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Open mike 14/07/2012

Written By: - Date published: 6:00 am, July 14th, 2012 - 107 comments
Categories: open mike - Tags:

Open mike is your post. For announcements, general discussion, whatever you choose.

The usual rules of good behaviour apply (see the link to Policy in the banner).

Step right up to the mike…

107 comments on “Open mike 14/07/2012”

  1. Jenny 1

    Q: What is the greatest single thing that prevents our parliament from taking real action against climate change?

    A: The ETS (Emissions Trading Scheme)

    The ETS also known in some circles as the PTS (Pollution Trading Scheme). Allows polluters to buy credits to allow them to continue polluting, (In practice the ETS has overseen an increase the amount GHG (Green House Gases) emitted by this country.

    • Colonial Viper 1.1

      Its not legislation which is preventing climate change action. Its the influential top quartile high consuming middle class middle management electorate who don’t want to be told that they need to scale back their energy and resource usage by 25%, immediately. Altering ETS legislation won’t affect that mindset.

      No legislation will.

      • Jenny 1.1.1

        What a cop out.

        • Colonial Viper 1.1.1.1

          You have a solution to the top quartile problem then? What is it?

          • Jackal 1.1.1.1.1

            Don’t help them when the shit hits the fan.

            The problem isn’t the ETS as such, the problem is that many polluting industries are not included in the scheme and the taxpayer is subsidizing polluting industries by purchasing half their credits. Without a proper charge being placed on pollution, including industries paying for cleanup costs (including climate change mitigation), there will be no reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, and our existence on earth will become even more tenuous.

      • Jenny 1.1.2

        Its not legislation which is preventing climate change action. Its the influential top quartile high consuming middle class middle management electorate who don’t want to be told that they need to scale back their energy and resource usage by 25%, immediately. Altering ETS legislation won’t affect that mindset.

        Colonial Viper

        How do you know how any section of the population will react unless you give a lead?

    • Colonial Viper 1.2

      JMG’s advice is simple – “Collapse now and avoid the rush”

      http://thearchdruidreport.blogspot.ca/2012/06/collapse-now-and-avoid-rush.html

      Thing is, no politician or business leader can advocate anything like this, even if they wanted to. They wouldn’t be a politician or business leader by the end of the month.

      • Jenny 1.2.1

        “Collapse now and avoid the rush”

        Is this the Labour Right’s advice to the Greens?

        • Colonial Viper 1.2.1.1

          lol. More seriously, this is where things need to go, but politicians and business leaders will never say it. To them, BAU growth will return shortly. No it won’t.

    • Jenny 1.3

      A right wing monetarist scheme to avoid meeting our international obligations to cut back on GHG emissions, the ETS was brought in by a Labour Government, controversially (and provisionally) supported by the Green Party.

      The time has come for the Green Party to remove that provisional support, or forever be a patsy for either of the two main parties in parliament.

      Like most monetarist avoidance schemes,once they are in place, under successive administrations they are refined and made even more inequitable. Over time the rules are made slacker, the loopholes are made bigger.

      And so it has proven with the Pollution Trading Scheme, rather than the polluters paying the cost of their pollution, this cost has been ‘socialised’. Now the taxpayers are effectively paying the polluters to continue BAU. (Business As Usual).

      (Not that this is much different from the Labour Government’s privatised version of the ETS, where the polluters just passed on the costs of polluting through price adjustments that left no effect on their bottom line. Which left them free to keep on keeping on, and even increasing emissions.)

      The time is well past when the Greens should have removed their support for this pollution trading scheme.

      The question is: Will the Greens parliamentary wing heed the call from the right of the Labour Party to shut up about the environment in exchange for a seat in cabinet?

      Or will they remain an independent voice in parliament outside of cabinet?

      Will Labour’s continueing “dogmatic” support for market solutions to climate change, be the breaking point of any coalition agreement, between Labour and the Green Party?

      Will Green continued support for pollution trading be the sticking point?

      • Colonial Viper 1.3.1

        NZ has fifteen years to get ready for a deeply energy depleted future. Transport, energy and comms infrastructure have to be absolute priorities.

        How many years of those 15 are you willing to waste dancing around the ETS?

        • weka 1.3.1.1

          Why the 15 year timeframe, CV?

        • Draco T Bastard 1.3.1.2

          NZ has fifteen years to get ready for a deeply energy depleted future.

          WTF? No we don’t. All indications are that we won’t be importing enough fuel by the end of this decade which, practically speaking, means we’ve got between 3 and 4 years to get ready. In 15 years we’ll be in the deeply energy depleted future.

          • weka 1.3.1.2.1

            Which indications are you referring to Draco? I hear a wide range of informed opinions on the timeframe.

            • Draco T Bastard 1.3.1.2.1.1

              http://oilshockhorrorprobe.blogspot.co.nz/2011/10/when-might-new-zealands-oil-imports-dry.html

              Peak Oil combined with oil exporting countries using more of the oil they have at home instead of exporting it and 100 year oil contracts* which we don’t have.

              * Not that I expect 100 year oil contracts to actually last out the 100 years.

              • weka

                Thanks, interesting. I accept the general premise of the article and understand the rational for his timeframe.
                 

                For example New Zealand produces about 61,000 barrels per day and consumes about 151,000 barrels per day (CIA 2009 data).
                 

                Does that mean that, theoretically, leaving aside the drop in production, at the moment we could manage to be self supporting if we dropped our usage by 60%?
                 

                The P50 estimates of actual oil production for the significant oil-producing fields around New Zealand each fall to the near-useless volume of 1 million barrels per year (about 2750 barrels per day) between 2020 and 2025
                 

                Is that giving us a 8 – 13 year window to power down if we actually owned and used it ourselves?
                 

                So even if we were to divert local production to our refinery (and then pay the going global price for it)
                 

                Why would we have to pay the global price? Is that because the refinery is privately owned?

                We do not even have any first-call on our local oil production that hovers between 60,000 and 40,000 barrels a day, depending on the state of our tiny oil fields. Instead we take the royalty money to assist with our balance of payments, and as noted above even that meagre cash injection is set to decline sharply. 

                 
                When the heat really goes on, can the NZ govt get out of that agreement, or nationalise the production and refining?
                 

                This ‘triangle of hope’ in the top left corner of the chart, terminates (and I use the word advisedly!) in about 2016, five years from today.
                 

                Do you mind me asking what you personally are doing in the face of that?
                 
                 

                • Draco T Bastard

                  Does that mean that, theoretically, leaving aside the drop in production, at the moment we could manage to be self supporting if we dropped our usage by 60%?

                  Depends upon what we’re actually importing it for. Purely for fuel, then, yes. Other stuff like plastics would still need to be imported (As I understand it NZ oil is a very light-sweet crude which isn’t suitable for producing the heavier products)

                  Why would we have to pay the global price?

                  Because the wells are privately owned and sell the oil at the global price and then pay us a pittance (5%) of what they sell it for.

                  The really funny/ironic thing about this whole concept is that if we did use it ourselves and only charged ourselves what it cost us to produce the rest of the world (especially the US) would be complaining about us subsidising the oil. This is, of course, complete bollocks and what they’d really be complaining about is the fact that they wouldn’t be able to buy it.

                  When the heat really goes on, can the NZ govt get out of that agreement, or nationalise the production and refining?

                  Parliament is supreme so, yes, we can get out of it. The question is whether the government at the time will do so.

                  Do you mind me asking what you personally are doing in the face of that?

                  Don’t own a car, walk as much as possible, PT for the rest. Meridian for power which, prior to Gerry Brownlee fucking around with the set up, didn’t have any fossil fuelled generators while minimising power usage as much as possible. What I’d like to do is add some solar panels/water heating and some passive heating and better insulation but it’s not actually my house.

                  • Colonial Viper

                    btw the spot price of oil, whether brent or wti or any other, can bear very limited resemblance to what is traded in the ‘dark pool’ exchanges, and is certainly of limited relevance to the prices set within long term supply contracts.

                  • mike e

                    DTB Just velcro panels of styrofoam insulation panels on the walls and ceiling with cheap velcro dots.
                    paint these panels the colour you like.
                    Cut out panels the size of windows to cover windows at night.

                  • weka

                    Have you looked at 12V solar? It is much more efficient than 240. And you can set up a system that is moveable/portable. You could probably do that for solar hot water if you’re handy too.

        • Jenny 1.3.1.3

          NZ has fifteen years to get ready for a deeply energy depleted future. Transport, energy and comms infrastructure have to be absolute priorities.

          How many years of those 15 are you willing to waste dancing around the ETS?

          Colonial Viper

          None.

        • Jenny 1.3.1.4

          NZ has fifteen years to get ready for a deeply energy depleted future. Transport, energy and comms infrastructure have to be absolute priorities.

          Colonial Viper

          Every time we are discussing climate change CV diverts the thread onto peak oil.

          Why is this CV?

          • Jenny 1.3.1.4.1

            Another tactic CV uses to avoid taking a stand on Climate Change is to scapegoat the “middle classes” Claiming that the middle classes are far too attached to their “comforts” to be asked to support a party that calls for action against Climate Change.

            In my opinion all this evasion, scapegoating and diversion and excuse making is a cover for the Labour Party’s support for deep sea oil exploitation, fracking, opening new coal mines for a new export industry, and probably the most CO2 polluting technology ever invented, lignite to diesel production. All plans approved and championed by the last Labour Government.

            CV’s hidden message is clear, Climate Change technologies will be continued and even expanded under a Labour administration. Blaming the middle class and citing peak oil will be the two most used excuses for doing so.

            I put it to you CV that your two excuses are very flimsy, and have both been discredited.

          • weka 1.3.1.4.2

            I don’t know why CV does it, but for me personally it’s because I think it’s far to late to do anything about CC*, but we still have some time to respond to PO.
             
            *Which doesn’t mean that I think efforts around CC should stop, I do think they’re very important for not making things worse.

            • Jim Nald 1.3.1.4.2.1

              Or it could be quite simply that given the various lifecycles related to each of them, we will experience PO much more significantly before CC?

  2. Gable 2

    Are you a Labour Party Member? Do you support the membership having a genuine and effective role in when and how we select the Leader? Are you concerned that ” senior sources” wants the Caucus to have a block vote? And that they can over-ride the process if their preferred candidate is not selected? Do you want to influence those on the NZ Council shaping the decision? They want to hear from you. Here is the contact info that you require.

    David Shearer    david.shearer@parliament.govt.nz
    Grant    Robertson, grant.robertson@parliament.govt.nz,
    Moira Coatsworth
    Chris      Flatt,  gensec@labour.org.nz
    Maori Senior VP, Parekura Horomia parekura.horomia@parliament.govt.nz
    Women’s VP, Kate Sutton
    Senior VP, Robert Gallagher
    Affiliates VP, Angus McConnell,
    Policy Council, Jordan Carter,
    Young Labour VP, Glenn Riddell,
    Te Kaunihere, Rudy Taylor,
    Te Kaunihere, Deborah Mahuta-Coyle,
    Pacific Island Vice President,
    Area 1,  Tanja Bristow,
    Area 1, Paul Chalmers,
    Area 2, Sonya Church,
    Area 3, Shane Stieller,
    Area 4,  Paul Tolich,
    Area 5, Tony Milne,
    Area 6, Glenda Alexander,
    Rainbow Sector, Simon Randall.

    Kia Kaha

     

  3. Gable 3

    And here is to background for your chat with your Area Rep. (taken from a blog on another stream)

    Seeing coverage of the apparently unhurried steps towards Labour party members having a say in future leadership bids made me want to stop and ask some questions about whether they are telling the full story:

    1) Will members have the same say as MPs? And who were the “Senior members” said there was some concern that giving too much weight to the membership vote over the caucus vote? Isn’t the point that MPs are accountable to the
    membership? If you think of the caucus as being like the employees and the membership is the Board, then employees don’t get to choose the CEO – in a grown up world you work with who you need to. And if the membership choose
    someone presumably they are doing it for a good reason? Could it be that there are some MPs who think there is something to fear from that extra level of accountability to the party grassroots?

    2) Will the proportion of the leadership vote assigned to affiliates be shrunk by those within caucus who distrust the union movement? Once again what do MPs fear? This is the Labour party, grounded in the Labour relations movement isn’t it?

    3) What will happen to the automatic 2013 vote (year ahead of an election)? Surely this would be the perfect opportunity for the membership and affiliates to illustrate their support for the leader for whom they will be volunteering their time to help elect in 2014? And given that this whole undertaking is designed to empower the party membership then why would you try and sidestep the rules before the ink is dry?

    4) How is the winnder in each category determined? Winner takes all? Proportional? We all recognise how the ‘first past the post’ approach establishes bias in the system – that’s why we have MMP!

    5) Finally, while I applaud caucus and the party for bringing this to the table they can’t afford to do it in a way that is less than meaningful. Besides, what are caucus afraid of? If all is going well who would want to challenge and open themselves to the sort of scrutiny that brings – especially as they would have to justify their decision to the membership, and the wider public, if things are out in the open. Having chosen to open this topic caucus cannot afford to sell the members short. Who is the winner if the party tears itself apart over this? Short term it may be those within the caucus who are resistant to change, but the long term answer would be National, as they’d retain the Treasury benches for some time to come.

    • Colonial Viper 3.1

      Thanks for posting this. NZ Council meeting is this weekend and people need to get word to their rep to make sure that members and unions get the utmost say, not the 30-40 people in caucus.

      A wide array of real options need to be brought to a democratic vote in front of delegates at November Conference.

      And who were the “Senior members” said there was some concern that giving too much weight to the membership vote over the caucus vote? Isn’t the point that MPs are accountable to the
      membership?

      As you know, there are a bunch of MPs who don’t really believe in any accountability to the party, and who prefer a party compliant to caucus.

      As for the “senior members” you ask about, I suspect (but cannot know for sure) Parker, Jones, Cosgrove and Robertson to be amongst them.

    • …I applaud caucus and the party for bringing this to the table…

      I applaud this too, good to see it being looked at and widely and openly discussed.

      Democracy sounds simple – until you start to consider all the possibilities. FPP is much simpler than MMP, but is generally regarded as less fair and less democratic. A simple majority has it’s benefits but also can have potentially major flaws – including when it comes to leader and candidate selection.

      I hope it ends up with a better way of doing intra-party democracy
      – but remember, democracy doesn’t satisfy all of the people all of the time.

      Vernon Small writes on it: Labour tiptoes towards perception change.

      • Colonial Viper 3.2.1

        Pete George, you took Gable’s quote right out of context. It was actually:

        while I applaud caucus and the party for bringing this to the table they can’t afford to do it in a way that is less than meaningful. Besides, what are caucus afraid of?

        • felix 3.2.1.1

          PG selectively quoting so as to present the opposite impression to what was said?

          Shock I am.

    • Ad 3.3

      Has anyone read Fran O’Sullivan in the Herald this morning? She says what many on this site have been saying for months, namely, that Shearer just isn’t doing a good job of presenting Labour policy or ideas and always prefers mango-skin variant stories.

      Even worse, that his primary threat is Greens Leader Russell Norman, who always appears succinct and focussed and appealing.

      Which means that those slowly increasing poll numbers for Labour are occurring DESPITE Shearer, not because of him.

      What we don’t want to do is lose the next election because we didn’t have someone who could unify the troops, or have the confidence of the whole – caucus, members, and our own SuperPACs the unions. We need a leader in fact who will do that.

      And this constitutional review must provide Labour with the mechanisms to do that.

      I dread what will occur if Labour’s NZCouncil do not.

      • muzza 3.3.1

        “Which means that those slowly increasing poll numbers for Labour are occurring DESPITE Shearer, not because of him.”

        Nah those polls are a carefully orchestrated diversion to ensure that there are still simpletons who think that NZ politics is a democracy, which is clearly is not!

      • Te Reo Putake 3.3.2

        Jeez, Ad, if you are relying On Fran O’Sullivan to back your arguments up you must know you’ve already on a loser. David Shearer is going to be the next PM whether you like it or not.
         
        Give the man some credit for steadying the ship. These slow, but effective poll gains are a result of his leadership and some real discipline from the rest of the caucus. Notice there haven’t been any self inflicted wounds in recent months? Discipline and positivity are going see Labour lead the next Government.

        • Ad 3.3.2.1

          Yes O’Sullivan makes me sick generally. Still the NZHerald editorial this week was clearly extremely well briefed by those who prefer the current leadership system to be protected, so it was good to see the Herald giving with one hand and then taking with the other. Balanced journalism right? ;-)

          It was pretty steady under Goff. In fact it was pretty steady under Rowling. Steady losers.

          Discipline and positivity is standard code for do what caucus tells you to do.

          We are over that now. Moira let the democracy genie out of the bottle and there is no stuffing it back in.

          Discipline and positivity will not will Labour any election. Inspiring members, supporters, and in fact inspiring New Zealand will.

          • mike e 3.3.2.1.1

            The Neo Con man Key is loosing his Teflon.
            Investment bankers are the most despised people in the world today.
            Labour just has to sit back and watch National implode.
            Austerity policies will Guarantee the economy continues to bottom drag.

        • Olwyn 3.3.2.2

          Some perspective is needed here. National’s vote is slowly collapsing. Labour’s vote has returned from its election day low to the general area where it has yoyoed for the past four and a half years. Winning an election from that position would very likely render it a one term government, with a long time in the wilderness to follow.

        • BillODrees 3.3.2.3

          Jesus wept, TRP
          How fucking inspirationless and ambitionless can we be? 
          Are you saying that the new strategy of the twits who brought Labour to its worse election defeat in 2011 is to just avoid upsetting people?  And then, Mirabula Dictu, half a million who did not vote or drifted to parties that inspired them, will come, racing down the street, first thing in the morning, and vote Shearer and Robertson into a government!  

          Next you will be telling us that the Meet shall inherit the Earth!  

          • Colonial Viper 3.3.2.3.1

            Bill. The Labour caucus has got a policy of leadership by managing internal poll numbers. Its the reason why NZ1 and the Greens can react faster and more authentically on every single issue.

            And the faction currently in power in the Labour caucus are only interested in chasing the soft middle class vote and befriending big business; they aren’t interested in turning out the working or under class vote.

          • Te Reo Putake 3.3.2.3.2

            Not saying any of those things, Bill. But I know a good strategy when I see one and letting your opponent make mistakes, while making none yourself tends to result in wins. And Labour will be looking to go into election year ready to win. That means building support now and announcing good policy then. Which they are clearly doing, according to my mate Roy Morgan. Under Shearer’s quiet, but effective leadership.
             
            Sorry you don’t have the patience, Bill, but the rest of us will carry on to victory with or without you.

            • muzza 3.3.2.3.2.1

              “But I know a good strategy when I see one ”

              –You don’t even know yourself, which is why you are able to spout this sort of shit!

              Ego is not being able to see where ones-self has been fooled, because ones ego, wont allow it!

              The other part is just being a fucken idiot, too stupid to see your own ego, yet making statements like “But I know a good strategy when I see one” & “Sorry you don’t have the patience, Bill, but the rest of us will carry on to victory with or without you”

              You manage to pull off both like a champion, but its your ego which is causing you the real problems, and its possible you are not dumb enough for that to be the major excuse!

              ‘Victory”, “the rest of us” – Sums you up right there, you cant even begin to hide it….dick!

              • Colonial Viper

                TRP embodies the core Labour caucus political philosophy.

                They are for winning, and stand against losing.

            • Ad 3.3.2.3.2.2

              “The rest of us will carry on to victory with or without you”

              … shows precisely why we no longer need a Labour Party dominated by caucus. Any criticism sees the blood-veil come over the eyes, and out come the “with us or against us” Bush-isms, just as you did.

              You need to get ready for democracy within Labour, Te Reo. There will be no more of that crap.

              No more bullying in the guise of “discipline”. You will have to learn grace. Leadership will have to learn to take criticism within and without. As, Te Reo, will you.

            • lefty 3.3.2.3.2.3

              Whats the use of winning an election by default?

              It leaves the electorate totally without hope because all they have done is vote against something.

              Those who support Labour standing for nothing simply because that will get them into government are actually actually advocating stripping out the final vestiges of any real meaning in the system of parliamentary democracy.

            • Blue 3.3.2.3.2.4

              A party NOT shooting themselves in the foot every five minutes is expected. It is the minimum standard to achieve.

              You don’t get a medal for doing that.

              Shearer and Labour are invisible. No one knows what they are doing, what they stand for or who they are. The Greens and NZ First have taken on the job of being the Opposition.

              National are losing popularity all on their own, not because Labour has done anything special lately. We’re at or nearing the point where the balance could tip.

              But it won’t if people see no alternative to National. Even if they dislike National they will still vote for them if they think Labour is worse.

              The idea that National losing popularity on their own is enough to propel Labour into Government is false. We could end up with a hung Parliament or a National/NZ First coalition or some other mad combination.

            • Draco T Bastard 3.3.2.3.2.5

              But I know a good strategy when I see one and letting your opponent make mistakes, while making none yourself tends to result in wins.

              There’s a difference between not making any mistakes and not doing anything at all.

              That means building support now and announcing good policy then.

              Support that only comes because people are sick of the other side is very, very soft.

            • Te Reo Putake 3.3.2.3.2.6

              Cheers, y’all, I salute your relentless positivity.  Meanwhile, the fight goes on.

              • Colonial Viper

                The fight? Wake up man, the fact there is no fucking fight in Labour – merely a timid strategy to run down the clock with fingers crossed – is what everyone is pointing out!!!

        • muzza 3.3.2.4

          “Give the man some credit for steadying the ship. These slow, but effective poll gains are a result of his leadership and some real discipline from the rest of the caucus”

          –You are a bigger part of the problem than I ever gave you credit for…Please just stand down!

          • Colonial Viper 3.3.2.4.1

            Yeah pretty much. Look up “The Peoples Flag is Palest Pink”.

        • Vicky32 3.3.2.5

          Discipline and positivity are going see Labour lead the next Government.

          Much though it hurts* to agree with you, I do.
          The Labour hatred, and specifically the Shearer hatred here gets very, very old…
           
          * You possibly have some conception of how much it hurts – and it applies to this one topic only! I’d rather die than agree with you about anything else, ever again.

      • QoT 3.3.3

        Gotta say, I’ll be deeply depressed if he follows her advice on this bit (referring to mining):

        Right now he is trying to extricate himself on the mining issue after the Herald’s bellwether poll showed that New Zealanders have warmed to the prospect of surgical mining to leverage the country’s valuable natural resource base: reversing himself out of the poll-driven cul-de-sac that he parked himself in when public opinion was running in the other direction.

        Or, just a thought, he could say “There is no such thing as surgical mining. I won’t lie to the New Zealand people about the effects of mining just to win votes, unlike the Government.”

        But of course O’Sullivan is not in the business of giving Labour good advice, just sometimes accidentally hitting on the truth when telling them how they’re doing it wrong.

      • Carol 3.3.4

        Both Shearer and Norman are too far to the right for my liking. But NAct and supporters will continue to focus on those two as more desirable than the more left wing members of of the Labour and Green Parties. And they will continue to try to play them (Shearer & Norman) off against each other.

        It’s taken some time for Norman to build a media presence, too. Remember when he was portrayed by righties as a wimpy joke when he protested with a Tibetan flag at parliament?

    • Draco T Bastard 3.4

      Could it be that there are some MPs who think there is something to fear from that extra level of accountability to the party grassroots?

      Careers are a lot easier when you only have to impress a few people at the top of a hierarchy rather than most people in an egalitarian organisation.

      This is the Labour party, grounded in the Labour relations movement isn’t it?

      It’s got the same name but it is no longer that party and hasn’t been since the 1980s.

  4. Carol 4

    Kind of related to this morning’s (so far) open mike theme of environmental destruction and the collapse of the dominance of the industrialised western world….

    As someone who is just not into owning land, this mania to purchase a mortgage, with people scrambling over the banks bargain bin sale, just sees like a craziness to me:

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10819502

    Thousands of New Zealanders chasing a cut in their home loan interest rate have caused a log jam in the banking system, which is groaning under the weight of homeowners battling for the best deal.
    [...]
    Mortgage rates have hit rock bottom and banks are going to extreme lengths to get borrowers to switch lenders.

    And then I read Monbiot’s piece commemorating the environmental poet, John Clare (1793-1864)

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/jul/09/john-clare-poetry

    Clare came from a poor [English] background, but took to the printed word, recording his pleasure in the natural world around him. Monbiot says, for Clare:
    While life was hard and spare, it was also, he records, joyful and thrilling.

    But then came enclosures, and the despairing decline of Clare. Monbiot describes the impact of the enclosures:

    Farming became more profitable, but many of the people of Helpston – especially those who depended on the commons for their survival – were deprived of their living. The places in which the people held their ceremonies and celebrated the passing of the seasons were fenced off. The community, like the land, was parcelled up, rationalised, atomised. I have watched the same process breaking up the Maasai of east Africa.

    And that last sentence reminds me that for John Key, the issue of water is about outright ownership, while for tangata whenua, it’s about rights & kaitiaki:

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10819504

    [Te Runanga-a-Iwi o Ngapuhi chairman Sonny] Tau said talk of who “owned” water was merely confusing, “because at the end of the day ownership in the Western ideology is not what we seek”.

    “We seek to be recognised in our role as kaitiaki or guardians of water so that if there’s any allocation or allocation of rights to water, then Maori need to be significantly involved.”

    We need to get away from western notions of ownership of land and resources, and get more into a kaitiaki state of mind. To quote Clare, as cited by Monbiot:

    “Inclosure came and trampled on the grave / Of labour’s rights and left the poor a slave … And birds and trees and flowers without a name / All sighed when lawless law’s enclosure came.”

    • Carol 4.1

      I also meant to include this quote from Monbiot’s article, about how the seeds of the decline of Western capitalism, were built into its (environmentally-destructive) rise:

      Our environmental crisis could be said to have begun with the enclosures. The current era of greed, privatisation and the seizure of public assets was foreshadowed by them: they prepared the soil for these toxic crops.

      • Uturn 4.1.1

        I agree. The conflict/solution, either/or, way of thinking creates conflicts that become ends in themselves. Lose perspective, find a “problem”. Treat the problem with a loss of perspective, create another problem, treat it with the system that created the problem, create another problem, treat it with the same system, that creates another problem…

    • Ad 4.2

      It makes it easier to describe what makes up the kind of world we have created when you describe the world as a series of conceptual layers:

      – Synchronised time, across all parts of the world, which calibrates our waking life into a march
      – Property, which drives divisiveness and pollutes humans with an ether of constant anxiety and avarice
      – Patriarchy, which sorts people by a scopic order of beauty and violence repressed or otherwise
      – Resource, as subset of property, which commodifies the earth into things that are quantified as ready to be used up
      – Speed, which integrates time and resource into productivity and lived experience
      – and Money, a subset of property that accelerates time and resource and enables them to be expressed together

      Get rid of any one of those layers in your life and you really no longer fit onto this world.

      • Uturn 4.2.1

        Succinct.

        Would you say that on leaving “this world” people can enter a new place, that despite it’s challenges, isn’t all that bad?

        • Ad 4.2.1.1

          Yes, particularly in New Zealand. There was a little book a while ago called “The Eight Tribes of New Zealand” and one of those was the Raglan Tribe. They are the outsiders, small in number, in some alternative black economy, often subsistence, sometimes illegal. They are our outsiders.

          I wouldn’t want it myself. Too soft.

    • weka 4.3

      [Te Runanga-a-Iwi o Ngapuhi chairman Sonny] Tau said talk of who “owned” water was merely confusing, “because at the end of the day ownership in the Western ideology is not what we seek”.

      “We seek to be recognised in our role as kaitiaki or guardians of water so that if there’s any allocation or allocation of rights to water, then Maori need to be significantly involved.”

      We need to get away from western notions of ownership of land and resources, and get more into a kaitiaki state of mind.
      ——————

      I quite agree Carol and am pleased to see Tau specifically naming Western ideologies as a problem. I’ve been increasingly alarmed by how much this debate is being framed around water as a commodity and who gets to control that, rather than any core concepts of rivers and lakes being part of the world we belong to and have responsibilities towards.

      A big problem here is that the MSM have almost no capacity for speaking outside the Western mindset, and because they are generally useless at covering Te Ao Maori, it’s unlikely they will even notice the differences. For those of us here who believe that we are all better off acknowledging and working within tangata whenua worldviews, there is a challenge now to change the nature of the debate.

      • Uturn 4.3.1

        For those of us here who believe that we are all better off acknowledging and working within tangata whenua worldviews, there is a challenge now to change the nature of the debate.

        Do you have any “everyday practical guidelines” for this?

        For example, the chances of me becoming a journalist are nil, and the instances where I might influence a journalist are theoretical at best, so what would people like me do that would change the debate from street level? I’m sure direct confrontation/endless arguments will work for some, but my experience is that it’s like bouncing a ball off a concrete wall. Don’t get me wrong, I like a good demonstration as much as the next protestor, but one reactive format does not suit every situation. Surely there’s got to be something big on effect, that does not rely on being adversarial?

        • weka 4.3.1.1

          Haven’t thought it through yet Uturn, but off the top of my head…
           
          The blogosphere is increasingly influential, and there is no reason why it can’t lead the way on this. Write posts and comments.
           
          Target reasonably receptive media like National Radio eg get Kim Hill to interview someone who knows these issues inside out and can hold their own talking with her. Use whatever means available to comment to MSM directly (txt, email, posting one websites). Make the issues visible.
           
          Educate ourselves and start using language and concepts that support alternatives to the Western world view (and try not to use Western new age language). This is a major challenge IMO. Many Pakeha do understand these issues to some extent, but English is not yet a good/easy language to discuss them.
           
          Start talking about Peak Water. Now that Peak Oil is in the mainstream, it gives an easy reference point. Fear can be a useful motivator.
           
          Build bridges between Maori and non-Maori. The risk here is that Pakeha appropriate Maori concepts and ideas without changing power structures (aka they steal more shit), or they engage in brownwashing.

          • Uturn 4.3.1.1.1

            Build bridges between Maori and non-Maori. The risk here is that Pakeha appropriate Maori concepts and ideas without changing power structures (aka they steal more shit), or they engage in brownwashing.

            On building bridges without first acknowledging power structures and “brownwashing”:

            This would roughly equate to not wearing gimmicky things like flags and t-shirts related to maori sovereignty? Turning it into a cheap fashion statement. Like the Che Guevara stuff that was once popular.

            How would a pakeha person behave in a way that tangata whenua would recognise as respectful/correct, regardless of there being any maori around to notice; avoiding brownwashing and other manifestations of a shallow kind of affirmative action?

            For example, let’s pick something randomly modern: Pakeha is at the supermarket, what is he/she doing, how is he she behaving, that allows space for maori to be maori, should maori enter the line at the checkout? Doesn’t matter which maori fills that space, just so long at it’s there when needed and that pakeha aren’t unwittingly occupying it in the meantime. How do pakeha “find their place”, or “make space”?

            Is this what you mean, or have I misunderstood something?

            • weka 4.3.1.1.1.1

              Not really understanding that example Uturn? Why would anyone need to let someone go first in the supermarket?
               
              I was thinking more about Pakeha being willing to engage with Maori on Maori terms eg spending time on Marae or in other Maori dominant spaces, reading Maori media and writings, educating ourselves about Te Ao Maori and finding ways to put aside our own agendas for a while, acknowledge that we are on a learning curve and let Maori voices be heard and practiced in non-Maori spaces (perhaps starting with TS)
               
              I also think taking actions to support/tautoko te reo. I only learned quite recently that te reo is not yet out of danger and that many of the gains in the 90s eg Kohanga reo are going backwards again.
               
              Brownwashing… just that we need to avoid doing what we’ve done with eco issues. So much of the middle class wants to do the right thing but only of it doesn’t inconvenience them too much, so we have lots of eco things that are just rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. I think Pakeha NZ is quite capable of taking what it wants without really changing.
               
              One example of this is the new agers. They acknowledge a deficit in their own cultures’ society and spirituality, express an interest in indigenous practices, and decry the fact that they’ve lost their own indigenous experience eons ago and so the only way they can feel connected is via someone else’s culture. They then flock to anything native so long as it’s presented in a non-complex, non-threatening way. As far as I can tell this is predominantly to make the new agers feel better. They are largely devoid of any political awareness (and will in fact say that politics is not good for spirituality) and so will take the things they perceive as taonga and almost completely ignore the rest (the real racists among them will go further and talk about the nice peaceful Waitaha and the nasty violent Ngai Tahu, and how there were really white people here before Maori anyway).
               
              A friend of mine calls them culture vultures. Not all new agers are like that, but it has been a core feature of those communities for a long time. I see the potential for Pakeha to do this with Maori culture in general – take the bits that feed them (or they feel comfortable with) and ignore/deny the rest. 

              • Uturn

                I don’t mean let people go first at the supermarket, but that there must be a mindset for pakeha that from a maori world view perspective, is correct for pakeha.

                If I understand correctly that a maori world view has everything in it’s place, then no matter where pakeha are e.g. at the supermarket, beach, riverside, on a hill, there must a be an action that illustrates a mindset. To do anything more overt, would be brownwashing, adopt-a-maori type thinking and completely false or ingenuine. Which is why I suggest, even if there are no maori around to notice, pakeha occupying a position that is inherent to tangata whenua would cause a disturbance to the maori world view?

                To avoid a brownwash situation entirely, should we be able to imagine a world where maori are there and pakeha are over there, the two rarely meet, but each occupies it’s correct space. Or to use another metaphor: if what we have now is a wall between maori and pakeha, and pakeha have a habit of jumping over the wall and taking stuff and jumping back again; and maori would prefer to replace the wall with a more fluid interface, what does that interface look like, as described by maori, once pakeha stop invading maori territory?

                • Carol

                  I’ve seen some articles relating to Matariki and traditional Maori food gathering (wild food from the bush) and food preparation. Some of it publicised events for everyone to learn a little about the traditional tangata whenua approaches to food.

                  Also, Pakeha have our own traditions that predate capitalism, that we can look back to. The community and common good that the poet Clare & Monbiot wrote about.

          • muzza 4.3.1.1.2

            “The blogosphere is increasingly influential, and there is no reason why it can’t lead the way on this. Write posts and comments”

            –While the net is a good tool for gathering, and sharing ideas, never underestimate its ability to suck the energy out of good intentions, misdirect them, and flat out be used against them.

            I can’t help but feel people believe that being active online is in some way helping, like believing that humanity becoming closer or better communicators, because we communicate more, when the opposite is in fact true. The tech is isolating, as much as it is unifying,

            So while the the blogs etc are all good an well, dont be fooled into thinking that at some point, all but the very few will have to take physical action, those few will also have to sometime after that.

            I know there was more to your post Weka, but I just wanted to highlight that singular component.

            Cheers

            • weka 4.3.1.1.2.1

              It’s a good point muzza, and I tend to agree as a generalisation. However I think I was meaning more that the mainstream is now taking blogging more seriously, the MSM uses the blogosphere, and people who have been traditional power holders also use the blogosphere. That means it’s a (one) point of intervention in terms of influencing how the debate goes. But yeah, don’t worry, I’m not thinking it’s replacement for real life.

  5. just saying 5

    .

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/jul/13/racism-public-discourse-power-to-define

    A brilliant piece from the Guardian: “Racism is still very much with us. So why don’t we recognise it?”

    The consensus that societies are post-racial has supported a range of political strategies often described as “cultural racism”. The people are not racist, the argument goes, and any prejudice is merely a natural defensive response to the “reverse racism” of “migrants” who refuse to adapt and accept “our way of life”. While these strategies eschewed overt claims of superiority, 9/11 and its aftermath have brought assertions of cultural hierarchy unashamedly back into mainstream European politics.’ ‘Our way of life’ only makes sense when there is somebody to define it, and defend it against.

    If shifting forms of racialisation make racism hard to pin down, the liberal ideal of “colour-blindness” makes it even harder. Being blind to race often involves being blind to racism. The election of Barack Obama led to the celebration of a post-racial era in the US, but it also led to what Darnell L Moore calls “e(race)sure”. That is, racism has not been overcome because a black President was elected, but the legitimacy of analysing society in terms of race has been undermined. Obama can be made to stand as evidence of the removal of the final racial barriers to achievement, with the twist that those who do not now achieve fail not because of inequality, discrimination or exclusion, but because they don’t try hard enough.

    The insistence that we live in post-racial societies, and the outrage when racism is called out, denies those who experience racism the right to define it and combat it on their terms. This is a central anti-racist principle, yet it is those who perpetuate racism who increasingly claim the right to say what racism is and, more frequently, what it is not….

  6. aerobubble 6

    Its not that we need a new paradigm to fix the problems.
    Its we need the rules to actually matter.

    Take my present problem. First some preliminaries.
    When you sleep you ears pick up (for evolutionary
    reasons that hearing a predator coming means you
    live to pass on your genes) a lot more. So
    much so people are oft required to use white noise
    machines to protect their hearing at night.

    Now we all know that road vehicles have a upper
    limit of noise, measured of course when they are
    maxed out for speed on the open highway. We
    see councils building new roads with huge earth
    barriers on either side of the roads, negative
    sensitive areas. Because to reduce costs, we
    spend more instead of investing in better motor
    vehicles (silent electric cars and putting freight
    on trains).

    Thirdly, in harder times people get angry. They
    are likely to believe they have a right not only
    to noise but noise at low speed. So they reconfigure
    their cars, which won’t be assessed for noise at
    low speed (or acceptable because the limit at high
    speed when engine is most violent is met), to be mean
    noise bombs the moment the ignition is turned on.

    Now obviously if they also go to work at 7am, too
    their high noise building site, where they lost their
    hearing many years before, then end up pounding their neghbors
    with noise every morning.

    And how does our society deal with this problem, of
    a legal road vehicle, pumped up for noise, waking
    good people to excessive noise at 7am when they
    were asleep. Well they call noise control.

    And as is the want of council noise control to
    decide what is acceptable, what they will investigate,
    because that what’s council decide, they do a rather
    blaize investigation and apply no standards but
    the subjective assessment of council officers!@#@

    You see, after a run of massive credit binging, not
    only have councils not had to deal with the growing
    rage and so losened their grip on what their legal
    duty is. That they have to investigate noise – ANY NOISE.
    Also, to be fair, its easier to clear up a problem by a
    word or too to the party of noise, and so they didn’t
    need all that dumb noise testing equipment and chucked it.

    Its not that we need a new paradigm to fix the problems.
    Its we need the rules to actually matter.

    Thirty years of neo-liberalism have softened the brains
    of our bureaucrats to the extent that even the most
    hairy sane ministers come up with nonsense policies
    that would have had their departments carefully pressing
    the buttons to talk down the minister. Not any more.

    Because the rot isn’t just noise officers saying they
    cannot investigate noise despite their legal duty under
    the local government act to do so, diligently. No,
    the rot is everywhere where a generation has had it too
    easy, easy in both senses, easier laxer regulation and
    easier and simpler times requiring a phone call to clear
    up. Not as now with lots of angry people and their angry
    cars.

    Since we are moving and becoming, a rightly, more angry
    society again. Cheap energy has made us destroy the planet,
    we don’t need no new paradigm, we just need to get anal
    about rules again. Apply them consistently, apply them
    rigorously, apply them quicker.

    And their in lies the problem. The conservative, always
    waiting at tipping points to stop the backward movement
    of society, away from all their deregulation and political
    hired lazy bureaucrats. Its doesn’t matter that a neighbor is
    losing their hearing, getting tinnitus, ACC is waiting
    to pay out. Its doesn’t matter that the costs of
    conservatism will cost us more, more destroyed lives.

    All that matters is our preservation of the ruling elite
    and their self-serving bad thinking patterns, the turd blossom.

    The turd blossom is a simple trick. The idea is to stop
    change that harms the elite. It involves a two step
    process, or as I like to think of it, arse backwards.
    Arguments start with evidence and then talk to changes.
    Arse backwards turb blossoms reverse this, they talk
    first about costs and difficulties with implementation
    before there is even agreement over evidence. So the
    convincing argument for change, that the elite fears
    becomes a mess of misunderstanding, distorted facts
    (since facts are worked differently in the investigation
    phase and the governing phases), and dispersion of the
    root need the argument was talking to.

    Now let’s not be too high minded, some turb blossoms are needed
    to protect the nation state. The problem is that conservatives
    are using them exclusively to protect themselves, the elite few.

    We don’t need no paradigm shift, we can’t wait for one, we
    need the rightwing to STFU, stop going brutal like a bunch
    of weak fearful people who are about (rightly) to be sacked
    for incompetence and laziness. Its only going to cost more
    in the long run, the longer they hang on that is.

    But we don’t need no frigging new paradigm, we need rules to
    matter. we don’t need no fanatic Senisible Sentencing Trust
    rush of blood to their head, end the right to silence.
    A classic two stop arse backwards argument, because
    the accused could create a better justice system by exposing
    themselves in court, then we should mess up the evidential
    trail by making it easier for botchups earlier in the process.
    we seperate matters for a reason. A good investigator
    knows the facts at the time of the crime will have a
    different facet in courts. So police can stage a press
    conference where they may believe the suspect is a family
    member, or use the need to search the area for offenders and
    find evidence in the course of investigating. Why would
    we want to reward the state law officers with the nonsense
    of the police investigation process, where facts found during
    investigating can have both positive and negative connotations.

    I need council to investigate a noisy car on private property,
    that leaves every morning just before 7am, a noise bomb, that takes
    the quiet of early morning and smashes it with a noise
    that should only be coming from a truck at 100 on the open
    highway. All vehicles should be minimized for noise, for
    obvious reasons that if we didn’t the cacophony would be
    horrendous. So why is it so hard for Police and Council to
    work together to minimize the noisiest vehicle around here,
    BY FAR? Because Police cannot act as its a car on private
    property, not the open road, and council says it cannot
    act because the car is legal for the road!!!! Council needs
    to act because it has a duty to investigate all roadway
    vehicles on private property being tested for their big
    day at the local raceway. So why isn’t it, is my council
    just more lazy, reckless about the loss of hearing to
    not only neighbors but family of the petrol head, his kids
    with 10m of this noise bomb???? Will ACC be picking up the
    costs in future years when these kids start claiming
    hearing aids??? When he deliberately passes his hearing loss
    to his own kids???

    We’ve had it easy, with lots of dosh, loads of money, flushing
    the economy, our bureaucrats didn’t need to be ruthless in
    regard of regulation, our society was happy, our public
    servants could nuance solutions off the cuff. These days
    are over. We do not need National’s continuing new paradigms,
    charter schools, national standards, kids learn naturally,
    ask why they aren’t, not how they can do so faster. Yeah,
    how stupid are National, that they believe if they can get
    kids at the tail to learn faster like those at the top do!
    Kids arent learning at the bottom, are inhibited, and aren’t
    going to learn faster if they aren’t fed, if they can’t do
    their homework for the cold home they live in, if all they
    can see is debt in their educational future. No reward, lots
    more barriers.

    National paradigm of having new solutions, of looking active,
    when we all know their extremism selects laughable evidence
    from crazy America, look at the great US, its imploding from
    horrendous levels of stupidity, the US will take us all with
    them into an environmental, economic, societal hell on earth.
    Its a joke that anyone believes Key’s government is good for NZ.

    We do not need a new paradigm, we need to live in the now,
    and enforce the rules we have now, and reverse the decline
    in rules that rightwing governments of Labor and National
    have produced. National are anti rule of law, want change now,
    when we need diligent government who worry about outcomes
    not balance sheets (they come later).

    National are arse backwards, like their neo-liberal turd
    bottom agenda. And someone get the council to do something
    about the noise bomb please!!!

    • John Connor 6.1

      very creative and very funny. If I could emoticon a big cheesy grin I would.

        • John Connor 6.1.1.1

          and then? mouse does not pick them up? Im such a luddite, but give me an in-chassis overhall of a 14 litre truck engine……..

          So the machines better watch out.

          Consider,
          EFT
          GPS
          Social-networking
          blogging
          TV
          Satellite
          Surveilance
          Surveys
          Statistics
          Apps
          E-readers
          Phones
          Pads
          Vehicle computers
          HIGH FREQUENCY ALGORITHMIC MARKET TRADING

          bored now, better go do my chores.

          It be Master and Slave.

          (well, spose peoples are not mining for salt here yet!)

          • Uturn 6.1.1.1.1

            To get that green smiling face, write as you word a normal word :,mrgreen,:

            but leave out the commas I’ve put in there. There should be no spaces between the colons and the mrgreen.

            Same goes for anything on the emoticons list link, but some are symbols only, such as,

            8 ,-, ) remove the commas and you get 8-)

            You can’t copy and paste the actual emoticon into this system’s text boxes. Won’t recognise it.

    • Uturn 6.2

      Enjoyed reading your words, aerobubble.

  7. joe90 7

    EFF on the TPP.

    https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/07/21st-century-agreement-is-really-best-way

    So, in summary, the USTR has released a public blog post about a secret proposal to expand something – a filtering mechanism on copyright limitations and exceptions – which might have real social, moral, and economic value. And all we know is that the only thing the authors of the proposal really wanted to make public was the fact that no matter what the content was, it was subject to enough international restrictions that it could be effectively gutted. The only thing 21st century about that is they used a blog to tell us about it.

  8. John Connor 8

    The irony is that this current cohort of wannabees do not recognise that the ubermensch over-come themselves not come-over themselves.

  9. Herodotus 9

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10819498

    Mr Quivooy said there was a two-year statute of limitations in the Gambling Act which meant “the department would be unable to bring a prosecution”.
    Was this law ever intend to be used in keeping the industry honest ?
    Perhaps these machines should be nationalised and be incorporated within the Lotteries commission, as it appears we cannot trust those running gambling :-(
    IMO if like alcohol any license operator caught breaching the rules then 1st case week, 2nd breach month suspension of ability to sell, then loss of license.

  10. John Key has copped most of the flack over water ‘ownership’, but he holds a fairly common view.

    Labour has exactly the same position as National – nobody owns the water – and if there were an adverse finding of the Waitangi Tribunal would not necessarily follow them.

    Yet leader David Shearer is unable to articulate it strongly for fear of sounding like National and for fear of offending the party’s Maori constituency.

    Instead, he joined Mana’s Hone Harawira this week in calling for the Maori Party to end its support agreement with the National Government.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/politics/news/article.cfm?c_id=280&objectid=10819407

    Tricky position.

    The Shearer argument went something like this: Yes, John Key is inflaming things by rarking up the Maori Council and saying his Government won't be bound by any Waitangi Tribunal ruling on the push to stop the Mighty River Power share float until a deal is done in this area.

    But, no, Maori don't have a valid water claim. Nobody owns water. We pay for water rights to use water, whether it be for irrigation or hydro-electricity or whatever.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/politics/news/article.cfm?c_id=280&objectid=10819407

    A waterproof jacket is different to a flak jacket.

  11. deuto 12

    A somewhat different approach from Audrey Young also on the Herald website this morning from Adam Bennett – John Key: Waking the Taniwha.

    The Maori Council’s Waitangi Tribunal water claim has served notice that the “taniwha” of Maori customary ownership has been awakened by the Government’s partial asset sales plan.

    It’s a creature that previous governments have trifled with at their peril, but Prime Minister John Key this week goaded it with comments that have been widely interpreted as marginalising the tribunal and its findings before they have even been produced.

    Though the elderly Sir Graham Latimer is not playing an active role in the presentation of the council’s case, his presence at Waiwhetu marae in Lower Hutt and his name on court papers as first claimant at the Waitangi Tribunal hearing should serve as a warning. It was Sir Graham who initiated court action over fisheries, in a major lands case, and over radio spectrum….

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/politics/news/article.cfm?c_id=280&objectid=10819504

    IMHO, Bennett’s article presents a much greater understanding of the implications than that of Young’s.

  12. joe90 13

    The mask slips: Fuck them all.

    Andrea Fabra, a deputy of the ruling party PP in the Spanish parliament, became the center of political storm in the recession-hit country on Friday after video showed her insulting unemployed citizens saying “Fuck them all” just seconds after Spanish PM announced austerity measures.

  13. weka 14

    When I reply to someone’s post, there is no menu bar with the bold, italics, quote etc buttons, but the reply box at the bottom of each page has one. ‘Use WYSIWYG’ is ticked in the bottom of page box, but not in the ‘reply to specific posts’ box. Anyone else have this?

  14. joe90 15

    More skulduggery from the bankers.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/07/13/us-jpmorgan-earnings-idUSBRE86C0G420120713

    (Reuters) – U.S. federal investigators are looking at whether JPMorgan Chase & Co traders hid trading losses that have since grown to $5.8 billion, according to a person familiar with the matter, after the bank said its own probe found reason for suspicion.

    • Colonial Viper 15.1

      Will they have the nerve to ever charge the man at the top, Jamie Dimon. Who is protected by a huge wall of political and financial influence in Washington.

      Meanwhile from Zerohedge:

      http://www.zerohedge.com/news/jpms-punshiment-two-years-clawbacks-three-traders

      Behold Newton’s 3rd law of Fraudics: Every gross fraudulent action has a laughably inadequate and unequal wristslap reaction. For years of mismarking CDS and the CIO ‘Mistake’, which incidentally everyone at JPM knew about for quarters, and where JPM thought it could manipulate any market it wants simply by sheer scale

      Also

      http://www.zerohedge.com/news/jpm-admits-cio-group-mismarked-hundreds-billions-cds-effort-artificially-boost-profits

      As a result of this, regulators who now are only 3 years behind the curve, are most likely snooping to inquire not only how JPM did it (call us: we can brief you in 2 minutes), but who else has been doing this? Hint: everyone.

      This is like the “LIEBOR” gate international interest rate setting scandal enveloping Barclays Bank.

      It will shortly be shown that multiple major banks participated. And why not, in an industry where DEFRAUDING CUSTOMERS (whether they are big or small) is seen as “best practice”.

      • mike e 15.1.1

        Add Wells Fargo 175million USD for racial discrimination&and the
        bank of America and at least 1/2 a dozen others for allowing drug cartels and terrorists to launder money.

        • Colonial Viper 15.1.1.1

          Ongoing legal action against BNY Mellon. A very large US bank.

          http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/31/us-bnymellon-ruling-idUSBRE82T1GR20120331

          Basically, the bank screwed large pension funds on forex trades. They retrospectively assigned the worst forex prices of the day, at the end of the day, to the pension funds.

          And kept the best prices for themselves.

          If you ever hear about US worker pension funds being “underfunded” just recognise that the banks have ripped them off of billions upon billions of dollars, over the last 10 years.

          Seems like BNY Mellon is currently doing a good job of getting off the hook on technicalities.

      • bad12 15.1.2

        Tossing the ‘man at the top’ in a cold jail cell for a decade or 2 while having a certain satisfactory ring to it would in the end be mere window dressing,

        There can only be one ‘logical’ outcome resulting from such systematic criminality inherent within the Western Worlds financial institutions, and that is for the relevant States to seize all the assets listed as possessions of such banks as part of the proceeds of crime committed by banking institutions using their position as banks as mere fronts for such organized criminal activity,

        Putting ALL the immoral,illegal and outright criminality in it’s correct perspective is the ultimate CON perpetuated by the Worlds banking elite, that of these institutions of crime being ‘Too Big To Fail’,

        Once government’s everywhere bought into that little gem of a fraudulent idea the criminal banking elite have at any time in the future the key to any country’s Treasury,

        Should not the gutless western World’s Governments move to seize the Banks at the heart of such fraudulent organized crime the next round of destruction unleashed upon us all via such Banks will simply be a far more complex systematic defrauding of both the public and private purse and as ‘growth’ is still the demand from within the ‘Ism’ the next wave of systematic criminality from those Banks will by far overwhelm in monetary terms the excesses of the past decade of deregulated debauchery unleashed upon us all by the institutions of criminal Banking…

  15. Draco T Bastard 16

    Pay them and they shall come, don’t pay them and they won’t.

    Fletchers EQR is contracted by the Earthquake Commission to carry out earthquake repair work.

    The company has cut the rate painters are paid from $25 to $19 per square metre.

    Sorry Christchurch but Fletcher’s is more concerned with their profit than with you getting a place to live.

    • Colonial Viper 16.1

      The entire city should be sorted out by a reformed Ministry of Works. Massively cheaper and more efficient.

      • Draco T Bastard 16.1.1

        Yep and then the government just gives the bill to the insurance companies.

        • Colonial Viper 16.1.1.1

          And if the insurance companies don’t pay, we nationalise all their insurance contracts into a new NZ State Insurance, and the privateers can fuck off back whence they came from.

    • Murray Olsen 16.2

      Fletchers should be expropriated without compensation. They grew on taxpayer money and were given a virtual monopoly position by successive governments. Now would be a good time for some dividend to be paid.

    • RedBaron 16.3

      Do they pay more for any commercial contracts they are doing?

    • John Connor 16.4

      :smile:

  16. Morrissey 17

    American Hero Watch No. 1: MATT LEE

    Yes, Virginia, there ARE some American reporters with the courage to do their job.

    Watch as Matt Lee of the Associated Press confronts government PR woman Victoria Nuland. The really disturbing feature of this clip is not Ms. Nuland’s refusal or inability to engage in debate, it’s the sheepish, embarrassed, bemused behaviour of the drones behind Matt Lee….

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfEIXy64HL0&feature=g-all-u

  17. RedBaron 18

    Help please??

    I am clearing mail for a younger family member and they have scored a request to participate in a 20 year survey on finances. Selection was by way of the electoral roll – supposedly – and age details etc must have been accessed..
    I checked the Electoral commission website privacy statements

    (noting they use google analytics but failing to reassure any of us that the commission continues to own the data not google. There is also no reassurance that Google are not doing some data matching of their own against other bases they may control and the data is stored offshore – whoopee- so under a different legal system)

    and find they can do this:

    “We may give this information to scientific or health researchers, political candidates, members of Parliament or political parties. We can also tell them your age group, postal address and whether you are of Maori descent.”

    Does anybody know how they control the research aspect? I can’t find any list of who is doing approved research or what controls there are on reserchers, if any. Does this mean that a named right wing funded think tank can access details and having done some vaguely worded research questions then supply all the details to the political party of their choice?

    The answer to the finance question is simple -‘already gone overseas for better prospects’.

  18. mike e 19

    More bad banking news Visa and master card have had to pay out $8billion dollars
    Because of over charging.

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    Greens | 12-10
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    Greens | 08-10
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    Labour | 02-10
  • 5AA Australia – NZ on UN Security Council + Dirty Politics Lingers On
    5AA Australia: Selwyn Manning and Peter Godfrey deliver their weekly bulletin Across The Ditch. General round up of over night talkback issues: Thongs, Jandals and flip-flops… ISSUE 1: New Zealand has been successful in its campaign to become a non...
    The Daily Blog | 22-10
  • When I mean me, I mean my office & when I call whaleoil I mean not as m...
    This. Is. Ludicrous. Green Party co-leader Russel Norman put the first of what are likely to be many questions about Mr Key’s relationship with Slater, asking him how many times he had phoned or texted the blogger since 2008. “None...
    The Daily Blog | 22-10
  • A brief word on describing the Government as ‘boring and bland’
    The narrative being sown is that this Government will be a boring and bland third term. Boring and bland. Since the election, Key has announced he is privatising 30% of state houses without reinvesting any of that money back into housing society’s most...
    The Daily Blog | 22-10
  • More Latté Than Lager: Reflections on Grant Robertson’s Campaign Launch.
    BIKERS? SERIOUSLY! Had Grant Robertson’s campaign launch been organised by Phil Goff? Was this a pitch for the votes of what few Waitakere Men remain in the Labour Party? Was I even at the right place? Well, yes, I was....
    The Daily Blog | 22-10
  • About Curwen Ares Rolinson
    Curwen Ares Rolinson – Curwen Ares Rolinson is a firebrand young nationalist presently engaged in acts of political resistance deep behind enemy lines amidst the leafy boughs of Epsom. He is affiliated with the New Zealand First Party; although his...
    The Daily Blog | 21-10
  • About Kelly Ellis
    Kelly Ellis.Kelly Ellis – As a child, Kelly Ellis didn’t so much fall into the cracks, but willfully wriggled her way into them. Ejected from Onslow College – a big job in the 70s – Kelly worked in car factories,...
    The Daily Blog | 21-10
  • About Kate Davis
    Kate Davis.Kate Davis – Having completed her BA in English and Politics, Kate is now starting her MA. Kate works as a volunteer advocate at Auckland Action Against Poverty and previously worked for the New Zealand Prostitutes Collective. Kate writes...
    The Daily Blog | 21-10
  • Parker does a Shearer – oh for a Labour Leader who can challenge msm fals...
    Sigh. It seems David Parker has done a Shearer… Like a cult and too red – Parker on LabourLabour leadership contender David Parker says Labour borders on feeling like “a cult” and must look at its branding – including its...
    The Daily Blog | 21-10
  • A brief word on the hundreds of millions NZ is spending on the secret intel...
    The enormity of the mass surveillance state NZ Government’s have built carries a huge price tag… Kiwis pay $103m ‘membership fee’ for spyingThe $103 million taxpayer funding of New Zealand’s intelligence agencies is effectively a membership fee for joining the...
    The Daily Blog | 21-10
  • Where. Is. Jason. Ede?
    Where. Is. Jason. Ede?...
    The Daily Blog | 21-10
  • Labour’s Din of Inequity
    Watching Labour’s leadership candidates on Q+A on Sunday, I noticed the ongoing use of terms like “opportunity” and “aspiration”, and “party of the workers”. What do these mean? We glean much from Labour, and from the media about Labour, but not...
    The Daily Blog | 21-10
  • “Blue-Greenwash” fails the test when it comes to endangered dolphins
    National’s pre-election promises saw some wins for the environment – perhaps as the party sought to appease its “Blue-Green” voters and broaden its popular appeal. Some of the ecological gains were a long time in the making, overdue even– such...
    The Daily Blog | 21-10
  • Reasons not to be cheerful, Part #272b
    Why don’t you get back into bed? The next few years — the rest of this century — are not going to be pretty. There is an obvious disconnect between any remaining political ambition to fix climate change and the...
    The Daily Blog | 21-10
  • OIA protocols and official advice ignored to hide Child Poverty
    It might not seem so now, but child poverty was a major election issue. What a pity we did not have the full debate. In that debate it would have been very helpful to have seen the Ministry of Social...
    The Daily Blog | 20-10
  • Previewing the 4 candidates for Leader of the Labour Party
    The extraordinary outbursts by Shearer last week highlights just how toxic that Caucus is. Shearer was on every major media platform as the ABC attack dog tearing into Cunliffe in the hope of diminishing Cunliffe’s support of Little by tearing...
    The Daily Blog | 19-10
  • GUEST BLOG: Kate Davis – the sudden explosion of ‘left’ blogs
    Time to Teach or more people will suffer from P.A.I.D. Political And Intellectual Dysmorphia.I was on the Twitter and a guy followed me so of course I did the polite thing and followed him back. He wrote a blog so...
    The Daily Blog | 19-10
  • Ego vs Eco
    Ego vs Eco...
    The Daily Blog | 19-10
  • We can’t let the Roastbuster case slip away
    Those of us (like me) left with hope that the police would aggressively follow through on the large amount of evidence on offer to them (let’s not forget they forgot they even had some at one point) in the Roastbusters...
    The Daily Blog | 19-10
  • Food, shelter and medicine instead of bombs and bullets
    The on-going conflict across the Middle East – due in large part to the US-led invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq – has created another humanitarian crisis of biblical proportion. The essentials of life are desperately needed in Iraq and Syria...
    The Daily Blog | 19-10
  • The politics of electorate accommodations
    National’s electorate accommodations with ACT and United Future were a big factor in it winning re-election. Interestingly, there is another electorate accommodation scenario whereby the centre-left could have come out on top, even with the same distribution of party votes....
    The Daily Blog | 19-10
  • Why you should join the TPPA Action on 8 November
    On 8 November 2014, thousands of Kiwis will take part in the International Day of Action to protest the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA). The rally cry for us is TPPA – Corporate Trap, Kiwis Fight Back. Why should you join...
    The Daily Blog | 19-10
  • GUEST BLOG – Patrick O’Dea: no new coal mines
    Green Party and Mana Party policy is “NO NEW COAL MINES!” Auckland Coal Action is trying to put this policy into action on the ground. ACA after a hard fought two year campaign waged alongside local residents and Iwi, in...
    The Daily Blog | 19-10
  • Comparing Police action – Hager raid vs Roast Buster case
    This satire had the NZ Police contact TDB and threaten us with 6months in prison for using their logo.   The plight of Nicky Hager and the draconian Police actions against him has generated over  $53 000 in donations so...
    The Daily Blog | 18-10
  • Malala Yousafzai, White Saviour Complexes and Local Resistance
    Last week, Malala Yousafzai was the co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Since her exposure to the worldwide spotlight, her spirit, wisdom and strength have touched the hearts of people everywhere. However, there have been cynics who have argued that...
    The Daily Blog | 18-10
  • Jason Ede is back – but no media can interview him?
    Well, well, well. Jason Ede, the main figure connected to John Key’s office and the Dirty Politics black ops is back with a company with deep ties to the National Party. One thing you can say about the right –...
    The Daily Blog | 18-10
  • GUEST BLOG: Curwen Rolinson – Leadership Transitions In Other Parties: A ...
    As cannot have escaped anyone’s attention by now, the country is presently in the grips of an election and campaign that will help determine the fate of the nation for years to come. It’s gripping stuff – with clear divides...
    The Daily Blog | 17-10
  • SkyCity worker says she faces losing her house
    SkyCity worker Carolyn Alpine told the company annual shareholder’s meeting today that she faced the prospect of losing her house because the company had cut her shifts from two a week to one without consultation. The solo mother, has worked...
    The Daily Blog | 17-10
  • Greg O’Connor’s latest push to arm cops & 5 reasons not to
    I was wondering at what point within a 3rd term of National that Police Cheerleader Greg O’Connor would start trying to demand cops be armed. O’Connor must have thought to himself, ‘if bloody Key can get us and the GCSB vast new...
    The Daily Blog | 16-10
  • You can’t have crisis without ISIS
    So the new scary bogeyman ISIS might have chemical weapons that the US secretly found in Iraq, but America didn’t want to expose this find because the WMDs were actually built and made by the US and Europe, the two powers...
    The Daily Blog | 16-10
  • NZ WINS UN SPIN THE BOTTLE! Privately sucking up to America for a decade me...
    Oh, we are loved! Little old NZ, the 53rd state of America after Israel and Australia, gets to sit at the adults table for the special dinner party that is the UN Security Council. How delightful, a decade of privately...
    The Daily Blog | 16-10
  • MEDIA BLOG – Myles Thomas – A World Without Advertising
    Non-commercial broadcasting and media. It’s a solution for all manner of problems ailing our tender nation… voter engagement, unaccountable governance, apathy, stupefaction, public education, science in schools, arts appreciation, cultural cringe… But no-one could’ve guessed that non-commercial media might solve...
    The Daily Blog | 16-10
  • March against war – 2pm Saturday 25th October
    March against war – 2pm Saturday 25th October...
    The Daily Blog | 16-10
  • Whack a mole as US govt foreign policy
    Whack-A-Mole was a popular arcade game from my youth.  It consisted of a waist high cabinet with holes in the top. Plastic moles seemingly randomly pop out of these holes. The purpose of the game was to hit as many...
    The Daily Blog | 16-10
  • In Paean of Debt
    This week is ‘Money Week’. It’s an opportunity to promote to the middle classes, and anyone else who will listen, the virtues of wise ‘investment’. The aims are to promote the mystical (and indeed mythical) virtues of saving for the...
    The Daily Blog | 16-10
  • The last 48 hours – Poverty denial, war denial and unapologetic abuse of ...
    The bewildering speed of events that simply end in Key shrugging and proclaiming he doesn’t really give a shit is coming think and fast as the Government suddenly appreciate the full spectrum dominance they now enjoy. Here is Radio NZ...
    The Daily Blog | 16-10
  • GUEST BLOG: Pat O’Dea – Mana 2.0 Rebooted
    Internationally the news is that Evo Morales of Bolivia won big with Left Wing policies But what are the chances that the Left will make a resurgence in this country? As the internecine struggles between the Left and the Right...
    The Daily Blog | 15-10
  • The Blomfield IPCA letter – Has Dirty Politics leaked into the NZ Police ...
    It’s difficult to know what to make of the IPCA letter to Matthew Blomfield over Slater’s continued insistence that the hard drive taken from Matthew wasn’t stolen.  Slater has selectively cherry picked the Police referring back to his claim that Blomfeild perjured...
    The Daily Blog | 15-10
  • ​Media release: Rail and Maritime Transport Union – Auckland move for K...
    The Rail and Maritime Transport Union is questioning a KiwiRail proposal to progressively relocate its Zero Harm personnel from Wellington to Auckland. “The purpose of the Zero Harm team is to drive KiwiRail’s performance in health and safety.  Rail is a...
    The Daily Blog | 15-10
  • Amnesty International – Friend request from an IS militant
    There’s always that one person, that one Facebook friend, usually a musician or event promoter, who, when you so foolishly accept their friend request, will completely inundate your news feed with copious event invitations and promotions. The person who, despite...
    The Daily Blog | 15-10
  • NZ should follow the UK and recognize the Palestinian state
    Over the past two weeks, the United Kingdom and Sweden have made headlines through their decisions to recognize the state of Palestine. They are hardly the first nations to do so. Indeed, 134 countries have, in various ways, given formal...
    The Daily Blog | 15-10
  • The Discordant Chimes of Freedom: Why Labour has yet to be forgiven.
    WHY DOES THE ELECTORATE routinely punish Labour and the Greens for their alleged “political correctness” but not National? It just doesn’t seem fair. Consider, for example, the Crimes (Substituted Section 59) Amendment Act 2007 – the so-called “anti-smacking legislation” –...
    The Daily Blog | 15-10
  • Hosking or Henry – Which right wing crypto fascist clown do you want to w...
    So Mediaworks are finally going to make some actual money from their eye watering contract with Paul Henry by launching a new multi-platform Breakfast show over TV, Radio and internet. This is great news for Campbell Live who have dodged...
    The Daily Blog | 14-10
  • Families need more money to reduce child poverty
    Prime Minister John Key is mistaken to rule out extending the In Work Tax Credit to all poor children (The Nation 11th Oct) and Child Poverty Action Group challenges government advisors to come up with a more cost effective way...
    The Daily Blog | 14-10
  • GUEST BLOG: Kelly Ellis – Don’t shit on my dream
    Once were dreamers. A large man, walks down the road and, even from 200 yards there’s light showing between his big arms and bigger body. It’s as if he’s put tennis balls under his arms. Two parking wardens walk out...
    The Daily Blog | 14-10
  • Labour and ‘special interests’
    The media narrative of Labour is that it is unpopular because it’s controlled by ‘special interests’. This ‘special interests’ garbage is code for gays, Maoris, wimin and unionists. We should show that argument the contempt it deserves. The next Labour...
    The Daily Blog | 14-10
  • Housing; broken promises, families in cars, and ideological idiocy (Part Ru...
    . . Continued from: Housing; broken promises, families in cars, and ideological idiocy (Part Tahi) . National’s housing development project: ‘Gateway’ to confusion . Perhaps nothing better illustrates National’s lack of a coherent housing programme than the ‘circus’ that is...
    The Daily Blog | 14-10
  • Here’s what WINZ are patronisingly saying to people on welfare when they ...
    Yesterday, a case manager from WINZ called to tell me that I needed to “imagine what I would do if I did not have welfare”. I replied “Well, I guess if I couldn’t live at home, I would be homeless.”...
    The Daily Blog | 14-10
  • David Shearer’s ‘no feminist chicks’ mentality highlights all that is...
    Mr Nasty pays a visit Shearer’s extraordinary outburst last night on NZs favourite redneck TV, The Paul Henry Show, is a reminder of all that is wrong within the Labour Caucus right now… He said the current calls for a female or...
    The Daily Blog | 13-10
  • Greenpeace 1 – Shell 0
    Greenpeace 1 – Shell 0...
    The Daily Blog | 13-10
  • GUEST BLOG: Kate Davis – A Tale Of Two Cities
    Sunday was surreal. I went for a drive and ended up in a different country. It wasn’t intentional but those days of too many literally intertextual references seldom are. There is no doubt that the Sunday drive this week had...
    The Daily Blog | 13-10
  • Bank gets behind NZ wildlife icon with sizable donation
    It will be easier than ever this summer for holiday-markers to dip into their pockets to support the yellow-eyed penguin....
    Scoop politics | 23-10
  • WorkSafe report raises concerns about asbestos
    The union representing construction workers in the Canterbury rebuild is surprised at WorkSafe’s conclusion that no action needs to be taken against EQC and Fletcher EQR over asbestos exposure in Canterbury homes. “This report was an opportunity...
    Scoop politics | 23-10
  • Union accuses SkyCity CEO of misleading public
    Unite Union has accused SkyCity CEO Nigel Morrison of misleading the public over the cut in hours for a staff member who raised the issue at the company's AGM....
    Scoop politics | 23-10
  • Last Hurrah on the Taxpayer
    Responding to the NZ Herald report that Hone Harawira spent up $54,000 on the taxpayer in his last three months as an MP, Taxpayers’ Union Executive Director Jordan Williams says: “It is absolutely disgraceful that an MP managed to rack...
    Scoop politics | 23-10
  • Press statement in relation to search of Nicky Hager’s home
    On 2 October 2014, Nicky Hager's home in Wellington was searched by police. Mr Hager asserted that documents kept at his house were protected by privilege, including because they contained information that might identify confidential sources....
    Scoop politics | 22-10
  • The Sam Simon arrives into Auckland for new campaign
    This morning Sea Shepherd ship, the Sam Simon, arrived into Auckland harbour after its journey from Melbourne. The ship and its 25 crew from around the globe have come to New Zealand to source supplies and prepare for the upcoming...
    Scoop politics | 22-10
  • Low inflation – time for meaningful wage increases
    With inflation low, now is a good time for workers to negotiate for pay increases that outstrip price rises and deliver real increases in wages and salaries. “For too many people, real pay increases have been missing for several years...
    Scoop politics | 22-10
  • Auckland Rates Rises Out of Control
    Responding to the NZ Herald report that Auckland ratepayers will face an average of a 29 percent rates increase, Taxpayers’ Union Executive Director Jordan Williams says: “These rate rises show that Len Brown's spending is out of control.”...
    Scoop politics | 22-10
  • Protest at New Plymouth Oil and Gas Expo
    About 30 protesters from Climate Justice Taranaki, Frack-free Kapiti, Te Uru Pounamu Action Group, Oil Free Wellington, Frack-free Manawatu and the east coast protested yesterday outside New Plymouth's biennial Oil and Gas Expo at the TSB Stadium....
    Scoop politics | 22-10
  • FMA warns consumers about cold-calling investment offers
    The Financial Markets Authority (FMA) is warning New Zealand consumers and investors to be wary of cold-calls asking them to buy shares or put their money into offshore firms....
    Scoop politics | 22-10
  • Comprehensive plan needed to end child poverty
    Child Poverty Action Group says it is vital the newly re-elected National government takes a planned and comprehensive approach to reducing child poverty in New Zealand....
    Scoop politics | 22-10
  • Metiria Gets Feed the Kids
    Yesterday the Speaker of the House advised that he had accepted my request to transfer my Feed the Kids (Education (Breakfast and Lunch Programmes in Schools) Amendment) Bill to Metiria Turei of the Green Party....
    Scoop politics | 22-10
  • DIA undercover investigation leads to jailing
    An undercover Internal Affairs investigation has led to a Hastings man being jailed for three and half years....
    Scoop politics | 22-10
  • Call on Minister McCully to pursue the case of Balibo Five
    Media Information: Call on Minister McCully to pursue the case of journalist Gary Cunningham and the Balibo Five...
    Scoop politics | 22-10
  • Australia and NZ actions on press freedoms alarming
    Global support for investigative journalism in Australia and New Zealand is a welcome response to law changes and a police raid, says the Pacific Freedom Forum...
    Scoop politics | 22-10
  • Call for release of French journalists in West Papua
    West Papua Action Auckland, the EPMU Print and Media Council and the NZ Media Freedom Network call on the Minister of Foreign Affairs to speak out in support of the two French TV journalists whose trial has just begun in...
    Scoop politics | 21-10
  • Court of Appeal: Dotcom v 20th Century Fox Film Corporation
    A The appeal is dismissed. B The 20 August 2014 order of the High Court dealing with confidentiality and the 29 August 2014 order of this Court dealing with confidentiality are set aside. C The confidentiality orders set out in...
    Scoop politics | 21-10
  • Glassons Blasted For Glamourising Animal Cruelty
    Clothing brand Glassons have found themselves embroiled in another controversy after launching a new advert featuring a girl riding a bull. Animal advocacy organisation SAFE have asked them to remove the ad immediately as it glamourises animal cruelty....
    Scoop politics | 21-10
  • Smuggling honey into New Zealand isn’t sweet
    Smuggling honey into New Zealand isn’t sweet Federated Farmers Bee Industry Group applauds the tough line taken by Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) Border Staff at Auckland Airport. In deporting the couple found trying to smuggle bee products...
    Scoop politics | 21-10
  • Taxpayers’ Union Responds to Joyce on Corporate Welfare
    Responding to Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce’s defence of corporate welfare , Jim Rose, the author of Monopoly Money , a Taxpayers Union report on corporate welfare since 2008, says:...
    Scoop politics | 21-10
  • Speech from the Throne brings welcome focus on children
    Today’s speech from the Throne confirms the Government’s focus on children, youth and their families in the areas of health, education, youth employment, poverty alleviation and Whānau Ora; now the challenge is to ensure every child in New Zealand...
    Scoop politics | 21-10
  • John’s Job Fairs no fix for unemployment and poverty
    “John Key has clearly been looking to the US for his latest bright idea on dealing with employment issues,” says Auckland Action Against Poverty coordinator Sue Bradford. “Job fairs where the desperately unemployed queue in their corporate best to compete...
    Scoop politics | 21-10
  • Speech From the Throne Foreshadows More Corporate Welfare
    Responding to the Governor General’s Speech from the Throne, which outlined that the Government’s intentions for the next Parliamentary term would include further Business Growth Agenda initiatives, Taxpayers’ Union Executive Director Jordan...
    Scoop politics | 21-10
  • Green MP to speak at panel on Rainbow Mental Health
    Hamilton, New Zealand: Recently re-elected Green Party MP Jan Logie will be a guest speaker at a panel on the mental health of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trangender, Takataapui and Intersex people taking place on November 1st as part of the...
    Scoop politics | 20-10
  • Evidence Supports GE Moratorium
    Federated Farmers spokesman Graham Smith's call for a 'rethink' on release of GeneticallyEngineered organisms is misguided, and instead it is time for a formal moratorium on GMOs in the environment.(1)...
    Scoop politics | 20-10
  • Chatham Rise mining could have impact on whales and dolphins
    Wellington, 21 October 2014--Mining phosphate on the Chatham Rise, off the east coast of New Zealand’s south island, could potentially have many impacts on marine mammals like whales and dolphins, the Environmental Protection Agency was told today....
    Scoop politics | 20-10
  • Council endorses Nanaia Mahuta as the next Labour leader
    Te Kaunihera Māori, the Māori Council of the New Zealand Labour Party, have passed a resolution to endorse the Hon Nanaia Mahuta as the next leader of the Labour Party...
    Scoop politics | 20-10
  • Kaumatua to organise petition to end Maori seats
    Ngapuhi kaumatua David Rankin has announced that he will be organising a nationwide petition to seek support from Maori voters to end the Maori seats. “These seats are patronising”, he says. “They imply we need a special status, and that...
    Scoop politics | 20-10
  • Announcing a New Voice for The Left
    Josh Forman is pleased to announce the creation of a new force on the Left of politics in New Zealand....
    Scoop politics | 20-10
  • Public services held back by poor workplace culture
    A new report by Victoria University’s Centre for Labour, Employment and Work shows that public servants are working significant unpaid overtime to ensure the public services New Zealanders value are able to continue....
    Scoop politics | 20-10
  • iPredict New Zealand Weekly Economic & Political Update
    Andrew Little’s probability of being the next leader of the Labour Party has reached 70% and Jacinda Ardern is favourite to become his deputy, according to the combined wisdom of the 8000+ registered traders on New Zealand’s predictions market, iPredict....
    Scoop politics | 20-10
  • Prison Drug Treatment Unit marks a milestone
    Christchurch Men’s Prison’s Drug Treatment Unit (DTU) celebrated the completion of its 50th six month Drug and Alcohol Programme today, with the graduation of a further twelve offenders....
    Scoop politics | 20-10
  • Security Council seat a chance for NZ to empower women
    The UN Women National Committee Aotearoa New Zealand (UN Women NCANZ) welcomes New Zealand winning a seat on the United Nations Security Council and is calling on New Zealand to use its position to proactively promote effective implementation of the...
    Scoop politics | 20-10
  • Waipareira and ACC sign Partnership
    Waipareira and The Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding at Whanau Centre, Henderson – marking a special day for the West Auckland Urban Maori organisation....
    Scoop politics | 20-10
  • Humanitarian aid desperately needed in Iraq and Syria
    Global Peace and Justice Auckland is calling on the government to provide humanitarian funding for non-aligned NGOs (non-governmental organisations) in the Middle East rather than give any support whatever for the US-led military campaign in the area....
    Scoop politics | 19-10
  • Court Judicial Decision: Dotcom v The USA: 17 October 2014
    The United States of America is seeking the extradition of Messrs Dotcom, Batato, Ortmann and Van Der Kolk. The matter has been before the Courts on numerous occasions, and no further recitation of the facts is needed....
    Scoop politics | 19-10
  • Marshall Island poet speaks at UN climate summit
    “The fossil fuel industry is the biggest threat to our very existence as Pacific Islanders. We stand to lose our homes, our communities and our culture. But we are fighting back. This coming Friday thirty Pacific Climate Warriors, joined by...
    Scoop politics | 19-10
  • Many tourist car accidents preventable
    Simple steps could dramatically reduce the number of accidents involving tourists, says the car review website dogandlemon.com ....
    Scoop politics | 19-10
  • RainbowYOUTH: 25 Years, 25 More
    In 1989, a group of young people in Auckland got together to form a support group for LGBTIQ youth. They called it Auckland Lesbian And Gay Youth (ALGY). After 25 years, several location changes, a name change, a brand reboot...
    Scoop politics | 19-10
  • Outdated Oath shows need for Kiwi Head of State
    MPs are sworn in today and New Zealand Republic has written to MPs asking them to talk about why 121 New Zealanders elected by the people of New Zealand and standing in the New Zealand Parliament swear allegiance to another...
    Scoop politics | 19-10
  • Council shouldn’t revenue grab from windfall valuations
    Auckland Council should state clearly they will not try and capture revenue as a result of the latest valuations and needs reminding that the City’s skyrocketing property values doesn’t change the level or cost of Council’s services, says...
    Scoop politics | 19-10
  • EPMU endorses Andrew Little for Labour leadership
    The National Executive of the Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union unanimously endorsed Andrew Little for the role of Labour leader, at a meeting held yesterday. “I have been speaking to our workplace delegates at forums across the country over...
    Scoop politics | 19-10
  • World Food Day promotes Agroecology not GE technology
    The UN has stated that agroecology is a major solution to feeding the world and caring for the earth....
    Scoop politics | 19-10
  • Labour Names Review Team
    Labour’s New Zealand Council has appointed Bryan Gould as Convenor of its post-General Election Review. He will be joined on the Review Team by Hon Margaret Wilson, Stacey Morrison and Brian Corban....
    Scoop politics | 19-10
  • Contenders for Labour leadership debate for first time
    The contenders for the leadership of the Labour Party debated for the first time on TV One’s Q+A programme today....
    Scoop politics | 19-10
  • UN Ambassador Jim McLay on TV One’s Q+A programme
    New Zealand's United Nations Ambassador Jim McLay on TV One’s Q+A programme....
    Scoop politics | 18-10
  • The Nation: RSA President BJ Clark & Ian Taylor, New NZ Flag
    Lisa Owen interviews RSA President BJ Clark and tech innovator Ian Taylor about changing the NZ flag...
    Scoop politics | 18-10
  • The Nation: RSA President BJ Clark & Ian Taylor, New NZ Flag
    Lisa Owen interviews RSA President BJ Clark and tech innovator Ian Taylor about changing the NZ flag...
    Scoop politics | 18-10
  • Lisa Owen interviews Foreign Minister Murray McCully
    Murray McCully says New Zealanders can expect a 5-10 year engagement against Islamic State if we join military action in Iraq and the government will take that “very carefully into account”...
    Scoop politics | 18-10
  • Lisa Owen interviews Julia Gillard
    Julia Gillard says there is “sufficient evidence” to fight Islamic State and does not think it will increase the risk of a domestic attack...
    Scoop politics | 18-10
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