web analytics
The Standard

Positive Things

Written By: - Date published: 2:27 pm, February 16th, 2014 - 21 comments
Categories: democratic participation, drugs, electoral systems, Environment, global warming, Parliament, political alternatives - Tags: , , , ,

Nice to see that Russell Brand’s political thought is evolving. In contrast to his stance on a fairly recent interview with Jeremy Paxman where he took aim at the entire concept of democracy, he’s now more targeted insofar as he now states:- “… I’m a man who doesn’t believe in parliamentary democracy – thinks it’s a charade – but what I want is change around this issue (UK drug policy) and I’m prepared to use the materials in front of me.”

Good to hear that he is no longer intent to throw the baby out with the bathwater and that he can walk and chew gum at the same time.

The entire interview, with Jon Snow is here. Having watched it, I can’t square the negative framing by printed media with what I saw. The interview was a tad confrontational and, sure, Russell Brand is excitable. But I think he did well and made some important points.

Meanwhile, the Leader of the Labour Party in the UK seems to be bringing AGW in from the political cold.

In 2012 we had the second wettest winter on record and this winter is a one in 250-year event. If you keep throwing the dice and you keep getting sixes then the dice are loaded. Something is going on….

…The science is clear. The public know there is a problem. But, because of political division in Westminster, we are sleepwalking into a national security crisis on climate change. The terrible events of the last few weeks should serve as a wake-up call for us all.

Nice to think that he might walk the walk and that if he doesn’t, overwhelming pressure will be applied by ordinary people via the type of means that Russell Brand advocates.

21 comments on “Positive Things”

  1. adam 1

    I always liked Russell’s comments – yeah they were not completely thought out – but he did have the anger of a working bloke in mind when he spoke. Yeah he still not the most articulate voice for change, but he is saying there are different ways and different approaches. In some ways that is better than Obarma, who can articulate a liberal approach rather well – shame his voting record nor his time as president reflect his liberal rhetoric at all. Back to Russell – he has been introduced to real democracy and me thinks he likes it!

    • weka 1.1

      I don’t know, I think he is articulate, he’s just not slick. I haven’t paid much attention to him, but I watched the interview and understood pretty well what he is on about. He’s a bit emotional and a bit theatric, but that seems refreshing to me.

    • Bill 1.2

      The anger and passion aren’t in doubt. I also believe he’s articulate enough and fairly good at ‘thinking on his feet’ too. Now if he could just get his around the fact that democracy is developed by the involvement and participation of all (and present that fact back to these establishment interviewers) then he could stop being all defensive about not being able to present a finalised blueprint for ‘what will be’….and demolish their position by highlighting the democratic deficits in their scenario.

      When you have been through and rejected all the scenarios that are not democratic, you are left with what is democratic. I know you know this and that I’m just stating the obvious, but hey.

      • just saying 1.2.1

        When you have been through and rejected all the scenarios that are not democratic, you are left with what is democratic.

        I fear this route could end up taking too long. I’m sure there are a thousand non-democratic ways of being that haven’t been dreamt-up yet, let alone put into action, and even more good intentions that veer off track and keep on going. I don’t have the answers, but feel we might need to be a bit more proactive than just rejecting the wrong.

        How we go about that, I’m not sure. I just hope we have a solid foundation of alternative communities and networks working together when the shit is finally seen to have hit the fan, because the ensuing panic is likely to foster even less democracy in the ways we organise ourselves.

        • Bill 1.2.1.1

          I fear this route could end up taking too long.

          I disagree. I reckon it’s probably the quickest way. It’s not a case of actually having to enact all undemocratic scenarios and then reject them before opting for democratic ones.

          Take an example.

          How about I just order things and tell everyone what to do? Do we even have to try that one out to know it’s not democratic? No. Well, how about a committee of people – experts or whatever – ordering things and telling everyone what to do? Do we have to try that, or do we already know that it contains the same strongly anti-democratic elements of the first scenario and so can be discarded ‘off the bat’? I think so. Well, how about we elect a committee of experts or whatever and maybe have them order things and telling people what to do for a limited time, of say, three years? Is that any different? No. So we can reject that too….and so on.

          Bottom line – any hint or sniff of ‘power over’ being exercised by some clique is, obviously, not democratic and so can be rejected out of hand.

          But before people get silly on it, I’ll throw this in. If I’m wanting to build something, then of course, I’ll rely to some extent or other on information from a person with building skill/knowledge. That’s just common sense. But does my relying on their skill or knowledge then grant that person any right or licence to exercise any power over me in either that situation or any other? No, of course not.

          So given the admittedly rather quickly thrown together examples above, is it safe to say that any hierarchy that somehow or other grants a right to exercise ‘power over’ precludes the possibility of democracy? I’d say so.

          So, whatever structures we employ or institutions we develop, they must be free of such hierarchies if we want democracy. And – well, hierarchies, whether institutional or informal, just ain’t that difficult to recognise and so any proposition that would lead to their formation can be rejected.

          Simple. And quick too 😉

          Oh yeah – and the bullshit I still hear from time to time how *this* hierarchical arrangement will somehow be different due to checks and balances (thinking variations on the theme of ‘democratic centralism’) – well, it’s up to the proponents of such scenarios to conclusively demonstrate the democratic integrity of their scheme. Just one identifiable glitch or weakness is all that’s required to reject it and move on.

          • just saying 1.2.1.1.1

            That’s not quite what I meant.

            It’s about the idea of democracy arising from stopping using the more overt forms non-democratic arrangements currently take, as opposed to someting, and I don’t know what, more proactive. It’s also about the danger of good intentions drifting into informal hierarchies with kinds of hegemony of their own.

  2. Rogue Trooper 2

    always a worthwhile read Bill., and a striking masthead.

    • Bill 2.1

      Thanks Rogue. Good to see you back here btw.

      • Rogue Trooper 2.1.1

        Too Kind.
        apparently Abe is quoted as saying “Determine that a thing can and shall be done, and we shall find a way”. kinda like these 2014 ‘Oil Tour Protests’, Well, sort-of. 😀 . And if you are inclined to Bill, check out that Nicholas Carr’s The Shallows ; a great ‘heads-up’, considering the plasticity of the brain. 😀

  3. weka 3

    I don’t know what the negative framing has been, but I can’t see the problem with the interview either. Apart from the interviewer getting hung up on the ‘don’t vote’ stuff and trying to force an admission of something from Brand rather than using it as an opportunity to explore what Brand is on about.

    Love the bit in the middle where Brand parodies politics “Sorry everyone, everythings fine. There is no poverty! There is no climate change! Those floods aren’t real!”

    • Bill 3.1

      The negative framing, well, y’know, when the linked article is this dismissive “Indeed, for much of the interview the presenter treated Brand like a boring schoolboy, appearing to suffer through the moments when Brand babbled on (occasionally getting so carried away with his own hyperbole he confused his words) by fixing him with a long-suffering stare.”

      Or the Huffington Post headlining “…Comedian Loses His Temper During Heated Talks On Drugs And Revolution”

      Or ‘the dailymail – “Comedian meets his match…”

      • Rogue Trooper 3.1.1

        lolz

      • karol 3.1.2

        “Comedian meets his match…”

        Has Jon Snow slipped that far in his media role?

      • One Anonymous Bloke 3.1.3

        I didn’t get that from Snow. He says exactly what he’s up to from the start. He wanted to get Brand to address an apparent contradiction in his position. Brand eventually, after much encouragement, did so, rather eloquently, but he was clearly there to push the drug law reform message. It was a good interview though.

  4. karol 4

    Jon Snow looks like he’s being deliberately hick.

    He’s reduced representative democracy to voting in elections. It also includes (in theory/principle at least) lobbying, protests, grassroots campaigns, circulating ideas, petitions, engaging people at the grass roots in debates, etc. Anyone can participate in such things, whether they vote or not.

    Brand is focused on these other democratic processes, that are also legitimate channels in our society.

  5. Yoza 5

    I saw the Paxman interview, I didn’t get the sense that Russell Brand was anti-democracy. It seemed quite clear he was condemning the established boundaries of what can be acceptably framed as democracy. In both instances, Paxman and Snow, the interviewers were determinedly set on getting Brand to recant and accept the kind of perversity that presents the likes of Tony Blair and Ed Miliband as the only alternatives.

    Brand is correct when he says voting in Western style parliamentary ‘democracies’ will not fundamentally change a system of social organisation which has been specifically designed to marginalise the general population while concentrating participation in decision making processes in the hands of the wealthy and the powerful. The illegal invasion of Iraq and global warming are probably the clearest current examples of an existing gulf between what the established elite expect the general population to believe and what your average person actually believes.

    The hierarchy of New Zealand’s security apparatus didn’t care about the democratically elected Clark government telling them they weren’t to join the invasion of Iraq, the bosses in Washington whistled and their New Zealand poodles came running.
    And how many news items about the storms in Britain or the US mention a link with anthropogenic global warming. There is a noticeably concerted effort in anglospheric media circles to minimise or completely ignore the effect human industrial activity is having on the planet’s climate.

    Brand’s campaign to institutionalise a sane approach to drug use is another lesson in what established interests have predetermined to be unacceptable thought crimes. Drugs are illegal so our domestic security forces have a pretext to kick around anyone who doesn’t conform to whatever the established order decides is tolerable behaviour. As I recall, one of the pretexts used to persecute Aziz Choudry and company was suspicion of drug use.

    I hope Brand gets more of these opportunities. He is quick on his feet, he is entertaining and he has a greater chance of getting the otherwise disengaged to consider the political paradigm in which they are ensnared.

    • karol 5.1

      Yoza, I agree with your point about voting in the current UK system will bring little change. It is more marked in the UK First Past the Post system than in NZ’s MMP system – though the dominance of the two main parties has become a problem as both have been captured by neoliberalism to a greater or lesser extent.

      It wasn’t always as bad as it is now – the Westminster system did provide a bit more of choice in times past.

      On reporting of the UK floods. The news coverage of the current UK & US storms does, firstly focus on the here and now of the storms’ impacts. The test will be if such storms raise awareness of climate issues in the long term. One storm alone is not evidence of climate change, but the increase in frequency and extent of severe weather does.

      I have seen some news reports of the storms that do raise the topic of climate change:

      This one from the UK Mirror:

      Meanwhile, a poll by ComRes for the Independent on Sunday and Sunday Mirror found that just 59% of people thought the Government was “beginning to get a grip” on the flooding.

      Some 48% said the storms had made them more convinced that climate change was happening, compared to 30% who said their views had not changed.

      An Opinium poll for the Observer found 51% thought Mr Cameron had responded badly to the floods.

      Some 51% of those questioned said they believed issues around climate change and global warming caused the floods while 24% did not take that view, and 20% were neutral.

      So this news organisation was raising the issue by polling about it.

      The Guardian has also printed an article about it by Nicholas Stern:

      The record rainfall and storm surges that have brought flooding across the UK are a clear sign that we are already experiencing the impacts of climate change.

      Many commentators have suggested that we are suffering from unprecedented extreme weather. There are powerful grounds for arguing that this is part of a trend.

      • Yoza 5.1.1

        I was thinking about the news coming through agencies like Associated Press or the BBC. I’m not saying there are no stories about climate change at all, but when it is discussed it is out in the margins like Comment is Free in the Guardian or if it is allowed it is relegated to a couple of paragraphs in a large screed of text. More often than not anthropogenic global warming is presented as an inconclusive theory dividing the scientific community, rather than the reality of a rigorously pursued field of scientific research conclusively demonstrating humanity is responsible for destabilising the climate to a point where it threatens the survival of the species.

  6. Mike S 6

    ” In 2012 we had the second wettest winter on record and this winter is a one in 250-year event. If you keep throwing the dice and you keep getting sixes then the dice are loaded. Something is going on….

    …The science is clear. The public know there is a problem. But, because of political division in Westminster, we are sleepwalking into a national security crisis on climate change. The terrible events of the last few weeks should serve as a wake-up call for us all.

    Nice to think that he might walk the walk and that if he doesn’t, overwhelming pressure will be applied by ordinary people via the type of means that Russell Brand advocates.”

    =============================================================

    “One of the Met Office’s most senior experts yesterday made a dramatic intervention in the climate change debate by insisting there is no link between the storms that have battered Britain and global warming.

    Mat Collins, a Professor in climate systems at Exeter University, said the storms have been driven by the jet stream – the high-speed current of air that girdles the globe – which has been ‘stuck’ further south than usual.

    Professor Collins told The Mail on Sunday: ‘There is no evidence that global warming can cause the jet stream to get stuck in the way it has this winter. If this is due to climate change, it is outside our knowledge.’

    His statement carries particular significance because he is an internationally acknowledged expert on climate computer models and forecasts, and his university post is jointly funded by the Met Office.

    Prof Collins is also a senior adviser – a ‘co-ordinating lead author’ – for the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).”

    • karol 6.1

      Here is a clarification from Prof Collins:

      Professor Collins made clear that he believes it is likely global warming could lead to higher rainfall totals, because a warmer atmosphere can hold more water. But he said this has nothing to do with the storm conveyor belt.

      • Yoza 6.1.1

        The guys over at Media Lens make an interesting observation:

        A careful analysis by Carbon Brief of 3,064 flood-related newspapers stories, published between the start of December and 10 February, makes this clear. Their stark conclusion is that over 93 per cent of press stories did not mention climate change (never mind the role of humans in disturbing the delicate balance of climate).”

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Worker safety top of mind tomorrow and beyond
    Workers’ Memorial Day, commemorated tomorrow, is both a time to reflect and to encourage a better safety culture in all workplaces, says Labour’s spokesperson for Labour Issues Iain Lees-Galloway.“On Worker’s Memorial Day, working people across New Zealand will remember those… ...
    11 hours ago
  • Communities forced to stomach water woes
    Confirmation by Health Minister Jonathan Coleman that he is to wind up a water quality improvement scheme will leave thousands of Kiwis with no alternative but to continue boiling their drinking water, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. The Drinking… ...
    16 hours ago
  • Labour calls for immediate humanitarian aid for Nepal
    The Government should act immediately to help with earthquake relief efforts in Nepal, Labour’s Foreign Affairs spokesperson David Shearer says. “The Nepalese Government is appealing for international assistance following yesterday’s massive quake. The full impact is only now being realised… ...
    16 hours ago
  • New holiday reflects significance of Anzac Day
    Anzac Day now has the full recognition that other public holidays have long enjoyed, reflecting the growing significance it has to our sense of identity and pride as a nation, Labour MP David Clark says.“The importance of the 100th Gallipoli… ...
    16 hours ago
  • Housing crisis hurting export growth
    If Steven Joyce wants to revive his failing export growth target he needs to make sure the Government gets to grips with the housing crisis, says David Parker, Labour’s Export Growth and Trade spokesperson. “Our exporters are struggling to compete… ...
    4 days ago
  • Gallipoli’s lesson: never forget, never repeat
     A special monument to one of our greatest war heroes should be a priority for the new Pukeahu National War Memorial Park, Labour Leader Andrew Little says.  “This will honour the spirit of Lieutenant Colonel William Malone, who led 760… ...
    4 days ago
  • Minister for who? Women, or Team Key?
    Louise Upston yesterday broke her silence on John Key’s repeated unwanted touching of a woman who works at his local café, to jump to the defence of her Boss. Upston repeated Key’s apology but, according to media reports “she refused… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    4 days ago
  • Taxpayer bucks backing US billionaire
    Kiwis will be horrified to know they are backing a Team Oracle subsidiary owned by a US billionaire, Labour’s Sports and Recreation spokesperson Trevor Mallard says. It has been revealed today that a Warkworth boat building company, which is wholly… ...
    4 days ago
  • English’s sins of omission: ‘Nothing left to be done’ on housing
    When Bill English said ‘there is nothing left to be done’ on the Auckland housing crisis he had overlooked a few things – a few things, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says.  “He’s right if you ignore: ...
    4 days ago
  • Climate change now hurts Kiwis
    Kiwis have twice been given timely and grave warnings on how climate change will hit them in their hip pockets this week, says Climate Change spokesperson Megan Woods.  “The first is the closure of the Sanford mussel plant and the… ...
    5 days ago
  • Clean, green and chocolate!
    Like many people I absolutely love chocolate! But until recently I hadn’t given much thought to how it was grown and produced. Fair trade and ethical food production are core Green Party principles, so yesterday Steffan Browning and I were… ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers MP
    5 days ago
  • National admits loan shark law not up to it
    National has admitted new laws to crack down on loan sharks, truck shops and dodgy credit merchants aren’t up to the task of protecting vulnerable consumers, Labour’s Commerce spokesperson Kris Faafoi says. “Paul Goldsmith has acknowledged the laws might just… ...
    5 days ago
  • Power and the Prime Minister
    I’d like to acknowledge the young woman* who has publically told her story. It was a very brave thing to do. She kept her story very simple and focussed on her experience of what happened. It told of unwanted attention… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    5 days ago
  • Extra holiday offers time to reflect
    The Mondayisation of Anzac Day provides New Zealanders with an opportunity to spend more time with their families and their communities, Dunedin North Labour MP David Clark says. “This is the first time legislation I introduced, to have Anzac and… ...
    5 days ago
  • More angst and anguish for red zone locals
    Local residents will be bitterly disappointed by the Government’s cherry picking of the Supreme Court’s decision regarding compensation for red zoned property owners, Labour Canterbury Earthquake Recovery spokesperson and Port Hills MP Ruth Dyson says. “Home owners have taken all… ...
    6 days ago
  • Australia shows why we need a sovereign wealth fund now
    Australia has not managed its great mining boom well, says HSBC’s chief economist for Australia and New Zealand, Paul Bloxham. When times are good, governments need to save for the bad times that will inevitably follow, and this can be… ...
    GreensBy Russel Norman MP
    6 days ago
  • Pure Water- pure rip off
    New Zealanders’ rights to fresh water must be protected before commercial allocations are given, but the Government is allowing resources to be taken, says Kelvin Davis MP for Te Tai Tokerau.  “The Government needs to resolve the issue of water… ...
    6 days ago
  • Cabinet paper reveals weak case for Iraq deployment
    A heavily redacted copy of a Cabinet paper on New Zealand’s military deployment to Iraq reveals how weak the case is for military involvement in that conflict, says Labour’s Defence spokesperson Phil Goff.  The paper warns that given the failure… ...
    6 days ago
  • Malaysia’s booty is Kiwis’ lost homeownership dream
    It’s unsurprising the Auckland property market is so overheated when Malaysians are being told they can live large on Kiwi’s hard-earned rent money, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “A Malaysian property website lists nearly 4000 New Zealand houses and… ...
    6 days ago
  • Ministry’s food safety resources slashed to the bone
    The Ministry for Primary Industries’ failure to monitor toxic and illegal chemicals in red meat is a dereliction of duty, Labour’s Primary Industries and Food Safety spokesperson Damien O’Connor says. “MPI compliance officer Gary Orr today admitted National’s much-vaunted super… ...
    6 days ago
  • Ministry must protect organic food industry
    The Ministry for Primary Industries must take urgent action to protect New Zealand’s $150 million organic food and beverage industry by establishing a certification regime, Labour’s Primary Industries spokesperson Damien O’Connor says. “Despite working with Organics Aotearoa on the issue… ...
    7 days ago
  • Tony Abbott, indigenous rights, and refugees
    This week, Tony Abbott has visited Aotearoa New Zealand, bringing with him his racist policies against indigenous Australians and his appalling record on refugee detention camps. Abbott has launched a policy “to close” remote aboriginal communities, which is about as… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    7 days ago
  • PM’s housing outburst bizarre
    Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford has described the Prime Minister’s latest comments on the Auckland housing crisis as bizarre. “John Key is deep in denial. He must be one of the only people left who are not concerned about the risk… ...
    1 week ago
  • Deflation: Another economic headache linked to housing crisis
    National’s housing crisis is causing even further damage with the second consecutive quarter of deflation a genuine concern the Reserve Bank can do little about, as it focusses on Auckland house prices, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “This is… ...
    1 week ago
  • Pot calling the kettle black over fossil fuel subsidies.
    Over the weekend alongside nine other countries the New Zealand Government has endorsed a statement that supports eliminating inefficient subsidies on fossil fuels. Fossil fuel subsidies are a big driver of increasing emissions. Good on the Government for working internationally… ...
    GreensBy Gareth Hughes MP
    1 week ago
  • At last – a common sense plan for Christchurch
    The Common Sense Plan for Christchurch released by The People’s Choice today is a welcome relief from the shallow debate about rates rises versus asset sales, Labour’s Christchurch MPs say. "Local residents – who have spent weeks trawling through the… ...
    1 week ago
  • National must lead by example on climate change
    The National Government must meet its own climate change obligations before it preaches to the rest of the world, Labour's Climate Change spokesperson Megan Woods says. "Calls today by Climate Change Minister Tim Groser for an end to fossil fuel… ...
    1 week ago
  • Biosecurity rethink a long time
    The Government has opened New Zealand’s borders to biosecurity risks and its rethinking of bag screening at airports is an admission of failure, Labour’s Primary Industries spokesperson Damien O’Connor says. Nathan Guy today announced a review of biosecurity systems in… ...
    1 week ago
  • Chinese rail workers must be paid minimum wage
    KiwiRail must immediately stop further Chinese engineers from working here until they can guarantee they are being paid the New Zealand minimum wage, Labour’s MP for Hutt South Trevor Mallard says. The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment today released… ...
    1 week ago
  • Better consultation needed on Christchurch asset sales
    The Christchurch City Council (CCC) should be promoting wide and genuine public consultation on its draft ten year budget and plan given the serious implications for the city’s future of its proposed asset sales, outlined in the plan. Instead, it… ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage MP
    1 week ago
  • ‘Healthy Families’ a good start but not enough to tackle obesity relate...
    Today the Government is making a the meal out of the launch of its ‘Healthy Families’ package to promote ‘healthier decisions’ and ‘changing mindsets’ over nutrition, physical activity and obesity. Great! The programme is based on a successful model from… ...
    GreensBy Kevin Hague MP
    2 weeks ago
  • ‘Healthy Families’ a good start but not enough to tackle obesity relate...
    Today the Government is making a the meal out of the launch of its ‘Healthy Families’ package to promote ‘healthier decisions’ and ‘changing mindsets’ over nutrition, physical activity and obesity. Great! The programme is based on a successful model from… ...
    GreensBy Kevin Hague MP
    2 weeks ago
  • No more sweet talk on obesity
    The Government should be looking at broader measures to combat obesity rather than re-hashing pre-announced initiatives, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says.  “While it is encouraging to see the Government finally waking from its slumber and restoring a focus on… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government two-faced on zero-hour contracts
    The Government should look to ban zero-hour contracts in its own back yard before getting too high and mighty about other employers using them, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. “Information collated by Labour shows at least three district health… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Scrutiny of battlefield deaths should continue
    As New Zealand troops head to Iraq under a shroud of secrecy, the Government is pushing ahead with legislation to remove independent scrutiny of incidents where Kiwi soldiers are killed in hostile action overseas, Labour’s Defence spokesperson Phil Goff says.… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Damp-free homes a right for tenants
    Labour is urging tenants to use a little known rule which gives them the right to live in damp-free rental homes. Otago University researchers have today highlighted the Housing Improvement Regulations 1947 as a way tenants can force landlords to… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • National must take action on speculators
    The Government must take action on property speculators who are damaging the housing market and shutting families and young people out of the home ownership dream, Labour Leader Andrew Little says.  “There are a number of options the Government could… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Milk price halves: A $7b economic black hole
    Global milk prices have halved since the peak last year, creating an economic black hole of almost $7 billion that will suck in regions reliant on dairy, crucial industries and the Government’s books, says Labour’s Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson. “The… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Kitchen plan set to swallow up health boards’ funds
    The financial impacts of implementing a proposal to outsource hospital food, forced on them by a crown-owned company which is now facing an auditor-general’s inquiry, are being felt by district health boards across the country, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Reserve Bank scathing of Government
    The Reserve Bank’s most scathing critique to date of National’s inability to handle the housing crisis shows the Bank is sick of having to pick up the pieces, Labour Leader Andrew Little says.  “John Key continues to deny there is… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Time for McDonald’s to upsize work hours
    Labour is calling on McDonald’s to have more respect for their workers and offer them more guaranteed work hours. McDonald’s is proposing to guarantee its workers 80 per cent of their rostered hours, Labour’s spokesperson for Labour Issues Iain Lees-Galloway… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Brownlee misses the boat on asbestos
    Gerry Brownlee has once again missed an opportunity to improve the lives of Cantabrians post-earthquakes, Labour’s Canterbury Earthquake Recovery spokesperson Ruth Dyson says. A new report from the Royal Society of New Zealand and the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Adviser,… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government must come clean on troop deployment and protections
    New Zealanders deserve more than to hear about their troops’ deployment overseas from Australian media, Opposition Leader Andrew Little says. “News from Australia that Kiwi troops are on their way to Iraq this week is another example of the culture… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Cancer prevention calls gain momentum
    Research showing bowel cancer treatment sucks up more public health dollars than other cancers once again highlights the need for a national screening programme, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. A study by Otago University, which found colon cancer is… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Burger King shows zero-hour contracts not needed
    The abandonment of zero-hour contracts by Burger King is further evidence good employers do not need to use them, Labour’s spokesperson on Labour Issues Iain Lees-Galloway says. "Congratulations to the Unite Union and Burger King for settling an employment agreement… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Kiwis deserve more than reheats
    The Government looks set to rely on regurgitated announcements for this year’s Budget if today’s speech is anything to go by, Labour Leader Andrew Little says. “National has been building up to this Budget for seven long years, promising a… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Landlords not cashing in on insulation schemes
    The fact so few landlords have taken up the generous taxpayer subsidy for retrofitting shows it is time to legislate minimum standards, says Labour’s Associate Housing spokesperson Poto Williams. “Many landlords aren’t using Government insulation schemes because they don’t want… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Zero excuses, end zero hour contracts now
    It’s time Workplace Relations Minister Michael Woodhouse cut the weasel words and banned zero hour contracts, Labour Leader Andrew Little says. “Michael Woodhouse today acknowledged zero hour contracts are unfair. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • We’ve reached Peak Key with ‘artificial target’
    John Key’s attempt to redefine his cornerstone promise of two election campaigns as an artificial target suggests his other promises are works of fiction, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “For seven years and two election campaigns, John Key has… ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Top 10 need to know facts on climate change
    All the numbers and stats around climate change can be confusing, so we’ve put together a handy list of the top 10 numbers about climate change that we should all know- and then do something about. You can sign up here to… ...
    GreensBy Frog
    2 weeks ago

Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere