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Port’s paid propagandist says cut workers’ pay

Written By: - Date published: 7:24 am, January 11th, 2012 - 398 comments
Categories: spin, workers' rights - Tags: , ,

They say that the nice thing about Cameron Slater is he’ll believe whatever he’s paid to believe. Yesterday, I asked whether Slater is being paid to run dirt stories for Ports of Auckland. He didn’t deny it. So what is the Port’s propagandist up to? Yesterday, he was calling for the workers’ pay to be slashed while defending the directors’ massive fees.

In my previous post, I wrote:

Cameron Slater’s rate is $10,000 for an operation like this

Slater responded:

There is no way I’d do what I am doing for $10,000 as a fixed fee, for something like the Ports of Auckland I’d probably do it for $20,000 after a discount for the sheer fun of union bashing

He didn’t admit being paid but his failure to deny it when given the chance is evidence itself. Unless his “I’m not being paid by Ports of Auckland” keys were broken. Slater doesn’t run this kind of intense campaign for the hell of it – it’s his occupation. And why would he be running the Port’s lines for free? Who are they to him? It’s not like a shipping line or an exporter moving from one New Zealand port to another matters a jot in his life. Different when you’re getting paid though, eh?

Updated: Ports of Auckland deny paying Cameron Slater anything. ]

In the past, Slater has been quite open about charging $10,000 to run a media campaign for prospective National candidates where he posts dirty little attacks on rivals (fellow National Party members, remember) designed to be picked up in the media, while subtly promoting his client – usually as a ‘there’s no other qualified alternative’ candidate but, hey, it works. So, I assumed he would be charging a similar fee to Ports of Auckland. He, quite intentionally doesn’t deny getting money but likes to pretend its more. Exactly how much Slater is being paid by the Port is for Tony Gibson to answer.

But enough about how much the Port is paying Slater to try to plant anti-union angles in the media. What are the lines he’s running for them?

Well, to start, the mythical $90,000 a year came from Cactus Kate, one of Slater’s occasional sub-contractors, of whom Slater says “there is only two ways to get Cactus Kate to do anything…offers of money or sex with hot men”.

The piddling $2,000 donation that the Maritime Union gave to Len Brown, Slater used to suggest the Supercity mayor was in the wharfies’ pocket. That one didn’t really fly.

But it’s really started to unravel for Slater a bit in the past few days. He had the ground to himself before but now the journalists are back at work and not buying his crap. So, the Port’s propagandist has gone more extreme.

He’s been comparing the mythical $90,000 income of the stevedores to ‘real professions’. First, it was teachers – until the National research unit called and reminded him that the spin is that teachers are a bunch of lazy, unskilled overpaid pricks too. Then it was Police. Apparently, the fact that a stevedore working over 60 hours a week could theoretically earn $90,000 a year while a trainee cop gets $35,000 is reason to cut the wharfies’ pay. No thought of raising the cops’ pay, of course. But that’s the National way, isn’t it, workers who dare to stand up for themselves are spoiled and should have their wages cut, be fired, or worse.

But, hang about. I thought the Port was offering to increase the workers’ wages. Wasn’t there something about an offer from the Port of a 10% pay increase (which Slater called “very generous” in this “economic climate”) that the crazy union had turned down? How come, then, that the paid propagandist is trying to lay the case for their wages being cut? Could it be that, in fact, the union is right, that the Port’s aim of casualising and contracting out the workforce is all about cutting wages and the 10% hourly increase won’t make up for the lost hours.

Seems like the Port isn’t getting value for money when the propagandist is arguing that the wharfies’ deserve to have their wages cut. Rather undermines the spin that the Port is the good guys, eh?

But, if this is the test now – that anyone earning more than a cop should get a pay cut – why start with the wharfies?

Why not start with Cabinet ministers on quarter of a million a year? (they don’t even need to have any qualifications!)

Why not start with bloggers charging $10,000 to rig party selections? (or, at least stop claiming the sickness benefit, if you still are, Cameron)

Why not start with Tony Gibson, who is on $750,000? (although, to be fair, it is well known that Gibson has the strength of 10 stevedores and can unload 30 containers an hour with his bare hands)

Why not the Port’s directors, who get $83,000 a year each for doing two-fifths of bugger all?

Slater went off his rockee yesterday when one of our commenters miscalculated and said the Port’s directors get $160,000 a year. He devoted a long post to showing it is ‘only’ $83,000 a year.

Remember, being a company director isn’t a full-time job or even a part-time one, really. The directors of the Port typically hold 4-5 other directorships or the like, and a presumably similarly well remunerated in those roles. But Slater, trolling through our comments sections (well, there’s nothing happening in his to warrant attention), devotes a whole post to a commenter double counting the directors’ fees – It’s not $160,000 each for bugger all work! It’s $80,000 each for bugger all work!

The wheels are starting to come off this one a bit for Ports of Auckland. Their paid propagandist is misfiring, their spin is unraveling.

People are starting to ask why it is that the second-most productive port in Australasia is crying ‘productivity crisis’ when it paid an $18 million dividend last year, gave its senior managers a 20% pay rise, and paid staff bonuses for increasing productivity by 4.1%.

They’re starting to wonder: if the Port’s offer is really so generous, them why have the workers turned it down and, if the Port is such a wonderful employer, why won’t it agree to let the workers keep their conditions with an inflation-matching wage hike?

They’re starting to question who is really holding Auckland’s economy to ransom when the Port threatens to sack the second-most productive stevedore workforce in Australasia and then try to employ replacements for worse pay.

And they’re starting to see the buzzards circling – the Righties saying that privatisation is the solution, the other Righties saying that tearing up our work rights is the solution, the Righties attacking workers merely for having supposedly generous conditions in their contracts – and they’re getting the sense that there’s a bigger game afoot.

[lprent:

Catherine Etheredge says :-

Dear James

I am the Senior Communications Manager for Ports of Auckland and I can categorically confirm that we have not paid and will not pay Cameron Slater anything.

Best regards
Catherine

]

398 comments on “Port’s paid propagandist says cut workers’ pay”

  1. james 111 1

    James this isnt a right left fight this is just a company trying to improve its competitiveness versus its competitors. This is just about a Company giving a reasonable return to all Auckland Rate Payers.
    As stated in this article in the Herald today an 8.5% return is not an ask out of the question.
    The Labor utilisation rate is only 65% when you have more than a third wasted in this area clearly you have problems.

    The POAL has to have modern Labor agreements so it can be more porductive as most Port companies have all around the World. Mr Pascoe is not with the times as a Union negotiator, and is leading his faithful members to the Dole queues he wont be affected they will. See article from the Herald Today.

    provide a reasonable rate of return on the community’s investment with the company, setting a minimum rate-of-return target of 8.2 per cent.

    “Achieving this target in the present economic climate requires POAL to significantly improve its operational productivity and efficiency. To do this, the company must [lift] its current labour utilisation rate from 65 per cent to over 80 per cent, just to remain viable,” the handout said.

    Mr Gibson said the recent loss of business by Maersk and Fonterra could cut port revenue by $25 million a year with no perceived opportunity to replace this revenue.

    • Colonial Viper 1.1

      The CEO and Board should be fired for the ham fisted incompetent handling of this situation.

      Firing the Board and the CEO would lift company profits from $19M to $22M pa instantly, and no one would notice that they were missing.

      Volunteer worker councils with volunteers paid an honourarium of $2500 pa would fulfill the roles perfectly, and because they understand how ports work the best, would also increase profitability further.

      The Council has a responsibility to its rate payers and citizens. Well who the fuck do they think the workers at the port, their partners, children and extended family in Auckland are.

      • Bazar 1.1.1

        You seem to be losing your grasp on reality.

        Are you honestly suggesting firing the head leadership and replacing it with volunteers who’d be paid sweet fuck all.

        I can’t even fathom such stupidity playing out.

        “The Council has a responsibility to its rate payers and citizens. Well who the fuck do they think the workers at the port, their partners, children and extended family in Auckland are.”

        I’d say that those dock workers and family are the 1%. Shoving their demands and greed onto the other 99%.

    • Zetetic 1.2

      Just repeating the management’s lines doesn’t make them true.

      The port is making a reasonable return and it doesn’t need to make a big one. Infrastructure shouldn’t be run for large profits – its job is to create opportunities for other businesses, not clip the ticket when they use the service, which impedes business.

      The ‘labour utilisation rate’ you talk about is the amount of paid time minus mandated breaks that ensure safety and productivity. Remove them and you get three deaths a year, like at Tauranga.

      Maersk and Fonterra didn’t leave because productivity isn’t high enough. They left because of the disruption to the port. Caused by the Port trying to cut its wage bill, rather than let the workers keep their conditions and the real value of their wages.

      Doesn’t your argument boil down to: the workers should accept less pay for the same work, so that the company can make more profit?

      • james 111 1.2.1

        So you think Productivity is good?

        The New Zealand coast closed down because Toby Hill, The Seamans Union, and the Officers guild all got greedy ,and tried to keep their conditions.Three crews for every rail ferry was never going to work. Funny how well they seem to work now Private contractors are doin g the catering. Funny how history repeats itself isnt it

        • KJT 1.2.1.1

          The NZ coast closed down because the farmers wanted cheaper freight. Along with the RWNJ delusion that “competition” would deliver it.
          No acknowledgment of the adverse effects on NZ’s balance of payments deficit, internal economy and jobs for our children.

          Now we get things like the Rena. Watchkeepers with 3 hours sleep in 24, And poorly lashed cargo falling off ships.
          The sad thing is that NZ ships have had to reduce standards of safety and conditions to compete also.

          The officers unions were not greedy. Wages and conditions for us were never that high.

          Ships going in and out of port several times 24 hours a day need three crews to operate safely. Or do you expect people to work 24 hours on the trot. Already have an increased number of accidents and incidents on the rail ferries due to the hours watchkeepers are now expected to work.

          I tell my family not to use the rail ferries because they are not safe. Tired watch keepers, not enough money spent on lifesaving equipment and cost cutting management are a disaster waiting to happen.

          Never had any time for the cooks and stewards either, many of the things they stuck for were a joke, but a lot of that was due to inflation outstripping wage rises, no matter what happened.

          Nothing to do with the present attack on one of the last remaining Unions with any power.

          It is obvious that the present situation is due to a RWNJ attack to break unions once and for all and bring us all back to the third world.

      • Inventory2 1.2.2

        Just repeating the management’s lines doesn’t make them true.

        Nor, by your own definition, does repeating the Maritime Union’s lines…

        • Colonial Viper 1.2.2.1

          Workers are getting fucked over by management and board. I think that’s pretty true, repetition or no.

          • Bazar 1.2.2.1.1

            The port and Auckland are getting fucked over by unionists and strikes. I think that’s pretty true, repetition or no.

            • Jackal 1.2.2.1.1.1

              Wrong Bazar… the Union has been trying to resolve the issue. The Port of Auckland’s senior management has been ignoring them in their idiotic quest to continue the crisis in order to have an excuse to privatize. Bloddy cronies the lot of em.

    • Interesting double standard.  

      The directors are paid on average $80k a year.  For this they would have a monthly board meeting, papers to read, emails to handle and possibly sub committee work.  They would also be expected to show up to social occasions.

      Workers are expected to work all hours of the day or night in dangerous work.  Many workers have lost their lives over the past few decades.

      When complaints occur about the return it is, according to James 111, the fault of the workers and not of the directors.  Changes have to be made to the workers conditions of employment.  It seems that the only ability there is to save costs is to cut into job terms and conditions.

      It is an interesting world that we live in. 

    • ianmac 1.4

      James:”The POAL has to have modern Labor agreements”. Wonder why you use the American/Australian spelling of “Labour”? I wonder….

      [lprent: He is local and previously known here under various names for many years. He has previously managed to get numerous moderation warnings to change his behaviour - which (at present) it appears that he has largely heeded. As a moderator I have no real issues with him. ]

  2. The $91k a year lie needs to be analyzed further because it speaks volumes on how the right operate.  It originally appeared in a Cactus Kate post.  It has since been used by Slater and Farrar continuously without embarrassment.  Even the Herald have been using this figure.

    I have had a go at looking through the POAL financials and trying to work out how the figure was arrived at.  All that I can think is that redundancies occurred and these payments were included in the total figures, thereby inflating the figures.

    Cactus Kate’s figures are unsourced but look like they came straight from the company.  If the MSM was any good it would be deconstructing the figures and highlighting the reality.  Because I get this sneaky feeling that the company has released dodgy figures in an attempt to win the propaganda war.

    • newsense 2.1

      It was mentioned by Tony Gibson in an Op-ed then five or six times by Katherine Rich and Damien Grant, and has been repeated in other news reports.

      Tony Gibson said it was “(and let’s remember that average remuneration for a fulltime stevedore is $91,000).”

      As noted below it includes extra hours worked and not mentioned, probably productivity bonuses!

  3. John Dalley 3

    Shipping / Freight companies are not happy with what’s going on. Not the port dispute but the manipulation by Maersk and Fonterra. The number one reason that Fonterra went to Tauranga is Maersk, Maersk and Maersk.

    • Zetetic 3.1

      And where was it that Tony Gibson worked before Ports of Auckland?

      Fact is, these companies only left once the management’s brinksmanship meant it could no longer reliably keep the port open. Maersk and Fonterra seemed content with the productivity levels beforehand – and why wouldn’t they be, it’s the second most productive port in Australasia

      • Colonial Viper 3.1.1

        Too bad NZ didn’t upgrade its publicly owned coastal shipping infrastructure to free itself from these fucking logistics multinationals. Who don’t give a fuck about the people about this country, just their major shareholders in the northern hemisphere.

        See how fundamental these pillars of the real economy (like transport and power generation) are. And when they are taken away our sovereignty is taken away.

        • james 111 3.1.1.1

          They couldnt afford to pay the Seamans Union, The Cooks & Stewards and have a viable business model that is why the Coast was lost to NZ workers

          • Colonial Viper 3.1.1.1.1

            Yeah lets sell off our own workforce for cheap immigrants enabling higher corporate profits for overseas shareholders.

            • RedLogix 3.1.1.1.1.1

              Good morning James. Been to your boss demanding that pay cut yet?

              Seeing as you are so keen to see New Zealand become more competitive and prosperous by cutting wages and conditions for workers… we’re all waiting to see you lead the way.

          • mickysavage 3.1.1.1.2

            Yep why should New Zealand businesses not be able to compete with those of the third world?

          • KJT 3.1.1.1.3

            Bullshit.

            Do you know what proportion of total; costs, crew are?

            One shipping company had a monopoly between NZ and Australia and they worked on cost plus.

            Do you know how much shareholders took out? Ask why they still had a UK subsidiary which owned the ships?

          • KJT 3.1.1.1.4

            Bullshit.

            The maritime Unions agreed to drastic manning cuts, (29 to 18 on the ship I was on at the time) changes to work practices (IR ships) and cuts to pay and conditions amounting in most cases to halving the crew costs on each ship.

            We lost the jobs anyway because the first ACT Government, Federated Farmers and other assorted idiots were determined to have underpriced substandard ships on the coast regardless.

            It actually wouldn’t have mattered what we did.

            The Rena is the direct responsibility of those buggers.
            The joke is on them because freight rates went up not down, and service levels down, without dedicated NZ ships to keep the overseas lines honest.

      • KJT 3.1.2

        Mearsk were shifting anyway.

        Attracting Mearsk by continually undercutting the last port is a losing sum game anyway.

        In the end you will be subsidising Mearsk.

        • Bazar 3.1.2.1

          Its not a losing sum game.

          Its called supply and demand.
          If you lower the costs, you’ll increase demand.

          If shipping costs less, taht’ll mean importing goods, everyday things like tins of fruit will be cheaper to import, and exporting goods like milk will be cheaper.

          NZ is an isolated country, lowing the cost of doing business with us would greatly improve trade.

          • RedLogix 3.1.2.1.1

            If shipping costs less, taht’ll mean importing goods, everyday things like tins of fruit will be cheaper to import, and exporting goods like milk will be cheaper.

            You could reduce port costs to zero and have almost no effect whatsoever on the total cost of most goods. ie the ‘demand effect’ you are thinking of has to be pretty damned weak.

            • Bazar 3.1.2.1.1.1

              “Almost no effect”, multiplied by 1.5 million people is a pretty damned big effect.

              But i guess you’re a big subscriber to the “Take care of the pounds and the pennies will look after themselves”

              How are you with carbon emissions?
              NZ has almost no effect to global carbon emissions, by that Logix of yours, we shouldn’t even bother with emission controls.

              • RedLogix

                Your logic is still not improved.

                If every country reduced it’s carbon emmissions to zero the climate change problem would be solved.

                If every port reduced it’s costs to zero it would have almost no impact on prices anywhere.

    • james 111 3.2

      So John what is your point its a big decision for a shiiping company to move.
      I dont believe they would move because the Maersk CEO had an Auntie in Tauranga
      They would move though for more productivity less down time , and cheaper costs than Auckland

      • Colonial Viper 3.2.1

        Gibson was managing director of Maersk NZ for 3 years. That’s much better than an Auntie in Tauranga.

        This thing is a fucking set up, has been from the day Gibson started the CEO job last year.

        • Bazar 3.2.1.1

          I love your thinking there Viper

          Because Gibson had ties with Maersk, he set things up.

          He pulled his connections to make Maersk pull a $20 million a year operation away from his company into an competing port, just to make the strikers look bad.

          In shorthand, you’re saying he royally screwed over his company, reputation, and performance bonuses just to make the strikers suffer….

          Or the reality is that Maersk got tired of dealing with interruptions that hurt its reputation and shipping deadlines and moved to elsewhere.

          The fact that fonterra has done the same probably was probably a convincing ploy as well to futher hammer the nail eh.

          And when other companies also stop using the port, its simply because it was a zero sum game and PoT was better (Which comes back in part to PoT operating better then PoA)

      • Zetetic 3.2.2

        if they would move over productivity, why hadn’t they moved already?

        They moved because the Port can’t reliably keep itself open.

        Besides, how does higher productivity help Maersk? The productivity’s all about making larger profits by cutting costs, you said. It would rather defeat the purpose if they cut prices too.

  4. KJT 4

    “”James this isnt a right left fight this is just a company trying to improve its competitiveness versus its competitors. This is just about a Company giving a reasonable return to all Auckland Rate Payers.
    As stated in this article in the Herald today an 8.5% return is not an ask out of the question.””

    Why should returns from a low risk monopoly equal those from speculation.
    That is only expected because speculation has become low, risk due to bailouts.

    “The Labor utilisation rate is only 65% when you have more than a third wasted in this area clearly you have problems.”

    This is a meaningless statistic unless you compare it with other ports or industries.
    Portainer crane drivers in Tauranga work 2 hours then 1 off. less tha 60% utilisation rate?

    My own observations of POAL working is that the organisation and communication between management is exceptionally poor. It cuts my “labour utilisation rate” when I have to have a whole ships crew standing around waiting for hours because POAL cannot get their shit together.
    Not to mention having to watch the casual, cheap labour, lashing gangs like a hawk because the islanders they ring in have no experience or training. Don’t really need half trained casual crane drivers and hatchmen as well.

    “”The POAL has to have modern Labor agreements so it can be more porductive as most Port companies have all around the World. Mr Pascoe is not with the times as a Union negotiator, and is leading his faithful members to the Dole queues he wont be affected they will. See article from the Herald Today.””

    “:Modern labour agreements” that mean being on call 24 hours a day 365 days a year without being paid for it. “Modern labour agreements” that allow for casual staff on minimum wages subsidised by tax payers. “Modern labour agreements” that have resulted in workers share of the money we produce go from 62% to 42% of GDP. Joke!!

    We will go back to the old ones, thanks, and keep the money in NZ.

    “provide a reasonable rate of return on the community’s investment with the company, setting a minimum rate-of-return target of 8.2 per cent.”

    With Mearsk and Fonterra, using the fake competition between ports to continually reduce rates. The only way is down. A race for the bottom. Just had an education on how well that works with the Rena and Pike River.

    ”Achieving this target in the present economic climate requires POAL to significantly improve its operational productivity and efficiency. To do this, the company must [lift] its current labour utilisation rate from 65 per cent to over 80 per cent, just to remain viable,” the handout said.”

    Easiest way to do that is sack the current management and board.

    “”Mr Gibson said the recent loss of business by Maersk and Fonterra could cut port revenue by $25 million a year with no perceived opportunity to replace this revenue.””

    Shouldn’t have decided to attack the union should he.

    When he first got in and the union members thought the constant attacks on their conditions would stop the box rate, the real criteria of port efficiency, went from 20 to 28 or more. In other words, if you treat your workforce with respect they will respond.

    The extra efficiencies are available under the present contract.

    • james 111 4.1

      KJT

      You say

      We will go back to the old ones, thanks, and keep the money in NZ.

      There is only one problem with this stance you and the workers keep nothing no conditions if you dont have jobs. Because of poor negotiation skills, and one track ideaology

      • Colonial Viper 4.1.1

        And the port shifts not a single tonne of cargo without labour.

        And since the very highly paid CEO and Board are proving themselves incompetent at team building the best port in NZ, they should be fired and replaced with workers councils fulfilling the same role.

        The savings in executive salaries and board fees would push port profitability up from $19M to $21M pa overnight. That is money which would help every single Auckland ratepayer.

        In fact, it also gives room for every port worker to receive a $1000 new years bonus.

