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Labour Opening Address

Written By: - Date published: 8:17 pm, August 23rd, 2014 - 74 comments
Categories: labour - Tags:

74 comments on “Labour Opening Address”

  1. bad politics 1

    Good. Cunliffe came across as a very warm, caring person. & has a great head of hair, wow.

  2. I think it’s really awesome that Labour showed itself to be a team who work together – absolutely literally. It highlighted the number of hardworking MPs Labour has – whereas National’s was 100% John Key personality politics.

  3. Mike the Savage One 3

    Well, I am a bit positively surprised by this election video, it sounds and looks good, but to be honest, some of the MPs in there look and sound a bit half-hearted, same as some of the members of the public commenting, or asking questions.

    Let us hope they (Labour candidates) mean it and stand up for each other and push the common, positive message across to the undecided voters.

    My vote will go elsewhere, the party vote that is, but as we will need Labour, best of luck! Time for a change, for sure!

  4. disturbed 4

    Yes a Helen Clark returned to a Kinder, gentler, caring, warm, Government is just what we need to save our wonderful country and her people from an aggressive bully of a tyrant.

    Thank you Labour for now we are proud to have returned home as Kiwis again for the last 16yrs. It’s been like hell the last six years.

    Come save our rail in HB Gisborne please from Key stealing it for a cycleway.

  5. Ad 5

    Key the pinstriped head got creamed by Cunliffe.

    In the minors, the Greens could simply not beat Peters’ solid flag waving.

    The rest were simply shit.

    • Colonial Viper 5.1

      The extension cord prop was a win.

      • Ron 5.1.1

        Is that what it was. I thought it was a rope and was waiting to see DC climb up the side of the building

        The extension cord prop was a win.

  6. Kat 6

    So completely uncorporate!!
    Fancy having real people on display!
    Has to be a conspiracy from the left.

  7. RedLogix 7

    Well done. 10/10 for the concept – 9/10 execution.

    I especially liked that the Labour team were in the picture.

  8. b waghorn 8

    Good ad for labour a touch cringy but got some points I liked across. Couldn’t believe despicable key claiming kiwis not going to oz because of something they did .

  9. karol 9

    Cunliffe came across really well. Very good setting and the whole community action thing. Stopping to talk policy was a bit clunky. It broke up the flow and seemed a bit like a cheap DIY ad.

    The best after Cunliffe, was Nania Mahuta. The conversation between her and the young woman seemed fairly natural as they continued doing stuff.

    Cunliffe was relaxed and approachable. Talking while walking is a pretty basic thing to do on camera to keep the flow and rhythm and not seem static, and Cunliffe did it very well.

    • Brendon Harre 9.1

      I liked the Phil Twyford housing segment. Maybe you were just focusing on what interests you, as was I. No worries it was all good…..

  10. Olwyn 10

    I liked it. The down-to-earth team work and the atmosphere of conviviality provides a marked contrast to National without the need for overt attacks.

  11. Charlieboy 11

    The best part of the ad was Cunliffe. Very assured performance, and the rest looked nicely normal like the rest of New Zealand. This is the country I want back!

  12. Colonial Viper 12

    Cunliffe was 100% who he needed to be: himself, using his own words, in his own way.

  13. TheContrarian 13

    Did we all see the same video? It was god awful.

    Though the rest weren’t much better. Peters could have saved some time and cash by just yelling “Asians!” to ominous music.

    • Jilly Bee 13.1

      OK T C – what would you have done better that wouldn’t be god awful.

    • RedLogix 13.2

      Don’t fret TC. You saw god-awful because you cannot understand it’s purpose or meaning. Never mind.

      • TheContrarian 13.2.1

        I saw god awful because it thought it was god awful, forced and contrived. Ah well.

        • RedLogix 13.2.1.1

          Yes I saw the contrived and forced too. OK so none of them are good actors and I’m willing to look past that to what they are saying.

          Which strikes me as the important thing.

    • Lanthanide 13.3

      I thought it was pretty bad too.

      Cunliffe was especially good and King was ok, the rest were stilted and forced. Greens was much much better.

  14. Charlieboy 14

    Nah, it was good, humble, normal, gentle, a place where ordinary people and families can feel safe and included. Come out of your negative contrary space and be part of a positive future.

  15. ghostwhowalksnz 15

    Did you notice that Key used images of the Queen for partisan politics ?

