Broadcasting spokesperson Kris Faafoi says. “National today admitted it doesn’t...
    Labour | 28-10
  • Does Judith Collins have a get out of jail card?
    Former justice minister Judith Collins appears to have been gifted a get out of jail free card based on the Prime Minister’s answers in Parliament today, Labour’s Acting Deputy Leader Annette King says. “Judith Collins claimed in an Official Information...
    Labour | 28-10
  • Solid Energy decision delay sensible
    Today’s announcement by the Board of Solid Energy that it will delay making a final decision on re-entering the Pike River mine is a sensible move, Labour’s MP for  West Coast-Tasman Damien O’Connor says. “It has been clear for some...
    Labour | 28-10
  • New York Green Bank off to a $1B start
    New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced late last week the New York Green Bank’s first NZD$1 billion tranche of green energy investments. The projects, which are difficult for the private sector to finance, are now possible by New York Green...
    Greens | 28-10
  • The Final Fifth: The Last Great Task for Progressive New Zealand.
    MOST OF NEW ZEALAND’S social problems are concentrated among those living at the margins of what is otherwise a relatively wealthy society. Recently released international data on child poverty has exposed an acutely stressed social strata encompassing roughly 20 percent...
    The Daily Blog | 31-10
  • Myth Busting Rape Boasters
    In just one week a case that galvanised a nation into discussing rape culture is now being reframed as mischievous teen hi-jinx. One year ago the Roast Busters case came to the attention of the media and the public. This...
    The Daily Blog | 31-10
  • Workers rights weakened by new laws – fightback needed
    The government’s changes to the employment laws are designed to weaken workers bargaining power – at both the individual and collective level.   30-day rule The old law required an employer with a collective agreement in place to employ new...
    The Daily Blog | 31-10
  • GUEST BLOG: Simon Buckingham – Where are Labour Candidates on disability?
    For the few people who know me (hello Mum), I am proudly New Zealand’s first Autistic Spectrum Lawyer, as well as being the very bottom Candidate on the Labour Party List. (64 out of 64). Being honoured like this is...
    The Daily Blog | 31-10
  • GUEST BLOG: Blockade the Budget
    The ‘Independent’ Police Conduct Authority’s report into the policing of student protests in 2012 is a whitewash The report released by the Independent Police Conduct Authority into the policing of student protests in 2012 is a whitewash riddled with inaccuracies....
    The Daily Blog | 30-10
  • When National claim new anti worker laws provide ‘flexibility’ they mea...
    And so it comes to pass. The first law National ram through as part of their victory march are new anti worker laws they pretend will generate ‘flexibility’. The new law denigrate the unions ability to protect workers and provide...
    The Daily Blog | 30-10
  • City Transport: A Taxing Matter
    This week the prospect of paying tolls on Auckland motorways became a hot topic. (See Mathew Dearnaley:Motorway tolling could hit some hard, NZ Herald, 30 Oct 2014.) As we might expect, the kneejerk response has been quite negative. But, as with...
    The Daily Blog | 30-10
  • Open Letter to Amy Adams: Please Reopen The Review Into Sexual Violence Cou...
    Ms Amy Adams, Justice and Courts Minister, Right now in this country it seems that although rape is illegal, it is not being prevented by the agents who uphold the law. It almost feels like rape is only illegal on paper,...
    The Daily Blog | 30-10
  • MEDIA WATCH: Does ‘No-Surprises’ Also Apply To TVNZ News?
    When you stand back and look at NZ media outlets, most of them have at least one or two people who attempt to hold the government to account: John Campbell on TV3, Guyon Espiner and others at Radio NZ, David...
    The Daily Blog | 30-10
  • Things That Make You Go Hmmmmmmm
    Every so often in politics, a public figure comes out with something so absurd and so outlandish … that it really does just make you go “Hmmmmmmmmmm”. We’re accustomed to this from certain quarters – by mid point through the...
    The Daily Blog | 30-10
  • Poverty & inequality don’t need protest marches – they need a riot:...
    The global level of inequality continues to skyrocket… Number of billionaires doubled since financial crisis The number of billionaires has doubled since the start of the financial crisis, according to a major new report from anti-poverty campaigners. According to Oxfam,...
    The Daily Blog | 30-10
  • If Key knows who Rawshark is…
    I’m sorry, what? John Key ‘given Rawshark’s name’The Prime Minister believes he knows who hacked Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater’s computer and produced the source material for Nicky Hager’s Dirty Politics, according to a new edition of a recently published...
