web analytics

Lucy Lawless to Steven Joyce: ‘U killed NZ film industry’

Written By: - Date published: 2:23 pm, October 25th, 2013 - 103 comments
Categories: business, economy, film, john key, Mining, national, overseas investment, Steven Joyce, sustainability, tv - Tags:

Steven Joyce seemed somewhat complacent in his RNZ interview this morning on Radio NZ. His argument seemed to mirror some of the points I and others made with my post yesterday on NZ’s struggling screen industry.  However, Joyce’s version seemed to be rather a shallow exercise in covering his lack of efforts for the Auckland screen production industry, while failing to offer any well developed, concrete solutions to the problems.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Lucy Lawless doesn’t appear to be that keen on Steven Joyce, judging by her twitter feed, blaming him for the decline of NZ’s film industry.

While Joyce and John Key seem to have been keen to actively intervene to get the sleazy Sky City convention centre-pokie deal, they (and Mayor Len Brown) seem to have neglected Auckland’s once thriving film and TV production. As ad points out, when Bob Harvey was mayor of Waitakere City, he actively promoted the West Auckland studios and locations for filming by local and international companies.  While Key was keen to offer handouts to Warners, they seem to have made far less effort for the Auckland region as a production and filming location.

Unlike the Key government’s support for the Hobbit movies, Joyce is now saying they don’t want to participate in a “race to the bottom” in competing with the bigger government financial incentives now available in countries like Ireland.

RNZ reports:

Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce concedes some television and film production companies are struggling and describes it as a challenging period.

He says the Government is working hard with agencies, including the New Zealand Film Commission, on a long-term solution.

Mr Joyce says Auckland in particular has issues and the Government is in talks with the Auckland Council to look at what it can do over and above the incentives offered by the Government.

Mr Joyce admits it is hard to compete with other countries offering better incentives but told Morning Report the key to making the film industry sustainable is more development and control of local stories.

He says key players such as filmmaker Sir Peter Jackson and producer Robert Tapert, who was behind Spartacus, also need to choose to keep making films here instead of going offshore.

NZ, as a small country and economy does have particular difficulties in developing it’s own screen production industries. This is explained in detail by Tricia Dunleavey and Hester Joyce in their 2012 book, New Zealand Film and Television: Institution, Industry and Cultural Change.  They argue that, unlike some larger countries like Australia and Britain, New Zealand screen industries are more noticeably impacted by the government of the day,

whose influence is exerted not only through the level of public funding that is allocated by supporting this production but also through the priorities for  screen policy that is determined at a cabinet level and enacted by politically-appointed officials. [pp. 19-20]

Furthermore, they argue, that NZ’s small internal market for screen productions means there is a need for a “consistent level of public funding … to insulate production industries from the effects of fluctuation in the general economy, ”and from external economic/financial shocks [p.23]

The authors show how the Clark government re-invigorated NZ’s film industry with both financial incentives for international productions in NZ, and with support for local NZ productions.

Undoubtedly, the NZ screen industries have benefited from the increase in major film and TV productions in NZ, especially those of Peter Jackson and Rob Tapert (the later the prime mover behind productions like Xena, Hercules and Spartacus).  The production of Xena and Hercules in Auckland resulted in significant developments in the industry infrastructure, local up-skilling and international opportunities for Kiwis, beginning in the latter half of the 1990s.  This skill development then fed into the production on the LotR films in Wellington at the turn of the century.

Now the international economic environment has changed, making it harder for the NZ industry to compete internationally.  I wonder if now the NZ industry has become a bit too dependent on big international productions.  From the above linked RNZ report:

Freelance television director Jonathan Brough, who has moved to Melbourne, says the responsibility for making the film industry sustainable lies with the Government.

He says the Government is too reliant on big budget film productions, which will go to the cheapest place to make movies, and that is no business model for an industry.

Mr Brough says changes to legislation are needed which would force broadcasters such as Sky Television to make local programmes, as is the case in Australia.

This directly contradicts claims that key’s government has prioritised production of NZ stories. Furthermore, allowing the internationally-supported Auckland screen production industry to go into decline, without already having something more locally-focused to replace it, reeks of government and Council neglect.

The infrastructure, resourcing and skilled local workforce took over a decade to develop, and will take time to rebuild if it is allowed to continue to wither.  There will continue to be some value from having some international productions in New Zealand, but this needs to be anchored by the development of a much stronger New Zealand funded, locally-focused screen industry.

Some recent tweets from (the real) Lucy Lawless, putting the blame firmly with Joyce:

SJ, u brilliant db, we shot #Xena for 6 yrs in that studio w. a train next door. The film industry is dying coz U killed it. @stevenljoyce

Bryce Pearce asked:

@RealLucyLawless @stevenljoyce Why not get Rob to discuss studio requirements with them Lucy? Evil Dead – warehouse. Spartacus – warehouses

Lawless replied:

He did. He gave them the best advice to keep film rolling and they screwed him over. @Brycepearce @stevenljoyce …

Another production just left NZ for Sth Africa. Film Industry dying, SJ! Why do you love fossil fuels so much? #ClimateChange @stevenljoyce

 John White responded:
SA. What’s that got to do with fossil fuels?
Lucy Lawless tweeted in reply:
@welliejaffa @stevenljoyce Govt policy on tax rebates for NZ film killed all incentive. foreign invest now NIL. Big Tax$ spent wooing BigOil

That last tweet is a little ambiguous, re-what “NZ Film” refers to.  I am very happy for the government providing incentives to prioritise NZ productions over international ones.  However, the bigger focus on wooing Big Oil with tax payer money is not good for NZ’s future. And the focus of the MSM seems to have been more on keeping Avatar here, than on Auckland’s screen failing industry.

I would like to see more concrete evidence of the ways the Key government is (allegedly) supporting NZ made and focused screen productions.