    It was the Balmoral pics too, the Brits were not amused when Key took cameras with him on meeting with HM.

    I imagine there will be a stiff please explain from the GG about this, and no dont send some lackey from ‘the office’.

  16. disturbed 16

    TC time waster, we are positive see!!

  17. Draco T Bastard 17

    When are Labour going to learn to turn on both sound channels?

    Didn’t watch all of it, wasn’t worth the effort but the bit about portable devices for school brought up a discussion with my tutor that I overheard. She was surprised to be teaching at university what she had learned in high school in the country she was from (I don’t know which country and nor do I care). This highlights one major problem with NZ – we leave the teaching of important fundamentals about computers too late.

    • Ergo Robertina 17.1

      ‘This highlights one major problem with NZ – we leave the teaching of important fundamentals about computers too late.’

      The average 6-year-old in Britain understands more about digital technology than the average 45 year old. No doubt it’s similar in NZ. By then they have only had 1 year of schooling anyway.
      http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/aug/07/ofcom-children-digital-technology-better-than-adults

      • RedLogix 17.1.1

        The average 6-year-old in Britain understands more about digital technology than the average 45 year old.

        Not really. Kids often have a very shallow or narrow understanding of how digital technology really ticks. All they really get exposed to is the application layers – while most people have no idea at all about all the other layers deep under the bonnet.

      • Foreign Waka 17.1.2

        Do you refer to the button of applications to play games by saying that a 6 year old understands more about IT? Because of parents have to keep their kids occupied whilst working, making dinner, being exhausted etc?

        This does not replace the understanding and knowledge one needs to implement any application to a particular problem or operational requirement. Yes, everybody can press a button and it has been shown that with sufficient training over 60 year old can learn software packages of any kind. What it will not be able to do, is to replace is the accumulated knowledge of a subject or issue. This has to acquired by learning and experience. Humans have not changed despite that IT has.

        • Ergo Robertina 17.1.2.1

          Sure, but the current focus in schools is application based using increasingly linear platforms.
          Labour’s proposal sounds like an opportunity cost (shared by the government and families) as the devices themselves do not improve children’s achievement levels.
          It seems to me the kids with an aptitude for IT need to be encouraged and resourced to explore ‘deep under the bonnet’ (in RedLogix’s words) in terms of coding or solving problems.
          Does the Govt’s (or Labour’s proposed tweak to it) digital device strategy increase the number of children who gravitate towards deeper level IT?
          For the rest of us, I agree with American computer scientist Kentaro Toyama who pointed out in a recent interview on Nine to Noon that he could teach someone how to use Twitter in 30 minutes. But just how to teach them to have something worthwhile to say on Twitter was an entirely different matter that had little to do with rapidly changing technology platforms.

          http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/20143331/the-limitations-of-technology-in-the-classroom-digital-devices-and-deeper-learning

          • Colonial Viper 17.1.2.1.1

            I agree with American computer scientist Kentaro Toyama who pointed out in a recent interview on Nine to Noon that he could teach someone how to use Twitter in 30 minutes. But just how to teach them to have something worthwhile to say on Twitter was an entirely different matter

            That’s it, right there.

            • Draco T Bastard 17.1.2.1.1.1

              And what I’m suggesting is to teach people to have something worthwhile to say.

            • Foreign waka 17.1.2.1.1.2

              The problem is a bit larger – what to say might be just the tip of the iceberg. How to write is the more serious issue. If you can read you can read a manual. If you can do maths, you can convert a description into a mathematical solution to a problem. Basics is what is lacking. Pressing colorful buttons – a baby can do this without having its cognitive functions developed.

    • Rich 17.2

      You think that we should learn about sock puppets, paid blog posters and encryption?

      • Draco T Bastard 17.2.1

        How to program, how operating systems work and about computer hardware. You know, the basics and the stuff that our children presently aren’t learning.

        • Rich 17.2.1.1

          Well they do, when the get to University. Those are not basics, they’re part of a computer science degree.

          I think that the concentration on education, housing in the video is a lot more relevant to most people than what some anonymous poster from god knows where says they should be talking about.

          • Stephanie Rodgers 17.2.1.1.1

            I disagree. Most of the people I know who are now into technology/IT picked up all that stuff as kids – they were the nerds who were pulling apart their computers and figuring out what everything did at age 10. It’s far more intuitive to them now than to people who didn’t learn it until they were adults.

            Being sneery about Draco’s opinion just because he’s posting under a pseudonym on a blog is kind of silly given you yourself are posting under a pseudonym on a blog.

            • RedLogix 17.2.1.1.1.1

              That more or less describes me Stephanie – although computers had yet to be invented when I was 9. And over a lifetime in the tech world I’ve done more or less everything to do with computers short of building my own silicon. But the really geeky kids like me are still a smallish minority.

              What is true is that children grow up in a tech world and they absorb what they are exposed to without being much in awe of it. And this means they don’t have too many inhibitions around playing about with a bit of tech or software until it gets them a result they want. But this ain’t the same thing as understanding.

              Nor is it true that all adults are hopeless at picking up tech – quite the opposite, there are plenty of take to it just fine and become proficient very quickly. Even quite late in life.

            • Rich 17.2.1.1.1.2

              Stephanie, the original sneering was not mine.

              And IT is not the only skill needed in this world. I tend to think the schools have got it about right on IT. If a high school student wants to learn some programming they can. But I don’t really see why they should have to learn about logic boards, ram, memory, hard disc or how to tune a database. This is a specialised area best done at the University level. For now I think it’s better that they learn about China, maths, how to write a good essay and maybe a language or two. Oh and science, biology, chemistry, physics.

              • Draco T Bastard

                the original sneering was not mine.

                Actually, it was.

                This is a specialised area best done at the University level.

                At the level we’re talking about it’s not specialised. It’s basic stuff on a similar level to what you’d learn about chemistry and biology at high school.

                • Colonial Viper

                  it’s more important to teach kids how to problem solve, communicate with others, laterally think and access their creativity. Sometimes this might be done through exposure to tech, but most of the time, not.

                  • Draco T Bastard

                    Using tech often requires problem solving, communicating today often requires tech and tech can also free peoples creativity.

                    Oh, and if we used your argument we also wouldn’t teach them maths, physics, biology, chemistry, etc, etc.

                    • Colonial Viper

                      PCs, tablets and smartphones were each designed by a whole generation of people who never used them at school. Think about it.

                    • Draco T Bastard

                      And the deeper understanding about tech that would come from learning about it sooner would bring about the next generation of tech.

                • greywarbler

                  I just want to chip in and mention here the necessity to learn problem solving, also a sound system of philosophy and ethics as a base to life and all learning, before learning how to play around with instruments of god.

                  Computers in theory can make you all-knowing. How to utilise the information into what context and framework and what system does a human need to keep to, is the most important thing to acquire first.

                  There are so many new things to learn all the time, but what basics are being taught, what sense of history and society-building by those before us is being disseminated and absorbed? How does one set new things in context with the old, and understand them. Tech heads are developing strong personal ethics, ie Aaron Swartz believing in the rightness of open availability of publicly paid for information.

                  But societies need to be built on agreed ethics providing direction, and controls, and that means that time has to be spent on examining philosophical questions not just to be spent on enabling us to be technically competent. What do we understand and do as we reach higher levels of capability using that technical competence?

                  • Draco T Bastard

                    And at no point have I said that any of those things should not be taught.

                  • Foreign waka

                    Agree, what many do not want to accept is, that a computer is just a tool – no more or less. None of the skills and information can be absorbed if a child cannot read. I belief that it is of utmost importance that every child is a competent reader. No guessing words please, this is for stupid people. Soundbites as the one’s in the headlines is not acceptable either. A child needs to be challenged, but then again how many adults are able to do his? Remember the Asian Tiger Mom? Right, this is what the kids will be up against. No amount of rugby will get them by and if this is watered down any further it will be 50% of kids on the poverty line.

              • Brendan

                “I tend to think the schools have got it about right on IT.”

                Strongly disagree. It’s about preparing younger generations for a future increasingly reliant on layers and layers of technology.

                “If a high school student wants to learn some programming they can.”

                Programming is a subset of Computer Science, one of the main benefits of which is teaching people to think better/problem-solve

          • Draco T Bastard 17.2.1.1.2

            Well they do, when the get to University. Those are not basics, they’re part of a computer science degree.

            Did you read my original comment at all? Did you understand it? By not teaching our children as early as possible we’re wasting time teaching them later.

            And, yes, they are the basics.

            Oh, and I’m not anonymous.

            • Colonial Viper 17.2.1.1.2.1

              Sorry draco, teaching children human skills to deal with themselves and with others is far more important than tech crap. Which can be picked up whenever.

            • Rich 17.2.1.1.2.2

              Did you understand it?

              You’re sneering again, Draco.

              And, yes, they are the basics.

              No they’re not.

  18. Ron 18

    Well I liked it and I think it will do the job. It was ‘running with scissor’ production I think?
    Not the Burroughs one either.

    • Rich 18.1

      It was fine. And it was about policy as well. 100,000 houses for the underpaid, more money into education (and I hope they get rid of charter schools after the election) etc etc.

      • Draco T Bastard 18.1.1

        100,000 houses for the underpaid, middle class

        FTFY

        If they were talking about the underpaid getting houses they would have talked about an extra 100 thousand state houses.

        • Rich 18.1.1.1

          The middle class are underpaid now. Auckland is a city where the average house costs 600k or so. If you’re on one middle class income of 60-80k that will not be enough to service the mortgage on that. (about 5k net for a 3,300 monthly mortgage).

          • Colonial Viper 18.1.1.1.1

            And if you’re brown, who have a median wage far under the national median wage of ~$42K pa, you’re basically screwed.

            • Rich 18.1.1.1.1.1

              Yes, exactly, but you don’t have to be brown for that (although it helps). And this in turn often forces you into the hands of unscrupulous lenders so you’re double screwed.

              • Colonial Viper

                It really is a cruel system, one which exists because it is deliberately tolerated (if not tacitly endorsed) by too many.

            • Foreign waka 18.1.1.1.1.2

              Or if you are a women you have to be content with a 30% drop in wages plus being the left foot of your husband once you retire.

          • Draco T Bastard 18.1.1.1.2

            The middle class are underpaid now.

            I think you have the wrong idea about what middles class is. The middle class, pretty much by definition, have enough to live on comfortably including housing. If they can’t afford housing then they aren’t middle class – they’re poor.

            • Rich 18.1.1.1.2.1

              What happened to the intern?

              As ColonelViper said the median income is around 42k. If you’re earning 80k a year I don’t see how you cannot be classified as middle class. But 80k will not pay a mortgage in Auckland and won’t pay it in a few other places as well.

              The middle classes have no fight with the poor, not naturally anyway. If they look up rather than down they will identify the problem.

              • Draco T Bastard

                But 80k will not pay a mortgage in Auckland and won’t pay it in a few other places as well.

                Obviously the income bracket isn’t the best determinant of if you’re poor or not.

                The middle classes have no fight with the poor, not naturally anyway. If they look up rather than down they will identify the problem.

                QFT

  19. cogito 19

    Great opening addresses by both Labour and the Greens…. and a total contrast to the Key sanctimonious monologue. Hope they get the traction they deserve.

    Quite funny how straight after the Key15 minute monologue, the first item on One News Update was about Collins refusing to apologise and resign! Great truth and reality check…. More please.

  20. Brian 20

    Excellent! A positive message about a great team. DC looks ever more the leader every time I see him.

  21. Rodel 21

    An honest message. DC conveys sincerity and Norm Kirk’s integrity. JK fakes both not very well.

    In a simplistic analysis typical of John? Ansell, Labour members were working as a team with ordinary people to achieve something and John Key was trying to sell us a second hand rowing boat or something. Not sure what he was trying to sell- futures maybe?

  22. Pasupial 22

    Wasn’t in the mood for 13:30min long vid on a Saturday night, so only just got around to finishing this video on Sunday morning.

    I thought the overarching theme of rebuilding communities as exemplified in renovation work was effective. Particularly liked the last minute of Cunliffe asking for questions from the public, that should be effective in getting people who might not otherwise go there onto the Labour website to be exposed to election messages.

  23. This was excellent .A welcome return to man and women the better team.
    We have had enough of the one man band .Team Key what a joke there is only onwe person in the team and he suffers with brain lapses . Im looking forward the Cunliffe and Key debate. My money’s on Cunliffe ,

    • David H 23.1

      Yeah but with Hoskins liking the sound of his own voice, and is a know ass kisser, you know that if Cunliffe starts to get on top, he will jump in, so as to break up the flow of things.

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