        AND I am sure that worker productivity would also immediately increase :D

      • KJT 4.1.2

        Bullshit again. We took an effective 40% pay cut, demanned (below safe levels I may add) and gave a lot of other concessions. And lost the jobs anyway because RWNJ’s were committed to giving away the jobs to substandard and dodgy overseas operators. Even if they cost NZ more than us. Which they do.

        It wasn’t our idealogy that lost the jobs.

      • spratwax 4.1.3

        “There is only one problem with this stance you and the workers keep nothing no conditions if you dont have jobs. Because of poor negotiation skills, and one track ideaology”

        Well, at least James is now admitting that the right-wing ideology is reducing jobs and conditions! No reaction from James to ther suggestion that he should approach his boss and ask for a pay cut to improve productivity…mmm!! And he seems to think ‘Mr Gibson’ has a salary-$750,000- which does not require renegotiation to a level commensurate with reality.

  5. randal 5

    ipredict that whaleshit will choke on a sausage roll this year.
    but they will make a simulacra at weka workshops that will be worse.

  6. Tangled up in blue 6

    People are starting to ask why it is that the second-most productive port in Australasia is crying ‘productivity crisis’ when it paid an $18 million dividend last year, gave its senior managers a 20% pay rise, and paid staff bonuses for increasing productivity by 4.1%.

    Also it’s been mentioned a few times that the PoA workers salary and wage costs aren’t much in relation to overall costs. Imo this is also very damning. Does anyone have the relevant PoA report and page number showing this?

  7. Craig GlenEden 7

    Lets not forget Len Browns role in this people many of us campaigned for this guy and I for one are pretty pissed with his and the councils role in all of this. I think its about time some in Labour had a face to face with Mr Brown.

  8. John Dalley 8

    From my same source. If you want to see productivity or lack there of, look at the Oz ports. I am lead to understand that they are considerably less efficient tha the POAL and do not in fact work 24/7.
    One of the problems it seems to me is that the shipping (Maersk) company has just about a monopolistc position in New Zealand. i e. no major competition to the freight entering and exiting NZ. Could there be improvements in the POAL, probably but i suspect that the management of the POAL played a game with Maersk and lost and are now trying to cover their arses. Len Brown and co need to immediatly sack Tony Gibson and the board for total incompetence and instill a more experience management team.

    • Colonial Viper 8.1

      Gibson was executive director of Maersk NZ for 3 years. He hasn’t gone against the wishes of his old colleagues. This has all been a set up from when he was hired in 2011.

      • The Voice of Reason 8.1.1

        Exactly, CV. Maersk are playing the long game. They will move to TGA to help POAL break the union, then move back once the scab labour has been hired.

    • KJT 8.2

      Could be true.

      Lyttelton cut their rates for Mearsk to get their business off Timaru.

      Some of my contacts think they are not even breaking even on the contract.

      Mearsk get discounts because they now have an effective monopoly on NZ shipping.

      Mearsk are also noted for their hostility to Unions worldwide.

      Apart from being a potential buyer for POAL.

      • UncleGeoff 8.2.1

        Speaking of Lyttelton and Timaru, I recall Brent Layton being dismissed from his position as chairman of the Lyttelton Port Company back in 2002, under circumstances with many similarities to what is happening at present. Even a leader issued by Colonel Blimp (aka Christchurch’s “Press”) advocated that he be dismissed, as he had been acting like an arrogant jerk at the time, including an occasion when he told [then Christchurch mayor] Garry Moore to back off after he suggested that the board and employees strive for a settlement.

        However, maybe Len Brown is unable to similarly dismiss Tony Gibson; didn’t Rodney Hide appoint the members of the board of POAL, and the central government is denying the Auckland Council total autonomy over their own activities? But if I was Len, I would still be inclined to at least give Tony Gibson a very public bollocking, and to make it very clear that he was not regarded as at all fit for the position.

        And speaking of Mearsk, I have heard that it is supposedly a Danish company. But isn’t Denmark also supposed to be a progressive country, with the lowest Gini coefficient [measuring inequality of wealth or annual income] for any country in the whole world? A case of one set of rules for home, and a different set of rules elsewhere?

    • james 111 8.3

      John
      What are you advocating Victorian Ports are cot case because of the Unions do you want us t o be like them

      • RedLogix 8.3.1

        Been to your boss demanding that pay cut yet?

        Or is that kind of thing only for other people?

      • McFlock 8.3.2

        yep, damned unions are ruining australia. That’s why so many nzers are choosing to stay in nz and not emigrate to oz.

  9. Colonial Viper 9

    So I read in the Herald that a Korean fishing boat in the Ross Sea has had a fire and suffering missing crew.

    • Blighty 9.1

      wonder if it’s taking NZ quota. Does that apply in the Ross Sea? I guess not.

      Interesting in that article to see how many disasters occur on foreign-flagged nz-based fishing vessels.

    • KJT 9.2

      Yet another vessel that was sold from Japanese ownership because it was too old to be safe, manned by slave labour and sent to the most dangerous ocean in the world.

      What we are heading towards in NZ as the unions are broken.

  10. Bored 10

    Cameron Slater – Ports of Auckland…..scum working for scum.

  11. Pascal's bookie 11

    OTOH, Maersk don’t seem to have much confidence in Gibson.

  12. Travis 12

    James Henderson: I’m interested in you putting forward some evidence in light of Cameron Slater “being paid to run dirt stories for Ports of Auckland”.

    Please tell me that “He didn’t deny it” is all you have to produce.

    Where did this $10,000 figure come from?

    I hope you’re not making assumptions based on past instances, that would be poor form.

  13. Dear James

    I am the Senior Communications Manager for Ports of Auckland and I can categorically confirm that we have not paid and will not pay Cameron Slater anything.

    Best regards
    Catherine

    [lprent: Double-checking the e-mail. If it pans out then I'll add to the post.
    Confirmed. Adding. ]

    • Inventory2 13.1

      How long then until the defamatory accusations against Cameron Slater are withdrawn?

      • Colonial Viper 13.1.1

        Which claims and how were they defamatory?

        • Inventory2 13.1.1.1

          They say that the nice thing about Cameron Slater is he’ll believe whatever he’s paid to believe. Yesterday, I asked whether Slater is being paid to run dirt stories for Ports of Auckland. He didn’t deny it. So what is the Port’s propagandist up to? Yesterday, he was calling for the workers’ pay to be slashed while defending the directors’ massive fees.

          In my previous post, I wrote:

          Cameron Slater’s rate is $10,000 for an operation like this

          Slater responded:

          There is no way I’d do what I am doing for $10,000 as a fixed fee, for something like the Ports of Auckland I’d probably do it for $20,000 after a discount for the sheer fun of union bashing

          He didn’t admit being paid but his failure to deny it when given the chance is evidence itself. Unless his “I’m not being paid by Ports of Auckland” keys were broken. Slater doesn’t run this kind of intense campaign for the hell of it – it’s his occupation. And why would he be running the Port’s lines for free? Who are they to him? It’s not like a shipping line or an exporter moving from one New Zealand port to another matters a jot in his life. Different when you’re getting paid though, eh?

          Updated: Ports of Auckland deny paying Cameron Slater anything. ]

          Well, that one would be a good start. Both Slater and PoAL categorically deny that any payment has been made. If sued, James Henderson would have to prove that they were lying, and that there had in fact been payments; the burden of proof would be on him.

          • felix 13.1.1.1.1

            “Both Slater and PoAL categorically deny that any payment has been made.”

            Err, what? Where does Slater “categorically deny” anything? Do you even know what that means, InventedTory?

          • Colonial Viper 13.1.1.1.2

            I don’t see where the defamatory accusation lies?

          • David H 13.1.1.1.3

            But isn’t he on a sickness benefit as well? So here’s hoping that the appropriate people point an optic in his direction, just to keep things kosher.

      • lprent 13.1.2

        Over the years Cameron Slater has made numerous accusations against various authors on this site, including me. Most of them were incorrect and many of them have been proven incorrect. To date I have never seen an apology from Cameron Slater for any of those blatant lying slanders.

        You want us to follow a different standard to him – please explain why? I’m interested in how you run this double standard of morality….

        I suspect James might offer an apology to the Ports or Auckland for suggesting that they dealt with the lying arsehole.

        However Cameron Slater has the same recourse as we had with him. He can choose anything from blustering (which is what I suspect he will (as usual) do) through to legal action. The latter we would defend as vigorously as possible. This would include seeking disclosure on his finances to show that it was a reasonable presumption, and arguing that in any case it was an issue that is covered by public good.

        • Inventory2 13.1.2.1

          And authors here have made many against him as well. Don’t pretend to be the injured innocent.

          • lprent 13.1.2.1.1

            So? Look at the timeline. I can’t see any reason to be nice to him.

            However I see that in your usual fashion you ignored my question about your hypocritical standards. You really do reek of having a low moral standard generally…

            When Cameron was deliberately lying about us, you were cheering him on. When an author make a speculative mistake here, you want us to operate completely differently. Please explain this?

            • Mickrodge 13.1.2.1.1.1

              “You want us to follow a different standard to him – please explain why”?

              Because, as my mother always told me…”two wrongs don’t make a right”.

              Otherwise it’s all just a little bit juvenile.

              • lprent

                Silly comment.

                So you’re saying that Inventory2 was wrong the first time in cheering on Cameron Slater.
                And that Inventory2 is wrong in telling us we should write a retraction for Slater?

                But that was what I was saying. Ummm I guess we have the stupid aphorism from someone who hasn’t bothered to actually read the question and engage their brain?

                • Mickrodge

                  Why is it a silly comment? Because it’s asking you to be mature and maybe look outside of the “he said, she said” schoolyard mentality?

                  You can take my “stupid aphorism” back as far as you like to include the actions of whoever you choose but put simply “the ball is currently in your court” given the latest accusations against Slater appear to be misleading.

                  Be the bigger man Lynn/James and admit that you might have got it wrong this time.

                  A big shiny $2 coin says you don’t.

            • Inventory2 13.1.2.1.1.2

              Oh bollocks Lynn; James Henderson didn’t make a “speculative mistake”; it’s the second post in two days that accuses Slater of accpeting money to run a dirty campaign. There is no evidence, and PoAL has denied it as has Slater.

              There is only one reason for this attack; to try and turn the tide of opinion back in favour of MUNZ. And it’s hardly speculative when it is part of a series; a “pattern of behaviour” as you have been known to say.

              • Maybe, “Inventory2″, we’d be be fairer to Slater if he didn’t roll around in the muck so often.

                This is one example why so many view him with complete disdain; http://fmacskasy.wordpress.com/2011/12/21/wishing-death-upon-him/

                I wonder if he’ll be apologising to Peters?

                And will Slater be apologising for sticking his nose into Auckland watersider’s affairs, when the strike doesn’t even concern him?

              • felix

                “PoAL has denied it as has Slater.”

                Again IV2, where does Slater “categorically deny” anything?

                • Colonial Viper

                  Inventory 2 upholding the Right’s moral standards for caring and consideration lol

                • McFlock

                  I think slater should sue IV2 for telling lies about slater issuing a categorical denial.

                • Here Felix:

                  Agent BallSack
                  Would be interested to know whether Whale has accepted any money, however. Not that its wrong to accept money for publishing views of others, writers do it all the time. Is there any truth behind the rumour that Whale is a ‘paid propagandist’ for the VRWC POAL!

                  Like
                  Reply

                  3 hours ago

                  Whaleoil
                  I have not accepted or received any money from Ports of Auckland, not 1 cent let alone $10,000. Though I must admit that their assumptions and allegations have given me pause for thought, perhaps I should charge for what I do. It was nice of them to establish a bench mark too.

              • lprent

                And I see that you are still avoiding facing the question I asked. Perhaps you’re scared of the depths of difference between who you think you are and how others perceive you? That would account for the avoidance behaviour.

                …has denied it as has Slater.

                Actually Slater didn’t deny it. He waffled around it without ever actually doing it. I had a look when I saw the first paragraph of the post this morning. I guess you didn’t make the effort?

                There is only one reason…

                Nope. The question I have had for some time is how someone who (as far as I know) is still on a sickness benefit is able to run a propaganda operation at the level that Cameron Slater does. His published figures for page views etc for his blog, even if they are as massaged as I suspect them to be, require quite a lot of server to run. And there doesn’t appear to be a lot of advertising supporting it. Then there is the question of his self-reported lifestyle….

                The question is if he gets paid for running blog campaigns.

                • The denial is posted above Lynn. To the best of my knowledge (never having actually met him) Slater is not on any benefit.

                  As for your original question:

                  You want us to follow a different standard to him – please explain why? I’m interested in how you run this double standard of morality….

                  The standard of morality you follow is entirely up to you. But when you, or somebody on your blog makes an unsubstantiated allegation which is subsequently denied, you have to decide whether to persist with it.

                  I’ve made allegations against people on my blog. When I’ve been called on it, I’ve apologised, and/or pulled the post. I know I’m not perfect, but I think I’ve been around long enough for people (other than yourself, given the “You really do reek of having a low moral standard generally…” jibe) that I don’t set out to make unfounded allegations. When I have, I accept responsibility.

                  Anyway, we’ve probably taken this discussion as far as we can; have a nice day :-)

                  • lprent

                    He published that he was on the sickness benefit when his medical insurance got cut. Since he has never mentioned actually working for a living and seems to spend all of his time on his blog actively churning out posts – my guess is that he still is. I’m sure if he wasn’t he’d have told everyone.

                    I was away in debugging limbo from just after the comment anyway…

                    • Jackal

                      I asked Slater recently what he thought about being means tested as a sickness beneficiary (when National implement more bashing policies)… but he ignored the question. Presumably and maybe justifiably because he thinks himself imune from National’s archaic policies.

                      Slater did mention getting some work a month or so prior to the last election, but didn’t elaborate on what it was or if he’d stopped his WINZ payments. I can only asume that it would be to do with his blog, as that’s all the guy ever seems do. In fact his modus operandi is to criticize anybody who has a life outside of the blogosphere.

                      If Slater, DPF et. al. aren’t proud enough of their affiliations and probable employers to openly announce them, then that says a lot about the right wing in general. Their faux outrage in this instance demanding apologies/retractions etc is highly amusing, considering how unapologetic they are when caught lying.

        • law 13.1.2.2

          lprent, I appreciate that the blog is written by volunteers, is there any accountability with your authors to follow up on comments and address errors in their postings?

          • lprent 13.1.2.2.1

            Like me, James is probably at work and only reading the site occasionally.

            I already did what was required for the site and updated the post.

          • Frank Macskasy 13.1.2.2.2

            “Law:”…

            A left-wing blog publishes an error and you demand “accountability”.

            A right wing blog publishes deliberate lies and when someone demands “accountability”, we get deflection.

            The realities of the internet, eh?

    • Craig GlenEden 13.2

      Catherine Etheregde can you confirm that the average figure of $90.000 that is meant to be paid to workers is also bullshit!

      • havingalaff 13.2.1

        She has denied it so it must be true/false.

        I also here Trevor Mallard hasn’t denied interfering with turtles…. nuff said !

    • KJT 13.3

      They have a “Senior! communications manager”. Says it all really.

      Tauranga has “A” port manager.

    • felix 13.4

      “I can categorically confirm that we have not paid and will not pay Cameron Slater anything.”

      Well I don’t think anyone expected he’d be invoicing you directly, Catherine.

  14. Jimmie 14

    Hmmmm SMOG. This post proves the old adage that assumptions are the mother of all f—ups.

    Take one vague assumption based on a non denial and extrapolate it out into a whole essay of a post with the one goal of demonizing the Whale.

    Perhaps its good for feeding your friendly resident commentators always wanting tosalivate on some anti VRWC morsel but as to contributing positively to the reputation of this blog as a fount of accurate and direct political commentary hmmmm opps better luck next time lol

    • joe bloggs 14.1

      Come, come Jimmie, that’s a bit tough – where is it claimed that The Standard is the “home of facts”?

  15. Yeah we are at the tail end of the Pacific, next stop Ross Sea, with RWNJs fighting a losing battle for the 1%. But look at what our historic buddies are doing on the West Coast of the US.
    100 years ago NZ and Californian workers were fornicating to the tunes of the IWW.
    This is what our impending revolution against the 1% looks like. Fuck the 1%!
    http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2011/12/29/18703559.php

  16. felix 16

    Just to be clear, Catherine’s statement that POAL aren’t paying Slater should be taken at face value and nothing more (or less).

    Of course they doesn’t pay a loser like Cameron Slater, no reputable organisation would. Reputable organisations pay lobbyists and PR firms, not disgraced political bloggers.

    What the PR firms and lobbyists do with the money is of course a separate matter and none of Catherine’s concern.

    • lprent 16.1

      An interesting point. Are they paying someone like Matthew Hooten’s company (as a “for instance”) rather than doing all of their communications themselves. That could explain why Cameron Slater is so evasive if he is receives money for writing blogs.

      I can’t think why the port company would need to in a industrial dispute. It isn’t like they’re trying to lobby government for anything..?

      If I find time and can be bothered, I may ask that question.

  17. Fotran 17

    This article and comments plays right into Slater’s hand.
    It is the sort of thing he apparently loves that he is attacked, and will continue to enjoy getting up people’s noses.

  18. In response to Craig of Glen Eden -

    I can confirm that the average remuneration for a full time stevedore, in the year ended June 30, 2011, was $91,480. The average remuneration for a part time stevedore (guaranteed at least 24 hours work a week) was $65,518.

    53% of full time stevedores (123 individuals) earned over $80,000. 28% (43 individuals) earned over $100,000 with the highest earner making $122,000.

    The averages were calculated by POAL’s payroll team based on actual payments, including for leave days, medical insurance and superannuation contributions. (For employees covered by the collective agreement, POAL matches their superannuation contributions up to a maximum of 7%.) We excluded those who had worked for less than the full 12 months e.g. had left part way through the year.

    Employees are also entitled to 15 days sick leave per annum, accruing up to 45 days. All shift workers are entitled to five weeks annual leave. Training for all stevedoring tasks (crane driving, straddle driving and lashing) is undertaken in house and is paid for by the company.

    One question that has been asked is how many hours you have to work to earn that $91,000. Stevedores who earned the average $91,000 in the 2010/11 financial year were paid for an average of 43 hours per week, excluding leave days. If you factor leave days in, that increases to 49 hours per week.

    This leads to the key issue for the company – the high amount of paid downtime – an average of 35% of total hours paid. An employee getting paid for a 43 hour week is only working around 28 hours; for a 40 hour week, 26 hours. In a busy week, employees get paid for 66.5 hours but can only work for a maximum of 44.5.

    On Monday 9 January, to give a recent example, we paid 26 staff a total of $5,484,80 for downtime, because they were entitled to be paid until the end of their set eight hour shift even though the ship had finished & they had gone home. In another example employees worked two hours of an overtime shift but were paid for the full eight hours.

    This is not a cost-efficient nor sustainable labour model, especially when the company is not covering its cost of capital, cannot therefore justify further investment in order to grow, and its closest competitor has a labour utilisation rate in excess of 80%. (At Port of Tauranga stevedores start and finish work when a ship arrives and departs).

    The company has offered an upfront 10% increase to hourly rates along with the retention of existing terms and conditions in return for more flexible rosters which would significantly reduce the amount of paid downtime. Employees would have the opportunity to plan their roster a month in advance. This proposal would result in a people being remunerated for fewer overall hours at a higher rate than they would currently get for the same paid hours. To be fair, until such time as container volumes recover/improve, the 10% increase to hourly rates would not (as some commentators have suggested) push average remuneration over $100K.

    Catherine Etheredge
    Ports of Auckland

    • Dear Catherine
       
      Good of you to engage with the online community.
       
      Two questions:
       
      1.  Do your calculations include one off payments including, for instance, redundancy payments?  You see the amounts claimed seem very high.
       
      2.  As far as I can make out the $91k figure first appeared in a Cactus Kate post.  Who provided the information to Kate and were there any conditions?

      • Lanthanide 18.1.1

        She stated that “We excluded those who had worked for less than the full 12 months e.g. had left part way through the year.” so we should assume that the figures do not include redundancy payments.

        It probably does include bonuses, though.

        At $91,480 for 43/hours week for 52 weeks, the average hourly rate including all benefits works out at $40.91. I saw somewhere that the stevedoors said they got paid ~$27 in pocket, so that leaves $14 dollars to be made up in benefits etc.

        I can’t claim to understand exactly how they’re calculating the paid leave in there, but it seems like they’re paying a lot for their medical insurance.

        • millsy 18.1.1.1

          Catherine,

          Please advise why you see your company’s workers as expendable, and do you accept that with this rosters changes, they will be more or less on call hours earning less money, and may need to apply for top ups from the welfare system?

    • Lanthanide 18.2

      Thanks very much for the detailed breakdown Catherine, appreciated.

    • Brett 18.3

      Hmmmm, stupid pricks don’t realise how good they have got it.
      Talk about fucking the golden goose up the arse.

    • Craig GlenEden 18.4

      So the average wharfie does not earn $90.000 a year from doing a 40 hour week! Thought not.

      • Bafacu 18.4.1

        Quite correct, as the statement clealy notes (if you care to really read it) “earned the average $91,000 in the 2010/11 financial year were paid for an average of 43 hours per week” – note the words “earned” and “were paid for” – they only “worked for 28 hours a week” though! So by your reconing they were paid $91,00 for a 28 hour working week – not too bad is it?

    • McFlock 18.5

      53% of full time stevedores (123 individuals) earned over $80,000. 28% (43 individuals) earned over $100,000 with the highest earner making $122,000.

      I’m not sure this bit adds up – would appreciate someone to check my math :) .

      For 123 workers to be 53% of the workforce, that gives a work population of 232. But for 43 individuals to be 28% of the workforce, the population is 153. I assume there’s a typo in there somewhere. If 43 workers are indeed on more than $100k out of a population of 232, then that means an actual top-echelon level of 18% of the workforce. 
       
      And I’m not familiar with the organisational structure on the port – does this average include only personnel with no personnel that report to them, or does is include the shift leaders or even a tier above small-team supervision?

      • phil 18.5.1

        McFlock – it looks wrong to me too. Could POAL clarify? Is the 28 meant to be 18 (18.5ish rounded down)?

        While we are doing maths, I though the directors would receive $70,883 on average (425,000/6) not $83,000.

    • RedLogix 18.6

      Now let’s do some unpacking of those numbers. I’ll stick to average case to keep it simple.

      You have to keep in mind that these figures are not straightforward; including as they do The averages were calculated by POAL’s payroll team based on actual payments, including for leave days, medical insurance and superannuation contributions.. Which are items NZ employers like to think are ‘paid’ to their employees, but are in fact just costs of doing business, and are treated as such in many other countries.

      The ‘average’ week is called at 43hrs, but that includes their annual leave. On the weeks actually worked it’s 49hrs.

      Now I have to assume that this is calculated as hours paid at the base rate of $27 per hr, because in the next sentence the ‘average’ overtime of 35% is included allegedly reducing the paid hours worked from 43 per week to 26 hrs actual work. (Well 43 * (1.0 – 0.35) = 28 hrs but near enough.)

      So if we simply multiply this 43hrs per week by the base rate of $27 per hour, and spread it over 52 weeks (because these numbers include annual leave) then we get an actual gross pay of about $60k.

      This leaves a fair old gap to $91k.

      • McFlock 18.6.1

        The other point I have a quibble with is the assumption that the hourly rate worked by those few workers earning the “average” income must therefore be working the “average” number of hours:
        One question that has been asked is how many hours you have to work to earn that $91,000. Stevedores who earned the average $91,000 in the 2010/11 financial year were paid for an average of 43 hours per week, excluding leave days. If you factor leave days in, that increases to 49 hours per week.
         
        I would expect those earning more than most of their colleagues to have some manner of performance-based weighting to their income to reflect either their superior performance, experience, qualifications, or additional/supervisory duties. These could well be more on an exponential basis, rather than linear.

        But even if it were so, as RL illustrates they would still face a cut in pay of 28% after the generous 10% “increase”. 
         

      • aj 18.6.2

        Do the numbers provided cover all staff, including management.

        • McFlock 18.6.2.1

          I’m actually wondering more about lower management – do stevedores have team leaders / site supervisors and the like? Especially if there are unfilled vacancies, I would expect them to be on a higher wage and be the ones onsite all hours.

          • KJT 18.6.2.1.1

            Of course they do.

            • McFlock 18.6.2.1.1.1

              I figured so.
              In which case, does “full-time stevedore” include “senior stevedore” or “site supervisor” when the POAL make their salary calculations? Who knows. 
               

              • KJT

                With the workforce numbers they have given they must include supervisors and foremen. I suspect specialists like planners etc also, which would push the numbers up.

    • KJT 18.7

      So. What you are saying is that POAL want the watersiders to be there and available, bound, to work. Not able to do any other commitments. Without paying for it!

      Just like McDonalds.

    • higherstandard 18.8

      This is the most useful information I’ve seen published anywhere on this issue since the start of the dispute. pity the MSM journalists could not print this along with a possible rebuttal/alternative viewpoint from MUNZ.

      • McFlock 18.8.1

        Except for the typo in the figures and the dubious practise of including costs of employment as part of the annual wage.

        • hs 18.8.1.1

          I can’t see any typo ?

          I would have thought MUNZ could rebut this all quite easily if there are gross inaccuracies.

            • hs 18.8.1.1.1.1

              Ah quite so looks like there is indeed a discrepancy in the %’s.

              That aside I still view it as the most useful information I’ve seen published and would welcome MUNZ doing likewise.

              • McFlock

                That, and if their “roster flexibility” actually eliminates their alleged “35% downtime” – personally I would figure that that’s where they could do their training and suchlike) then their “10% offer” is actually an effective paycut of 28%. 
                  
                Thanks, guvnor! The missus was mighty grateful for that shilling you gave us at Christmas! [cough cough]

                • hs

                  I doubt they’d spend 35% of their time training.

                  Possibly for new employees but not on an annual basis across the workforce.

                  The crux of the issue to me does seem to be the difference between the two parties in relation to ‘paid downtime’.

                  I can see the need for paid downtime in certain areas – fire services being the best example perhaps but with modern communication I would have thought there would not be the need for such a large amount of downtime for the port.

                  • McFlock

                    But the point being that even if they were only spending 10% of their “downtime” training, then it’s not downtime. It’s training time.
                     
                    It just goes to show the wriggle-room in one can do in stats if you’re the only one with acces to the database.

          • McFlock 18.8.1.1.2

            above.

            53% of full time stevedores (123 individuals) earned over $80,000. 28% (43 individuals) earned over $100,000 with the highest earner making $122,000.

             (123/53)*100  =~232
             (43/28)*100    =~153

             
            However:

             (43/18)*100     =~238,  (43/19)*100     =~226

            So I’m assuming that it was an accidental typo that accidentally made it look like well over a quarter of stevedores were earning more than $100k, rather than it being less than a fifth.

    • Vicky32 18.9

      I can confirm that the average remuneration for a full time stevedore,

      Just an aside – I look it up, and confirmed my impression that the word ‘stevedore’ is the American term. Why are we using the American word now? Does it mean that we now have American union-busting thought processes as well? It matters what we call something – if we persistently use American lexis/spelling, it makesit so much easier to think American thoughts about industrial relations…
      http://en.allexperts.com/q/Etymology-Meaning-Words-1474/Stevedore.htm
      What we used to say:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevedore#New_Zealand
      and for thoroughness:
      http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/stevedore
       

    • Jackal 18.10

      The company has offered an upfront 10% increase to hourly rates if they leave the Union… Don’t forget that bit of your “generous” offer Catherine Etheredge.

      This is entirely designed to bust the union, which is in fact a breach of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:

      Article 23 (1) Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment. (2) Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work. (3) Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection. (4) Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.

      May I also just remind you that your plans to employ full time scabs will be in breach of the Employment Relations Act 2000, which states:

      96 Performance of duties of striking or locked out employees
      (1) This section applies if there is a lockout or lawful strike.
      (2) An employer may employ or engage another person to perform the work of a striking or locked out employee only in accordance with subsection (3) or subsection (4).
      (3) An employer may employ another person to perform the work of a striking or locked out employee if the person—
      (a) is already employed by the employer at the time the strike or lockout commences; and
      (b) is not employed principally for the purpose of performing the work of a striking or locked out employee; and
      (c) agrees to perform the work.
      (4) An employer may employ or engage another person to perform the work of a striking or locked out employee if—
      (a) there are reasonable grounds for believing it is necessary for the work to be performed for reasons of safety or health; and
      (b) the person is employed or engaged to perform the work only to the extent necessary for reasons of safety or health.
      (5) A person who performs the work of a striking or locked out employee in accordance with subsection (3) or subsection (4) must not perform that work for any longer than the duration of the strike or lockout.
      (6) An employer who fails to comply with this section is liable to a penalty imposed by the Authority under this Act in respect of each person who performs the work concerned.

      You cannot by law discriminate against Union members, o stop with the psychological warfare via people like Slater and start negotiating properly.

      • higherstandard 18.10.1

        I don’t think POAL have stipulated that anyone has to leave MUNZ if they accept the offer, although I accept I could be mistaken, have you got a link for that ?

        • Jackal 18.10.1.1

          Matt McCarten: ‘Greedy wharfies’ tale hides ambitions for port

          When the union negotiators pointed out that half of the workforce were part-timers and casuals so he already had enough flexibility, Gibson responded by saying this was his “best and final offer”. He followed up by offering existing casual employees permanent jobs paid at 10 per cent more than the union rate, provided they resigned from the union.

          • higherstandard 18.10.1.1.1

            I’ll think you’ll find that Matt has a history of going off half cocked and printing untruths.

            Once again have you got a credible link for that such as a release from POAL or MUNZ ?

            • McFlock 18.10.1.1.1.1

              Shifting goalposts again, lower?

              “have you got a link for that ?”
              vs
              “Once again have you got a credible link for that such as a release from POAL or MUNZ ?”
               
              i.e. any source you disagree with is not “credible”.

              • higherstandard

                McF

                As per the Jackal’s first post

                ..’The company has offered an upfront 10% increase to hourly rates if they leave the Union… Don’t forget that bit of your “generous” offer Catherine Etheredge.

                Do you think it is credible that POAL has made an offer of 10% conditional on members leaving the union based on no such report from MUNZ or POAL and solely based upon an article from Matt McCarten ?

                From what I have seen they have made the offer to MUNZ without any such condition.

                • McFlock

                  Certainly possible. Also possible that McCartin’s wrong. But the issue here is what you deem to be “credible”. You asked for a source. You were given a source – a source more credible than the dodgy math from pr staff. But having been given the single source you asked for, now you’re claiming  that what you asked for was not enough to be “credible”.
                   
                  The previous standard you set for “credibility” is now, according to you, insufficient. Which is why I said you were shifting the goal posts.

                  • higherstandard

                    So Matt McCarten is a better source than either of the two parties involved … mmmm OK, let’s just agree to disagree.

                    • McFlock

                      Well, you didn’t stipulate “source, and I will only accept the direct testmony from either of the two parties involved in the dispute, delivered under oath.” You got what you asked for.
                        
                      It’s not even an issue about the relative trustworthiness of a source – although I find it interesting that the port pr uses figures here that don’t agree with themselves (and I’m not even quibbling about $91k, I’m referring to the basic issues they have with calculating percentages).
                        
                       

                    • higherstandard

                      Crikey you’ve almost got me wishing that Rogernome would return to commenting here.

                      For the avoidance of future confusion when there is a comment such as

                      ‘..’The company has offered an upfront 10% increase to hourly rates if they leave the Union… Don’t forget that bit of your “generous” offer Catherine Etheredge.’

                      and I comment

                      “I don’t think POAL have stipulated that anyone has to leave MUNZ if they accept the offer, although I accept I could be mistaken, have you got a link for that ?”

                      I’m looking for confirmation in the form of a link to statement from MUNZ or POAL not a link to a third party piece from Cameron Slater, The Standard or Matt McCarten

                    • The Voice of Reason

                      HS, you’re probably not aware that the only way a worker can end a lockout is by leaving the union. The lockout notice is usually in the form of ‘you are locked out until you sign our offer’. That required signature is on an IEA and the CEA overules the IEA if the worker is a member of a union party to the CEA. Therefore, for the IEA to be operative, the worker must resign their union membership.
                       
                      CMP were very explicit about it, POAL maybe less so. But when you lock out workers, you are compelling them to leave the union if they wish to return to work. And, in POAL’s case, that included a ten percent wage rise, so McFlock is right.
                       
                       

    • DH 18.11

      “An employee getting paid for a 43 hour week is only working around 28 hours; for a 40 hour week, 26 hours”

      I take it there aren’t many accountants at the Standard, no-one seems familiar with the cost of labour formula. Every person on a wage typically works about 30-33hrs for each 40hrs paid so the 26hrs is rather misleading if it’s worked out from the annual pay & includes leave etc.

      Cost of Labour formula for the standard 40hr week…

      A 40hr week is 2080 hrs paid per year, or 260 8hr days. Take off 4weeks holiday; 160hrs, 11 days statutory; 88hrs, 5days sick leave; 40hrs. 20minutes per day in paid smoko; 75hrs. Total hrs paid & not worked; 363. Average hrs worked for 40hr week; 33hrs.

      On top of that 363hrs every worker has some unproductive time which is typically around 7-10% so the real chargeable hrs worked on an annual pay basis is close to 30hrs for pretty much every person who works a 40hr week. I expect Catherine Etheredge only works some 30hrs for every 40hrs she gets paid too. The 26hr figure needs explaining; how did they arrive at it?

      You guys don’t question the statistics enough IMO.

      • RedLogix 18.11.1

        Well we were very sceptical… but you are right.

        Just about everything we have been told by PoAL is probably bs or spin one way or another.

  19. I get the very strong sense that the employers, National Party, and assorted right-wing groupies, are starting to realise that the PoA strike is spinning out of control.

    With the internet, the truth about casualisation is syarting to emerge. People are beginning to realise that this is not about a 10% wage increase (which was offered by the BOSSES – not a Union demand!)…

    Yup, panic is starting to set in.

    And the more Blogs and Facebook pages that report the truth, the more they will be shitting themselves…

    • infused 19.1

      I don’t think there is any panic at all to be honest.

      • Dan hansen 19.1.1

        Rather than panic the port is winning the debate and this turning into another hobbit moment for the unions

        PS: i guess at 91k port workers are now officially ‘rich pricks’? So Colonial Viper will now automatically dislike them and assume they ripping off everybody else?

        Or are there two classes of rich pricks – labour voting ones (that are good) and national ones (that are bad)?

        • felix 19.1.1.1

          It’s only you and your mates who use terms like “rich pricks”.

          Grow up.

          • Dan Hansen 19.1.1.1.1

            …and certain labour party finance minster of note who coined the term

            The underlying message of a large number of the left wing thought processes outlined on this site is that “if you are rich you have got there by exploiting others”

        • Frank Macskasy 19.1.1.2

          Dan – you appear to resist higher wages for NZ workers. Why is that?

          Even John Key pledged to raise wages for workers, way back in 2008.

          Do you have a problem with NZ becoming a high-wage economy?

    • Karl 19.2

      I get the very strong sense that the union, Labour Party, and assorted left-wing groupies, are starting to realise that the PoA strike has spun out of their control.

      With the internet, the truth about casualisation is syarting to emerge. People are beginning to realise that this is not about a group of hard done by workers striking for their ‘rights’ but an overpaid Union Hierarchy movement trying to extort more for their already overpaid membership.

      Yup, panic is starting to set in.

      And the more Blogs and Facebook pages that report the truth, the more they will be shitting themselves…

      • Colonial Viper 19.2.1

        Dream on mate, please justify the $300/hr board member rate for sitting on their fat asses, and the $750K pa the CEO gets – I note he is not planning to bust down his own working terms and conditions, just those of the line workers.

  20. Cactus Kate 20

    A Whale subcontractor?
    You are fucking joking.
    There’s one more reason I do things – love
    And I love smashing up Unions,

    • Don’t you think your hatred of unions is a bit unbalanced Kate?  They have achieved a great deal of good in the time that they have been in existence.

      • law 20.1.1

        Don’t you think your hatred of National is a bit unbalanced Greg? They have achieved a great deal of good in the time that they have been in existence

        • Frank Macskasy 20.1.1.1

          “Don’t you think your hatred of National is a bit unbalanced Greg? They have achieved a great deal of good in the time that they have been in existence”

          No.

        • Colonial Viper 20.1.1.2

          Let’s see. Hundreds of workers being fucked over while port execs and directors make millions in salary, fees and benefits.

          Seeing that POAL have no interest in being reasonable, they get everything they have coming to them. If they are expecting “balance” in return for their inept operational management, they’re more incompetent and naive than it looks like presently.

          • Dan hansen 20.1.1.2.1

            At 91k for 43 hours a week of unskilled labour i could probably handle being “fucked over” – hell i might even enjoy it

            • Colonial Viper 20.1.1.2.1.1

              Hey Dan, did you say that all POAL wharfies are getting a raise to $91K pa? Awesome! Where did you see that.

              Gibson gets $750K pa and he sure as hell doesnt work back to back shifts. In fact, value destroyer that he is, he needs to go and now.

              • Dan hansen

                91k is the figure that reflects a circa 40 [43] hour work week, which is line with the hours of the average worker in NZ – so its the most useful comparison point in determining whether it fair.

                I agree that 750k is excessive for running what in a global (and NZ) sense is a relatively small company. In fact I agree that that majority of CEO salaries are out of control – just as in this case the wharfies pay is also far too high relatively to other like occupations and hours worked. For example is it ‘fair’ that the average nurse earns 50-60k for a similar 30-45 hour shift based work week? If you going to rally against excessive CEO salary you should at least be consistent in your thinking when it comes to the excessive pays earned by wharfies…or is the fact they in a union blinding you to realities?

                • Colonial Viper

                  Start by setting the example at the top. Clean out the over priced Board and CEO now.

                • KJT

                  It’s not the wharfies getting too much, it is that our Teachers and Nurses, and many other New Zealanders, are grossly underpaid.

                  Due, to a large extent, to the emasculation of unions since the ECA.

                  • Dan Hansen

                    Lets just MAKE the minimum wage 91k and be done with it!

                    Of course this would have no impact on the return earned by providers of capital, of course in response they would not remove their capital but rather just suck it up and earn perpetual losses

                    The government can just step in a buy these now worthless assets for $1 and we can live in a socialist utopia

                    Genius

                    • Colonial Viper

                      This is why we need infrastructure in public ownership, so some foreign based privateer doesn’t decide to fuck off with the capital, either directly, or indirectly by running the balance sheet down.

                      Yeah let’s make the minimum wage $91K and make sure that the CEo and the board members take massive paycuts to be on it eh.

                    • KJT

                      Who provided the capital for Ports of Auckland in the first place.

                      Clue. It was not a private provider of capital.

                      And POAL’s cost of capital is just a valuation construct.

                    • Dan Hansen

                      In reply to KJT below

                      Who provided the capital for Ports of Auckland in the first place is irrelevant – shareholders be it private or public demand a return for a commercial investment

                      If you think the cost of capital is only a valuation construct then you missing the key driver of our capitalist society – earning a return that at least reflects the risk of the investment. It drives all capital flows within and externally to a country

                      Im not sure you even know what it means….

                    • Colonial Viper

                      Dan Hansen you’re wrong. No one is stupid enough to try and demand an ROI for a port based solely on the port in isolation and without taking into account the wider societal and economic benefits such a facility has for Auckland.

                      Oh yeah RWNJs are.

                      Frankly the ROI on public port capital should be the same as a savings account. 2.5% pa if that.

                      And fire that damn CEO and the directors, thats an extra 10.5% ROI there.

                    • KJT

                      I know all too well what it means.

                      And specifying an ROI when nobody can definitely quantify the real cost of capital is BS.
                      http://www.comu.govt.nz/about-comu/our-role/monitoring/board-valuation/

                      Any costs of capital valuations for assets built up over decades are just guesses.

                • DH

                  “91k is the figure that reflects a circa 40 [43] hour work week,”

                  That is false. The 43 hours looks to have been calculated by dividing total hours worked by a full year to get an average. It is a fake figure because they don’t work a full year; they have holidays just like every other worker does. When holidays (leave) are included it works out to 49hr weeks and even that is too low because workers usually get paid for a standard 40hr week when on leave & 8hr day for statutories which bring the average down. Clearly the $91k comes from working greater than 50hr weeks.

            • Frank Macskasy 20.1.1.2.1.2

              I’d like to see an unskilled worker drive a multi-tonne container crane. The PoA’s insurance company would have a collective coronary.

              • Dan hansen

                Then what about the comparison of wharfies pay to nurses and teachers that earn much less?

                Or in fact a comparison to your generic GP which probably also earns circa 90-100k? Who is more ‘skilled’? Who has sacrificed more to get their position?

                http://www.emigratenz.org/salary-general-practitioner.html

                At least Mickey in his response to Catherine appeared to agree that the wharfies average pay “seemed very high’ – when will the rest of you admit it? Once you made that step you might have a bit more sympathy for the position of the POA for wanting to obtain better productivity from their payline (if your inherent biases allow you to make that intellectual jump)

                • Ianupnorth

                  The average GP is on over $150K per annum; the average hospital consultant starts on $150K and rise to over $200K, plus can dabble in a bit of private work; they also get 6 weeks annual leave, two weeks paid study leave (with about $14K to spend on ‘professional development – normally a conference in a nice place with the family) and a 3 month sabbatical every five years, with expenses met! (see http://www.asms.org.nz/includes/download.aspx?ID=119302)

                  • Dan Hansen

                    Two links – two different figures. You got to love stats

                    • McFlock

                      Not really. 
                        
                      You guesstimated a NZ average from a list of job advertisements that had no demonstrable sampling methodology.

                      Ianupnorth provided a collective contract for a union that represents 3500 health professionals.
                        

                    • Dan Hansen

                      Mcflock

                      Did you even look at my link – was no guess-estimate at all i quoted figures provided in the link. Though i agree the second link does appear more comprehensive. Hence my comment re stats

                      Though if it easier for you to understood the issue, think of the comparison between nurses / fire man / police and the higher (over paid and unproductive) POA wharfies – is there a logical or economic or fairness reason why wharfies should earn more than nurses?

                    • McFlock

                      Sigh.

                      This link:
                      http://www.emigratenz.org/salary-general-practitioner.html ?

                      The bit where it says “Salary and wage information for New Zealand professions is compiled regularly by analysis of New Zealand jobs advertised in major publications. Salaries are annual unless otherwise stated” is what we like to call “a description of sampling procedure”. For specialist employment I would expect examination of specialist journals as well as “advertisements in major publications”. 

                       
                      I would also caution you against assuming that regional salary approximate averages (or at least approximate averages for starting points in salary negotiations in different regional centres) can in any way be validly extrapolated to  “your generic GP which probably also earns circa 90-100k” (by which I assume you mean something along the lines of “a GP with average qualifications and pay conditions in New Zealand”). The Queenstown GP figure, for example, might come from only one advertised vacancy. The Auckland GP figure would have a higher turnover, but then you’re also merging Counties Manukau DHB with Auckland DHB. 

                      At least the ASMS figure is an actual collective contract for an organisation that has approx 20-25% membership of registered doctors.

                      PS: as to your wider issue, I agree entirely. Doctors, Nurses, fire-fighters and police officers should all receive immediate pay increases.

                  • higherstandard

                    Ian as you know there are not a large number who work 10/10ths in public and then supplement with much private work.

                    Also to suggest that consultants in the pubic system rort the professional development fund to spend conferences overseas with this families this is also rare these days – at least in my experience.

                    • So what?

                      Good lord, are you right wingers going to put everyone under the flippin’ electron-microscope to see who is a deserving wage-earner and who isn’t?!

                      Talk about yer Tall Poppy Syndrome!

                      John Key pledges to raise wages and the first thing that reactionaries do? Slam those workers who earn high wages.

                      Bugger me, there ain’t no pleasing you people, is there.

                • Lanthanide

                  Dan, the figures up above by Catherine are total remuneration. The figures you linked to are wages and salary. You’re comparing apples with oranges.

                  • Dan Hansen

                    So Mcflock if “Doctors, Nurses, fire-fighters and police officers should all receive immediate pay increases [to 91k]” how will this be funded…i assume you mean a rich prick tax – in which case what will the rich pricks do?

                    If nurses, firefighters are all now paid 91k wont the vast majority of workers now demand 91k?

                    Suggest you take a few minutes to work out the implications of this

                    • KJT

                      Oh yeah. The old threat of capital flight.

                      Fortunately they are too greedy to stick to principle.

                      Also explain why everyone is heading to OZ where the “rich pricks” are taxed a lot more?

                    • McFlock

                      Idiot. By putting [91k] in my mouth you’re actually demanding a pay cut for doctors.
                       
                      By missing such an obvious point you’re obviously too stupid to understand the “implications” of a progressive taxation system, free education and the consumer/production increase of an expanding middle class. As opposed to the social problems we have from an expanding lower class.

          • Monty 20.1.1.2.2

            [Deleted .Blatant trolling ... when you use the word 'scumbags' to describe firemen you've gone too far. RL]

            (Sorry mickey to lose the parent comment on you.)

            • mickysavage 20.1.1.2.2.1

              Wow, cactus, Monty, higherstandard, Hooten have all commented.  The right wing sure enjoy a bit of union bashing …

               

              • higherstandard

                You call my comment Union bashing Greg ?

                Well I suppose you call yourself a competent lawyer so you’re on record as being pretty loose and fast with your use of language.

                • Well HS you do seem to have got awfully excited over the posts concerning the Maritime Union.

                  And you know nothing about me or my reputation.

                  BTW are you really the person who was masquerading on the Standard as female staff members a little while ago? 

                  • higherstandard

                    Female staff members ?

                    Best you go back and do some basic human biology revision. Not me bud I’ve used a number of handles here including my own in the early days when lynn was using the milder AncientGeek handle but have always been male handles.

                    Oh and there’s plenty on record here about you, on the interwebs and among the Labour illuminati, all hilarious.

                    • lprent

                      …lynn was using the milder AncientGeek handle…

                      And Lyn still reckons she preferred my personality as AncientGeek. I used that when I was separating the admin/sysop role from my commenting (originally I just did the tech role).

                      I dropped it when we (finally) decided to start active moderation. There was far to much possibility of getting into a situation of conflicts of interest. I still largely separate my comments from moderation in terms of what I’d do in each role. But the ‘personality’ tends to be creeping together as being a bit of an old ogre impatient with seeing the same old crap. But that is more a factor of not really taking much of a break from blogging, and progessively having less time to do it as the comments mount up.

                      I still use it sometimes whilst testing a non-admin login.

                      http://thestandard.org.nz/?s=%40author+AncientGeek&isopen=block&search_comments=true&search_sortby=date

                • McFlock

                  As opposed to an outright liar like you?

            • higherstandard 20.1.1.2.2.2

              Why not leave his comment up – if he did indeed call firemen scumbags I’ll happily roger him sideways in a bloglike fashion.

      • Cactus Kate 20.1.2

        Don’t you think your hatred of big business and that of the Standard is a bit unbalanced Mickey? They have achieved far more than Unions have.
        I will always help in the fight against Unions, as I’m sure you will always help fighting big business.

        • Colonial Viper 20.1.2.1

          Achieved far more, but for whom?

          As the GDP pie has grown, an increasing amount of that increased economic productivity has gone to the top 1%, and financial capital exported offshore, making NZ a poorer place. For those who are left.

        • mickysavage 20.1.2.2

          Kate I run a business.  They are absolutely vital for the economy.  As are workers.  As are unions.

    • So did the Polish Communist Party in 1981, Kate…

      But they failed.

      • Gosman 20.2.1

        Hey Frank, do you know what happened to the Gdansk shipping yards that were at the heart of the Solidarity movement?

  21. mickysavage – we did not include one off payments such as redundancy – the averages were calculated only on current employees who worked the full year.

    The figures first appeared in a POAL advertisement in The Shipping Gazette on 26 November 2011. I sent them to Cactus Kate after she emailed me asking for them. There were no conditions.

    Best regards
    Catherine

    • Colonial Viper 21.1

      Dear Catherine,

      In addition to the average figure you have quoted, would POAL please release what the median income over that year was, for those employees.

      • Dan hansen 21.1.1

        Lol – you looking for any explanation for the ridiculously high pay numbers arent you!

        Face the truth and it will liberate you

        • Craig GlenEden 21.1.1.1

          Because Dan hansen the figures have to include over time and extra shifts. Next question was the Port of Auckland profitable in the last 5 years and how much have the board members been paid in that same period.

          • Colonial Viper 21.1.1.1.1

            And how much has the CEO and the rest of the executive management team taken for themselves, from the economic surplus that the wharfies and other actual workers at POAL generated.

            • Dan Hansen 21.1.1.1.1.1

              Given its been stated the POA hasnt meet its cost of capital no economic surplus has been generated!

              Besides workers (and CEO’s who are only glorified workers) cant generate an economic surplus unless somebody provides the capital (and should get a return for doing so) – a point lefties conveniently forget

              • Colonial Viper

                What cost of capital. The port generates massive economic benefits for the city, and that needs to be taken into account.

                Besides workers (or CEO’s or are only glorified workers) cant generate an economic surplus unless somebody provides the capital (and should get a return for doing so) – a point lefties conveniently forget

                Nah fuck it we don’t need capitalist owners to provide the capital, the Govt can do that by taxing capital from millionaires and billionaires, and then providing that capital back as 1% loans to worker co-ops. Easy.

                • Dan Hansen

                  Thats right lets nationalise everything – thats worked out so well every other time its been tried during the 20th century

                  • Colonial Viper

                    Worked for China. And Iceland. And it will work for Greece, Portugal and Spain.

                    Ireland are too gutless to try it though. Better than being owned by the banksters.

                    • Dan Hansen

                      I think you will find that China’s success only happened once they embraced defacto capitalism…also the remnants of communism and central planning in China only remain due to the existence of a police state that tramples over everybody’s human rights….

                    • Colonial Viper

                      China’s version of capitalism is NOT American style capitalism.

                      In fact, China exploited the characteristics (weaknesses) of US style capitalism to great success.

                  • felix

                    China now supplies the entire world with manufactured goods and has more money than a capitalist pig can shit, while the U.S.A. desperately prints money to stay afloat.

                    This apparently is evidence of the failure of nationalisation and the success of privatisation.

                    Right Dan?

                    • Dan Hansen

                      Do some reading – the vast majority of exporting entities in China are private (or have significant private ownership)

                      Capitalism saved communist China – ironic isnt it

                      Some reading for you (“Private ownership: The real source of China’s
                      economic miracle – Mckinsey)

                      http://www.gmupolicy.net/china/readings/McKinsey%20on%20Private%20ownership.pdf

                    • RedLogix

                      Yes … but the other partner is almost always the CCP. And usually has a controlling interest.

                      And critically you overlook the fact that China holds it’s banking system very, very tightly to the State. And uniquely among the large trading nations; the government fixes it’s exchange rate.

                      For while many entities are indeed private, they operate with a quite tighhly controlled and planned marketplace and fiscal environment. Certainly China is nothing like the US capitalist model you seem to have in mind.

                    • Dan Hansen

                      In reply to RL above

                      Yes you right banking system in China is very tightly controlled – but i suspect not for too much longer

                      The US effectively exporting inflation to China – the pressue to liberalise the banking system and float the exchange rate is increasing rapidly.

                      IF there is a parner it normally the CCP – but CCP ownership has been decreasing overtime. Which makes senses – the conversion to capitalism has to be staged – full CCP ownership, then partial then minimal then none

                      As you dont dispute (and as detailed in the paper) the arise of private ownership and capitalism is what has driven the success of China so to say the solution for NZ is to nationalise assets is a rather silly comment.

                      Finally central planning and control works when you have a compliant population – that requires a police state the the inevitable human rights abuses

                      Im not sure we should aspire to the China system – as an example Lynn and the authors (and contributors) to this form would likely find them self in jail for critising the government

                    • RedLogix

                      And yet you conveniently ignore the fact that while China was undergoing this massive transformation .. it was still being running as an economy with a very high degree of central planning, and in particular controlling it’s exchange rate to a fraction of it’s real value.

                      While at the same time highly de-centralised and privatised Western economies have stagnated and struggled. Clearly capitalism on it’s own is not the whole answer.

                      Simplistic ‘communism versus capitalism’ arguments are appallingly narrow and so last century really.

                    • KJT

                      Meanwhile. In the home of failed capitalism.

                      http://www.alternet.org/economy/153646/america_beyond_capitalism%3A_is_it_possible

                      “”Mondragón Cooperative Corporation in the Basque country of Spain. This highly successful grouping of worker-owned cooperatives employs 85,000 people in fields ranging from sophisticated medical technology and the production of appliances to large supermarkets and a credit union with over 21 billion euros in assets””.

                      And North Dakota continues to buck the trend of job loses in the USA with State controlled banking.

                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_of_North_Dakota

          • Dan Hansen 21.1.1.1.2

            The median may by slightly lower looking at the range provided by Catherine but i highly doubt the difference will be significant and change the underlying point that wharfies are over paid

            Profitability in its self isnt meaningful unless tied back to the capital employed – and that is POA’s point. There shareholders arent getting a WACC (cost of capital) return on their investment – hence value is being destroyed on an annual basis and that isnt sustainable.

            A useful counter argument (if somebody could bothered to do the analysis) is that the value of the investment as reflected on the balance sheet is out of date and therefore is artificially high and should be revalued lower – implication is for a given level of profitability that return is higher, and potentially a cost of capital return is already being earned on the true economic value of the assets. To get this economic value you going to have to revalue POA assets using POT assets as a proxy for the true value

            Maybe the question for Catherine is “is the value of assets as reflected on the POA balance sheet a true reflection of the economic value and has POA had any advice that a revaluation (downwards) may be required?”

            • Colonial Viper 21.1.1.1.2.1

              The median may by slightly lower looking at the range provided by Catherine but i highly doubt the difference will be significant and change the underlying point that wharfies are over paid

              1) Let’s see the median figures then.
              2) Fire the CEO and the Directors, they are the ones who are overpaid, destroying value and they need to be shat on.

              • Dan Hansen

                1) Sure but its not going to change the picture

                2) if you want to fire the CEO and Board for being overpaid – then by same logic you should fire the port wharfies for earning a ridicilious 91k for 28 hours work.

                • Colonial Viper

                  Responsibility and leadership starts with those at the top setting the example. Save $2M by firing the CEO and half a dozen board members for a start. And no one would notice their absence.

                  • Dan Hansen

                    So who leads the company under your scenario? The workers?

                    • Colonial Viper

                      There’s a few options. Perhaps a CEO elected by the workers on an annual or bi-annual basis (might be from the existing workers, might be an outsider), and a governance structure consisting of a workers council which holds 20% of the board seats.

                      There will be plenty of workers happy to sit on the workers council and the board for an honourarium of just a few grand per year. And they will be far more able to get productivity gains from workers than this current “smash the union” approach of the 1990′s.

                      Each of these would be significant steps to realising a democratic socialism.

                    • felix

                      “Perhaps a CEO elected by the workers on an annual or bi-annual basis (might be from the existing workers, might be an outsider), and a governance structure consisting of a workers council which holds 20% of the board seats.”

                      Elected? That sounds like democracy to me.

                      You filthy comm1e, trying to democratise everything.

                    • KJT

                      I will, for half of Gibson’s salary.

                      Plenty of competent people around, but as they are not experts on cost cutting, privatisation and union bashing and know how to build companies rather than destroy, they will not get a look in.

                • Craig GlenEden

                  They dont get $91.000 for 28 hours work they get $91,000 a year for 49 hours a week over twelve months. Stop telling lies Dan.

                  Surely you should be happy that these families are getting a decent wage to live on, if they have their conditions cut they will like thousands of others will most likely pack up and go to Australia where Unions are strong and wages continue to be decent for working families.

                  Why do you and the rest of the RWNJ hate working families why would you want to see NZ workers not getting a decent wage?

                • KJT

                  They do not earn 91 k for 28 hours/week work. Read above.

                  Do you really think people should be required to be “at work” and not be paid because the management cannot organise work time properly.

                  Simply paying the managers and directors a more reasonable amount, and cutting down on the tribe of HR, “communications” and other managers will give the required return on capital.

        • Blighty 21.1.1.2

          dan hansen. Would it be such a terrible thing if workers were earning $90,000 a year? They’re not, but would it be so terrible?

          I don’t hear you nashing your teeth over Paul Reynold’s $7 million a year, which is 80 times $90,000 – or quarter of the union workers’ total pay even under the Port’s bullshit numbers.

          • Willie Maley 21.1.1.2.1

            +1

          • Dan Hansen 21.1.1.2.2

            It would be great thing – if we could afford it and had the productivity to support it – sadly we dont as a nation

            See my above post when i note that the vast majority of CEO are overpaid

            • Colonial Viper 21.1.1.2.2.1

              It would be great thing – if we could afford it and had the productivity to support it – sadly we dont as a nation

              Lie.

              Didn’t you see Dan – the value of the the Rich Pricks List has gone up enormously in the last 10 years.

              Worker productivity has sky rocketed and the top 0.1% have been keeping the gains for themselves.

              • KJT

                Productivity gains of 83%. Wages went up 15%. Most of which went to the top 5% of wage earners.

                If median wages had kept up with productivity and prices, the median wage would be more than 90k now.

                We can afford decent pay for workers.

                What we cannot afford is a continued hemorrhage of cash to overseas speculators, in our infrastructure, borrowing back our own money at interest from banks and non productive parasites like our old boys club of managers, speculators and financiers.

  22. Cactus Kate 22

    http://asianinvasion2006.blogspot.com/2011/12/unions-stealing-christmas.html
    Here is my original post where I asked the question.

    Like I said at the time I promised to make enquiries and contacted POA and several of my contacts in the business reporting community. All of whom were too lazy to get back to me.

    The POA as Catherine has stated gave me the numbers. Which I then published. Free of charge. Motivated solely by a well documented dislike of Unions. As well as of course hypocrisy on the wharfies side that they want public sympathy when they’re coining it.

    No leaks, no conspiracy. Shit some might go all the way and call it journalism.

    • RedLogix 22.1

      Motivated solely by a well documented dislike of Unions.

      How do you get by as a lawyer if you don’t belong to any Bar Association? Just curious?

      • Cactus Kate 22.1.1

        Quite well for many years. I’ve only rejoined in the last year as it was beneficial to be listed overseas. Membership is voluntary and not being a member hasn’t held me back in the slightest according to the figures I published on Lawyers pay from surveys.

        Funnily enough I haven’t had any complaints from lawyers about publishing their pay, but the Unions and pinkos have gone nuts when I did for the stevedores.

        • felix 22.1.1.1

          So you find it beneficial to be a voluntary member of a union but you’d like to deprive others of the same right.

        • RedLogix 22.1.1.2

          So you are happy to join a Union when it suits you. Thought so.

          And I take it you’ve not taken much issue with Unions like, Federated Farmers, various Employer, Police and Medical Associations? Or Fonterrra which is one big farmer collective?

          And haven’t you noticed that most big corporates will do anything to ensure they operate in a non-competitive oligopoly? Anything to raise the barrier to entry for new competitors… operating in a market where the only important differentiator is price, is always a race to the bottom and zero profits.

          No-one really believes in free markets you know.

          • Cactus Kate 22.1.1.2.1

            Actually it is not a Union. It doesn’t negotiate my pay or that of other lawyers.
            And in any case ironically I had to in order that offshore businesses could search that I was indeed a lawyer. That is I had to be a member of the Bar association to get on their website so foreigners could google that I was a lawyer.

            Otherwise I wouldn’t have bothered. So yes another crappy argument by you all as I am in fact by stealth required to pay to be a member.

            If you google me vs Fed Fuckwits and Fongterror you will see I have carved both those organisations up therefore am entirely consistent in bashing these up as well.

            • KJT 22.1.1.2.1.1

              It doesn’t set floors on Lawyers fees, And doesn’t lobby for that benefit system for Lawyers, legal aid. Yeah right.

            • felix 22.1.1.2.1.2

              “That is I had to be a member of the Bar association to get on their website so foreigners could google that I was a lawyer.

              Otherwise I wouldn’t have bothered.”

              But you did bother because it is beneficial to you. You joined a collective because it’s in your best interests to belong to one.

              You do realise that it’s voluntary to join all the “evil” unions too, don’t you Cathy?

              • Cactus Kate

                It wasn’t voluntary as I joined for one purpose – To get my name on the public register to prove I am a lawyer ie. hold a current practising certificate. Mickey can explain this to you.
                No joining, no name on website so those foreign to the NZ jurisdiction cannot verify your claim to hold a practising certificate.
                Not one person or organization in NZ responsible for any pay or conditions I receive, if for no other reason genius. I don’t work in NZ!
                That I had to join is an indictment on the monopoly they have and charge for of publishing names of lawyers with current practising certificates.
                If the courts offered that service for free there is no way I would bother being a member.
                But you aren’t understanding this so feel free to continue your ignorance.

                • KJT

                  If the courts offered this service paid for by the tax payer. While I stay where I do not pay back taxes for the cost of my education or any other services NZ tax payers provided to me.

                  Fixed it for you.

                • felix

                  I understand this perfectly well, Cathy. It’s you who’s been changing your story re- voluntary membership from comment to comment.

                  Have another drink, granny.

                • Jackal

                  Catcus

                  Shit some might go all the way and call it journalism.

                  Hardly! I still find it hard to believe that you’re a real lawyer Odgers… could you perhaps post your credentials? Things must be pretty diabolical in Hong Kong if they let you practice law with such obvious mental deficiencies going on.

          • Colonial Viper 22.1.1.2.2

            No-one really believes in free markets you know.

            Especially China, who signed a “Free Trade Agreement” with us allowing them to put tarriffs on NZ dairy products as they wish. Which they have done so more than a dozen times since its signing.

    • DavidW 22.2

      Oh shit Kate, I hate it like anything when you blow a good conspiracy theory out of the water. You mean you just ASKED for the information and it was provided?? Well I’ll be . ………….. And here we were spending days disputing the numbers and calling each other dirty lying capitalist running dogs and all kinds of groovy insulting names and obfuscating like crazy over matters completely non-central to the argument, and abusing anyone who meekly suggested that facts were a commodity in short supply around here and what do you do? Damn you Kate !!!!

      • RedLogix 22.2.1

        You mean you just ASKED for the information and it was provided??

        And you’ve pretty much swallowed the company numbers uncritically. When you unpack them a bit …something doesn’t make sense.

        They don’t provide a complete picture.

        • DavidW 22.2.1.1

          Don’t mistake me for dumb RL, I know perfectly well what a cost-to-the-employer calculation looks like. If you now want to say that benefits should not be included in earnings, perhaps you should have been a bit more specific earlier. Rule 1, when you get an answer, carefully define the question.

          I am however interested in the 1 for 1 super subsidy to 7%, don’t see that much these days (or ever for that matter), most of the rest including productivity incentives look a bit vanilla (not that they appear to have improved the POAL efficiency rankings much tho’)

  23. Don’t you think your hatred of big business and that of the Standard is a bit unbalanced Mickey? They have achieved far more than Unions have.
    I will always help in the fight against Unions, as I’m sure you will always help fighting big business.

    Kate, that statement doesn’t even come close to accuracy..

    Of course Unions have achieved much. You and I are both aware of the last two hundred years, where Unions have played a prominent part in promoting safety; fair pay; a 40 hour week; equal pay; etc; etc. Manyh of the benefits you enjoy in your own employer-employee contract is based on what Unionists have achieved in the past.

    In fact, you probably owe the fact that you’re a qualified lawyer (?) rather than a pregnant housewife with a dozen kids; a pile of laundry; a stack of dirty dishes; etc – on the achievements of unionism and feminism. (No offence intended to housewives, who do a hard job and often for little recognition.)

    Count yourself lucky you live in 2012 – not 1812.

    I can’t speak for others, but stating that ” you will always help fighting big business” is, again, not accurate. We (generally) fight against the excesses and abuses of big business. That is the difference, as I perceive it: you oppose Unions because they exist – I oppose Big Business’ abuses when such abuses exist.

    Considering the global banking crisis caused by big business abuse; incomptenance; and greed – I think there is reasonable cause to keep a close watch on businesses?

    After all, it wasn’t the Maritime Union , sitting in Wall St boardrooms, that had to be bailed out by Bush and then Obama.

    • law 23.1

      Frank, since you appear to not like banks, have you considered closing down your bank account?

      • Colonial Viper 23.1.1

        Hey law, after the righties privatise the water supply and all the power generators what would you like us to do to protest?

        Never drink water or use power again?

        Moron. Strategic economic infrastructure like the banking system must always be owned and operated in the public good, not for the good of Australian shareholders.

        • Frank Macskasy 23.1.1.1

          Indeed, CV.

          (And I like to say, I don’t bank with a foreign owned bank. )

        • law 23.1.1.2

          CV- you are welcome to connect a water tank to your gutters as I have done, next project will likely be a solar panel- I note an article in the Herald this week highlighting the increasing price reduction of them.

          You are also welcome to purchase shares in Westpac, ASB or the ANZ Group, though I am not sure what their owenership has got to do with this? I was simply letting Frank know he has the option not to have a bank account seen as he appears to not like bankers.

          • Frank Macskasy 23.1.1.2.1

            “I was simply letting Frank know he has the option not to have a bank account seen as he appears to not like bankers.”

            As with your other assumptions and prejudices, you are in error.

          • Vicky32 23.1.1.2.2

            I was simply letting Frank know he has the option not to have a bank account seen as he appears to not like bankers.

            Surely you know that no one has the option not to have a bank account? Quite aside from anything else, no employer will pay cash in hand.

            • Colonial Viper 23.1.1.2.2.1

              By law employers are required to agree to pay cash in hand…unless they contract out of it. Which is why every employment contract says that your pay will be direct credited into your bank account.

        • Colonial Viper 23.1.1.3

          So capitalist owners with net assets and net worth will be welcome to participate in your little society then? After all it is predominantly the 1% who actively participate in the equity and debt markets.

          Your cute little EV system cannot power your oven or your hot water cylinder, and your grey water system is just that – grey water not potable.

          The privatisation of infrastructure leaves most with no way out but to pay for private profits for shareholders.

          False non choices as the corporate sector gobbles up the key monopoly infrastructure each of us need to live.

          • law 23.1.1.3.1

            Ahh no, my water is drinkable, the UV light and other filters it goes through ensures that.

          • Karl 23.1.1.3.2

            Because no one on a farm drinks rainwater? Twit.

            • Colonial Viper 23.1.1.3.2.1

              Suggesting that townies have a serious option of getting off the town supply en masse is ridiculous.

              Stop privateers making money off core infrastructure each of us need to live.

    • Cactus Kate 23.2

      And out with the sexist insults already now you’ve been discredited.

      Nah no offence intended to belittle housewives because you know the Union did so much for women they should be able to achieve more….

      I suppose Maori and Pacific Islanders should thank Unions as well that they aren’t living in caves, beating each other over the heads with sticks still or cleaning your shoes? What about the gays? And the Asians? And the transgendered?

  24. The POA as Catherine has stated gave me the numbers. Which I then published. Free of charge. Motivated solely by a well documented dislike of Unions. As well as of course hypocrisy on the wharfies side that they want public sympathy when they’re coining it.

    It’s not hypocrisy.

    The Maritime Union is simply fulfilling National Party policy, in raising wages;

    “We will be unrelenting in our quest to lift our economic growth rate and raise wage rates.” – John Key, 29 January 2008

    Source: http://www.johnkey.co.nz/archives/306-SPEECH-2008-A-Fresh-Start-for-New-Zealand.html

  25. ABS 25

    At least Whale and Kate attempt to quantify their statements with facts. As has been shown, this whole post is a fantasy from go to finish. And if you bothered to check, 6 hours ago I asked Whale whether or not he had taken any money from the POAL or subsidiaries and he replied with a very definitive NO! Won’t link but given the severe moderation here I will screenshot and post on every other site that allows free and frank discourse.

    • McFlock 25.1

      At least Whale and Kate attempt to quantify their statements with facts. 
       
      First time for everything, I suppose…

    • felix 25.2

      Bollocks, Mr Ballsack.

      If it’s the q&a InventedTory quoted above then neither the question nor the answer said anything of the sort.

      If that’s not the exchange you’re referring to then please link to the correct one.

      “Won’t link but given the severe moderation here I will screenshot and post on every other site that allows free and frank discourse.”

      What absolute bullshit, people post links here all day long. You won’t post one because you lied about the wording of your question and Slater’s answer.

      • ABS 25.2.1

        Sigh. Anyone who disagrees with the left is a liar. Obfuscate all you want ~ the whole premise and body of the post above us is complete and utter bullshit. However, you won’t call out James Henderson will you? I will stand by my original observation that The Standard is the biggest circle jerk in history. If I make it past moderation of course.

        • Frank Macskasy 25.2.1.1

          “I will stand by my original observation that The Standard is the biggest circle jerk in history.”

          I suppose the irony of that statement totally eludes you?

    • Inventory2 25.3

      Happy to post your screenshot ABS :-)

      • felix 25.3.1

        Why don’t you just link to it here like anyone else would?

        Ballsack doesn’t seem to have the capacity, but you know how to paste a link, right IV2? What’s stopping you?

        Is it that you don’t have anything to link to other than the q&a you posted above in which Slater doesn’t actually deny being paid for his work?

        • ABS 25.3.1.1

          Because I find it hard enough to pass moderation here without linking to WhaleOil. Thanks Inv2 for doing so.

          • felix 25.3.1.1.1

            He hasn’t linked, he just quoted your question and Slater’s answer.

            They don’t say what you claim they do.

            • ABS 25.3.1.1.1.1

              I tried linking before but was put on moderation again. Here’s a thought – just go to WhaleOil. For your information, I came to this thread and after reading it, wanted to know myself whether Cameron was paid money for publishing the views of POAL.

              To surmise:
              ABS: Cameron have you taken money to run POAL’s propaganda?

              Direct Quote WhaleOil: Whaleoil
              I have not accepted or received any money from Ports of Auckland, not 1 cent let alone $10,000

              [The auto-spam trap catches all sorts of stuff that would otherwise make this site utterly unmanageable. It's necessary. Most of the time if you are patient a moderator will get around to releasing your comment within an hour or so.]

              • felix

                That answer doesn’t come close to denying that he’s being paid for the work, it only says he hasn’t received any money from POAL.

                Why don’t you read the fucking thread? This has been addressed several times already.

                And stop bullshitting about not being able to link. You’re just using that as an excuse to change your wording every time you describe the question and answer.

                • ABS

                  To paraphrase the left: “this is why we need National Standards”

                  I am not Cameron Slater. I asked a question and received an answer. Sorry if that answer trims your ball hairs.

                  ~BallSack

                  • felix

                    Look I can see you’re not the sharpest prick around so I’ll explain this one more time and I’ll type slowly.

                    Slater said he hadn’t received any money from POAL, and that’s all he said.

                    He hasn’t denied that he’s being paid for the work.

                    Do you get it yet?

  26. The piddling $2,000 donation that the Maritime Union gave to Len Brown, Slater used to suggest the Supercity mayor was in the wharfies’ pocket. That one didn’t really fly. - Author’s opening post.

    Interesting…

    Slater condemns the $2,000 donation?

    How does he square that – with this:

    “Dealer who gave Nats $50k eyes Govt BMWs”
    - http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10725267

  27. $91480pa is the average wage???????

    I thought these guys were only getting $13 bucks an hour??

    • Brett – you do know that the Union is not seeking a 10% wage increase, don’t you?

      You do know that the 10% was offered by the PoA employers – not the Union?

      And you are aware that the reason for the strike isn’t over wages – but threatened casualisation by PoL ?

      There y’go; glad to be of assistance.

      • Brett Dale 27.1.1

        POA offered 10%, and the unions turned it down. The LIBERAL MEDIA (I should get a job at faux news) kept showing that guy with a banner that had $13 dollars an hour in all conditions.

        Im guessing most kiwis think these guys are on 13 dollars and hour and not 94 thousand.

  28. Fat Cat 28

    $100k per year. Imagine being that lucky! Imagine being so lucky that an insurance company will pay you out $100k per year for 6 years! . . after which you’re so depressed you have to go on a sickness benefit . . but you’re never too depressed to appear on Leighton Smith’s show, or Larry Williams’ show, or court, or blogging tours, or hunting, or holidaying.

  29. Here is a simple question, will I get a answer from it????

    How much money are these [port workers currently paid on average?

    Im not talking about management?

    Im talking about the workers who you guys are supporting.

    Im kinda guessing the figure of 90 thousand a year is wrong?

    • felix 29.1

      $27 an hour for full time apparently. Not bad.

      • Brett Dale 29.1.1

        Nice for them, too bad they wanted more.

        • felix 29.1.1.1

          No Brett, they wanted the same money adjusted for inflation. The Port wants to pay them less.

          Try to keep up mate.

          • Brett Dale 29.1.1.1.1

            I thought they wanted more than 10%?

          • Brett Dale 29.1.1.1.2

            Inflation is over 10%??

            [God I can't stand you flailing around like this.

            The Union is asking to retain existing terms and rosters plus a 2.5% inflation only adjustment.

            PoAL is asking for a complete dismantling of the rosters which will mean a reduction of paid hours in the order of 25-35%. In return they are only offering a 10% pay rise. Yet the workers will still have to be available to work 24/7.

            In total this amounts to a substantial pay cut for exactly the same work....RL]

            • Brett Dale 29.1.1.1.2.1

              So basically the Union dont want their workers to be on call 24/7, and they want their workers to be paid even if they dont work.

              Well here is what should happen

              You should only get paid for the hours you work.

              If your not working, and dont want to come in on call, turn your cell phone off.

              • The Voice of Reason

                Hey Brett, I can’t find your comments decrying the payment of workers who were unable to work due to the Chch earthquakes. Can you show me where they are? I presume they will be near your posts opposing the payment of workers whose places of work were closed due to snow in Otago and Southland last winter. And the winter before that. And the winter before that, etc etc.
                 
                But, fundamentally, what you support is the unilateral breaking of contracts by the party who can’t plan a workload effectively. All fulltime Kiwi waged workers are guaranteed minimum working hours each week (usually in the range of 35-45 hours per week). It’s not the workers’ fault if the work isn’t available, so why should they subsidise incompetence?

                • Voice of reason:

                  There is no earthquake in Auckland, there is no snow in Auckland, these workers who are on a huge wage already want to be paid a 40 hour week for only working 20 odd hours.

                  Now if their current employer wont do this, perhaps they can look for work in another industry, Im sure other employers would be quite happy to pay them for a 40 hour week and have them only work 20 odd hours.

              • RedLogix

                I’m rapidly losing patience with idiots.

                The union is perfectly happy for their workers to be on call 24/7. It’s the nature of the work, they’ve done it like that forever.

                You should only get paid for the hours you work.

                The workers have contracted to do a full 8 hr shift. They are required by their employer to be available for that shift. The workers do not have the option to ‘turn their cell-phone off’, nor can they seek alternate employment.

                The employer then shortens that shift from 8 hrs to say 2 hrs; it is the employer who is breaking the contract.

                Do you think it is the employee who should wear the cost of the employer breaking the contract.

                • RedLogix:

                  If the work isnt there though? what is the employer suppose to do?

                  • RedLogix

                    In the case of PoAL the work is there. These guys actually do heaps of overtime in the course of a year.

                    The problem is that the employer has real structural problems with proper utilisation of their asset, and with workflow management.

                    But rather than fix those problems; they just want to take the cheap lazy way out and dump the cost onto their workers.

                    Which is plain dumb.

                    • Colonial Viper

                      POAL and Port of Tauranga also appear to be charging way less than their Australian port management counterparts.

  30. Blue 30

    See Post 18 for your answer Brett

  31. randal 31

    dont worry folks.
    according to fran sulivan they are going to fill in the harbour or move it somewhere else or whatever if the accountants dont get their way and spit the dummy.

  32. Karl 32

    Of course one of the most amusing things about watching all the left wing commentators on this thread supporting the wharfies – is you seem to have forgotten this is a CCO.

    So anything given to those “rich pricks” above the median wage is stealing from all the impoverished Auckland City dwellers. In fact Len may have just found a way to pay for his train set…

    • Karl – for your benefit – you do know that the Union is not seeking a 10% wage increase, don’t you?

      You do know that the 10% was offered by the PoA employers – not the Union?

      And you are aware that the reason for the strike isn’t over wages – but threatened casualisation by PoL ?

      There y’go; glad to be of assistance. Again.

  33. Karl 33

    Of which only 28 hours were actually worked – the rest were spent at home the poor dears.

    • Colonial Viper 33.1

      Still doesn’t beat the $300/hr rate gifted to the double dipping company directors to destroy the port’s value and lose the port’s major customers.

      • Dan 33.1.1

        Double dipping how?

      • Karl 33.1.2

        Because you assume that a director with full legal liability for the entity is only doing 5.5 hours a week? Have you ever even remotely seen what a director typically does?

        We had one of the most useless hands off directors I have ever seen at my previous employer – but even he did far more than that for us.

        Also while basking in your collectivist ideals you may want to reflect on this:
        http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2011/11/thanksgiving-lessons.html

        “It’s one of the ironies of American history that when the Pilgrims first arrived at Plymouth rock they promptly set about creating a communist society. Of course, they were soon starving to death.”

        I just hope the union bosses spread their largess around to support all the workers they’ve successfully gotten fired.

        • Colonial Viper 33.1.2.1

          “It’s one of the ironies of American history that when the Pilgrims first arrived at Plymouth rock they promptly set about creating a communist society. Of course, they were soon starving to death.”

          46M Americans on Food Stamps and counting mate. Hows the bastion of free market capitalism doing these days?

    • Blighty 33.2

      no, they weren’t ‘spent at home’. Paid down time is spent at the port.

      And the 28 hours of work you refer to a week is 40 hours of restored shifts. On their hourly rate of $27, that’s $56,000 a year – hardly ‘rich pricks’.

      Jesus. You don’t understand this issue at all.

      But, then, you’re a righty arguing for someone else to get a pay cut. What’s new there?

      • Rob 33.2.1

        what , playing plants vs zombies all day, geeze

        • felix 33.2.1.1

          Righto Rob, are you going to be talking to your boss tomorrow and offering to turn up to work several hours early and sit around for with no pay while you wait to be called up?

          No?

          Didn’t think so.

    • You really haven’t the faintest, do you…?

      So, after the maritime worker’s jobs are casualised, Karl, can we go after YOUR job?

      Just checking.

    • And you should care because—?

  34. Colonial Viper 34

    Workers have to do double shifts to turn their $27/hr into $91K

    The CEO is not worth the $750K he is earning, fire him first.

    Face it POAL has run out of ideas to improve their profitability; the only thing the Board and executive management can think of now to make an extra dollar is to take it away from workers.

    There needs to be a thorough clean out at the top.

  35. Allyson 35

    Reading this thread leads me to conclude that Matt McCarten is either very gullible or does not always tell the truth.

    • indiana 35.1

      Apparently doesn’t pay taxes either…

      • That is pretty close to slander.

        So the right wing nutters start trolling when they can’t win the debate with rational discourse.

        • law 35.1.1.1

          pot. kettle. black

        • Inventory2 35.1.1.2

          Frank Macskasy said

          That is pretty close to slander.

          So the right wing nutters start trolling when they can’t win the debate with rational discourse.

          No Frank; those allegations against McCarten are a proven fact.

          http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?objectid=10740987

          Inland Revenue is chasing unionist Matt McCarten’s Unite Support Services Ltd. for $150,750 in unpaid taxes after the department forced the company into liquidation last month.

          McCarten’s vehicle, which supplied administrative support services to the youth-orientated union Unite Inc., was put into liquidation by a High Court order last month after the tax department pursued it for “failure to provide for taxation,” according to the first liquidator’s report.

          The Official Assignee rated the prospect of a dividend as “unlikely,” and is looking into the company’s possible interest in an Onehunga building lease, the report said.

          The liquidator will contact McCarten to verify Unite Support Services’ interest in the building, which may have outstanding arrears owed on the lease.

          IRD is seeking almost $4,000 costs, $97,000 in a preferential claim and a further $49,800 as an unsecured creditor with proof of debt.

          The Unite union assigned an interest in a lease and the provision of educational activities to McCarten’s company, according to its 2009 financial statements, the latest lodged with the Companies Office.

          The union has the right to take action against McCarten’s company if there’s a default of the lease agreement.

          The union fell afoul of the IRD after failing to pay tax on revenue accrued between October 2007 and March 2009. After racking up $134,000 in unpaid tax, it agreed to repay that at a rate of $8,000 a month.

          The company reported a net deficit of $33,700 in the 2009 year and made a loss of $15,500 the year before.

          Both Unite Union and Unite Social Services Limited (of which McCarten was sole director) had significant arrears to the IRD. In the case of the Unite Union, it was $134,000 in debt, accrued over an 18-month period before and after the 2008 election.

          If an employer of Unite union members failed to pass on deductions for PAYE, Kiwisaver, Student loans etc, the union and McCarten would be rightly irate. So it’s not a good look when a trade union withholds money it has deducted from union staff, is it now.

          I hope I haven’t shattered your image of McCarten and Unite; I’m surprised you weren’t aware of this, widely read as you are. But thanks for the opportunity to educate you :-)

          • ABS 35.1.1.2.1

            [We always delete these 'pwned' comments. They start flamewars.....RL]

          • Frank Macskasy 35.1.1.2.2

            So it’s the UNION that is/was being “chased” for taxes – not Matt McCarten?

            The right wing trolls should be a tad more specific then, eh? Because Username Indiana can still be seen as making slanderous allegations.

            Facts.

            Glad to help IV2.

            • Inventory2 35.1.1.2.2.1

              No Frank; Unite Social Services was liquidated by IRD because of a tax debt of $150k. Unite Social Services Limited’s sole director and shareholder was Matt McCarten. And you may note the the IRD’s application to place the company into liquidation was for “failing to provide for taxation”. Effectively, IRD is saying that USS Ltd had made no provision for tax, and had no intention of paying it.

              McCarten set up USS to contract to Unite Union to provide administrative services (ironic given the outrage at the thought that PoAL may contract out services!). The two are unable to be separated. And as anyone knows, Unite Union is Matt McCarten. He has admitted elsewhere that he got it wrong. But it has been an embarrassing episode for the union movement and for McCarten personally who was one of the few union leaders I had a modicum of respect for.

  36. Travis 36

    lprent: since James Henderson has gone to ground since making his false claims this morning and failed to answer my question, and since you’ve seemingly been more than happy to support his claims perhaps then you would be happy to answer the same question I asked him:

    ” James Henderson: I’m interested in you putting forward some evidence in light of Cameron Slater “being paid to run dirt stories for Ports of Auckland”.

    Please tell me that “He didn’t deny it” is all you have to produce.

    Where did this $10,000 figure come from?

    I hope you’re not making assumptions based on past instances, that would be poor form.”
    ***********
    And please don’t feed me that ” Like me, James is probably at work and only reading the site occasionally.”

    I’m not interested in any sidestepping, but will partially accept any pedalling in the reverse direction, I keenly await your response, or did I ask a curly one?

    • lprent 36.1

      Ummm well I was working some nasty code from mid-afternoon to quite late. Had dinner, written a post, cleaned up e-mails, . And now I’m working my way back through the comments now.

      But the short answer I don’t know for sure (and James never comments anyway).

      However I’d presume that in the absence of any other visible means of support apart from a sickness benefit that he may or may not be on, and as he clearly doesn’t work, I assume that he is getting his blog to pay his income somehow – the question is how. Now there have been rumours for some time…

      If Slater doesn’t like it, then he is always welcome to pursue legal avenues. I for one would love to force a disclosure on him via the courts to prove where he is supporting his blog (and lifestyle) from. I’m sure that would be of considerable public interest and in the public good.

      I’d suggest that you read the about and the policy. Especially the section on “You must..”. You’re just lucky I didn’t see this while moderating.

    • Travis; considering the dirt that Cameron dishes up – much of it unfounded – you’ll excuse me if my Sympathy Factor for him remains firmly set at ‘zero’.

  37. chris73 37

    Seriously this is gold, the only thing you clowns should be greatful for is that this has happened so early in the election cycle and people will have forgotten about it…

    Honestly how dumb are you guys or is that you’re so far out of touch with the majority of kiwis that you really have no idea what people who arn’t stuck in the 1950s actually think?

    See heres the thing, the problem is you think that everyone else thinks and act like you lot on the left do so if someone (cactus kate for example) posts something you don’t like/agree with you immediately assume shes making it up because thats what the left do (make stuff up, lie, mis-spoke, disinformation etc etc)

    Best entertainment on the net (after notalwaysright.com)

    To be positive Shearers shown good instincts by keeping well away for this

  38. Colonial Viper 38

    I see the RWNJs have a real interest in this issue. Wonder why :D

    • chris73 38.1

      Because your lots first thought is to lie, attack and discredit any view that you disagree with and in this instance (like so many others) you lot have lost this battle because of it (and by battle I win the publics perception)

      And its amusing

      • Cactus Kate 38.1.1

        +1

      • “Lost this battle”, Chris?

        No, I don’t think so.

        The propaganda from the employers was that this was a wages-related issue and the figure of 10% was bandied about.

        Then the truth becomes public; it’s not about wages, and the figure of 10% increase came from employers who wanted to CASUALISE their workforce.

        I think that’s when most New Zealanders would have realised what, precisely was going on.

        And most New Zealanders would be horrified if their employer tried to change a full time, 40+ hour a week job into a casualised role. Not only is that unfair, but it’s pretty damned hard to pay the mortgage and raise a family when you don’t know what your rostered work hours will be from day to day, or week to week.

        Because if the Maritime Union workers can be casualised – who’s next?

      • muzza 38.1.3

        Chris73 – You have no idea what you are talking about, and you have no idea what you are playing with. Back the workers, because we all are workers in some way shape or form, and need to support eachother , not look to tear it all apart.

        The left-right paradigm is killing peoples ability to rationalise, “You lot this, you lot that” is that the level we have reached now is it!

    • James 111 38.2

      CV
      Its a bit of shame when the truth come out from POA and blows away all the Left Wing Bull Shit isnt it?
      Gone very quiet on here trying to justify what really seems like greed.

      Notice Mcflock has gone hiding

      • McFlock 38.2.1

        Went to the pub with my friends, dickwad.
        Look up “friends” in the dictionary. Then tell me what your point is.

    • ABS 38.3

      Perhaps we are just as sick of left wing trolls CV. The difference being right wing trolls say what they personally believe whilst left wing trolls repeat the party line ad infinitum.

      • KJT 38.3.1

        LOL.

        I have yet to see an original thought from a RWNJ.

      • felix 38.3.2

        lolz

      • Really, ABS?

        Considering that you’re a right winger of a Left wing Blog, I think that’s a bit rich.

        And considering you’ve not attempted to add anything of a factual nature to this debate – who, precisely, is the troll?

        You’ve come here simply to make derisory comments and ad hominem attacks – through the safety of your anonymity.

        So really, you contribute practically nothing to this discourse. At least Cactus Kate attempts to add something of value by addressing specific issues.

        • felix 38.3.3.1

          “At least Cactus Kate attempts to add something of value by addressing specific issues.”
          [citation needed]

          • lprent 38.3.3.1.1

            Oh come on Felix. Despite my frequent carping at her, she does argue her case and usually to an agree to disagree level. That is despite her proclivity toward getting indignant about being offended.

  39. Peter Martin 39

    So…after all that, just how much do people consider a PoA employee should earn…and how many hours per week?

  40. Tangled up in blue 40

    I can confirm that the average remuneration for a full time stevedore, in the year ended June 30, 2011, was $91,480. The average remuneration for a part time stevedore (guaranteed at least 24 hours work a week) was $65,518.

    53% of full time stevedores (123 individuals) earned over $80,000. 28% (43 individuals) earned over $100,000 with the highest earner making $122,000.

    The averages were calculated by POAL’s payroll team based on actual payments, including for leave days, medical insurance and superannuation contributions

    vs.

    The company says workers are getting $90,000 per year for 26 hours work. This is simply wrong, and management has not provided any supporting data to back up this claim

    A stevedores guarantee for 40 hours per week is $1,090.40 = $56,700.80 per annum @ 260 shifts per year. To earn the money being quoted by Mr Gibson, stevedores would have to complete an extra 1,377 hours.

    http://www.munz.org.nz/ports-of-auckland-dispute/

    I’m guessing that the 30 odd thousand discrepancy is worker benefits?

    • chris73 40.1

      I’m thinking that the unions (and lefties in general) believe the end justifies the means so they’ll tell lies

      Or they were hoping the info wouldn’t come out.

      • Colonial Viper 40.1.1

        Alsways fascinating watching the Right project their inner characteristics on the world around them.

        In addition to ‘the ends justifies the means’ meme, the politics of envy meme, and the hater meme are all very revealing of the RWNJ personality.

      • RedLogix 40.1.2

        We KNOW from PoAL themselves that the base rate is $27.40 per hour.

        Now if you multiply that out at say just an ordinary 40 hour week, by 52 weeks in a whole year … this is a gross pay of $56,000 or so.

        Now how do you think PoAL arrived at a gross pay of $91,000 for 26hrs a week work?

        I’m really interested to see how you think these two numbers can be reconciled?

        • ropata 40.1.2.1

          There are probably allowances added to the base rate. Depends on the collective agreement but I would expect a shift allowance, danger allowance, possibly a dirt allowance for most workers. Also there would be a scale for skills, seniority, and holding tickets to safely operate the machines. Then there are overtime rates and productivity bonuses.
          All very reasonable considering the enviroment these guys work in.
          See Helen Kelly’s detailed breakdown here.

    • James 111 40.2

      Wonder who is lying then? Makes you wonder whether the Union has all its facts together on this one doesnt it. Looking at the standard of representation the Wharfies have on TV I some how dont think they have. Or they cant actually come to grips with the situation that these guys are very well paid for what they do or dont do compared with like Jobs less than 2.5 hours drive from here

      • Tangled up in blue 40.2.1

        Total remuneration includes “medical insurance and superannuation contributions“.

        Are these types of expenses (especially insurance) usually counted as a payment to the employee??

        Serious question.

        • KJT 40.2.1.1

          Not normally when you are comparing hourly rates.

        • RedLogix 40.2.1.2

          Employers like to…especially in this country. In most other countries these sort of costs are seen for what they are, costs of doing business.

          When counting medical insurance into the total package, what they don’t mention is that if the individual employee decides to opt out of insurance, they don’t get offered the cash difference.

          It’s much the same if a company vehicle is supplied, if you ask for the cash instead the employer will always turn you down.

          Employers usually don’t supply these things from the goodness of their hearts; they do it because they are generally regarded as a necessary expenditure to ensure the employee is available, and capable of doing the job. It really makes as much sense to include these things into a ‘total renumeration’ as including costs like office space, IT and software, tools and training. All these things can directly or indirectly benefit BOTH employer and employee in varying degrees.

          Another interesting one is superannuation. Different countries link various forms of contribution solely as a cost to the employee, some to the employer… but in both cases they really amount to a form of taxation earmarked for the purpose of retirement.

          But of course what counts to most people is the cash they see at each payday. No-one really believes these inflated ‘total renumeration’ packages.

      • So? Why should you care, James?

        Do you expect others to comment on your wages, whether it’s justified or not, for the work you do?

    • Hmmmm, sounds like the “politics of envy” there, TuiB?

  41. James 111 41

    I thought these figures were really interesting

    » 35% of hours paid are for when there is no work to be done, so those 43 paid hours, on average only 28 hours are actually worked.
    » This means the effective pay per hour worked is an average of $62.50 per hour ($91,000/52/28).

    $62.50 an hour equivalent for actual hours work not bloody bad getting right up there in the hourly rate stakes. No wonder they want to hang onto that for as long as possible.

    No wonder the company cant pay for ts cost of capital, and its dividend has fallen whilst Tauranga ports dividend has soared

    • KJT 41.1

      So. A shop assistant should only be paid for the actual time serving customers. Not hours at work.

      And the low returns are nothing to do with management giving Mearsk too cheap a rate to entice them from Tauranga.

      POAL drops rates and Labour costs to get Mearsk back. Tauranga does the same and vs=versa until all wharfies are casuals on $13. That is what the strike is about.

      Don’t be a dick.

      • James 111 41.1.1

        KJT

        I believe the guys name who runs such an efficent wharf at Tauranga is Les Dickson he has the contract . He also sorted out the Bluff wharf as well when you see how well they run, and what a great dividend the Ports of Tauranga are paying back to the people in the bay. POA would be foolish not to get him involved up here .W e would see productivity go up Auckland Rate payers getting a better return on investment. Even may be some left over for Lens trainset what do you reckon. Im sure Mr Parsloe must tremble at the knees when he hears the name Les Dickson

      • James 111 41.1.2

        KJT
        The shop assistant cant go home and get paid for it would get fired. The Wharfies can go home and get paid for a full 8 hours even if they only worked 2 hours what a great job. Cant see how you can draw any correlation that works in your favour in that little comment

        • KJT 41.1.2.1

          Bullshit.

          They have to be available for the 8 hours. same as the shop assistant.

          And the shop assistant doe’s not get called out at random times outside the daily hours when a customer arrives.

          • James 111 41.1.2.1.1

            KJT
            Please read this note worked 2 hours wnet home got paid for 8 hours not bullshit fact from Catherine Etheridge

            On Monday 9 January, to give a recent example, we paid 26 staff a total of $5,484,80 for downtime, because they were entitled to be paid until the end of their set eight hour shift even though the ship had finished & they had gone home. In another example employees worked two hours of an overtime shift but were paid for the full eight hours.

            • RedLogix 41.1.2.1.1.1

              So what.. the company required those workers to be available for work. Whether it turned out to be 2hrs actual work, or a 16hr double shift… the employer gets the benefit of having them available.

              And therefore should pay for it. Have a bit of a think about this.

            • KJT 41.1.2.1.1.2

              So What.

              I paid my staff to be at home when we could not work because of rain, customer cancellations etc. The price you pay for having trained staff on standby.

              That is why you set your charges to cover your costs.

              And organise other work, like restowing the container stacks and rail discharge, when the ships are not in. Instead of slowing the ship rate down by doing the final stacking as you go.

            • Frank Macskasy 41.1.2.1.1.3

              And what would you propose, James? Cut wages?

              Is that what you and your libertarian colleagues want?

              Firstly, cut wages and the result may be a flood of skilled, experienced watersides heading to Australia and elsewhere. I’m sure other countries would welcome our skilled workers.

              Heck, they already have our doctors, nurses, teachers, etc.

              Secondly, John Key’s stated policy in 2008 was to raise wages to Australia’s level. It seems to me that there is a reaction against the Prime Minister’s stated objective?

              Thirdly. So what is watersiders are paid $90,000 p.a.? Why are you and other anti-unionists indulging in the “politics of envy”?

              When the top 150 NBR Rich Listers increased their wealth by 20% in 2010, the neo-liberal groupies were wholly supportive, ands derided the Left as being “envious”.

              So why is “politics of envy” ok against workers – but not against multi-millionaires?

        • KJT 41.1.2.2

          I doubt if much makes Gary tremble at the knees.

          I’ve had a few dealings with him over the years, usually from the other side of the table.

        • RedLogix 41.1.2.3

          Of course it’s a different story if you start work at midnight and the ship is unloaded by 2am. Now what are you going to do with the rest of the night? You still need to get some sleep and much of the next day is cut.

          In your scenario you’ve made yourself available for an 8 hour shift, but you only got paid for 2 hrs…and you had no choice in the matter. The workers HAVE to be available 24/7.

          I’ve been in a similar situation as a contractor some years ago; I’d signed up to a fixed 6 weeks work beginning in March, but due to project delays …week by week I was put off… until I finally got on site mid-July.

          And for a whole four months I couldn’t take on any other work. In the end it cost me almost six months time… for a mere six weeks pay. I only survived it because I happened to have other funds to draw on, more by good luck than anything.

          • Descendant Of Smith 41.1.2.3.1

            I’ve got a mate who looks after factory machinery at night. He’s allowed to sleep, play his Xbox whatever while he’s there. He’s there in case something goes wrong and he has to fix it. He’s gets paid for all the hours he works.

            Fireman don’t get paid only when they are putting out fires – guess what they are allowed to go to sleep and even have beds provided.

            If you’re on the employers time you should get paid – no if’s, no buts.

            The case against the IHC reconfirmed this recently as well.

            I suspect as well it is not in the ports interest to have the workers at work while there are no ships there. There would be increased costs and risk to manage around staff who don’t physically need to be there and increased costs (while small) to provide work, supervision etc while on site.

            I can’t see logically why you would want them at work unless you actually had something for them to do.

            Reducing wages in my view doesn’t increase productivity in any way. It’s a cheats way out to pretend that you have increased productivity when all you have done in reduce input costs.

            It’s a symptom of poor management if that’s the only solution they can come up with.

            In this case, and having seen this scenario played out over the years, it seems more like a deliberate push to break the union and a push to sell off the port.

            It’s not just about the port as an ongoing entity – it’s also about the prime real estate they own.

            Len Brown and the rest of the council need to get their shit together and take some sensible control back.

            As to all those right w(h)ingers moaning about the pay as always follow your own advice.

            Remember if you are on a benefit, or paid a crap wage or don’t have a decent income, or earn less than these workers it’s all your own fault. Get off your lazy backsides and get a better paying job. Work a bit harder. Do some training that will get you a better job and pay for it yourself. You’re only in that position cause you are slothful and lazy.

            Anyone can be a millionaire if they aren’t a lazy shit.

  42. Jum 42

    http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1201/S00027/cbaff-asks-auckland-council-to-intervene-in-port-dispute.htm

    Yes it is time for Brown to make a decision; let’s see whose side he really is on.

    Is he the Mayor in charge of the council or are JKeyll and Hide still in control in Auckland?

    Yet another greedy CBAFF which seeks to sell off every New Zealanders’ birthright – not just anyone in Auckland. This is a New Zealand asset and should be defended as such.

  43. James 111 43

    It aint gunna happen at Poa for much longer because it isnt happening Tauranga that is why they are running a much more effective operation.

    Productivity is higher than POA, Labour cost is lower. Why wouldnt POA want to head in exactly the same direction it makes absolute sense

    • RedLogix 43.1

      And the shipping company Maersk will just play off both ports against each other until…?

      Think about it James. What is the logical end-point of your argument?

    • Jum 43.2

      James 111

      ‘Labour cost is lower.’

      You fucking bastard – those are people you’re talking about, not statistics.

  44. Helen Kelly 44

    The Ports response is an interesting change of position isnt it?

    The first position was that Port workers earn an average of $91,000 for a 26 hour week. This was widely publicised and is now being so seriously challenged they have been flushed out to provide the correct information.

    Now it appears the $91,000 is for a 49 hour week and this includes superannuation, medical insurance etc. Assuming the superannuation is 7% then $6,370 of this is a super subsidy, leaving an avearage annual salary of $84,000. Given these “average” workers are working 22.5% more hours than a “normal working week” of 40 hours, then $20,475 of this salary can be considered payment for the extra working hours.

    This leaves an avearage wage of $64,155 which includes medical insurance.

    The union says a stevedores guarantee for 40 hours per week is $1,090.40 = $56,700.80 per annum @ 260 shifts per year. Regardless, the position has changed dramatically since the Ports first shots rasing questions about the other information they are using to disguise the agenda to make permanent workers into casuals.

    It would be great if the Port could provide the avearage salary of the 20% of casuals workers they employ at the port by hours worked?

    [Edited for clarity. Thanks for this HK... RL]

    • Sp1 44.1

      Surely you still need to include superannuation into total remuneration, especially at a generous 7%?

      • RedLogix 44.1.1

        Well yes and no. Different countries treat these sorts of ‘worker benefits’ differently.

        In fact employers incur a whole range of costs, training, equipment, IT and tools, admin, work space etc. Superannuation and PAYE are really just taxes and are just another cost of doing business.

        Most people are really only interested in what arrives in their bank account each week.

    • Helen Kelly 44.2

      clarity is good :)

  45. randal 45

    well first of all POA gave the wharfies the money now they want to take it away.
    POA is just a pack of Indian giving bastards.

  46. Sp1 46

    Couldn’t the union do a better job of getting the public onside by asking for the full payroll data to be released (seems to be a large gap still in what is being reported by both sides) and asking for a representative roster of what POAL is asking for?

    • Spl, that would rely on the media actually covering the issues. For vexample, a TV3 reported that the union was striking again after certain demands from one side. The media report left it at that; no in-depth reporting of who-wanted-what or what those demands were.

      Most of the real info has to be gleaned from the internet.

      In these instances, the media is actually worse than useless, as reporting only bits of the story simply mis-leads the public.

  47. Jenny 47

    So what is the Port’s propagandist up to? Yesterday, he was calling for the workers’ pay to be slashed while defending the directors’ massive fees.

    JAMES HENDERSON

    That clinches it then. Slater can’t be in the pay of POAL as the company are not the slighted bit interested in any concessions from the union.

    In fact Slater’s call to lower the wharfies pay, goes against POAL’s strategy of offering to pay workers 10% more if they leave the union.

    From the beginning, POAL strategy has been to remove the union from the site altogether.

    This is their end game.

    The union could offer to agree to a 50% wage cut, and POAL would not be interested.

    Bottom line, company offer = Contractors are being brought in, and redundancies are to be announced for the wharfies. No ifs, no buts.

    Referring to the 1998 Australian waterfront dispute, where wharf employers did exactly the same thing. Union leaders are calling this unfolding management strategy “a Patricks situation”.

    Depending on the union’s reply to this strategy, this could be shaping up to be this country’s most significant dispute since the Progressive lock out.

  48. Jenny 48


    Employees of Xbox contractor, Foxconn, theaten mass suicide

    Cameron Slater can now safely take a break from his full time job, churning out right wing anti-worker hate speech, to do a little catch up on his Xbox tan, happy with the news of Xbox’s can’t beef hooked employee relations.

  49. Colonial Viper 49

    Australian port managers more competent than NZ

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10778226

    Australian ports receive higher fees per container than NZ ports.

    Our loser NZ port managers prefer to compare themselves against cut price Asian ports with cheap labour and low safety standards, and ignore the inconvenient comparison with our high performing Aussie cousins.

    Fire the Board and the executive management at POAL. They are destroying the port’s value and trying to hide the fact that they are incapable of demanding world best market rates from their customers by blaming workers.

  50. muzza 50

    Same old story – demosise the unions and the workers, while defending the fees or the directors.

    As an Auckland Tax Payer, I am perfectly ok with how things at the port “productivity” etc, although I would be happier if the directors were not double dipping in fees…

    The POAL’s own reports states that they are doing a good job, and performance etc is good, and the port is competivie with other ports of relative similarity..

    I also love those arguments who attempt to breakdown the pay based on time “actually working” – as if they themselves are productive every minute of their working day!

    FFS people, keep the politics of envy out of it, support these guys because there is much more at stake than what seems to be on the surface of it!

  51. randal 51

    the truth is out.
    this whole thing has been a giant red herring so the productivity commission (who the fuck are they) can come out and say its time to privatise the port.
    I see.
    Now the CEO gibson and is going to be able to reward himself with a big parcel of shares and pay whale shit off a s well.
    this thing gets crummier and crummier by the minute and in the middle of it all are the watersiders who get to lose everything just to pay these bastards off.

  52. And here’s another case of de-unionisation – going on even as we write,

    “ANZCO locked out 111 workers at the plant when they refused to accept pay cuts of up to 20 per cent and reductions in conditions.”

    “Overseas labour concerns union”
    - http://www.wanganuichronicle.co.nz/news/overseas-labour-concerns-union/1198634/

  53. Colonial Viper 53

    Internal POAL document proves management bad faith and intention to escalate

    http://thestandard.org.nz/why-does-the-right-think-port-workers-pay-should-be-cut/#comment-424753

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  • Judith Collins: guess who’s coming to dinner?
    Judith Collins, Justice Minister, is playing dumb in parliament at question time and avoiding media. Her patronising responses, or non-responses, to allegations of corrupt influence is not becoming of a Cabinet Minister.  Her abuse of the House by criticising questions...
    Tumeke | 17-04
  • Can fracking save the climate?
    Blogging is a great way MPs can communicate and engage with citizens about the issues facing us. I have joined The Daily Blog blogging team and have so far posted on Anadarko’s failure to find oil and a piece outlining...
    frogblog | 17-04
  • New Fisk
    A History of the First World War in 100 moments: A forgotten naval victory in which even Nature played a part...
    No Right Turn | 17-04
  • Labour’s manufacturing plan
    David Cunliffe has launched Labour's policy to get more manufacturing jobs back in New Zealand: Labour leader David Cunliffe launched the policy to an Auckland business audience this morning, adding the depreciation and procurement policies to the known suite of...
    Polity | 17-04
  • Easter PT shutdown
    It’s Easter weekend and that invariably means the rail network is shut down for works. Auckland Transport advises the rail network will be closed for Easter and there are changes to timetables for buses and ferries during the holiday break....
    Transport Blog | 17-04
  • Another perspective on the postgraduate allowance cuts
    I have already shared two stories from psychology students about how the postgraduate allowance cuts have affected them. These stories demonstrate the widespread impact the changes are having. Here is yet another story I have received, this one giving the...
    frogblog | 17-04
  • Against secret "justice" in NZ
    Last year, in response to a series of court cases challenging its control orders or claiming compensation for human rights abuses by its intelligence services, the UK passed the Justice and Security Act 2013. The Act introduces a "Closed Material...
    No Right Turn | 17-04
  • Massey chancellor sets up company in opposition to university
    Massey Chancellor Chris Kelly will chair the board of a company that intends to be New Zealand’s largest private training provider (PTE)...
    TEU | 16-04
  • Gibbs, Hayek, Canterbury and the free market for degrees
    The New Zealand Herald notes that philanthropist Alan Gibbs is about to receive an honorary doctorate from the University of Canterbury today. One of the many institutions Alan Gibbs has donated his money to...
    TEU | 16-04
  • Hard News: Friday Music: Record Store Day
    As readers will know, I have long embraced the internet music revolution. The ability to discover and download new things pretty much as they're being made has reinvented and refreshed my lifelong relationship with popular music. But I still really...
    Public Address | 16-04
  • Great Sorkin Parody
    Aaron Sorkin (SportsNight, The West Wing, The Newsroom) makes a very particular style of TV. Some good parts to that, some really silly parts. Amy Schumer' Comedy Central parody of Sorkin is pitch-prefect and hilarious. Enjoy: Inside Amy SchumerGet More:...
    Polity | 16-04
  • Photographic proof
    Deborah asked for a picture of my bicycle, after I wrote about it, and there is now one in existence which even includes me riding it along Mt Albert Rd, thanks to a dear friend who drove past me and...
    The Hand Mirror | 16-04
  • Our future lies in science
    This is not a column on global warming, climate change or whether humans are or aren’t having an impact....
    Pundit | 16-04
  • Gordon Campbell on drone strikes and Judith Collins‘ last stand
    Reportedly, US drone operators refer to their kills as “bug splat” – mainly because when the carnage is viewed on their screens thousands of kilometres away at home, it looks like an insect strike on a windscreen. The name has...
    Gordon Campbell | 16-04
  • Revealed: Steven Joyce’s select committee submission
    Dear Education Select Committee, Well, there are less than two weeks for people to get their submissions in to you on my proposals to remove staff and students from university and wānanga councils. You...
    TEU | 16-04
  • World News Brief, Thursday April 17
    Top of the AgendaTensions Rise in Ukraine’s East Ahead of Talks...
    Pundit | 16-04
  • Northern Europe looks to end fixed-term agreements for academics
    Long strings of fixed term employment agreements are not just a problem here in New Zealand but Sweden too, according to Education International. But the Swedish Association of University Teachers (SULF) has a plan to solve this. It is turning...
    TEU | 16-04
  • At Last: A Manufacturing Policy
    Date of Release: Thursday, April 17, 2014Body:  FIRST Union congratulates Labour on the release of its Manufacturing policy today.The union represents workers in the wood, food and textile manufacturing sectors. “In a week that has seen another manufacturing company, Christchurch Yarns, go into...
    First Union Media | 16-04
  • Collins: More contemptible lying
    Yesterday, Judith Collins treated New Zealand's media and people as if we were all complete fools. Here is what she said (via this morning's Herald): Ms Collins said she was unaware Oravida was having any problems getting its products into...
    Polity | 16-04
  • The Downside of Park and Ride
    Flicking back through older Atlantic Cities posts led to one from last year about Park and Ride catching my eye. It’s a fairly well reasoned cautionary tale which highlights the pitfalls and potential perverse outcomes from something that would appear...
    Transport Blog | 16-04
  • Heartland logic: More people have heard of Fidel Castro than Michael Mann, ...
    This is a guest post from Narahani.   Or is happening and is good for you, or has stopped happening, or is caused by CO2 but only a little, or is about to reverse due to lots of yet-to-be-discovered negative...
    Skeptical Science | 16-04
  • Submission
    Below is my draft submission on the Environmental Reporting Bill. I'm primarily interested in the freedom of information issues; I expect other groups to be focused on the reporting itself. I support the aims of the Environmental Reporting Bill of...
    No Right Turn | 16-04
  • Government’s ‘rock star economy’ throws hospital staff ou...
    The Public Service Association says administrative staff at hospitals around the country are missing out on Bill English’s ‘rock star...
    PSA | 16-04
  • Lip service: it’s all climate action ever gets from Key & Co
    As expected, the New Zealand government’s response to the IPCC’s Working Group 3 report on mitigating climate change pays lip service to the science, while maintaining that NZ is doing all that can be expected. Climate change minister Tim Groser’s...
    Hot Topic | 16-04
  • Progress of FCV “slave ships” Bill is good news – but much work remai...
    The Maritime Union of New Zealand says the progress of the “slave ships” Bill in the New Zealand Parliament is good news – but much work remains to be done....
    MUNZ | 16-04
  • Judith Collins’ reputation dependent on Slater’s scandals
    Judith Collins' reputation as the possible next leader of the National party is in shreds. Her reputation as a minister of the crown in the Key owned National party caucus is in tatters. A resignation is the only honorable thing...
    the Irascible Curmudgeon | 16-04
  • Photo of the Day: Red III
    Learning Your Stripes, 2013, Regan Gentry, Papatoetoe. Commissioned by Auckland Council aer  ...
    Transport Blog | 16-04
  • The cost of tax cheats
    How much do corporate tax cheats cost? In the US, over US$180 billion a year:US taxpayers would need to pay an average of $1,259 more a year to make up the federal and state taxes lost to corporations and individuals...
    No Right Turn | 16-04
  • Power prices soar on the eve of winter
    On the eve of winter as New Zealanders are turning on their heaters, power prices have soared sky high, Labour’s Energy spokesperson David Shearer says. “Energy Minster Simon Bridges claimed in Parliament that prices were estimated to rise 2.4 per...
    Labour | 18-04
  • Workers can kiss goodbye to Easter Sunday off
    The Government’s decision to “reprioritise” scarce labour inspector resources by abandoning the enforcement of Easter Sunday Shop Trading laws means workers can kiss goodbye to a guaranteed day off, says Labour’s Associate Labour Issues spokesperson Darien Fenton. “The Labour Minister...
    Labour | 18-04
  • Businesses need to respect workers this Easter
    Businesses intent on flouting Easter shopping laws should face stiff penalties, Green Party industrial relations spokesperson Denise Roche said today. This Easter, at least one major garden centre chain intends to open on Good Friday despite this being in breach...
    Greens | 17-04
  • Time to deliver on 26 weeks Paid Parental Leave
    Today marks two years since Labour MP Sue Moroney's Bill extending paid parental leave to 26 weeks was drawn from the members' ballot. “It’s time the Government acted in the interests of families,” Sue Moroney says. “National has tried every...
    Labour | 17-04
  • Taxpayers robbed of $130m in Genesis sale
    Kiwi taxpayers have been robbed of $130 million by the Government in its final failed asset sale, says Labour’s SOEs spokesperson Clayton Cosgrove. “National set the price for Genesis far too low in a desperate attempt to beef up demand....
    Labour | 17-04
  • Work visa problems need monitoring
    The Government is handing out temporary work visas to migrants to work in jobs that could easily be filled by unemployed Kiwi workers in the Christchurch rebuild, says Darien Fenton, Labour’s Associate Immigration spokesperson. “In the past 12 months, temporary...
    Labour | 17-04
  • Resignation rates among cops soar
    The number of frontline officers quitting the police force is at a four-year high, with more than 350 walking off the job in the past year, Labour’s Police spokesperson Jacinda Ardern says. “Since 2009 resignation rates among sworn staff have...
    Labour | 17-04
  • Service for victims of sexual violence pushed out in cold
    The Green Party is calling on Housing New Zealand to revisit its decision to evict an essential community organisation in Christchurch with only eight weeks notice.Yesterday at the Select Committee inquiry into funding for sexual violence support services the organisation...
    Greens | 17-04
  • Legal high ban worthy of wider pick-up
    Auckland Council’s ban on using legal highs in a public place is an excellent idea that should be replicated around New Zealand, says Labour’s Associate Health Spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway. “Auckland Council has implemented a by-law banning the use of psychoactive...
    Labour | 17-04
  • Smith sells state P-houses to first home buyers
    Nick Smith must reassure worried first home buyers that any Housing NZ houses sold under his First Home policy will be tested for P contamination after revelations that three out of seven properties sold in Wanganui tested positive for methamphetamine,...
    Labour | 17-04
  • PM’s China visit assisted Oravida, not Fonterra
    Questions must now be asked whether it was Fonterra or Oravida who really benefited from the Prime Minister’s recent visit to China, Labour’s Primary Industries spokesperson Damien O’Connor says. “Before his departure, John Key said he would wait until all...
    Labour | 16-04
  • New Zealand’s use of ozone depleting gases increases
    A new Government report highlights that the amount of ozone depleting gases New Zealand is using is increasing, the Green Party said today.The report tabled in Parliament yesterday shows that total use of ozone depleting gases in New Zealand has...
    Greens | 16-04
  • Manufacturing Upgrade
    Labour is determined to support and grow our manufacturing sector. These policies grew out of the findings of the 2013 Parliamentary Inquiry into Manufacturing.  ...
    Labour | 16-04
  • Collins must admit misleading Parliament
    ACC Minister Judith Collins must front up and admit she has misled Parliament over ACC’s policy to stop paying compensation to clients who refused to fill in its privacy form, Labour’s ACC spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway says. “Judith Collins claimed Labour...
    Labour | 16-04
  • English confirms he has no plan to raise wages
    Finance Minister Bill English has confirmed he has absolutely no plans to lift wages, Labour’s spokesperson on Labour Issues, Andrew Little says. “Bill English told the Chamber of Commerce yesterday that workers could expect a rise in average income of...
    Labour | 16-04
  • Govt careless and callous about threatened birds
    The National Government is increasing the threat to two of the world's most threatened and unique birds by opening up Victoria Forest Park to petroleum drilling, the Green Party said today.Scientists have recently published a ranking of the 100 most...
    Greens | 16-04
  • Genesis: The biggest fire sale of them all
    National has finished its asset sales with a massive bonfire of a fire sale, showing once and for all how much of a disaster this programme was, says Labour’s SOEs spokesperson Clayton Cosgrove. “Just 68,000 Kiwis bought shares in Genesis,...
    Labour | 16-04
  • Interest rates rise but only smokes increasing
    Mortgage rate rises are making life harder for homeowners, and many of them will be surprised the latest CPI figures show inflation would be zero were it not for tobacco tax hikes, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson David Parker. “New Zealanders...
    Labour | 16-04
  • Term One Report Card for Hekia Parata
    Assignment Teacher’s Comments Grade      ...
    Labour | 16-04
  • Hekia Parata kept exam book errors from schools
    Schools will be appalled to learn Education Minister Hekia Parata knew since January that hundreds of exam booklets had been returned to the wrong students but said nothing about it, Labour’s Education Spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “Exams are stressful enough...
    Labour | 15-04
  • What has ACC Minister been doing?
    The ACC Minister needs to front up and explain what, if any, changes she has made to the broken culture of ACC rather than denying that she has any part to play in the dysfunction of her Ministry, the Green...
    Greens | 15-04
  • Promise of jam tomorrow takes the cake
    A claim by Minister of Finance Bill English that average wages will climb by $7,500 over the next four years is a cynical promise of jam tomorrow by a government whose record on wage growth is atrocious, Labour spokesperson on...
    Labour | 15-04
  • Judith Collins has to fess up on ACC blunder
    ACC Minster Judith Collins must front up and tell New Zealand how many people who refused to hand over their private details to ACC have been denied cover, says Labour’s ACC Spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway. “The legality of ACC’s privacy waver,...
    Labour | 15-04
  • Board of Inquiry conditions will save rivers in New Zealand
    The Ruataniwha dam decision released today has protected the Tukituki River and dashed the Government’s hope of the “one nutrient model” (TRIM) being adopted nationwide, says Labour’s Conservation spokesperson Ruth Dyson. “It is a massive victory for those in the...
    Labour | 15-04
  • Labour turns wheels for cycling safety
    With more than a million New Zealanders now using cycling as an attractive alternative means of transport it is past time their safety was taken seriously, Labour’s Transport spokesperson Darien Fenton says. Due to speak to a cycling rally at...
    Labour | 15-04
  • SPEECH: Institute of Directors
    LEADING AND MANAGING OUR ECONOMIC FUTURE David Cunliffe MP, Labour Leader Speech to the Institute of Directors 15 April 2014, Auckland It's a privilege to be speaking here. The Institute of Directors has a proud history of developing New Zealand's...
    Labour | 15-04
  • More Oravida endorsements from John Key
    The use of a picture of John Key in an advertisement for Oravida’s scampi products in a Chinese airline magazine is further evidence of an unhealthily cosy relationship between the National Party and this company, Labour Leader David Cunliffe says....
    Labour | 15-04
  • Workers at Canterbury Yarns need redundancy support
    Workers faced with redundancy at Canterbury Yarns need a redundancy support co-ordinator, Green Party industrial relations spokesperson Denise Roche said today.Last week, Canterbury Yarns was placed in receivership. Canterbury Yarns joins a long list of New Zealand manufacturers who have...
    Greens | 14-04
  • Making the holidays easier for Kiwi drivers
    The next Labour Government will make the holidays easier and journeys quicker for Kiwi families driving on the roads, says Labour Leader David Cunliffe. “There’s nothing Kiwis like more than getting on the road and going on holiday. But on...
    Labour | 14-04
  • Ae Marika! 15 April 2014
    Our MANA AGM down in Rotorua on the weekend was a sold-out affair – even the media were struggling to get in! Political conferences can be very dull, but not this one. We had a great line-up of speakers including...
    Mana | 14-04
  • Green light from Labour for cancer screening programme
    Labour Leader David Cunliffe has today committed to a national bowel screening programme, starting with extending the current service to the Southern and Waikato districts. “Around 3000 New Zealanders develop bowel cancer each year and about 1200, or 100 a month,...
    Labour | 14-04
  • Adequate resourcing needed for victims’ advocate
    The establishment of a victims’ commissioner role will only be meaningful if it is properly resourced to do the job of advocating for victims’ interests, Labour Justice spokesperson Andrew Little says. Justice Minister Judith Collins has just recently indicated her...
    Labour | 13-04
  • IPCC report shows Government ignoring climate experts
    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) report into climate mitigation, just released in Berlin, shows the National Government is ignoring the pleas of the world's best climate scientists.The report says deep and fast emission cuts are vital from all...
    Greens | 13-04
  • Japan’s quick turnaround on whaling disappointing
    News that Japan plans to recommence some form of “scientific” whaling programme so quickly after the International Court of Justice’s ruling against it is very disappointing, says David Shearer, Labour’s Foreign Affairs spokesperson. “New Zealanders expected the ICJ ruling -...
    Labour | 13-04
  • Reviewable tenancies will increase risks for vulnerable children
    Instead of kicking families out of their homes if they can pay their rent, parents with young children should have the opportunity to purchase equity in a state-built home over time, the Green Party said todayFrom July, Housing New Zealand...
    Greens | 13-04
  • 48,000 New Zealanders drinking faecally contaminated water
    Some 48,000 people were provided with water that had issues with faecal contamination, 18,000 of whom were from Canterbury, the Green Party said today. The Ministry of Health's Annual Report on Drinking-Water in New Zealand for 2012/13 shows that 48,000...
    Greens | 12-04
  • Labour will move to save the Kauri
    Labour will spend $20 million over the next 10 years to stop the spread of Kauri dieback disease, says Labour Leader David Cunliffe. “We are facing an ecological disaster with over 11 per cent of the Kauri trees in the...
    Labour | 12-04
  • SPEECH: Saving our Kauri
    Seech notes Good morning. Thank you for joining us here today. As a West Auckland MP I am very aware the kauri is an important part of this place. The Waitakere Ranges with their thousands of kauri, are a taonga....
    Labour | 12-04
  • MANA to continue negotiations with the Internet Party
    The MANA AGM has decided unanimously tonight to continue negotiaitions with the Internet Party. Within a month further negotiations, further consultation with MANA branches and a final decision on whether to proceed with a relationship is expected....
    Mana | 12-04
  • National’s tax dodge
      National’s insistence that it is cracking down on tax dodgers is little more than a bit of election year chest beating, Labour Leader David Cunliffe says. “Revenue Minister Todd McClay surely doesn’t believe collecting $100 million of an estimated...
    Labour | 12-04
  • Housing prices go up – Gens X & Y give up
    Today’s REINZ report shows house prices continue skyward while first home buyers are dropping out of the market, says Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “According to the Real Estate Institute of New Zealand the national median house price has risen...
    Labour | 11-04
  • Do Key and Adams support Chorus appeal?
    John Key and Amy Adams must tell New Zealanders whether they support Chorus’ appeal of the High Court’s ruling in favour of the Commerce Commission, says Labour Leader David Cunliffe. “Chorus’ appeal is a waste of time. The company is...
    Labour | 11-04
  • Is Judith Collins unapologising
    Judith Collins appears to have retracted her apology for failing to disclose her meeting with her husband’s fellow company directors and a senior Chinese border control official just weeks after being ticked off by John Key for not doing so, Labour...
    Labour | 11-04
  • Media Advisory
    There have been a few minor changes to the MANA AGM agenda. Moana Jackson is unable to attend due to family commitments. Speaking in his place on Saturday morning MANA is pleased to welcome Georgina Beyer and Willie Jackson. MANA...
    Mana | 10-04
  • Green Party requests inquiry into Peter Dunne and Trust
    Green Party MP Denise Roche today wrote to the Parliamentary Registrar of Pecuniary Interests requesting an inquiry into whether Peter Dunne should have included his involvement as chair of the Northern Wellington Festival Trust on the Register of Pecuniary Interests...
    Greens | 10-04
  • Veterans short-changed
    The Veterans’ Support Bill reported back to Parliament today rejects a key recommendation of the Law Commission Review on which it is based and ignores the submissions of veterans and the RNZRSA, says Labour’s Veterans’ Affairs Spokesperson, Phil Goff. “A...
    Labour | 10-04
  • Tribute for Maungaharuru- Tangitu settlement
    Labour Member of Parliament for Ikaroa-Rāwhiti, Meka Whaitiri paid tribute to Maungaharuru-Tangitu today as their Treaty of Waitangi settlement became law. “The Bill acknowledges Treaty breaches that left Maungaharuru-Tangitu virtually landless. Today we were reminded of the history, mamae, loss...
    Labour | 10-04
  • Neglected rural and regional roads will cost more lives
    The government must take urgent action to prevent more accidents to truck drivers and other road users of increased logging trucks on neglected roads, says Darien Fenton, Labour’s Transport spokesperson. “The dangers to drivers and other road users in the...
    Labour | 10-04
  • Judith Collins’ refusal to answer a disgrace
    If John Key is holding his Ministers to any standards at all, he must make Judith Collins answer questions about the senior Chinese official she met during her taxpayer-funded visit to China last October, Labour MP Grant Robertson says. “Judith...
    Labour | 10-04
  • Ryall needs to heed hospital workforce issues
    The public health workforce, the same one Tony Ryall argues is making a lot of progress is facing increased pressure and staff burnout through his continued shuffling of the deckchairs, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. “Mr Ryall uses all...
    Labour | 10-04
  • That Sinking Feeling: Labour’s urgent need for persuasive words and coura...
    THE LATEST ROY MORGAN POLL has Labour on 28.5 percent (down 3.5 percent) and the Greens on 11.5 percent (down 1.5 percent). At 40 percent, the combined vote of the two main centre-left parties has fallen 5 percentage points since...
    The Daily Blog | 18-04
  • Why the Labour movement should support a Universal Basic Income
    The Mana movement’s support of the idea of a universal basic income is a welcome development. It could become one of the litmus issues that define the party and prove extremely popular. If Mana are in a position to do...
    The Daily Blog | 18-04
  • Legal high and cannabis regulation
    I marched through Henderson last month with my fellow Westies to express our concern about the impact of so called “legal highs” on our community. Some people chanted loudly calling for banning, some expressing anger at the parliamentarians who voted...
    The Daily Blog | 18-04
  • Know your Tory fellow travellers and ideologues: John Bishop, Taxpayers Uni...
    . . On 19 March, I reported on the Board members of the so-called “Taxpayers Union”. With one exception, every single member of the Taxpayers Union Board was a current (or recent) card-carrying member or supporter of the National and/or...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • GUEST BLOG: Daniel Bruce – Internet Party: What Seems Ridiculous To The O...
    Imagine you’re a 18-21 year old, from a working class family. You’ve never had a landline phone at home, because your parents can’t afford the fixed monthly bills, so everyone in your familiy has a pre-pay mobile phone. Because of the same tight...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Greens to push for housing standards in MOU with Government
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Greens to push for housing standards in MOU with Government Tuesday, 28 Aug 2012 | Press Release We don’t need any more official reports. We know the problem and we have the plans....
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Mighty River squanders $3.8m preparing for sale
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Mighty River squanders $3.8m preparing for sale Tuesday, 28 Aug 2012 | Press Release New Zealanders do not want asset sales and they do not want the Government wasting millions of dollars on...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Government’s economic agenda on shaky ground
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Government’s economic agenda on shaky ground Monday, 27 Aug 2012 | Press Release Instead of betting on a boom and bust industry and selling off assets the government needs to invest in a...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • National’s tax cuts haven’t cut tax avoidance
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: National’s tax cuts haven’t cut tax avoidance Sunday, 26 Aug 2012 | Press Release It is not fair that many rich New Zealanders are cheating on their tax. National’s 2010 tax cuts, that...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Waitangi Tribunal report adds to crisis in asset sales agenda
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Waitangi Tribunal report adds to crisis in asset sales agenda Friday, 24 Aug 2012 | Press Release In its rush to sell our assets, National has found itself in a crisis of its...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Privacy across all departments needs checking
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Privacy across all departments needs checking Friday, 24 Aug 2012 | Press Release “People don’t have a choice about giving their information to the state so the Government has an absolute duty to...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Reports show Government role in driving ACC dysfunction
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Reports show Government role in driving ACC dysfunction Thursday, 23 Aug 2012 | Press Release Restoring public trust and confidence is an essential goal and will require very major change starting from the...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Government must front up on full costs of asset sales
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Government must front up on full costs of asset sales Thursday, 23 Aug 2012 | Press Release It’s time for the Government to front up over just how much these asset sales are...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • New report: middle NZ worse off, inequality grows
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: New report: middle NZ worse off, inequality grows Thursday, 23 Aug 2012 | Press Release Our society has never been as unequal as it is today. New research from the Ministry of Social...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Government to delay addressing climate change indefinitely
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Government to delay addressing climate change indefinitely Thursday, 23 Aug 2012 | Press Release “It would be a shock for any other Government to introduce such a self-defeatist piece of legislation but unfortunately...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Time to deliver on 26 weeks Paid Parental Leave
    Source: Labour Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Time to deliver on 26 weeks Paid Parental Leave Today marks two years since Labour MP Sue Moroney’s Bill extending paid parental leave to 26 weeks was drawn from the members’ ballot. “It’s...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Taxpayers robbed of $130m in Genesis sale
    Source: Labour Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Taxpayers robbed of $130m in Genesis sale Kiwi taxpayers have been robbed of $130 million by the Government in its final failed asset sale, says Labour’s SOEs spokesperson Clayton Cosgrove. “National set the...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Service for victims of sexual violence pushed out in cold
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Service for victims of sexual violence pushed out in cold Thursday, 17 Apr 2014 | Press Release Christchurch cannot afford to lose this agency The Green Party is calling on Housing New Zealand...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Resignation rates among cops soar
    Source: Labour Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Resignation rates among cops soar The number of frontline officers quitting the police force is at a four-year high, with more than 350 walking off the job in the past year, Labour’s Police...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Work visa problems need monitoring
    Source: Labour Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Work visa problems need monitoring The Government is handing out temporary work visas to migrants to work in jobs that could easily be filled by unemployed Kiwi workers in the Christchurch rebuild, says...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Legal high ban worthy of wider pick-up
    Source: Labour Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Legal high ban worthy of wider pick-up Auckland Council’s ban on using legal highs in a public place is an excellent idea that should be replicated around New Zealand, says Labour’s Associate Health...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Smith sells state P-houses to first home buyers
    Source: Labour Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Smith sells state P-houses to first home buyers Nick Smith must reassure worried first home buyers that any Housing NZ houses sold under his First Home policy will be tested for P contamination...
    The Daily Blog | 17-04
  • Brazil: Human rights under threat ahead of the World Cup
    Source: Amnesty International NZ – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Brazil: Human rights under threat ahead of the World Cup     Protests in Brazil:Brazil Franciscan friar kneels in front of Brazilian riot police officers asking for calm during confrontation with Landless...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Brazil: Human rights under threat ahead of the World Cup
    Source: Amnesty International NZ – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Brazil: Human rights under threat ahead of the World Cup     Protests in Brazil:Brazil Franciscan friar kneels in front of Brazilian riot police officers asking for calm during confrontation with Landless...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Libya: Trial of former al-Gaddafi officials by video link a farce
    Source: Amnesty International NZ – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Libya: Trial of former al-Gaddafi officials by video link a farce     Saif al-Islam al-Gaddafi will face the courts on 14 April. © IMED LAMLOUM/AFP/Getty Images         Read...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Libya: Trial of former al-Gaddafi officials by video link a farce
    Source: Amnesty International NZ – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Libya: Trial of former al-Gaddafi officials by video link a farce     Saif al-Islam al-Gaddafi will face the courts on 14 April. © IMED LAMLOUM/AFP/Getty Images         Read...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Algeria: Pre-election clampdown exposes ‘gaping holes’ in human rights ...
    Source: Amnesty International NZ – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Algeria: Pre-election clampdown exposes ‘gaping holes’ in human rights record     Freedom of expression, association and assembly are under threat ahead of elections in Algeria. © FAROUK BATICHE/AFP/Getty Images    ...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Algeria: Pre-election clampdown exposes ‘gaping holes’ in human rights ...
    Source: Amnesty International NZ – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Algeria: Pre-election clampdown exposes ‘gaping holes’ in human rights record     Freedom of expression, association and assembly are under threat ahead of elections in Algeria. © FAROUK BATICHE/AFP/Getty Images    ...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Viet Nam: Prisoners of conscience released but dozens remain jailed
    Source: Amnesty International NZ – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Viet Nam: Prisoners of conscience released but dozens remain jailed     Vietnamese activist Nguyen Tien Trung was one of the prisoners of conscience released this week. © Private      ...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Viet Nam: Prisoners of conscience released but dozens remain jailed
    Source: Amnesty International NZ – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Viet Nam: Prisoners of conscience released but dozens remain jailed     Vietnamese activist Nguyen Tien Trung was one of the prisoners of conscience released this week. © Private      ...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • PM’s China visit assisted Oravida, not Fonterra
    Source: Labour Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: PM’s China visit assisted Oravida, not Fonterra Questions must now be asked whether it was Fonterra or Oravida who really benefited from the Prime Minister’s recent visit to China, Labour’s Primary Industries spokesperson...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • New Zealand’s use of ozone depleting gases increases
    Source: Green Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: New Zealand’s use of ozone depleting gases increases A new Government report highlights that the amount of ozone depleting gases New Zealand is using is increasing, the Green Party said today. The report...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • The issues behind the possible MANA-Internet Party Alliance
      Last weekend Kim Dotcom spoke at MANAs AGM to discuss the possibility of the Internet Party and MANA Party working together to defeat John Key this election. As someone who knows both Hone and Kim, I have a unique...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Manufacturing Upgrade
    Source: Labour Party – Press Release/Statement: Headline: Manufacturing Upgrade   Labour is determined to support and grow our manufacturing sector. These policies grew out of the findings of the 2013 Parliamentary Inquiry into Manufacturing.   – The claims and opinions...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Get work on 29th and the ANZAC spirit deserts the TPPA
      Groser and co would have been spitting tacks last week as the ANZAC spirit deserted the TPPA negotiations. Australia has done a deal directly with Japan which undercuts the demand for Japan to opening all agriculture in the TPPA....
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • No fracking solution to climate change
    Some British tabloids and oil lobbyists have jumped on comments made by an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change author that fracking could play a role in addressing climate change as an argument for it here in Aotearoa, so is fracking...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • At Last: A Manufacturing Policy
    Source: First Union – Press Release/Statement: Headline: At Last: A Manufacturing Policy Date of Release:  Thursday, April 17, 2014 Body:  FIRST Union congratulates Labour on the release of its Manufacturing policy today. The union represents workers in the wood, food and...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Drone murder of New Zealander “justified” by Prime Minister
    Yesterday Prime Minister John Key justified the extrajudicial killing of a New Zealander in a US drone strike in Yemen with a few cynical, callous words at a stand-up press conference. Key said he’d been briefed by our spy agencies...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Secret Policeman’s Ball
      Amnesty International’s Secret Policeman’s Ball is back in New Zealand for one night of some of the best stand-up comedy from both national and international comics The freedom to provoke and in some cases offend is essential to the...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • So the US has assassinated a NZ citizen – what did Key know?
    A non judicial assassination by the US on a NZ citizen raises questions. Key made the idea that NZers were training with terrorists part of his farcical defence for the GCSB mass surveillance legislation. I say farcical because even if...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Something Better Than Something Worse: Why John Key could become our longes...
    IN HIS MEMORABLE holiday-home encounter with the host of Campbell Live, the Prime Minister, John Key, did not rule out running for a fourth term. Were he to be successful, the long-standing record of Sir Keith Holyoake (11 years and 2...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • GUEST BLOG: RIO TINTO WINS 2013 ROGER AWARD
      Sky City Casino Second, Chorus Third  The seven finalists for the 2013 Roger Award for the Worst Transnational Corporation Operating in Aotearoa/New Zealand were: ANZ, Chorus, IAG Insurance Group, Imperial Tobacco, Rio Tinto, Sky City Casino and Talent 2. The criteria for judging are...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • National drowning in an ocean of poisoned milk
    It is becoming difficult to keep up with which National Party MP is bleeding the most at the moment. Simon Bridges is being crucified by Whaleoil almost as much as Greenpeace are attacking him, suggesting Cam is seizing the moment...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Want to get rid of synthetic cannabis? Legalize real cannabis
    Have we managed to appreciate the madness that synthetic cannabis is legal yet more harmful than organic cannabis which is illegal? I find the current moral panic over synthetic cannabis difficult to become concerned with when alcohol is FAR more...
    The Daily Blog | 16-04
  • Save our homes – stop the evictions!
    “We will keep on fighting because it frightens me to think my grandchildren could become homeless,” Tere Campbell told me. Tere is a member of Tamaki Housing Group. In September 2011, tenants in 156 state homes in Glen Innes received...
    The Daily Blog | 15-04
  • The daily humiliation of women and the constant policing and shaming of our...
    The last few months have been particularly bad for the shaming and policing of women’s bodies in the media, both in New Zealand and globally. First we had NZ Newstalk ZB presenter Rachel Smalley referring to women weighing over 70kgs...
    The Daily Blog | 15-04
  • A case study of racism by Police at Auckland Airport
    A couple of days ago I returned from Samoa after attending a family matter and some contract work. Spending a few days in the warmth of our homeland was welcome relief from the cold weather starting to make its presence...
    The Daily Blog | 15-04
  • An acute shortage of emergency youth housing
    The housing crisis is effecting everyone in Christchurch but some are more vulnerable than others. Recently I attended a workshop on emergency youth housing hosted by the 298 Youth Health Centre, who I worked for from 2001-2003. Over fifty people...
    The Daily Blog | 15-04
  • The Oceans Issue
    The ‘Earth’ is 71% water but our oceans are the last frontier. The oceans are huge, relatively unexplored, full of weird and wonderful diversity. In New Zealand we’re never far from the sea, and our identity, our landscapes, our communities,...
    The Daily Blog | 15-04
  • Fear of South Auckland
    Fear of South Auckland...
    The Daily Blog | 15-04
  • Global unions applaud NZ ‘slave ships’ progress
    Global unions the ITF (International Transport Workers' Federation) and IUF (International Union of Food, Agricultural and Hospitality Workers) today applauded the steps forward made in preventing often shocking abuse of crews on fishing vessels in New Zealand...
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Families before commerce at Easter
    Families before commerce at Easter The retail workers’ union has hit back at critics of New Zealand's modest Easter trading restrictions. "Some things are more important than going to the mall, and for just three and a half days each...
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Easter trading laws archaic, in need of overhaul
    Press release: ACT New Zealand Easter trading laws are outdated and in need of a major overhaul, said ACT leader Jamie Whyte today....
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • ALCP welcomes Campbell Live poll result
    The Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party welcomes last night's Campbell Live poll, saying it is an overdue reality check for public opinion on personal cannabis use....
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Q+A This Week 20/4/14
    Q+A This Week SUNDAY 20 APRIL, 9AM ON TV ONE The latest on the US-NZ relationship from the US military’s top man in the Pacific, Admiral Samuel J. Locklear . Deputy Political Editor Michael Parkin asks him whether we’re allies,...
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Community detention for pokie theft
    A 67-year-old former company director, convicted of stealing pokie machine profits, was today sentenced to six months community detention, 160 hours of community work and ordered to make reparation of $6,000....
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Waitangi National Trust Board Amendment Bill
    The Māori Affairs Committee is inviting public submissions on this bill. The closing date for submissions is Wednesday, 14 May 2014....
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Collaboration stops drugs from crossing borders
    Collaboration between Hong Kong and New Zealand Customs has stopped millions of dollars worth of drugs coming into New Zealand this year, with a number of seizures and arrests in both countries....
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Call for public enquiry into the future of farming
    Fish & Game NZ is calling for a public enquiry “to examine the future of agriculture in New Zealand”....
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Comment on Labour Policy Announcement by NZMEA President
    “This policy release from the Labour Party is so important that if it becomes government policy it would define a shift in New Zealand’s culture,” says Brian Willoughby President of the NZMEA and Managing Director of Plinius Audio and Contex...
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Manufacturing policy makes sense but….
    On the surface much of Labour's prescription for manufacturing is sound though questions remain over some of the detail not yet announced, the Employers and Manufacturers Association says....
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Where Are The 15,000 Jobs?
    “Paula Bennett is today proudly telling New Zealand that beneficiary numbers have decreased by 15,000 in the past year. There is no proud declaration that 15,000 jobs have been created in the same period,” says Auckland Action Against Poverty spokesperson,...
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Change of approach to government procurement needed
    The rail engineering industry has been totally let down by National’s lack of manufacturing policy, and Labour’s measures outlined today represent a marked shift in approach to supporting domestic industries, the RMTU said today....
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Depreciation Policy Shouldn’t Be Just for Pet Industries
    The Taxpayers’ Union is welcoming Labour’s announcement to beef up rates of depreciation in the manufacturing sector, but is questioning why David Cunliffe is picking winners rather than applying the policy across all sectors. Jordan Williams,...
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • FIFA U-20 World Cup NZ 2015 Kick Off Times Announced
    An array of kick-off times to suit football fans of all ages has been confirmed for the FIFA U-20 World Cup New Zealand 2015. With 52 matches spread across the nation, the public will be able to enjoy a collection...
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • “Legitimate purpose” provides no protection under 167 form
    On Radio New Zealand today, the Privacy Commissioner indicated that ACC could only request information that was "relevant" for a "legitimate purpose". His view was therefore that the ACC167 form is not a "blank cheque" or...
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • State: still keeping you safe on the road this Easter
    The long-awaited Easter/ Anzac break is nearly upon us while the weather may have taken a turn for the worse in several parts of the country, many Kiwis will still be packing up their cars to take a road trip....
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Govt plan for community input into residential red zone
    Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel has welcomed Prime Minister John Key’s announcement today of a community participation process for the public to have a say on the future use of the residential red zone....
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Governor-General to visit Turkey
    The Governor-General, Lt Gen The Rt Hon Sir Jerry Mateparae, is to visit Turkey next week to lead New Zealand’s representation at the annual Gallipoli commemorations....
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Actions of Police prior to death in custody were justified
    A report by the Independent Police Conduct Authority on the death of Adam Palmer while in Police custody found the actions of Police were justified during the arrest. The report also found that Police took all possible steps to try...
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • New Electorate Boundaries Finalised
    New boundaries for the country’s 64 General and seven Māori electorates have been finalised – with an additional electorate created in Auckland. The 2014 Representation Commission has completed its statutory role of reviewing and redrawing electorate...
    Scoop politics | 17-04
  • Save The Children Welcomes Strengthening Children’s Rights
    Save the Children New Zealand welcomes a new treaty which allows children to complain directly to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child about alleged violations of their rights....
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Labour takes manufacturing seriously
    Labour takes manufacturing seriously Manufacturing workers and employers will all benefit from economic policies announced today by the Labour Party leader, David Cunliffe. The Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union has welcomed the announcement...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Manufacturing policy welcomed
    “Today’s announcement of Labour’s manufacturing policy is very welcome,” says CTU Economist Bill Rosenberg. “Just as many other developed countries are realising, having a strong manufacturing sector pays off in good jobs, retaining...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Operation Unite – a Blitz on Drunken Violence
    New Zealand Police are hoping to reduce the number of victims from alcohol related crime by asking the public to say ‘Yeah, Nah’ more often this holiday weekend....
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Dunne Speaks
    Dunne Speaks 17 April 2014 There have been a number of harrowing cases presented this week about the impact of psychoactive substances on vulnerable young people. At one level, the tales are deeply disturbing. It is awful to see anyone...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Research announcement welcomed
    A leading Māori researcher has welcomed the announcement of the 2014 Te Pūnaha Hihiko - Vision Mātauranga Capability Fund by Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce and Māori Affairs Minister Dr Pita Sharples....
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • At Last: A Manufacturing Policy
    At Last: A Manufacturing Policy FIRST Union congratulates Labour on the release of its Manufacturing policy today. The union represents workers in the wood, food and textile manufacturing sectors. “In a week that has seen another manufacturing company,...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Republic campaigners still positive after royal visit
    "Campaigners for a New Zealand Head of State are still feeling positive after ten days of royal events" says NZ Republic Chair, Savage. "Our polling before the visit showed increased support for a kiwi head of state. We have a...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Selling homes to foreigners benefits New Zealanders
    Winston Peters has apparently convinced David Cunliffe that when foreigners buy New Zealand property they make New Zealanders worse off. Mr Cunliffe has announced his intention to adopt Winston Peters’ policy of banning foreigners from buying...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Taxpayers’ Union Welcomes Key’s Rejection of ‘Fat Tax’
    The Taxpayers’ Union is welcoming Prime Minister John Key’s rejection of fat and sugar taxes ahead of this year's election. Jordan Williams, Executive Director of the Union, says:...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Law Commission Paper on a New Crown Civil Proceedings Act
    The Law Commission has released A New Crown Civil Proceedings Act for New Zealand , its Issues Paper on reforming the Crown Proceedings Act 1950. The Issues Paper proposes a new statute to replace the Crown Proceedings Act 1950....
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Focus must now go on fishing industry jobs for NZ workers
    Maritime Union says focus must now go on fishing industry jobs for New Zealand workers...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Make the choice to stay safe on the road
    With Easter and Anzac Day giving us two successive long weekends this year there will be a lot of happy families preparing for trips....
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Students Welcome Engagement with StudyLink
    The New Zealand Union of Students’ Associations (NZUSA) has welcomed the improved performance from StudyLink in 2014. There is no doubt that getting their loans and allowances processed on time makes it easier for students to concentrate on being...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Deaf And Hard of Hearing New Zealanders Marginalised
    Deaf And Hard of Hearing New Zealanders Marginalised Imagine if you could not access vital news and information. What would you do?...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Public lose interest in this council, 2016 to be a watershed
    The second term Auckland Council is proving to be an interesting one and very different to the inaugural 2010 – 2013 Governing Body. We are currently going through a budget round to lock in where council’s $3b expenditure is directed...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Labour and National join forces in new Maori confiscations
    Chris McKenzie, former-treaty negotiator and Te Tai Hauauru Maori party candidate, says that the Minister of Primary Industries’ plans to remove temporary exemptions for vessel operators derived from settlement negotiations is akin to confiscation...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • The FCV Bill – Flagging 30 years of failures?
    Paying seafarers at least a minimum wage under the Minimum Wage Act 1983 has applied to the New Zealand fishing industry for more than 30 years. It was, and is, a basic protection which had two universals – it was...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Oxfam’s Morning Tea 2014
    Oxfam’s Morning Tea 2014 Kiwis across the country are getting together over a cuppa to make a difference in the lives of people living in poverty in the developing world. They’re getting involved in Oxfam’s Morning Tea, a fun and...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • 1 in 4 Want to Improve Financial Literacy But Don’t Know How
    1 in 4 Want to Improve Financial Literacy But Don’t Know Where to Go...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Rio Tinto Wins 2013 Roger Award
    Sky City Casino Second, Chorus Third - The criteria for judging are by assessing the transnational (a corporation with 25% or more foreign ownership) that has the most negative impact in each or all of the following categories: economic dominance...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • ACC’s Strategy to stop compensation using ACC 167 Form
    On Radio NZ national’s morning report on 15 April 2014, ACC’s spokesperson Sid Miller denied the non-compliance was just a way for ACC to refuse people....
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Workers support plain packaging of tobacco
    The CTU have today presented to the health select committee in support of plain packaging of tobacco. “Any steps that can be taken to lower smoking rates will result in New Zealand workers and their families having healthier and better...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Christchurch Housing Accord a Joke
    Christchurch Housing Accord a Joke Hugh Pavletich Performance Urban Planning Christchurch New Zealand 16 April 2014 The Housing Accord entered in to today between the Government and the Christchurch City Council, can only be described as a joke. Christchurch...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Infographic : World Giving Index 2013
    Infographic from Charities Aid Foundation World Giving Index 2013 A Global View Of Giving Trends (click to see full size version)...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Tranter questions CEO’s assurances
    “There is a bizarre notion among bureaucrats, politicians and others that if they say something then it must be so - despite all evidence to the contrary” said David Tranter, Health spokesman for Democrats for Social Credit....
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • UNICEF NZ Urges Progress on Plain Packaging of Tobacco
    In its oral submission to the Health Select Committee today, UNICEF NZ expressed its strong support for the Smoke-free Environments (Tobacco Plain Packaging) Amendment Bill as a measure that will help reduce the uptake of smoking, and urged parliament...
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • Whitebait partners look for solutions
    Waikato-Tainui, local marae, councils and agencies are working together to better manage whitebait fisheries at Port Waikato following the compilation of a new report....
    Scoop politics | 16-04
  • NZ’s biggest killer fails to receive the Roger
    The Smokefree Coalition is disappointed Imperial Tobacco did not win the Roger Award for Worst Trans-national Company operating in New Zealand, despite manufacturing products that kill 5000 New Zealanders every year....
    Scoop politics | 16-04
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