 

103 comments on “Lucy Lawless to Steven Joyce: ‘U killed NZ film industry’”

  1. mickysavage 1

    I heard Joyce’s interview this morning and felt a continuous urge to say “you hypocrite.”

    The Government bent over backward to solve a problem with the Hobbit that did not exist yet is doing nothing when the evidence of a crisis is clear.

    • karol 1.1

      Yes. Agreed micky.

      And Key & Joyce favoured Sky City over Auckland’s screen industry – they seem to pick their favourites.

      btw, is the RNZ audio showing on your browser? It showed when I previewed the post, but on my browsers the post has a message saying I need to download version 9 of audio flash player needed.
      – ah working now.

      • mickysavage 1.1.1

        Yep Safari version 6.

      • FastSage 1.1.2

        RNZ reports: “the Government is working hard with agencies, including the New Zealand Film Commission, on a long-term solution.”

        This is what I call B.S. on. They had a long delayed, over due two-year long Screen Sector Review, heard from people like Rob Tapert during it, and then changed nothing. No forward thinking or strategy came out it, ‘cos they didn’t care or understand that you can make money and jobs out of creative industries as well as oil.

    • Dumrse 1.2

      Hobbit, now there’s a movie title that’s not hard to recognise however, the ” Auckland screen industry” does not ring any bells. Sounds like the latter is on the bludge for some funding so we could rightfully ask for a long hard look at the last 3 or 4 balance sheets so as we can get some idea of where the money will be spent. Looking for handouts seems to suggest there have not been too many financially successful screen productions of late. Unlike the Hobbit.

      • QoT 1.2.1

        If you missed the awesomeness that was four seasons of Spartacus then you’ve only got yourself to blame. Three seasons of Almighty Johnsons? Six seasons of Outrageous Fortune? Bueller?

        • weka 1.2.1.1

          Bueller?

        • McFlock 1.2.1.2

          Spartacus didn’t really rock my world, but they did try to do interesting things with it.

          What actually is “Bueller” (comments above notwithstanding 🙂 )?

          Oh, what was that Neill/Kightly one: “Harry”? That’s definitely on my dvd list.

        • Draco T Bastard 1.2.1.3

          If you missed the awesomeness that was four seasons of Spartacus…

          I don’t think I finished watching the first series. Pretty good but not great.

          • Mike S 1.2.1.3.1

            It seems Spartacus was one of those love it or not so much kinda series. Personally, I thought it was the best TV series I’ve ever watched and was groundbreaking in terms of it’s visual style. Awesome stunts, awesome cast, awesome crew obviously. Getting to see mz LL strut her stuff as a scheming, nasty, oh so sexy baddy was brilliant! I am a wee bit biased but it also was and is extremely popular worldwide. I think it was the number one cable show in the states and possibly the number one downloaded show on the internet at one stage.

            Jupiter’s cock!!

          • QoT 1.2.1.3.2

            It went for four seasons despite having to replace the main actor. It ain’t This is Not My Life which was cruelly cut off after one season, but that speaks to its success.

    • Tim 1.3

      The trouble is Micky, Joyce couldn’t actually give a shit. These people wear such things as badges of honour.
      The only thing they understand is when things begin to hurt personally.

      You’ll see that when there actually is a change of government when you can expect to hear them squeal like stuffed pigs – AND when that happens, I hope like hell that Labour doesn’t get all sorrowful and let them off the hook.

      • Draco T Bastard 1.3.1

        You’ll see that when there actually is a change of government when you can expect to hear them squeal like stuffed pigs – AND when that happens, I hope like hell that Labour doesn’t get all sorrowful and let them off the hook.

        QFT and when that does happen, as it will, Labour and the rest of the Left need to put more pressure on them.

  2. Davidw 2

    Oooh ‘eck, if Lucy Lawless says so, it must be true! I have real difficulty in ascribing believability status to people who have only proven very adept at uttering other peoples’ words – mostly fiction, and exhibiting convincing outward signs of being someone else. That’s just me I suppose.

    • McFlock 2.1

      So that’s why you think Joyce is full of crap.
      What about Lawless?

    • karol 2.2

      I think you’ll find Lawless has done a little more than act.

      Meanwhile, you ignore the other evidence referred to in the post, eg by television director Jonathan Brough? Plus supporting sources that point to the buck stopping wit the government?

      Meanwhile you accept the word of politicians who mouth the words scripted for them by their PR advisers?

      • lprent 2.2.1

        Don’t be so harsh and judgemental about DavidW. Afterall stick figure puppets *like* stick figure political puppets. Neither can see the strings…

      • newsense 2.2.2

        She was the Prime Minister’s personal assistant so I think she knows what she’s talking about guys…

    • emergency mike 2.3

      Wow you’ve got a point Davidw, dem actors make career from acting, why should we listen to anything they say? Especially the hugely experienced and successful ones like Lucy Lawless.

      Politicians like Stephen Joyce on the other hand, we know they’re straight up folk who tell it like it is.

    • Sosoo 2.4

      I’d agree with her. She’s too handy with a sword.

    • Bryce P 2.5

      Ahh, David, you might want to do some research on Lucy’s husband – Rob Tapert. He’s done a few little films and TV series. Nothing big. Just Evil Dead and the like.

      • Kikilia 2.5.1

        Um- Bryce P— In regards to Rob Tapert and the “little films and tv series”…. Xena ring a bell? It’s still a money maker at conventions, what about Hercules, or Spartacus? They were all shot in NZ and brought a lot of work and money to the country.

        The Evil Dead was made before he moved to NZ for his projects…..

  3. Philgwellington Wellington 3

    Xox
    JOYCE and Key have their favourites. Tiwai, Warner Bros, America’s Cup, RWC. Andarko , Fletcher, Sky Channel and SKY TV, etc. What about help for the
    struggling smaller businesses KEY?

  4. Ennui 4

    I really objected to the government donation to the Sainted Peter and Time Warner for the Hobbit. I also really object to the government donating my portion of cash that is taken to provide me with a decent social environment to any other private entity. That includes the film industry. That National choses not to fund the film industry suits me just fine. Give the money to aged care, womens refuge, etc.

    • karol 4.1

      Well, definitely concerns like aged care, women’s refuges, beneficiaries etc should be a priority for government funding. But it should be possible also to set in place the legislation and funding for local screen industry, related to public broadcasting and affordable access to online activities for all Kiwis – it’s the arena for the kind of communications and engagement necessary for democracy to thrive.

      The Dunleavy & Joyce book that I referred to in my post, also explains the reasons for “New Zealand domiciled” or “locally produced” productions which “describe productions whose conception, narratives, financing, development, and completion are centred upon New Zealand culture, creative personnel and institutions.”

      They say up til the 1960s and 1970s, there was pretty much no local NZ screen production. So NZ basically was saturated with US & British images, idioms, stories and values & this continued the Pakeha-dominated colonial legacy & a kind of cultural “malaise”.

      There is a reason why the US government strongly supports measure to maintain their international dominance in screen productions. Part of that is economic, but part is also related to a deliberate campaign for cultural colonisation internationally.

      Since earlier in the 20th century, they have aimed to “soften up” local populations to accepting dominant US values & perspectives by encouraging distribution of Hollywood movies to other countries. First the movies, then entrance of other economic activities into overseas countries. And, they have continued similar practices into the 21st century: in Iraq after the invasion in 2003, they started broadcasting US TV programmes into Baghdad and other areas of Iraq – part of the “winning hearts and minds” initiative.

      Economic and cultural independence for NZ go hand-in-hand.

      • Tat Loo 4.1.1

        Thanks for making explicit note of the importance of propaganda in the control of western opinion, karol. It’s especially easy for the smart and the educated to be manipulated, because they think that they are way too smart and educated to fall for it. Which as every con knows, makes them perfect marks.

        Because of a lack of media coverage, hardly anyone in the west recalls the case of the Al Jazeera cameraman the US imprisoned in Guantanamo Bay for years, primarily because they regarded the news channel as an enemy organisation.

        Of course throughout the Mulsim world, Sami al-Hajj is a household name.

      • Tim 4.1.2

        Dunleavy (if it’s Trish you refer to), is one very smart lady! (although from Natty stock) and hopefully someone who’ll be prepared to participate in the restoration of Public Service broadcasting in NZ when the time is ripe – alongside a couple of her colleagues).
        That lady – along with the likes of Thompson at Vic, and acouple of others of a more technical bent, know exactly what needs to be done to break the back of the destruction of PSB, Freeview, Sky monopoly, Government dept and Quango incompetence and TVNZ gravy-train-riders. (Well almost – she got thoroughly hoodwinked by one nasty little gravy-train rider that’s still a TVNZ trougher).
        Her research is usually impeccable. It’s a BIG shame she hasn’t received more support from some of her colleauges (that’s of course if we’re talking about Trisha Dunleaey)

    • belle 4.2

      “‘ I also really object to the government donating my portion of cash that is taken to provide me with a decent social environment to any other private entity.”‘

      Foreign productions bring multi million dollar budgets. They pay New Zealand workers millions of taxable dollars. They bring money here the government would never had in the first place? How is that spending “your portion of cash”?

        • greywarbler 4.2.1.1

          DTB
          Mmmm… But it’s nothing that you can hold in neat oblongs or circles with special art work.

      • Ennui 4.2.2

        You obviously have zip all grasp on the economics of NZs film industry: TW only agreed to play ball after they and the the Sainted Peter blackmailed the maleable Shonkey to part with tax payers dollars. We the tax payers run a deficit and some privileged few keep employment at the expense of other taxpayers…i.e we transfer the pain, somebody else does not get funding so goes on the dole etc. Meanwhile the taxpayer also lines the pockets of those who profit. Last time I read the papers Treasury stated that the whole thing was a deficit to the taxpayer.

  5. Rich 5

    The argument for pork-barrelling business is usually that it’s “seed money” that will enable the business to take off without government funding in a short while.

    We’ve been doing this for the screen industry for 20+ years, and it hasn’t worked. (It hasn’t worked for tourism or big sport, either).

    Meanwhile, NZ on Air financed thousands hours of film for less than the Hobbit cost – NZ created stories, not a US-oriented adaptation of an old English book.

    If government stuck to funding things for the benefit of New Zealanders on a sensible basis, rather than pouring dollars into the pockets of foreign multinationals, it would create jobs and benefit everyone.

    • FastSage 5.1

      Um… Peter Jackson is the result of Film Commission “seed money”. Seems like a good pay-off to me. Weta Digital was in the Herald this morning as a $140m annual revenue company.

      • karol 5.1.1

        I agree that Weta Digital has been the big success story resulting from Jackson’s international productions. And it is areas of digital creativity that the NZ government should be investing for the future.

        • FastSage 5.1.1.1

          Agreed. Yet (I’m told), digital animation rebates are more out of touch with international trends than film and video games (the growth area) are completely excluded.

          • karol 5.1.1.1.1

            Interesting, FastSage. Can you explain that more, please?

            Like how can NZ produced digital animations & video games be encouraged and supported?

            • FastSage 5.1.1.1.1.1

              (Done my homework, see http://www.mch.govt.nz/screensector-review)
              After 2 years of navel gazing in July the govt announced:
              17.3 That the qualifying expenditure threshold for short-form animation be lowered
              from $1 million to $0.4 million per hour.
              17.4 That animation productions have joint access to NZ On Air, Te Mangai Pāho and
              Screen Production Incentive Fund funding.

              Spending $1m/per hour of TV on animation before you can access the rebate would require Pixar-quality animation and meant no local animation studios could use the rebate that was intended for them. So: National Govt inaction meant we had 5+ years of animation studios not even being able to access their supposed support. And I hear that the current $400k/per hour rate is unrealistic also, especially combined with the $NZD.

              Also, see how there were all these ‘silos’, which is an out-dated view of things. The Screen Production Incentive Fund criteria specifically exclude computer games. They don’t even have 1 silo.

              My answer: create a fund that encourages original IP for international audiences but owned by Kiwis, in addition to the existing funds to tell local stories for NZers, and for NZers to work on overseas productions. It would be for film, TV, animation and games. It amazes me that this doesn’t exist.

              • karol

                Excellent. Thanks, FastSage, I’ve saved it for future reference.

                What is “IP”?

                • Tat Loo

                  Intellectual Property

                  • karol

                    Ah, Thanks, Tat. I kept reading it as Internet Provider.

                    • Draco T Bastard

                      I do things like that as well. I always read “TS” as TeamSpeak.

                    • Tim

                      And everytime I see a van (such as) with “J.P. Wally & Sons – shopfitters”, I read shopLIFTERS. It’s a sign of the times.
                      We should avoid acronyms – its really very neo-lib – part of the agenda to fool and deceive.
                      SDLC – is it Synchronous Data Link Control? or is is Systems Development Life Cycle? – or has yet some other meaning been applied?

                      The neo-libs LERV the potential ambiguity ….. and nine times out of ten its just as quick to say the actually meaning than it is the acronym.
                      IP – Internet Provider
                      IP – Intellectual Property

                      They’re all acronyms designed for lack of specificity and for ambiguity.

                      IT …. now ‘so last century’!!!. Now has to be ICT I think.
                      Same shit, different stink.
                      Still, I ‘spose a few people earned a few grand kicking in the buzz (while a few others starved, one or two Bangladeshies got crushed, and a Nat polly or two convinced themselves how important and how much power they had).

                    • Francis

                      I generally us “copyright” since, for the most part, it covers it. You could also add in “trademarks” too, I guess.

                      Never liked the term “Intellectual Property”, besides “IP” standing for a heap of other terms, it implies property rights (ugh) of an intangible object and lumps several relatively unrelated concepts together (trademarks, copyright, and patients usually).

                      EDIT: Throw in “Internet Protocol” as another ambiguity of “IP” (as in Internet Protocol address)

                    • Draco T Bastard

                      Never liked the term “Intellectual Property”, besides “IP” standing for a heap of other terms, it implies property rights (ugh) of an intangible object

                      Which, of course, is it’s purpose. Just another part of the neo-liberal paradigm subtly changing our language and thus our culture.

              • karol

                This looks like a success story: Reservoir Hill, developed and delivered as an Online series for the TVNZ website, the rights have been sold to a Swedish TV company for a remake, plus it’s being developed into a film by the NZ Film Commission.

        • Mike S 5.1.1.2

          Rob Tapert has employed more Kiwis than Weta ever will. The wage bill alone for Spartacus was 90 million dollars.

    • karol 5.2

      Yes, I agree that their should be a priority on smaller budget NZ movies. The Dunleavy & Joyce book also points to the successes of the NZ Film Production Fund, set up under the Clark government in 2000. By 2009 it had contributed to the production of the following films:

      Whale Rider
      Perfect Strangers
      Perfect Creature
      River Queen
      The World’s Fastest Indian
      The Ferryman
      The Vintner’s Luck
      Boy
      Two Little Boys

      But since then it has been short of funds, partly due to the GFC, and probably also due to the change to Key’s government – according to Dunleavy & Joyce.

      • FastSage 5.2.1

        Yeah, but if we want a sustainable (read, self-funding) screen sector, instead we need NZ not to fund The Hobbit but to own something the equivalent of The Hobbit. Whale Rider only made US$41m (according to Wikipedia).

        The best attempts at this I can see are The Wots Wots, Jane and The Dragon (Richard Taylor is involved in both of these two) and Buzzy Bee. They’re global in appeal, but are based on what were originally NZ works. Then you get the show, the toy, the game app, the ebook, the royalties and a long-term brand.

        Ironically, these are all children’s TV shows – exactly what a public broadcaster should be funding so we have NZ stories for NZ kids, yet they can be commercialised internationally. The ABC in Australia do this well too, with shows like Bananas in Pyjamas. Check out http://kidsonscreen.co.nz/

        Maybe we can have public broadcasting and commercial outcomes at the same time?

        • tc 5.2.1.1

          Yup, easy. Hope across the tasman and look at their ABC which now sits 3rd in the 5 networks on audience share as the major footy codes have completed their seasons.

          You could also look back to when TVNZ made alot of money onselling its kiddult shows like ABC does now.

          Its just another example of the blighted future under neolib MO, like Hillside and telco etc one more industry been sent packing either by action or inaction.

  6. Draco T Bastard 6

    Freelance television director Jonathan Brough, who has moved to Melbourne, says the responsibility for making the film industry sustainable lies with the Government.

    Yeah, because the private sector won’t. They’ll just go the cheapest route which means importing foreign shows.

    • karol 6.1

      Yes, due to economies of scale, the US can produce of lot of screen product (that looks slick but may, or may not have great quality) a lot more cheaply than by NZ companies. That’s why co-productions with other countries in the region (Aussie, South East Asia) may be a better option than encouraging US and European companies to film here.

      • Draco T Bastard 6.1.1

        Yes, due to economies of scale, the US can produce of lot of screen product (that looks slick but may, or may not have great quality) a lot more cheaply than by NZ companies.

        They don’t make it any cheaper, they sell it to far more TV channels which means that they can sell it cheaper while making similar, if not more, profit. NZ could do the same, make it here and then sell it around the world and the price on the market would be about the same as the US shows. Private investors won’t do that though – they’ll just look at the shows already available, decide that it’s too risky to make new shows here and then import decimating the local industry.

        This is why I say that the government needs to step in with full funding.

  7. Richard Christie 7

    Unlike the Key government’s support for the Hobbit movies, Joyce is now saying they don’t want to participate in a “race to the bottom”

    humph, very rich as that’s the rationale behind all of neolib’s labour market and social policy.

  8. VFX Soldier 8

    I’ve written heavily about the subsidy race in the film industry. In order to compete, NZ has to give the US studios more money than other countries. NZ has given $411M since 2008.

    So my challenge to you: How much money would NZ have to give to US studios in one year to beat Canada? Is there any limit to the amount to give away? NZ is a relatively small country compared to others in competition.

    • Tat Loo 8.1

      “How much” $$$ to give away is one issue, yes. However, there also has to be a longer term comprehensive plan than just a subsidy race to the bottom (although part of a longer term plan could be short term participation in that subsidy race to help establish more expertise and infrastructure). Anything else isn’t sustainable.

      The big studios are of course professional experts at setting off bidding wars between nations. They aren’t our friends and they have no loyalties, apart from to their own margins.

    • Draco T Bastard 8.2

      And for that $411m we could have produced our own movie using full NZ actors, writers, audio and sound production and then sold it worldwide and made a decent profit. Hell, for that price, we could probably have made two or three of them.

    • Ad 8.3

      Good question.
      Instead why not subsidise industry that is spatially fixed and not completely globally fluid like screen industry is?
      A: it’s precisely because fixed industries can’t leave that you don’t have to support them as much as globally fluid ones
      B: globally fluid industries tend to require creative, specialised, highly paid people. They are the ones that change economies fastest and best.
      C: the interventionist point is to strive to attract industry capital to partner, and make less mobile, and make them interdependent with society. Creative industries I’ve observed really get that more than many others.

    • Bryce P 8.4

      You don’t have to give more but you need to be in the ballpark. The rest of the tempting comes down to locations / crew etc.

  9. cricklewood 9

    If I was been cynical the industry is dead/dying because we make to much shit TV that no one wants to watch… Sure production here costs but as in many industries if you produce a high quality product the cost isn’t much of an issue…

    • karol 9.1

      NZ does produce good stuff, but we need more, and it needs to be promoted well.

      Actually, I think there’s a cycle that needs to be broken. The US media corporations spend a lot of time promoting their screen products. Many Kiwis that are Internet connected, tend to look to the US as having the “best” programmes – you only need to look at web sites like Throng NZ to see how they salivate over the published line up for the latest seasons of US series when they first get published.

      And NZ TV schedules tend to follow that line too. But there’s a much more diverse lot of TV and movies and web series coming out of various countries all over the globe. I have watched programmes and/or and/or web series films from Japan, South Korea, France, Germany, South American countries, Canada, etc, that never get shown here, but have strong international support, albeit sometimes with niche audiences.

      I rate NZ’s Blue Rose, and there are some very good Aussie series showing on NZ Freeview TV. But often they can be on late night, and require a digital recorder. Maori TV also shows some very good movies and TV series from various countries, but many people don’t even think of watching that channel.

    • Mike S 9.2

      shit TV such as? …….

  10. Nick K 10

    The high $NZD has nothing to do with it aye.

    • Tat Loo 10.1

      So you agree that the NZ$ is currently too high?

      Good to know. Let’s get a Labour/Greens Government prepared to do something about that.

      • BM 10.1.1

        That’s going to be easy.
        Just getting elected will wipe about 30% off the value of the Kiwi dollar.

        • McFlock 10.1.1.1

          One can only hope.

          • BM 10.1.1.1.1

            Really?, I’m sure all those voters will be stoked to see their cost of living go through the roof.

            • McFlock 10.1.1.1.1.1

              well, at east they’ll have jobs.
              Because our exporters will make a killing.

              Hell, we might even start making stuff again.

              • BM

                Yes, all these jobs will just appear overnight and everyone will be happy, especially the little pixies.

                Happy times for all

                • McFlock

                  It wouldn’t happen overnight, but it would happen.

                  We have:
                  rich natural resources, most of them renewable
                  A culture of improvisation, creativity, invention, and innovation
                  fucking awesome scenery

                  This fucking screams “massive export advantage”.

                  The two things holding us back are:
                  a national govt that serves finance companies, not manufacturers
                  a dollar artificially inflated by the above

            • Tat Loo 10.1.1.1.1.2

              Offset by shitloads more jobs, movie industry contracts, and more onshore manufacturing. I guess a few people in the top 5% might be miffed that their dollar doesn’t buy as much on their European ski tour.

      • Dumrse 10.1.2

        How do you plan doing that? Will you get Russel to crank up the printing presses?

  11. lindsay 11

    What’s Joyce thinking of when he says that Peter Jackson needs to choose making films here. Peter has been doing this for 25 years. Joyce hasn’t noticed?.

    • karol 11.1

      I guess Joyce is saying Tapert and Jackson should “choose” to film in NZ even when competitive financial incentives are not on offer.

      Lawless’s tweets indicate that Tapert tried to negotiate so that it would be viable to film his latest project in NZ. She tweet that Tapert,

      He gave them the best advice to keep film rolling and they screwed him over.

    • QoT 11.2

      There’s also a coded threat: “we have to make whatever accommodations Peter Jackson demands or he’ll throw a tanty and take his film home.”

  12. Ennui 12

    This whole column seems in contradiction with where we were at when Shonkey gave away our dollars to TW plus when Richard taylor made mockery of Labour day leading an anti union march.

    • karol 12.1

      The main issue here is about how to save an industry – or at least the Auckland region part of it – rather than how to get a higher subsidy for one production that was always going to be filmed here, plus to change employment law to suit a US corporate.

      The most significant issue here is how to make a sustainable industry that works best for NZ, economically and culturally.

      • Tat Loo 12.1.1

        Correct. The whole Hobbit/Peter Jackson saga was centred around tax payer subsidies of corporate and personal super profits. What we are trying to do here is find a pathway ahead for a diverse, locally self sustaining industry ready to nurture the next generation of creative New Zealand talent.

        And notice how subsidising the Hobbit/Peter Jackson to the tune of millions has had no positive long term impact on the situation we see now in Auckland. That’s what we need to avoid.

        • greywarbler 12.1.1.1

          Tat
          That’s so true that the subsidy was only good for one use and now we’re empty again.. But what can be done immediately to stop companies breaking up? NACT are good at one off showpieces. Now Labour has to find a way to pick up the pieces now the show has moved on. And apparently it has now

          And Ennui all our creative innovative industries need some sort of subsidy. It is hard enough for them to get the chance to come up with new clever stuff. Then the beefy ox faces look at them with the words ‘Is this good for me’ going through their minds like ticker tape. We have to support them like tender plants which we will be able to eat later.

      • Ennui 12.1.2

        The aim of “saving” the industry is laudable. Which other industry will pick up the bill via tax transfers? Which other workers will be out of a job because government “picks” a winner and cant subsidise somebody else? We just cant go on expecting the tax payer to pick up the cost of unsustainable unprofitable enterprises at the expense of others.

        • Tat Loo (CV) 12.1.2.1

          Look at the Singapore Government’s current massive investment in biotech enterprises.

          And the Australian government has just announced it is putting AU$112.6M into a new biotechnology venture capital fund (to match the same sum from the private sector).

          Mariana Mazzucato has done a lot of work in this area i.e. “the entrepreneurial state”. Building brand new industries and technologies usually takes a lot of government time and money; the eventual pay back to the country needs to be in financial, social and cultural terms, as well as an industry which is self-sustaining and successful on it’s own terms.

  13. BrucetheMoose 13

    Never mind. They might as well continue, as they have been successful at slowly killing plenty of other establishments during their term. Worker’s rights and wages, the nation’s environment protection, education sector, the erosion of the country’s fundamental democratic processes, New Zealander’s privacy, Christchurch.

  14. Sable 14

    Seems no one likes these arseholes save a few sad old Tory die hards like Shitelands, King Pong and the rest. Even Lawless is applying her boot to Joyce’s fat ass and good job too.

  15. rich the other 15

    lucy and her lot are getting what they deserve .
    Money to support anything in our community must be earned .
    Lucy and her deranged green extreme mates are against most things that generate revenue .
    Attacks on farming , mining , oil and gas , motor way construction etc etc are real examples of the destructive negative attitudes these people have, they want to stop real money making ventures yet still want a hand out.
    It’s time this lot woke up , money doesn’t grow on trees .

    • karol 15.1

      Almost reads like a parody, but not a very original one.

    • Tat Loo (CV) 15.2

      It’s time this lot woke up , money doesn’t grow on trees .

      In fact, you are absolutely correct.

      Today, money is in fact generated out of thin air (“ex nihilo”) using computer keystrokes, and digitally credited to electronic accounts. A hundred million, a billion, a hundred billion dollars can therefore be created in seconds, at no cost.

      No trees need to be involved, or need to be turned into currency paper for printing, for this to happen. Hope this satisfactorily explains to you “where money comes from.”

    • Sable 15.3

      Just look at the losses National has incurred from its asset sales alone and its not hard to see what brand of fool votes for these idiots.

  16. Vanessa 16

    For all the fuss and blow bagging the Hobbit caused at the time of Shonkee wanting to rub shoulders with Hollowood when they had the ‘big boy secret squirrel signing of the Warner Bros tax break thingy’, the film itself was boring, and so uninteresting, after ten minutes I thought, “hurry up”, then I thought (about the story and characters) “who cares, then I fell.. That said, Shonkee is and will only ever be interested in putting his hand in when and where there is ‘big money’… even if its ‘blood money’. Look at his back ground and where he’s come from. His whole working life is geared around setting up business situations thru dodgy loopholes so that he and his stockholders can rake in someone else’s money. And so what he has shown us over the last few years has exposed him as being ’emotionally, spiritually and compassionately unintelligent’. Where are NZ’s other choices in leadership. Why do we not have other strong options in leadership. Surely to god we can come up with a hand full of people that are better, stronger, wiser than Shonkee. Come on you fullas step up to the base stop hiding and being humble, we need you to come forward and take charge away from these ‘sandpit truants’.

  17. Sophie 17

    After working on both PJ and Rob Tapert projects I know for a fact this is BS! “He says key players such as filmmaker Sir Peter Jackson and producer Robert Tapert, who was behind Spartacus, also need to choose to keep making films here instead of going offshore.” This is absurd, he has no idea what he is talking about. Both are continuing/trying to keep projects here!!!

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • National’s cuts shave $100K off KiwiSaver by retirement
    New analysis shows National’s constant cuts to KiwiSaver will reduce the average worker’s retirement savings by $100,000 over their working life, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “The former Labour Government launched KiwiSaver nine years ago today to boost ...
    1 day ago
  • TPK struggles to measure Whānau Ora outcomes
    The Government needs to explain why so many vulnerable whanau are falling through the cracks, Labour’s Whānau Ora spokesperson Nanaia Mahuta says. The Minister of Māori Development Te Ururoa Flavell attended the Māori Affairs Select Committee to highlight “gains” – ...
    1 day ago
  • EY: TPP stamp duties on foreigners may have to apply to Kiwis
    The Government’s claim that a TPP-enabled tax on foreign buyers would amount to a ban has been exposed as folly by tax experts, who say that in most cases a tax would apply to Kiwi buyers too, says Labour’s Trade ...
    2 days ago
  • Project 300 short on facts
    A Minister’s pet scheme to employ 300 disabled people in Christchurch seems to be short on facts, says Labour’s Disability Issues spokesperson Poto Williams.  “Nicky Wagner cannot provide solid evidence to show that her much vaunted Project 300 has actually ...
    2 days ago
  • Who are they going to call?
    A cry for help from New Zealand’s longest-running crisis line highlights chronic underfunding of the sector by the Government, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. “Lifeline is THE go-to helpline for people in crisis, taking up to 180,000 calls each ...
    3 days ago
  • Five months too long for homeless to wait
    New figures revealing homeless people registered with Work and Income are waiting an average of 155 days to be housed shows the Government is totally overwhelmed by the housing crisis, Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni says. “What’s worse is ...
    3 days ago
  • Minister in cloud cuckoo land
    Hekia Parata needs a very big reality check if she truly believes every parent has the choice of sending their child to a private school, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. Questioned in the House today about plans to pump ...
    3 days ago
  • Convention centre failure means years of uncertainty for CBD
    The failure of Gerry Brownlee’s planned convention centre deal leaves Christchurch facing uncertainty about when activity will be restored to the CBD, says Labour’s Canterbury spokesperson Megan Woods. “As one of the CBD’s major anchor projects, the convention centre complex ...
    3 days ago
  • PCE proves water quality still deteriorating
    The PCE State of the Environment Report shows that river water quality is continuing to get worse across large parts of New Zealand, says Labour’s Environment and Water spokesperson David Parker. “Water quality has deteriorated in Canterbury, Central Otago, Auckland, ...
    3 days ago
  • Families with new babies victims of today’s veto
    Families with new babies are the victims of an historical “first” for the New Zealand Parliament today. “For the first time ever, a Bill will have a third reading debate and no vote will be taken at the end because ...
    3 days ago
  • Crime on the rise…again!
    The Police Minister’s contention that Police have enough resources to meet the expectations of New Zealand communities is not reflected in the Police’s own statistics, says Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart Nash.  “Yet again, reported burglaries have increased in every region ...
    4 days ago
  • Private schools beneficiaries of extra cash
    Plans to give more taxpayer money to private schools at a time when state schools are struggling to make ends meet says everything about the National Government’s twisted priorities, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “Not only did this year’s ...
    4 days ago
  • Inequality getting worse under National
    Inequality is getting worse under National with almost 60 per cent of the wealth in this country concentrated in the hands of the top 10 per cent according to Statistics NZ figures released today, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. ...
    4 days ago
  • Government freezes elderly out of insulation subsidy
    Government cuts to the Warm Up New Zealand insulation subsidy means it will now only be available for rental properties and could leave many elderly homeowners cold this winter, Opposition Leader Andrew Little says. “In this year’s Budget the Government ...
    5 days ago
  • Shewan report delivers rebuke to National
    John Shewan’s report into foreign trusts is a rebuke to John Key and the National Party who have protected an industry that has damaged New Zealand’s reputation, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Three years ago the Inland Revenue Department ...
    5 days ago
  • Auckland Airport rail analysis must be made public
    The Government should publicly release its detailed analysis of rail to Auckland Airport before it closes off options, so the public can have an informed debate, says Labour’s Auckland Issues spokesperson Phil Twyford. The Transport Agency today said it is ...
    5 days ago
  • Minister approved OIO consent despite death and investigations
    Louise Upston must say if she knew Intueri was being prosecuted for the death of a student and under a funding investigation when she approved its overseas investment consent to buy another education provider, says Labour’s Land Information and Associate ...
    6 days ago
  • Brexit vote costs NZ effective EU voice
    Despite being extremely close the result of the referendum in Britain reflects the majority voice, Labour’s Foreign Affairs spokesperson David Shearer says. “While we respect the decision to leave the EU, it goes without saying the move will usher in ...
    1 week ago
  • Pasifika Education Centre doomed
    The Pasifika Education Centre appears doomed to close down this December, says Labour’s Pacific Island Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio  “In a written question I asked the Minister whether he would put a bid in for more money. His answer ...
    1 week ago
  • Onetai Station review a shameful whitewash
    A report released today on the Overseas Investment Office’s (OIO) good character test is a whitewash that does nothing to improve New Zealand’s overseas investment regime, says Labour’s Land Information spokesperson David Cunliffe. “The review of the good character test ...
    1 week ago
  • We need a national strategy to end homelessness now
    Long before I entered Parliament, housing and homelessness were issues dear to my heart. I know from personal experience just how hard it is to find an affordable home in Auckland. In my maiden speech, I talked about how when ...
    GreensBy Marama Davidson
    1 week ago
  • Capital feels a chill economic wind
      Wellington is on the cusp of recession with a sharp fall in economic confidence in the latest Westpac McDermott Miller confidence survey, says Labour’s Regional Development spokesperson David Clark.  “Economic confidence amongst Wellingtonians has dropped 12% in the past ...
    1 week ago
  • Dive school rort took six years to dredge up
    News that yet another private training establishment (PTE) has rorted the Government’s tertiary funding system since 2009 shows that Steven Joyce has no control of the sector, says Labour’s Associate Education (Tertiary) spokesperson David Cunliffe. “Like Agribusiness Training and Taratahi, ...
    1 week ago
  • National’s housing crisis hitting renters hard
    National’s ongoing housing crisis is causing massive rental increases, with Auckland renters being hit the hardest, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    1 week ago
  • A Day with the PSA
    This week, along with Labour MP Kris Faafoi, I accepted an invitation to spend a day working alongside the good folk at the Public Service Association in Wellington. As the Workplace Relations and Safety spokesperson for the Greens, I was ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche
    1 week ago
  • A Day with the PSA
    This week, along with Labour MP Kris Faafoi, I accepted an invitation to spend a day working alongside the good folk at the Public Service Association in Wellington. As the Workplace Relations and Safety spokesperson for the Greens, I was ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche
    1 week ago
  • Government holds Northland back
    New information shows Northland remains the most economically depressed region in New Zealand, says Labour’s Regional Development spokesperson David Clark. “The latest Westpac McDermott Miller regional survey found that more Northlanders believe their local economy will deteriorate this year than ...
    1 week ago
  • Rebstock report into MFAT leaks a disgrace
    An Ombudsman’s report on the Paul Rebstock investigation into MFAT leaks shows the two diplomats at the centre of the case were treated disgracefully, says Labour’s State Services spokesperson Kris Faafoi.  “The Ombudsman says one of the diplomats Derek Leask ...
    1 week ago
  • More families forced to turn to food banks for meals
    Increasing numbers of families are having to go to food banks just to put a meal on the table, according to a new report that should shame the Government into action, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni. ...
    1 week ago
  • We have a housing emergency in New Zealand
    Auckland, New Zealand, where house prices have risen 20 percent in the last year alone We have a housing emergency in New Zealand.  Like many people we are ashamed and angry that in a wealthy country like ours, we have ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage
    1 week ago
  • We have a housing emergency in New Zealand
    Auckland, New Zealand, where house prices have risen 20 percent in the last year alone We have a housing emergency in New Zealand.  Like many people we are ashamed and angry that in a wealthy country like ours, we have ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage
    1 week ago
  • Aussie reforms signal trouble ahead for school funding plan
    Plans by the Government to return to bulk funding are likely to see increased class sizes and schools most in need missing out on much-needed resources, Labour’s Acting Education spokesperson Grant Robertson says. “The signaled return to bulk funding is ...
    1 week ago
  • Toxic Sites – the down low on the go slow
    In  2011, I negotiated an agreement with the National Government to advance work on cleaning up contaminated sites across the country. This included establishing a National Register of the ten worst sites where the creators of the problem could not ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    1 week ago
  • Aucklanders face new motorway tax of up to $2500 a year
    The Government wants to tax Aucklanders thousands of dollars a year just to use the motorway network, says Labour’s Auckland Issues spokesperson Phil Twyford. “Officials estimate the average city commute is 11.8km. This means for the average Aucklander commuting five ...
    1 week ago
  • 15 corrupt bank managers identified in student fraud
    New information show 15 bank managers in India have been identified by Immigration New Zealand as presenting fraudulent documents on behalf of foreign students studying here, Labour’s Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway says. “Documents obtained by Labour under the Official Information ...
    2 weeks ago
  • National leaves Kiwi savers the most vulnerable in OECD
    News last week that Israel’s Finance Minister will insure savers’ bank deposits means New Zealand will be left as the only country in the OECD that has no deposit insurance to protect savers’ funds should a bank fail. Most Kiwis ...
    GreensBy James Shaw
    2 weeks ago
  • Comprehensive plan for future of work needed
    A Massey University study showing many New Zealanders are unaware of the increasing role of automation in their workplace, highlights the need for a comprehensive plan for the future of work, says Grant Robertson, Chair of Labour’s Future of Work ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Another National Government failure: 90 day work trials
    On Friday last week, the Treasury released a report by MOTU economic consultants into the effectiveness of the controversial 90-day work trial legislation. The report found that there was “no evidence that the policy affected the number of hires by ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche
    2 weeks ago
  • Iraq mission extension case not made
    The Prime Minister has not made the case for extending the Iraq deployment another 18 months nor the expansion of their mission, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little.  “Labour originally opposed the deployment because the Iraqi Army’s track record was poor, ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Denial is a long river
    William Rolleston from Federated Farmers made the absurd claim on RNZ on Saturday that “we actually have very clean rivers”. This statement doesn’t represent the many farmers who know water quality is in big trouble and are working to clean ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    2 weeks ago
  • Denial is a long river
    William Rolleston from Federated Farmers made the absurd claim on RNZ on Saturday that “we actually have very clean rivers”. This statement doesn’t represent the many farmers who know water quality is in big trouble and are working to clean ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    2 weeks ago
  • Melanoma deaths could be avoided by an early access scheme
      The tragic death of Dunedin’s Graeme Dore from advanced Melanoma underlines the cruelty of this Government in promising a treatment but delaying for months, says Labour’s Health Spokesperson Annette King.  “Graeme was diagnosed with Melanoma last year. He used ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Assessing the Defence White Paper
    The Government’s recently released Defence White Paper has raised questions again about New Zealand’s defence priorities, and in particular the level and nature of public funding on defensive capabilities. The Green Party has a longstanding belief that priority must be ...
    GreensBy Kennedy Graham
    2 weeks ago
  • Kiwis’ confidence drops again: Economy needs a boost
    Westpac’s consumer confidence survey has fallen for the seventh time in nine quarters, with middle income households ‘increasingly worried about where the economy is heading over the next few years’, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “This survey is a ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Relocation grant simply kicks can down the road
    The response by state house tenants and social agencies to the Government’s rushed plan to shift families out of Auckland tells us what we already knew – this is no answer to the chronic housing shortage, Opposition Leader Andrew Little ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Peace hīkoi to Parihaka
    On Friday a Green crew walked with the peace hīkoi from Ōkato to Parihaka. Some of us were from Parliament and some were party members from Taranaki and further afield. It was a cloudy but gentle day and at one ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    2 weeks ago
  • Children’s Commissioner right to worry about CYF transition
    The Government must listen to the Children’s Commissioner’s concerns that young people under CYF care could be ‘negatively impacted’ as the new agency’s reforms become reality, says Labour’s Children’s spokesperson Jacinda Ardern. “Dr Russell Wills has used the second annual ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Bill English exaggerates PPL costs to justify veto
    The Finance Minister has used trumped-up costings to justify a financial veto against parents having 26 weeks paid parental leave, says Labour MP Sue Moroney. “Bill English’s assertion on RNZ yesterday that the measure would cost an extra $280 million ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government must refund overcharged motorists
    Labour is calling on the Government to refund motor registration fees to three-quarters of a million Kiwi motorists whose vehicles were wrongly classified under National’s shambolic ACC motor vehicle risk rating system, Labour’s ACC spokesperson Sue Moroney says.“Minister Kaye’s ridiculous ...
    2 weeks ago
  • 90-day work trials an unfair failure which must change
    A new Treasury report shows the Government’s 90-day trials haven’t helped businesses and are inherently unfair, Labour’s Workplace Relations spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway says. “The Motu report found that 90-day trial periods had no impact on overall employment and did not ...
    2 weeks ago

Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere