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Media Watch: infotainment & “balance” – inequality

Written By: - Date published: 10:01 am, January 30th, 2014 - 53 comments
Categories: babies, capitalism, child welfare, class war, cost of living, david cunliffe, david shearer, education, election 2014, greens, labour, news, same old national, welfare - Tags: ,

The infotainment, ratings/sales driven basis of our news media, results in the skewing of political news in various ways: whether or not such skewing is intentional.  One of the things the MSM does with this “neoliberal”-supporting approach to news, is to focus on human interest stories.  Following the party leaders State of the Nation speeches, inequality is currently the main focus.

labour-education-inequality

So, in an apparent attempt at “balanced” coverage of the Labour Party’s Best Start policy, Simon Collins has compared the responses of two couples to the policy: article entitled ‘Labour’s baby bonus: a waste or a boon’.  Simon Collins has written a lot of well considered, fair, and knowledgeable articles about social policies.  However, this one provides a comparison, that while stark, skews the playing field in some unstated ways.

It looks like this is an attempt to compare a relatively high income couple with a couple on a low income, both with young children. The article doesn’t claim the two couples are representative of others in the same income brackets. Nevertheless, in the current context where the income inequality gap is center stage, they will most likely be understood as representative of all the “haves” and “have nots”.

However, neither couple is truly representative of either end of the income inequality spectrum.

The female half of the high earning couple is far from representative, although she may be representative of some of the 1%er  wannabes: Jane Siloway Smith is a high earning woman in an economy where the average female income is lower than that for the average male; and she works for the right wing, anti-welfare think tank, the Maxim Institute. The last two posts on the Maxim’s website blog are:

20-01-014: Jeremy Vargo praising National’s (alleged) education policy, as mentioned in John Key’s State of the Nation speech last week.

24-01-14: Jane Siloway Smith giving praise to some minor statement from David Shearer – a long with a backhander to Labour.  Ignoring Labour and the Greens’ SON speeches, Siloway Smith focuses on Shearer’s private members Bill aiming to feed children in schools.  Siloway Smith refers to an op ed by David Shearer of 20 January 2014.  She claims Shearer is doing a major U Turn with respect to his Bill. Siloway Smith claims that this means Shearer is agreeing with her that welfare is a bad thing. Shearer is NOT arguing against such welfare, but is saying this needs to be coupled with policies aimed at ending poverty in the long term.

In his op ed, Shearer says that his Bill is a start, but that he also wants to include some provisions aiming for long term self sufficiency.  This will include education on nutrition and the acquisition of practical  gardening skills.

Back to Simon Collins’ article.

Dr Jane Silloway Smith, research manager at the conservative Maxim Institute, and her scientist husband Dr Bryan Smith between them earn just under the $150,000 threshold that Labour has set for its proposed child payment for the first year after a new baby is born.

The Smiths, who came here from the United States in 2008, say they would be grateful for the extra $60 a week, but they could do without it.

Not suprisingly, given Siloway Smith’s views on welfare, she is opposed to Labour’s Best Start policy (though supports Paid Parental Leave).  In the course of her comments she manages to get a few words in praising the fact that the economy is (supposedly) heading in the right direction.

There is a quote from Ardern saying that, if this couple is opposed to the Best Start payment, they don’t have to apply for it.

The second couple are are both of the middle class and part of the precariat: Dr Barnett has been made redundant from lecturing at UNITEC, and her partner, Francois Byamana, is an actor and musician.  This couple, though well qualified and with skills and experience, are sometimes in need of social security payments.

The article does, however, show that they are huge differences in lifestyles in New Zealand, and describes the realities of low income living. However, it focuses on the struggles of a couple with more options than many who live on low incomes for long periods.

On the other hand, Bryce Edward’s Wednesday round up of articles and blog posts on the inequality, election focused debates, does give a pretty full coverage of the range of arguments.  The round up ends with reference to Greg Presland’s “pushback” against the criticisms of Labour in two Standard posts.

David Cunliffe state of the nation

These are among two articles, that show that Labour (and to a lesser extent, The Greens), have so far set the agenda for this year’s election.

Turei children

The Maxim blogs in contrast, are doing their best to ignore this as Key tries desperately to regain his momentum through some flag waving.

Meanwhile, the majority of potential voters are more likely to read Collins’ article; that’s if they don’t just watch the even more highly infotainment skewed coverage of the 6pm TV news.

 

 

53 comments on “Media Watch: infotainment & “balance” – inequality”

  1. Molly 1

    A couple of thoughts looking at the article.

    The framing, style and background of the photos reinforces the tone of the article.

    Despite the broad mention of income for the first couple, the second couple provides more detail on where the money is spent including $445 for rent. Would it have been too much for the journalist to ask the same detail of the Smiths?

    Auckland housing is notoriously expensive – if you are mortgage free – then you have quite a substantial cushion against financial woes. If you have the use of a company car, or access to Airpoints from business travel – these too provide benefits unavailable to many wage earners.

    “She has a second baby due in April and plans to take six months off this time – 14 weeks on taxpayer-funded paid parental leave, part of the remaining time on leave paid by Maxim, and several weeks unpaid.

    Dr Silloway Smith supports paid parental leave, but she said the Government had a limited budget and giving her family $60 a week would be “a waste of money”.

    Dr Smith benefits from a generous employer – and doesn’t consider their extra maternity leave payments a waste of money for them – even though maternity and early childhood care are not part of their mission. However, she applies this description to our government – where it is one of their core functions.

    Also, working for this think tank – as a research manager – you would assume that she would know that policy works in broad brushstrokes and will always have those on the fringe who are included or miss out.

    • newsense 1.1

      Surely the equivalent in the US is a bit like asking Karl Rove if he is going to get anything out of Obamacare?

      not sure if Baby bonus is bs it has been popular in Aussie…

  2. Bill 2

    Nice one. Also maybe worth pointing out the use of the term ‘dosh’ in the secondary header? Lot’s of connotations to that term. Also…what is it with the headline ‘Baby Bonus’ bullshit? (I know what it is. I’m being rhetorical)

    • geoff 2.1

      It’s a way for them to spin it negatively but also alliteration and that’s what the aussies call their similar system. Except over there, it’s not a dirty word.

    • geoff 2.2

      oops you were being rhetorical, my bad.

  3. just saying 3

    Good points, Karol,

    As a side issue, a quote from David Shearer linked in the post regarding teaching children about vege gardening:

    I want to see parents and communities given the support they need to look after their kids and not simply depend on a government feeding scheme.

    David Shearer is MP for Mt Albert and Labour Party spokesman for Foreign Affairs and Energy and Resources.

    This really pisses me off.
    Does Shearer have any idea how much it costs to set up a functioning food garden?
    How weather/soil/luck dependent the results are?

    The words “feeding programme” annoy me too. I associate “feeding programmes” like “breeding programmes”, with livestock. If people don’t have the resources to buy nutritious food*, we need to provide adequate resources. Does Shearer have any idea how much land, resources, and expertise is required to provide adequate nutrition for a family? – plonker.

    This smacks of victim-blaming to me.

    *Benefit levels were deliberately set below amounts needed to meet adequate levels of nutrition. This was supposed to “incentivise” work.

    • Colonial Viper 3.1

      NB “Feeding Programmes” are exactly what he helped to organise and manage at the UN.

      Does Shearer have any idea how much land, resources, and expertise is required to provide adequate nutrition for a family? – plonker.

      Thinking of it – he very well might – but hasn’t thought it through.

      I doubt that he’s proposing clearing acres of land in the middle of Auckland suburbs for this. Which is what it would need.

    • Bill 3.2

      Absolutely agree with your comment about set up costs. Took me a long time.

      Not proposed as a complete solution, but what about school gardens? Perhaps a possible component of the Green Party’s school hubs?

      I’m thinking they could be much more accessible than community gardens that often require using a car to get to and the necessary social/community connections already exist to some extent or other in a school context.

      • just saying 3.2.1

        I’m aware that this is a tangent and Karol might want to move this to open-mike.

        Most primary schools have a rudimentary vege garden, and a couple of the community gardens locally, (bigger and worked by community volunteers) are located at schools. However, there is a problem with access in at least some cases. Something about permission to be on school grounds.

        A substantial community garden at each school would be brilliant. It would also be great if food was grown in every park and reserve area. Locals could tend them – fruit and nut trees and berries aren’t necessarily labour intensive. The biggest problem with the community gardens is how few and far between they are (so far).

        Now if Shearer were to talk about significant resources devoted to this kind of thing (without mentioning ‘feeding programmes’ at all)……

        • karol 3.2.1.1

          Not really off topic, js.

          The post is about media coverage of inequality and political parties policies on it. The post included comments on Shearer’s article, which also suggested a way to decrease poverty/inequalities through development of gardens.

          Some good critical comments here on Shearer’s article.

        • Zorr 3.2.1.2

          With regards this, in my local community there is a well maintained community garden at the local library because it is all council owned and anyone is welcome to call past and grab a head of broccoli or similar… depending on what has been having success…

    • JK 3.3

      I agree Just Saying – and to Karol too. Good post. I’ve only just read the Simon Collins article and Herald editorial (sent a comment into both) and was thinking along the same lines, Karol.

      As to poor people growing gardens – like Bill and Just Saying have said – it takes several years, and quite a bit of input with money as well as whatever you can harvest from your presumably bare land – to build up decent vege gardens. We’ve used access to free manure from local farm animals – that’s not a choice for many people living in urban areas.

      We’re in our sixth year of building our vege garden and fruit trees and only now, are starting to reap a benefit from them. We were given the feijoa trees, they’ve been in and well manured for five years, and this is the first year I’ve seen flowers and now fruit forming – so hoping to at last harvest them later this year.

      And a vege garden takes up a lot of day time. If both parents are working, and have to come home to look after kids, cook meals, do the shopping, housework, etc – there’s not much time left over for them to get a decent vege garden going.

      Its patronising for people in authority or in a better financial situation to suggest that those who are poor should just get outside and dig up a vege garden.

  4. Tracey 4

    Isnt meridian running an ad about 1 in 4 kids going without food? I thought poverty couldnt be measured.

    Anyone who thinks the delving into the 60 bucks waS even handed compare with keys 359m education policy… which schools and when. What criteria. Msm didnt chase those answers

  5. Will@Welly 5

    Expect more of this b.s. as we get closer to the election. National are desperate.
    Let’s assume Labour/Greens/Mana do win, then Cunliffe and the Labour Party must make it abundantly clear to those right-wing M.P.’s that their time in Parliament is limited.

  6. SHG (not Colonial Viper) 6

    What does “40,000 Kiwi kids arrive at school every week without food” mean?

    40,000 Kiwi kids only go to school once a week and when they do it’s without food?

    8,000 Kiwi kids go to school 5 times a week and every time they do it’s without food?

    40,000 Kiwi kids have arrived at school without food on one day out of a week?

    At the end of a week we totalled up every time a kid had arrived at school on at least one day without food and the total was 40,000?

    • McFlock 6.1

      seriously? The problem doesn’t need addressing if it’s only 8,000 constantly hungry kids, or if 40,000 kids miss one breakfast a week because of poverty?

      • SHG (not Colonial Viper) 6.1.1

        Whether or not it’s a problem that needs addressing is not my point. The headline on the campaign document is shit. It’s vague. It needs explaining. Labour fails at communication, episode 956309.

        • McFlock 6.1.1.1

          No, it’s not.
          The only thing that matters is whether thousands of NZ kids are going to school hungry. That is clear whichever way you want to interpret it. 8,000 or 40,000 should not affect whether or not something needs to be done about it.

          But keep pretending the problem doesn’t exist

          • SHG (not Colonial Viper) 6.1.1.1.1

            Why doesn’t the campaign say that then? Why doesn’t it just say “THOUSANDS OF KIWI KIDS GO TO SCHOOL HUNGRY”?

            Again, Labour can’t communicate a policy to save itself.

            • McFlock 6.1.1.1.1.1

              Because then you’d argue that the problem’s exaggerated, that only hundreds go hungry. Because then you’d criticise the font, or the pic, or the colour palette. Because then you’d do anything else you can think of to avoid addressing the facts presented in the poster.

              I mean, if you genuinely gave a shit you’d have looked up the report cited in the poster, rather than whinging here.

              • SHG (not Colonial Viper)

                Heaven forbid that Labour get some people who can actually communicate effectively.

                • McFlock

                  I think the words you are looking for are Heaven forbid that Labour get some people who can actually communicate so pedantically and exhaustively that every poster it produces takes the format of Das Kapital, for fear that someone going “LALALALA NOT LISTENING” might be able to wilfully miss the point.

                  the current poster does the job for most people who are not intentionally blind.

                  • SHG (not Colonial Viper)

                    The current poster does the job for people who already support Labour’s policy on child welfare and will be voting Labour anyway. It’s preaching to the choir – a choir that for two elections in a row hasn’t been big enough to get Labour into government.

                    What Labour should be doing is making its messages so clear, direct, and unassailably powerful that even someone who WANTS to go “lalalala not listening” has to concede the point. Labour should be crafting and timing its messages to attract people who currently don’t intend to vote for Labour. It should be communicating effectively. But it’s not.

                    I didn’t see Cunliffe’s speech because he gave it on a public holiday, and I was at the beach. So I watched a recording of it, and then I read Labour’s documents, and they said two different things on an important point so I was confused. Then when I wanted to think about it a bit more I didn’t get a chance because I was swamped with work the day after a public holiday. Then I was distracted by Labour announcing that it considered Facebook a paedophile network and would ban it, which is something I consider retarded, so I was less likely to consider Labour a party with sensible policies. Then I saw a Labour poster about hungry children and while I think that’s an important issue my attention was already lost because I wasn’t sure what the heading actually said.

                    All of these things could have been avoided, and they weren’t because Labour can’t communicate for shit.

                    • McFlock

                      The fact that you were not convinced does not mean that the material was only preaching to the choir.

                      Failing to convince people who follow the catechism “if I don’t know exactly how many thousands of children are going hungry each day, I will refuse to acknowledge that there is even a problem” is likewise not the same as “preaching to the choir”.

                      Try drawing a Venn diagram to figure it out.

                    • SHG (not Colonial Viper)

                      If a sensible reader’s first reaction upon reading your headline is “what does that mean?”, then your headline is shit.

                    • McFlock

                      Yeah, but that was your reaction. Don’t go accusing a sensible person of being in that club.

    • PapaMike 6.2

      I have still not received an answer as to what those children do during the school holidays.
      I am aware that in some lower decile schools they are open for breakfast and some supervision, but only a few schools.

  7. Tracey 7

    Youve nailed it. Those are the most important things to sort out before we feed a single child.

  8. gem 8

    ”One of the things the MSM does with this “neoliberal”-supporting approach to news, is to focus on human interest stories.”
    With so-called ‘hip pocket’ issues, the news media always sought out and highlighted people directly affected. It pre-dates neoliberalism.

    To the wider point, I think the prevalence of the human interest angle (and often this means angling the story on the ‘real’ person but having official comment/statistics in the body of the article) is linked with the Rogernomics era overhaul of the public sector.
    It is incredibly difficult for journos to get straightforward answers from government departments because of their defensiveness about disclosing information, and their legions of ‘communications’ operatives acting as gatekeepers.

    It’s another reason we have personality-driven political news coverage; other information sources have virtually been closed down. From reading the Ombudsman’s annual report, the watchdog does not have the resources to investigate all the complaints that are lodged regarding departments and ministerial staff refusing to comply with the Official Information Act.

    Turning government departments into quasi corporate entities, inculcating an odd mix of public and private values, was driven by a de facto bipartisan consensus between Labour and National that the public sector should be run like a business.

    Should the media become activist in changing the system, or should political parties do something to change it?

    • karol 8.1

      Very good comment, gem.

      Also working with the infotainment approach, is the cut backs on experienced journalists. There’s a lot of quite young journalists, without a strong background in many political areas. Furthermore, journolists are given less time for research, and spend a disporportionate amount of time behind their computers or roaming the corridors of political power.

      Simon Collins is one who actually does get out to demos and interviews people there.

      • gem 8.1.1

        You just about need a private income to be a journalist these days, thus for most it’s become a stepping stone to a higher-paid, less stressful job.
        Journalists used to be on par with teachers when it came to pay, as I understand it, but that is no more.
        The consolidation of ownership also saw the axing of evening papers, which generally held left-leaning political views compared with the more pro-establishment morning papers.

  9. blue leopard (Get Lost GCSB Bill) 9

    The Maxim Institute is mentioned in Nicky Hagar’s book “The Hollow Men” (2006).

    A collection of some of the mentions:

    Maxim was set up “based on the model of right-wing United States thinktanks.” [Hagar, 2006, p203]

    and was active in supporting Don Brash’s National party (the one that didn’t get in in 2005) – The head of that Institute at the time supported Brash’s divisive Orewa speech publically in The Herald. [Hagar, 2006, p204]

    for another meeting the head of that Institute ” offered ‘to put together a meeting of up to 1000 “flammable”: parents on the North Shore of Auckland’, so Brash could present National’s education policies to a large and sympathetic audience.” [Hagar, 2006, p204]

    ……..
    ….So methinks providing a voxpop of a woman who is one of that group (a group that has been active in electioneering for a previous Nat party – and I would suspect nothing has changed for this election) is hardly ‘a person off the street’ and this choice of TV3’s can hardly be called ‘balanced’ and certainly not politically neutral in any way, shape or form.

    [n.b. I do not consider Karol is attempting to make the point that TV3 is managing balance, I am merely adding some detail for those that hadn’t heard of this ‘Institute’].

    • Tracey 9.1

      Thanks blue

    • gem 9.2

      +1 At least the fact she is a staff member of a right-wing thinktank makes her less credible to the public (the word ”conservative” was used as description in the Herald piece).
      Maxim must have waning influence; surely it could have organised a ”flammable” parent to ring the Herald to volunteer their views who did not have such an obvious link to itself.

      • blue leopard (Get Lost GCSB Bill) 9.2.1

        @ Gem,

        Yes I agree re at least they introduced her as “research manager at the conservative Maxim Institute”[the exact words] – It did give a lead. I was thinking of adding that point to my comment, so am glad you did!

        I still get concerned about the use of a member of that particular group, however, because had it not been for my having just happened to have picked up “The Hollow Men” last night and recalled the name mentioned in the first chapter of that book – I wouldn’t have known the extent of their involvement with the Nat party and that puts a different slant on the comment she made and the choice to quote her.

        I do agree, though, that at least they mentioned the name of the Institute and that it was conservative.

        • gem 9.2.1.1

          ”I do agree, though, that at least they mentioned the name of the Institute and that it was conservative.” And ideally the story would mention Maxim’s involvement in the 2005 pre-election machinations, because as you said in your original post, some people won’t know what it is.
          The Hollow Men is a great resource, a book every Kiwi should read, and re-read in an election year. Thanks for the page refs.

    • karol 9.3

      Thanks, bl. Some very good background.

      In this case the article was from NZ Herald, not TV3.

      • blue leopard (Get Lost GCSB Bill) 9.3.1

        Thanks for the correction, my apologies for the error – The Herald not TV3 argh!

        [I had TV3 in my mind having just read Micky Savage’s post, whom mentioned your comment about Maxim and separately mentioned TV3 – have made a similar error before – the mainstream media outlets are all lumped into the same ‘read or watch with severe scepticism’ section of my mind and so I will have to take care not to commit this error again for that reason!]

    • RedBaronCV 9.4

      Assuming they are not returning New Zealander’s how did they manage to emigrate here. Being a RWNJ is probably not on the skill’s shortages list?

  10. Olwyn 10

    This piece from the Herald, while it does allow Cunliffe to clear up misunderstandings around the Best Start policy, is illustrated with not one, but four, unflattering photographs. Four photos of the same subject hardly seem necessary to such a short piece. He is not smiling in any of them, and in one the shadowing lends his face a purplish hue. A subtle addition to “balanced” reporting.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11194159

    • blue leopard (Get Lost GCSB Bill) 10.1

      +1 The bias in this choice of pictures is shocking

    • Xtasy 10.2

      Simon Collins has been stopped from writing as he used to, because his “paymaster” wants him to “tow the line”, that is behind all this. If he does not tow the line, he will join others on the damned “dole”!

      That is the way power plays in this country, and under Key and Nats more so than under any other government!

      Do as you are told, and you will be “fine”, if you raise issues, hey, we got some “news” for you, it may be worth to rethink, what you just said!

      Make no damned doubt about it, this society is controlled and manipulated with pressure plays 24/7, and as the society has been divided into endless fearsome, mindsome, worried and also mercenary individuals, nobody dares to rock the boat. Nobody dares to even discuss certain things with work mates anymore, as the boss may hear, and then it is “down the road”.

      Yes, they have done a thorough job, the Natzies, and I hear and see it every day. But where is the “guts” that is displayed by some on the rugby fields? Where is the guts of people here to take a solid and firm stand, and to bring about change? I am waiting!

    • mickysavage 10.3

      Aye Olwyn. We should think about a special “The Herald is trying to make David Cunliffe look bad” post and put all of them up.

  11. BM 11

    there will always be haves and have nots food and accommodation is not a human right kids are a life style choice they shouldn’t have them if they cant afford them.

  12. Camryn 12

    I thought Dr Barnett and Mr Byaman were a fairly poor choice to represent those who might need the $60 because she was not laid off. It says she left her job voluntarily to study further. Therefore, if the child was planned, she chose to be studying (and lowering her income) at the time she was having a child. Her desire to extend herself in her field is great, but lecturing Art History is one of the few ways to earn a living with an education in Art History and she was already doing that… her timing in furthering her education was her choice and so it opens up the criticism of the policy that it only makes it easier for people to make personal choices without having to fully appreciate the consequences.

    • Olwyn 12.1

      You are right insofar as they are not minimum wage workers, so are not in the most desperate need. But Best Start, as I understand it, is intended to take the pressure off families, and they too would have benefited from having less pressure on them when their child was born. And you are drawing a long bow in suggesting that their example opens the policy up to the criticism that it encourages ill-considered personal choices. It is quite usual to juggle financial needs, personal development and so on, in order to include a child. We are not automatons. Moreover, Dr Barnett’s PhD makes her more employable in her chosen field, and she is working at the moment.

  13. Anthony Blomfield 13

    John key is a cunt. I’m shamed that I voted once for him.

    • mickysavage 13.1

      I do not suffer from that sense of regret but it is good that you acknowledge it Anthony.

    • gem 13.2

      fair enough. My mother says she won’t vote national this year for the first time in her life.

  14. Xtasy 14

    “One of the things the MSM does with this “neoliberal”-supporting approach to news, is to focus on human interest stories.”

    KAROL, thank you, another good contribution to expose what goes on. Yes, the MSM (mainstream media), they “love” those individual stories. They just love to “personalise” and “individualise” everything, because it is “VERBOTEN” to challenge the main reasons for the malaise, the SYSTEM!

    So they continue to personalise, individualise, trivialise the issues at stake, and because the MSM (being mostly large corporate, or similarly minded “competing” media organisations, even in public hands) does not want to force any issues, or even “bite” the hand that feeds them (advertisers and agencies that do the expensive brainwashing work for them).

    New Zealand is in this regard the same as Australia, the same as Canada, and ultimately the same as the United States of America, as that is where the major influences on our economy, our economic and social realities come from. New Zealand maybe doing great trade with China, Japan, the EU, and others, and be quite a lot dependent on this, but in its “spirit”, tradition and “culture”, it is the US and the UK that have shaped and thus control New Zealand and the people’s psyche here.

    The powerful lobbies behind the media, the payers of the advertising, the lobby groups and major economic participants in this society, they DICTATE, where the journey goes, and what is “allowed”. Make no damned doubt about this!

    That is why we have NO “independent” media, apart from a few blogs catering for a few tens of thousands at best, that is why we have NO democracy. The spin is always favouring the government, and since at least the early to mid 1980s, ALL governments in NZ have been influenced, if not been “determined” (through basically “rigged” elections by manipulated media serving the interests of certain “contenders” and their lobbyists), by forces other than the people who voted.

    When you have a manipulated, poorly or even misinformed public, then you will end up with totally biased, thus irresponsible, and “bought” voters. That is what we are heading for again, with that, what I have observed the last two or three weeks.

    It appears that anything Labour, Cunliffe, the Greens or New Zealand First, let alone Mana or others, say, that is instantly “rubbished”, and anything that “the government” says, it gets taken up with a statement from “officialdom”, and thus with credit and respect.

    Karol and others, I cannot believe, how patient, long suffering and patient so many of New Zealanders are, you are taken for a damned ride again. It is not helpful, this “New Zealand way”, to not speak up, to not protest, to endure, and to somehow sort things out without standing for firm positions and principles. No, that is NOT my way, I fight, I stand for principles, and I will never make rotten, or half rotten deals, with what this government, the rotten media and whosoever tries to promote.

    Having shopped again in todays Auckland supermarket in an inner suburb, where it is push and shove now, like anywhere else in the world, I know, the traditional “New Zealand way” is dead, as that was allowed to happen. Better wake up and start fighting, for the remnants of what this country may still stand for!

    Amen!

  15. tricledrown 15

    Blinkered Mysoginist
    So Natures drive to reproduce should be repressed by poor and uneducated…
    Laws of the jungle only the strongest should be allowed to reproduce what do you suggest forced abortion alah China.
    Compulsory birth control .
    Or just leave children of the poor starving cold sick.
    Remember We Johnny Key he would have been on your eugenics list.

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    Just 16,000 – or 8 per cent – of the 209,000 work visas issued last year were for occupations for which there is an identified skills shortage, says Labour Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway. “The overwhelming majority of the record number ...
    1 day ago
  • Hard won agreement shouldn’t be thrown away
    The Government should ignore talk across the Tasman about doing away with the labelling of GM free products, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King. “Labelling of genetically modified products was a hard won agreement in 2001 by Australian and the ...
    1 day ago
  • National’s privatisation Trojan horse
     The National government is using the need to modernise the school system as a Trojan horse for privatisation and an end to free public education as we know it, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.  “There is no doubt that ...
    1 day ago
  • Shameless land-banking ads show need for crackdown
    The fact that more than 300 sections are shamelessly being advertised on Trade Me as land-banking opportunities during a housing crisis shows the need for a crackdown on property speculators, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “Of the 328 ...
    1 day ago
  • Standard and Poor’s warning of housing crisis impact on banks
    The National Government’s failure to address the housing crisis is leading to dire warnings from ratings agency Standard and Poor’s about the impact on the strength of the economy and New Zealand banks, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Standard ...
    1 day ago
  • Ihumatao needs action not sympathy
    The Petition of Save Our Unique Landscape (SOUL) calling on Parliament to revoke Special Housing Area 62 in order to protect the Ihumatao Peninsula and Stonefields, has fallen on deaf ears, says the Labour MP for Mangere Su’a William Sio.  ...
    2 days ago
  • Student visa fraud & exploitation must stop
    The Government must act immediately to end fraud and exploitation of international students that threatens to damage New Zealand’s reputation, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. ...
    2 days ago
  • Government needs to show leadership in reviewing monetary policy
    The Reserve Bank’s struggles to meet its inflation target, the rising exchange rate and the continued housing crisis shows current monetary policy needs to be reviewed - with amendments to the policy targets agreement a bare minimum, says Labour’s Finance ...
    2 days ago
  • Slash and burn of special education support
    Slashing the support for school age children with special needs is no way to fund earlier intervention, Labour’s Education Spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.  “National’s latest plan to slash funding for children with special needs over the age of 7 in ...
    3 days ago
  • National’s Pasifika MPs must have free vote
      Pacific people will not take kindly to the Government whipping their Pacific MPs to vote in favour of a  Bill that will allow Sunday trading  at Easter, says Labour’s Pacific Island Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio.  “We are seeing ...
    6 days ago
  • Maritime Crimes Bill – balancing security and free speech
    Parliament is currently considering the Maritime Crimes Amendment Bill, which would bring New Zealand up to date with current international rules about maritime security. The debate around the Bill reflects two valid issues: legitimate counter-terrorism measures and the right to ...
    GreensBy Kennedy Graham
    6 days ago
  • Teachers’ low wages at the centre of shortages
      Figures that show teachers’ wages have grown the slowest of all occupations is at the heart of the current teacher shortage, says Labour’s Education Spokesperson Chris Hipkins.  In the latest Labour Cost Index, education professionals saw their wages grow ...
    7 days ago
  • Government’s Tax Law undermines common law principles
    A tax amendment being snuck in under the radar allows changes to tax issues to be driven through by the Government without Parliamentary scrutiny, says Labour’s Revenue spokesman Stuart Nash. “The amendment allows any part of the Tax Administration Act ...
    7 days ago
  • Government slippery about caption funding
      The Government has refused to apologise for taking the credit for funding Olympic Games captioning when the National Foundation for the Deaf  was responsible, says Labour’s spokesperson on Disability Issues Poto Williams.  “This shameful act of grandstanding by Ministers ...
    1 week ago
  • Default KiwiSaver investments should be reviewed
    The investments of the default KiwiSaver providers should be reviewed to make sure they are in line with New Zealanders’ values and expectations, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Most New Zealanders would be appalled that their KiwiSaver funds are ...
    1 week ago
  • New ministry should look after all children
    The Government has today shunned well founded pleas by experts not to call its new agency the Ministry for Vulnerable Children, Labour’s Spokesperson for Children Jacinda Ardern says.  “Well respected organisations and individuals such as Children's Commissioner Judge Andrew Becroft ...
    1 week ago
  • Ratification okay but we need action
    Today’s decision to ratify the Paris agreement on Climate Change by the end of the year is all well and good but where is the plan, says Labour’s Climate Change spokesperson Megan Woods.  “The Government’s failure to plan is planning ...
    1 week ago
  • Stats changes can’t hide unemployment reality
    Today’s minor drop in unemployment numbers is nothing to celebrate given the changes made to the official numbers that cut thousands of people looking for work out of the jobless rate, says Labour’s Employment spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Making any comparisons ...
    1 week ago
  • Stats changes can’t hide unemployment reality
    Today’s minor drop in unemployment numbers is nothing to celebrate given the changes made to the official numbers that cut thousands of people looking for work out of the jobless rate, says Labour’s Employment spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Making any comparisons ...
    1 week ago
  • Auckland’s affordable homes plummet 72% under National
    Comprehensive new data from CoreLogic has found the number of homes in Auckland valued at under $600,000 has plummeted by 72 per cent since National took office, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “This data tracks the changes in ...
    1 week ago
  • Govt should face the facts not skew the facts
    National appears to be actively massaging official unemployment statistics by changing the measure for joblessness to exclude those looking online, says Labour’s Employment spokesperson Grant Robertson. “The Household Labour Force Survey, released tomorrow, no longer regards people job hunting on ...
    1 week ago
  • More voices call for review of immigration policy
    The Auckland Chamber of Commerce is the latest credible voice to call for a review of immigration and skills policy, leaving John Key increasingly isolated, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little. “The Prime Minister is rapidly becoming a man alone. He ...
    1 week ago
  • Better balance needed in Intelligence Bill
    Labour will support the NZ Intelligence and Security Bill to select committee so the issues can be debated nationwide and important amendments can be made, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little. ...
    1 week ago
  • Serco circus has no place in NZ
    A High Court judgment proves National’s private prison agenda has failed and the Serco circus has no place in New Zealand correctional facilities, Labour’s Corrections spokesperson Kelvin Davis says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • State house sell-off a kick in the guts for Tauranga’s homeless
    The Government’s sale of 1124 state houses in Tauranga won’t house a single extra homeless person in the city, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “Tauranga, like the rest of New Zealand, has a crisis of housing affordability and homelessness. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Axing Auckland’s affordable quota disappointing
    Auckland Council has given away a useful tool for delivering more affordable housing by voting to accept the Independent Hearing Panel’s recommendation to abolish affordable quotas for new developments, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Ae Marika! Māori Party Oath Bill fails
    The Māori Party must reconsider its relationship with National after they failed to support Marama Fox’s Treaty of Waitangi Oath bill, Labour’s Maori Development Spokesperson Kelvin Davis says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Police Minister all platitudes no detail
    The Police Minister must explain where the budget for new police officers is coming from after continuously obfuscating, Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart Nash says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Lost luggage law shows National’s lost the plot
    The Government has proven it can’t address the big issues facing the tourism industry by allowing a Members Bill on lost luggage to be a priority, Labour’s Tourism spokesman Kris Faafoi said. “Nuk Korako’s Bill drawn from the Members’ Ballot ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Hiding behind the law – but can’t say which law
    National is refusing to come clean on what caused the potential trade dispute with China by hiding behind laws and trade rules they can’t even name, says Labour’s Trade and Export Growth spokesperson David Clark. “National admitted today that an ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Work visas issued for jobs workless Kiwis want
    Thousands of work visas for low-skilled jobs were issued by the Government in the past year despite tens of thousands of unemployed Kiwis looking for work in those exact occupations, Labour’s Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway says. “A comparison of the ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Kiwis nationwide now paying for housing crisis
    The Government’s failure to tackle the housing crisis is now affecting the entire country with nationwide house price inflation in the past year hitting 26 per cent, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “None of National’s tinkering or half-baked, piecemeal ...
    2 weeks ago
  • OCR cut piles pressure on Government
    Today’s OCR cut must be backed by Government action on housing and economic growth, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Reserve Bank Governor Graeme Wheeler’s monetary policy statement underlines the limits of Bill English’s economic management. He says growth is ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government must explain the McClay delay
    Todd McClay must explain why it took two months for him to properly inform the Prime Minister about China’s potential trade retaliation, says Labour’s Trade and Export Growth spokesperson David Clark. “This may be one of the most serious trade ...
    2 weeks ago
  • OCR cut would be vote of no confidence in economy
    If Reserve Bank Governor Graeme Wheeler cuts the OCR tomorrow it would show that, despite his loudly-voiced concerns about fuelling the housing market, the stuttering economy is now a bigger concern, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Bill English and ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Leading medical experts back Healthy Homes Bill
    Leading medical experts have today thrown their weight behind my Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill, saying it will improve the health of Kiwi kids, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “The Bill sets minimum standards for heating, insulation and ventilation ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Minister, it’s time to listen to the Auditor General
    Minister of Health Jonathan Coleman needs to listen to the independent advice of the Auditor General and review the capital charge system imposed on District Health Boards, says Labour’ Health Spokesperson Annette King.  “The capital charge on DHBs has been ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Peas explain, Minister
    The Minister of Primary Industries needs to explain how the failure of its biosecurity systems led to the Pea Weevil incursion in the Wairarapa, Labour’s Primary Industries spokesperson Damien O’Connor says “The decision to ban the growing of peas in ...
    2 weeks ago
  • PM’s police numbers wrong
    The Prime Minister has said that police numbers will increase in-line with population growth, however, the Police’s own four year strategy clearly states there are no plans to increase police numbers for the next four years, Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Ministerial double speak on GP Fees
      The Associate Health Minister Sam Lotu-Iiga was simply making it up when he claimed today that General Practitioners had been given money in the Budget to lower fees, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “In a reply to a ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government must close loophole in LVR rules
    The Government must urgently close a loophole in loan to value ratio mortgage restrictions which are stopping homeowners from buying new houses before they sell their old one, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “The Reserve Bank was forced to ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Bulk funding means bigger classes
    National’s plan to bulk fund schools can only result in bigger class sizes and a reduced range of subject choices, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Time for John Key to sack his Housing Minister
    It is time for the Prime Minister to take serious and meaningful steps to address the housing crisis – and start by sacking Nick Smith as Housing Minister, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “Clearly whatever it is National ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Coleman puts skids under cheaper GP visits
      Hundreds of thousands of New Zealanders with high health needs are missing out on cheaper GP fees as the cost of going to the doctor hits $70, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says.  “The number of practices subsidised to ...
    3 weeks ago

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