    The Daily Blog | 30-10
  • Child Poverty stats in NZ
    Child Poverty stats in NZ...
    The Daily Blog | 30-10
  • Crimes Act + Police Investigation = WTF
    Just to frame the farce that is the Roastbuster’s investigation and conclusion – here are the parts of the Crime Act http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1961/0043/latest/whole.html#DLM329057  the Roastbusters are proven to have violated – that the police (and some suspects!) themselves acknowledge occurred: Crimes...
    The Daily Blog | 29-10
  • Publishing Journalists’ Home Addresses Is A Tactic Of The Right, Not The ...
    I think I’m starting to get rather annoyed with the conduct of some pro-MANA people over this ongoing Parliamentary Services crew complement issue. Yes, we get that there are legitimate issues to be raised with how some political reporters in...
    The Daily Blog | 29-10
  • Aucklanders caught between a tarseal-addicted government and a weak mayor
    Len Brown’s proposal for motorway tolls to reduce congestion and provide funding for better public transport is a weak response to a critical issue. The $12 billion dollar shortfall on transport funding he talks about is mainly for projected new...
    The Daily Blog | 29-10
  • A Very Weird Story: Deconstructing Darren Aronofsky’s Noah.
    NOAH is a curious movie. Conceived as a biblical epic, it’s target audience was originally the millions of Americans who regard the Bible as God’s inerrant word. With the sin-filled works of Hollywood forbidden to these true-believers, Christian movie-makers have developed...
    The Daily Blog | 29-10
  • You Can Get Away With Rape In New Zealand
    Jessie Hume with last years petition against rape     The police have sent a strong message today.  In fact they’ve been sending a strong message for a while; a message that our government supports. “You can literally get away...
    The Daily Blog | 29-10
  • Roast Buster case – no charges. In the immortal words of NWA…
    Roast Busters case: No prosecutions Police are to make an announcement this afternoon on Operation Clover, the investigation into the “Roast Busters” allegations. The Herald understands the victim has been told that the alleged offenders will not be prosecuted due...
    The Daily Blog | 29-10
  • Key’s flag change distraction to cost $26million!
    No. Way. Bid to change NZ flag to cost millions The cost of holding two referendums and consulting on a change of flag has been estimated to be just under $26 million. Look. We all appreciate that the sleepy hobbits...
    The Daily Blog | 29-10
  • Why NZ Herald’s Labour Party crocodile tears are so audacious
    The front page the NZ Herald would use if they thought they could get away with it No one can take the recent columns by NZ Herald seriously… John Armstrong: Shadow lingers on National John Roughan: Labour’s leadership vote matters...
    The Daily Blog | 28-10
  • The beginning of the end of Cameron Slater?
    Slater postings on man bizarre, court told A businessman has changed his appearance and had to install extra security at his home after Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater posted his business and personal documents online, he says. Mr Slater has...
    The Daily Blog | 28-10
  • We are a milk power republic and Fonterra our unelected senate
    Wow. Just wow… Deputy mayor says he’ll be sacked South Taranaki deputy mayor Alex Ballantyne says he expects to be sacked because he has spoken out about the impact gasses coming from dumped Fonterra dairy products have had on his...
    The Daily Blog | 28-10
  • MEDIA WATCH: “…But *actually* this is about ethics in political-game jo...
    Yesterday, a piece of mine on the recent revelations about Hone Harawira employing several gentlemen either accused or convicted of sex offences was published on The Daily Blog. Predictably, given the fierce loyalty which Hone inspires in his party faithful and...
    The Daily Blog | 28-10
  • Privilege cheque
    There was no race problem in my childhood. Living in central Wellington I was well-insulated from what was going on not so far away. This was the 60s and 70s, where the teachers enjoyed free love in the staff room...
    The Daily Blog | 28-10
  • A brief word on Key’s claim that it will be raining carnage
    Isis will ‘rain carnage on the world’ – John Key Left unchecked Isis would “rain carnage on the world”, Prime Minister John Key says, but he has yet to make a decision on whether New Zealand troops will join a...
    The Daily Blog | 28-10
  • Meanwhile…
    ...
    The Daily Blog | 27-10
  • How does Andrew Little win Labour Leadership and unify the caucus?
    Audrey Young’s excellent column on how the Caucus vote  is shaping up shows how Andrew Little becomes the next leader of the Labour Party. She identifies the factions as the following… Andrew Little 6: Andrew Little, David Cunliffe, Iain Lees Galloway,...
    The Daily Blog | 27-10
  • GUEST BLOG: Joe Trinder – Right of response to Curwen
    You have asked that Hone Harawira deserves to explain what happened, how would he explain when his next door neighbour is an alleged sex offender. What explanation can Hone offer he wasn’t involved, Hone had no idea this offending was...
    The Daily Blog | 27-10
  • MEDIA WATCH: That Hella-Weird Feeling When You Defend Tova O’Brien
    Oh dear. Yesterday morning I blogged that Hone deserved a chance to explain what exactly had happened as applies his office’s Parliamentary Services crew complement – and, importantly, that we deserve to be able to judge him on the strength of...
    The Daily Blog | 27-10
  • Canadian Green MP warns against harsh anti-terror measures
    Canada’s Green Party has provided a welcome counterpoint to Prime Minister Harper’s call for tougher anti-terrorism laws in the wake of a soldier outside the Canadian Parliament. On October 22, while she was still locked in her parliamentary office, Green...
    The Daily Blog | 27-10
  • When is an asset sale not an asset sale? When it robs from the poor and ste...
    National have turned state housing on its head. At no time during the 2014 election did the Key Government even hint that they were going to privatise 30% of the Housing NZ stock of state homes. Not once. Key even...
    The Daily Blog | 27-10
  • Housing; broken promises, families in cars, and ideological idiocy (Part To...
    . . Continued from: Housing; broken promises, families in cars, and ideological idiocy (Part Rua) . Bill English comes clean on National’s intentions for HNZ privatisation . On 14 October, in a report on The Daily Blog, I wrote, In...
    The Daily Blog | 27-10
  • The Questions Have Been Asked – They Deserve An Answer
    A few days ago, allegations that had been percolating for some time about Hone Harawira employing three either accused or convicted sex offenders on his Parliamentary pay-roll came to light. (one imprisoned before working for MANA; one who found himself convicted and...
    The Daily Blog | 26-10
  • I have seen one future, and it is bleak
    . . Back in  March 2012, I wrote this story regarding a march to support striking workers at Ports of Auckland. It appears there was some prescience about some of my observations at the time… . | | 18 March...
    The Daily Blog | 26-10
  • US air strike war Key wants us in has killed a civilian a day so far
      The US air strike war that John Key wants us to join has killed a civilian a day so far. From the Washington Post... The United States launched its first airstrikes on militants in Syria on Sept. 23, and has continued...
    The Daily Blog | 26-10
  • The instant Jihad syndrome
    My favourite new term is ‘self-radicalised’ – it suggests the reasons for terrorism are totally divorced from the actions of the West. This need to suddenly ramp up terror laws because of lone wolf, self-radicalised Jihadists seems convenient and counter-productive....
    The Daily Blog | 25-10
  • We have nothing to fear from Ebola but fear itself
    I suspect most Americans perceive Ebola like this   I can’t work out if the fear being spread within the media about Ebola is deliberate or just ignorance. Yes Ebola is a terrible plague that kills a large percentage of...
    The Daily Blog | 25-10
  • GUEST BLOG: Anjum Rahman – “Meritocracy? I wish.”
    I’d like to start by linking to a post I had published at another site in support of Nanaia Mahuta for the Labour Party leadership election.  She has a reasonable chance, given that she already has the endorsement of Te...
    The Daily Blog | 25-10
  • Chocolate milk shortage and creepy Santa? Let’s talk about real news
    Child poverty is still a scarily serious problem in this country and house prices are soaring through the roof to the point where it is simply impossible for the average New Zealander to buy a home. There is also little...
    The Daily Blog | 25-10
  • It’s time to celebrate Kiwi schools and teachers
    Some would have you believe that New Zealand’s schools are in a state of collapse, that your children are not being educated well and that things are going to hell in a hand basket.  That there is no innovation, no...
    The Daily Blog | 25-10
  • Ideological Blitzkrieg – Privatization of state housing, more charter sch...
    Pundits in pundit land will tell you that this Government is boring, that Key is the great pragmatist and that it is his ability to create elegant solutions that keeps him the firm favourite in many Kiwi eyes. This ability...
    The Daily Blog | 24-10
  • Hegemony rules but resistance is fertile
    The Prime Minister is a puppet. Not just our current Prime Minister, but given the forces of multinational globalisation, the role of any head of state, is less as independent actor, and more as a puppet of international trends and...
    The Daily Blog | 24-10
  • An open Letter to Sir Bob Jones: demanding a ‘liveable wage’ is not “...
    How out of touch with reality is Sir Bob Jones? You know, that white dude who invested in privatised SOEs after the selling off of our assets in the eighties and made a ludicrous and disgusting amount of money and is...
    The Daily Blog | 24-10
  • My insecurity about the Security Council
    As I write this (on 24 October) it is international UN Day. Of course, you all knew that already, right? Well, the day celebrates the entry into force of the UN Charter in 1945. With the ratification of this founding...
    The Daily Blog | 24-10
  • GUEST BLOG: Catherine Delahunty – Back in That House
    Parliament opened this week and I still find it a very odd place. Most of the people are reasonably courteous and friendly, but the rituals are archaic and the rules around issues like the swearing in oath are oppressive and...
    The Daily Blog | 23-10
  • Marae Investigates No More
    TVNZ yesterday announced the closure of their Māori and Pacific programmes department. That means they’ve chosen to stop making Fresh, Tagata Pasifika, Waka Huia and Marae Investigates to let independent producers get their hands on these lucrative contracts. This is...
    The Daily Blog | 23-10
  • BLOGWATCH: An Un-Civil War in Labour, eh?
    Earlier today, my attention was directed to an entry that’s just recently appeared on the Slightly Left of Centre blog. It purports to contain the ‘inside word’ from a highly placed NZF source – which is funny, because I’m pretty sure...
    The Daily Blog | 23-10
  • Santanomics 101
    Santanomics could mean a number of things. It could be the study and practice of giving. Or it could mean the study and practice of rampant end-of-year commercialism. However, for me today it is the economics of erectingAuckland’s giant Santa...
    The Daily Blog | 23-10
  • SkyCity boss misleads public over workers lost shifts
    SkyCity CEO Nigel Morrison has defended the employment practices at his company in an “Opinion” piece entitled “Human Capital key to corporate success” in the NZ Herald on Thursday. A number of his claims are misleading, contain only partial truths...
    The Daily Blog | 23-10
  • Roast Busters: Turn Indignation into Action
    People raged about the Roast Buster case. The indignation was justified – it was horrible. “Where were their parents!?” Fair question. I am sure the Roast Busters’ parents and the victims’ parents all wish they had been more proactive in...
    Scoop politics | 31-10
  • Stats NZ only have themselves to blame for postponement
    The Public Service Association (PSA) says Statistics NZ only have themselves to blame for the indefinite postponement of the release of the Food Price Index: November 2014....
    Scoop politics | 31-10
  • NZ Diversity Survey – benchmarking workplace diversity
    AUT University’s New Zealand Work Research Institute (NZWRI) has released a report on diversity in New Zealand workplaces....
    Scoop politics | 31-10
  • Māori Language (Te Reo Māori) Bill
    Tutehounuku Korako, Chair of the Māori Affairs Committee, is inviting further public submissions on this bill. The closing date for submissions is Friday, 5 December 2014....
    Scoop politics | 31-10
  • ERA amendments a mixed bag
    The Employment Relations Amendment Act has the potential to put vulnerable workers in a more precarious position, says Equal Opportunities Commissioner, Dr Jackie Blue. However, the commissioner says the right for all to request flexible work hours is...
    Scoop politics | 31-10
  • Sensible Sentencing calls for appeal of judicial activivism
    The Sensible Sentencing Trust is appalled that Justice Jill Mallon has today refused to apply the Life without Parole (LWOP) provisions of the Three Strikes law as enacted by Parliament....
    Scoop politics | 31-10
  • Global Rally against ISIS – for Kobanê – for Humanity, Nov 1
    The New Zealand Kurdish Community will march in solidarity with Kurdistan as part of the “GLOBAL RALLY AGAINST ISIS – FOR KOBANÊ – FOR HUMANITY” on 1 November 2014, 2pm....
    Scoop politics | 31-10
  • Does ‘No-Surprises’ Also Apply To TVNZ News?
    When you stand back and look at NZ media outlets, most of them have at least one or two people who attempt to hold the government to account: John Campbell on TV3, Guyon Espiner and others at Radio NZ, David...
    Scoop politics | 31-10
  • Safer roads are better for everyone
    Recent pedestrian versus vehicle incidents highlight the real issues being addressed by delegates as the 2Walk and Cycle conference concludes....
    Scoop politics | 31-10
  • Law change creates more flexible labour market
    The Employment Relations Amendment Act, passed yesterday, will bring new flexibility to the labour market and will reduce the ability of unions to organise and to recruit....
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Bumper ANZ profits mean no excuse for insecure hours
    A big rise in profits at New Zealand's largest bank needs to be reflected in a better pay offer and more security around hours of work, the bank workers’ union said today....
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Count down to lowered alcohol limit
    With just a month to go until a new lower alcohol limit for adult drivers comes into effect, Police and road safety agencies are reminding drivers of the impending change....
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • WorkSafe Supports Forestry Review Findings
    WorkSafe NZ says the Independent Forestry Safety Review has clearly identified the problems facing an industry in which ten workers were killed last year. “The Review’s analysis matches our own view and leaves no doubt about the need for comprehensive,...
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • CTU welcomes forestry review recommendations
    The CTU is welcoming the today's release of the independent forestry safety review panel findings. "These recommendations must be implemented to ensure that everything possible is done to make forestry safer." CTU President, Helen Kelly said....
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Activists will confront animal abusers
    Today animal rights activists will confront a group of wealth advisers who want to build the biggest egg factory-farm in New Zealand....
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Turia: Women’s Refuge Conference 2014
    This is a milestone moment in my life. This will be my last official address as Co-leader of the Maori Party. On Saturday night at our Hui-a-Tau, I will be standing down from that role and enabling a new co-leader,...
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Rodeo Code of Welfare ‘Sick Joke’
    Animal advocacy organisation SAFE says the revised Code of Welfare for Rodeos just released is nothing but a sick joke. “Rodeo animals are goaded, tormented and forced to endure needless suffering and gross mistreatment, all for the sake of so-called...
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Conservative Party applauds binding referenda on flag
    The Conservative Party are congratulating the Government on the decision to hold two binding referendums to decide the fate of New Zealand’s flag – and believes it will pave the way for binding referenda to form part of New Zealand...
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Walk the Talk – Opposing violence against women
    Soroptimist International of Auckland have organised a walk on 22 November from Silo Park at the Wynyard Quarter through the Viaduct and back to Silo Park, to show their opposition to violence against women. This event hopes to raise awareness...
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Recommendations on the Design of Pecuniary Penalties
    The Law Commission has reviewed the use of pecuniary penalties as a regulatory tool. Pecuniary penalties are financial penalties that policymakers are increasingly opting to use in place of criminal sanctions in order to punish and deter misconduct in...
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Every worker will be affected by employment law changes
    Every worker will feel the effects of the government’s new employment laws and should join a union if they want to maintain and increase their wages and conditions, says New Zealand’s largest private sector union, the EPMU....
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Shameful attack on all workers
    The Government has passed the Employment Relations Amendment Act slashing the rights of all Kiwi workers. “These changes are shameful. New Zealand now has some of the worst employment protections in the OECD. It is embarrassing that a country which...
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Unnecessary law changes more to do with ideology
    The government’s employment law changes are simply ideological and are at odds with its approach in the related areas of health and safety and immigration law, FIRST Union said tonight....
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • CTU Runanga calls on iwi leaders
    Maori workers are calling on iwi leaders to speak out against the employment law changes expected to go through today. “Iwi leaders have previously spoken out when workers in Aotearoa have been under attack, we believe they should do so...
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Educating children not the best solution to alcohol harm
    Alcohol Healthwatch says we need to look beyond educating children and young people to address deeply embedded attitudes and behaviours concerning alcohol....
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • New code of welfare for rodeos released
    New standards to strengthen the animal welfare requirements for rodeos have been issued today by the Minister for Primary Industries, Nathan Guy....
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • IPCA report riddle with inaccuracies, say students
    A report by the Independent Police Conduct Authority into the policing of student protests in 2012 is riddled with inaccuracies, say students who laid the original complaint with the IPCA....
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • CT v The Queen – indecency convictions quashed
    This summary is provided to assist in the understanding of the Court’s judgment. It does not comprise part of the reasons for that judgment. The full judgment with reasons is the only authoritative document. The full text of the judgment...
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Rameka v The Queen – murder convictions quashed
    This summary is provided to assist in the understanding of the Court’s judgment. It does not comprise part of the reasons for that judgment. The full judgment with reasons is the only authoritative document. The full text of the judgment...
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Auckland Council Out of Control
    Responding to the NZ Herald article that some Auckland households will face a rates rise of up to 9.6 per cent next year, Taxpayers’ Union Executive Director Jordan Williams says: “Len Brown’s pledge to cap rates rises at 2.5 per...
    Scoop politics | 30-10
  • Stats NZ staff escalate action with ‘no more meetings’ rule
    Statistics NZ staff have voted to escalate their ongoing industrial action in an effort to get Stats NZ back to the bargaining table with a reasonable offer. The staff, who are members of the Public Service Association (PSA), have been...
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Rape Crisis calls for changes to criminal justice system
    Wellington Rape Crisis has added its voice to the public outcry following the announcement that there will be no charges in the teen rape gang case. Butterworth says the decision not to lay charges will not have been a surprise...
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Police action justified in Blockade the Budget demonstration
    Police actions in dealing with a demonstration in Central Auckland known as Blockade the Budget on 1 June 2012 were justified and appropriate, an Independent Police Conduct Authority report released today found....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • NZDF Joins with Australia to Commemorate WWI Centenary
    A contingent of New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) personnel will join their Australian counterparts at Australia’s first major commemoration of the First World War centenary in Albany, Western Australia this weekend....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Reserve Bank should reduce interest rate
    “The Reserve Bank should be reducing its policy interest rate, the OCR”, says CTU Economist Bill Rosenberg in response to the Bank’s announcement today that it is not increasing it....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • 2015 Stout Fellow will write about Māori & Criminal Justice
    Kim Workman, founder and advocate for the Robson Hanan Trust, which administers the Rethinking Crime and Punishment and Justspeak initiatives, has been awarded the 2015 John David Stout Fellowship at Victoria University....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • What John Key thought about ‘dirty politics’
    On September 20, John Key swept to victory to become one of New Zealand’s most successful and popular Prime Ministers. Rocked by scandal, the 2014 election campaign was one of the most brutal – and riveting – in recent history....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Trade Deal Threatens Farmers and Food Businesses
    The secret Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations are a direct threat to food businesses and farmers, and a moratorium on the release of GE crops must be enshrined in law before the TPP is signed....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • CTU announces election of new Secretary
    The contested election for the position of CTU Secretary has been won by Sam Huggard. Sam officially takes office on Monday 1 December 2014. Sam has worked in the union movement and brings a wealth of experience and a commitment...
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Kim Workman awarded 2015 J.D. Stout Fellowship
    The Victoria University of Wellington 2015 J.D. Stout Fellowship, funded by the Stout Trust, has been awarded to justice reform advocate Kim Workman. Mr Workman (Ngati Kahungungu ki Wairarapa, Rangitaane) is well known for his work on criminal justice,...
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • TPPA causing concern
    Concern over the secretive Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) negotiations is being expressed in two public meetings over the next week; one at a presentation on 5th November by former councillor Robin Gwynn to the Napier City Council, the...
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Kiwis rally to demand justice for ‘Roast Buster’ survivors
    Over 1,500 kiwis have rallied to demand justice after the announcement of the NZ Police decision not to lay charges in the ‘Roast Busters’ saga....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • New employment law will hurt the most vulnerable NZers
    The Public Service Association (PSA) says changes to the Employment Relations Act, expected to be passed in Parliament tonight, will hurt vulnerable workers and their families more than anyone....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Consultation to close on proposed place names
    The New Zealand Geographic Board (NZGB) Ngā Pou Taunaha o Aotearoa today advised that only one month remains before public consultation closes for 18 name proposals for geographic features and places around Te Ika ā Māui (the North Island)....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Operation Clover – Statement from Police Commissioner
    I have taken a close interest in this investigation and I am confident police have conducted a thorough and professional enquiry in what has been a challenging and complex case. The Operation Clover team has ensured that victims have been...
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Better policy would have protected children from recession
    Child Poverty Action Group says an international report released by UNICEF today shows good policy can protect and improve child well-being, even during a recession....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Outcome of Operation Clover investigation
    Police have completed a multi-agency investigation, Operation Clover, into the activities of a group calling themselves “The Roast Busters”. The 12 month enquiry focused on incidents involving allegations of sexual offending against a number of girls...
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • False birth registration brings home detention
    A Whangarei woman who attempted to register the birth of a fictitious child to claim a sole parent benefit was sentenced to six months home detention in the Whangarei District Court today....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Family of Robert Ellis demand a proper investigation
    The family of a New Zealander killed in Indonesia are growing increasingly concerned at the lack of information they’ve received, and the handling of the investigation into his murder....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
  • Minister of Health must account for aged care workers’ pay
    The New Zealand Federation of Business and Professional Women (BPW NZ) congratulates rest-home worker Kristine Bartlett on her landmark claim for equal pay from her employer and successfully pursuing this to the Court of Appeal....
    Scoop politics | 29-10
Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere