web analytics

Sacred cows

Written By: - Date published: 9:02 am, December 20th, 2012 - 38 comments
Categories: class war, newspapers, tax - Tags: ,

Interesting anonymous editorial in The Herald yesterday:

Sacred cows fair game as Govt clings to surplus

A$66 million surplus in 2014-15 is, as Bill English noted yesterday, “not large”. But, in the interests of avoiding embarrassment, it is one the Finance Minister is clearly very keen to protect.

As much was apparent as he used the release of the half-year economic and fiscal update to indicate that spending on the Government’s biggest programmes is now under the gun. “Long-term drivers of costs in areas such as welfare, health, education and law and order” were mentioned as Mr English outlined his plan to retain the surplus in the face of a threatened further deterioration in the global economy. …

The universality of the likes of Working for Families, as well as the generosity of interest-free student loans, have previously been deemed out of bounds. The Government has, unfortunately, not been prepared to take tough decisions, whatever their rationality and reasonableness.

The wealthy, therefore, continue to be eligible for Working for Families benefits. Student loans have been subjected only to tinkering, aimed mainly at reclaiming loans. Mr English’s gaze should be directed at tailoring welfare to those who genuinely need it, and reining in the benevolence of the loan scheme.

Why is it, that on any editorial list of sacred cows the Nats’ tax cut bribe for the rich never seems to feature? Rolling back those tax cuts would raise much more revenue than tinkering with student loans, and is much fairer besides, but strangely this particular cow is never offered up for sacrifice.

In unrelated news, it’s a fair bet that the anonymous scribe waxing lyrical about the “benevolence” of the student loan scheme (1) received a free education themselves, and (2) benefited greatly from the tax cut bribe. Mmmm – funny that.

38 comments on “Sacred cows”

  1. r0b 1

    And on that somewhat grumpy note, I’m off for a bit. Back in January some time. Have a good Christmas all. Be careful on the roads, and have a great summer.

  2. rosy viper 2

    I’ve been thinking lately that it will be interesting to see how well Tony Ryall does if more pressure is put on health spending. It looks like he better be preparing himself.

    So far he’s remained off the list of incompetent ministers despite DHB and PHO mergers and reduced funding for primary care access for vulnerable populations. Whatever pressures there are seem to have remained ‘in house’. I’d go so far as to say that by keeping away from the headlines he’s on the list of top performing ministers. I’ll be interested to see if he can maintain that when the pressure to cut goes on.

  3. fatty 3

    .In unrelated news, it’s a fair bet that the anonymous scribe waxing lyrical about the “benevolence” of the student loan scheme (1) received a free education themselves, and (2) benefited greatly from the tax cut bribe. Mmmm – funny that.

    True, and we should not forget that Bill English got two unrelated degrees at two different universities. A Commerce degree at Otago and then an English degree at Victoria in Wellington. He would have been paid to study back then.

  4. Off topic, and only because I know the author will be too modest to link to it himself:

    http://www.otago.ac.nz/news/news/otago040382.html

    Well done.

  5. “as well as the generosity of interest-free student loans,”

    Yeah this really pisses me off. New Zealand appears to be importing educated people, due to a lack of them in this country and at no time does the sacred cow of the failure of the student loan scheme ever get addressed.

    Rather we get cowards, who can’t even sign their name to the memes they are propagating; writing crap about “the generosity of…”.

    Yeah, sure, thank you Masters for providing a whacking great debt to those who are going to provide society with a much needed service, I mean, free education used to be factored as an investment, however now that mindless-market-mania-mentality has taken over all sense has walked out of the equation. And forethought, or analysis of the effects of certain policies appears to have become a sacrilege to be replaced by mindless “proverbs” mentioning “generosity” and “debt creation” in the same sentence as though they are synonyms.

    • Lanthanide 6.1

      Higher education is both a public and a private good. I don’t think it is unreasonable that there should be some level of private investment in it. I think the SL scheme we have at the moment is a good compromise.

      What I would like to see is the diploma mills shut down (private institutes selling entry-level courses on hype and misrepresentation), as well as stopping people from going to university and racking up debt if it’s clear they’re only doing it because they have no idea what else to do, or people who eventually drop out with no qualifications and a load of debt. I believe the government has added some requirements that 2nd year onwards SL requires passing marks for 1st year, which is a good step in this direction.

      I also wouldn’t be opposed to a very low rate of interest, no more than 1-2%, as well as the 10% bonus brought back for voluntary payments over $500 in fiscal year (government has scrapped them for next year). At the moment most people are just letting inflation eat away at their debt.

      • blue leopard 6.1.1

        What isn’t factored in Lanthanide, is the people who are capable of university level study who have backgrounds that are not flush with money and how agreeing to tens of thousands of dollars worth of debt, is really a whole lot more difficult for one in that position, than for someone who has more financial abundance in their background. This holds true whether the wealthy parents are generous or not.

        To put it a wee bit callously
        This means that many people who could be very active members of society, may end up being non-active and costs to society.
        This also means that the majority of people with educated careers are those with certain flush background and have very little idea of how to address the problems of different stratos of society.

        This is entirely inefficient system and I think you would find, if any studies were done, the least of our problems would be people who are going into education and failing their courses. I agree about the “diploma-mills”. Education is becoming more and more about funding for educational institutes and less about imparting useful knowledge effectively. This is another by-product of turning educational institutes into business-models. The main focus is not there anymore.

        • DS1 6.1.1.1

          Agree completely.

          It also discriminates against students who come from a non-university town who can’t therefore live with their parents. My loan would have been far smaller had I been able to live with the folks.

        • Lanthanide 6.1.1.2

          “This means that many people who could be very active members of society, may end up being non-active and costs to society.”

          I didn’t voice the other side of this policy bent of mine: student allowances would be made more available, which would in turn likely help those of lesser financial backgrounds more than the other changes I suggest would hurt them.

          The thinking behind that is that generally my proposals would lead to a higher calibre of students, so there would be fewer of them, therefore the money can be concentrated amongst them more.

          • blue leopard 6.1.1.2.1

            Thanks DS1
            Lanthanide, I don’t understand. As far as I know, student allowances are available to all, although only for about 5 years study, therefore, how could they become “more available”?

            • McFliper 6.1.1.2.1.1

              Income thresholds, individual and parental.
              5 year restriction.
              Length of study.
              Study workload.
              Achievement requirements.

              All have or are little tweaks that help make students ineligible for part or all of the allowances. And cost fuck-all compared to loss-making highways, bailing out incompetent money managers, or giving key tax cuts and pay rises.

              Fuck, part time students can’t even borrow to pay for course related costs.

              • Ah, cheers, I had forgotten about the income thresholds for those with wealthier parents.

                Yes, cost fuck-all, **with more benefits** than loss-making highways, bailing out incompetent money managers, or giving key tax cuts and pay rises too!

                It would be interesting to know what Universities and Polytechs costs and expenditures are. I’m guessing the amount that students are charged is likely to be higher than what it costs to supply the education, I realise there are many costs involved, over the pay of the lecturers, including up-dating knowledge and equipment to convey the information, however, I have been in lectures with 100s of students, and these students’ fees, I would guess, subsidize the later year classes, where there are fewer students. Unsure about this, however, seems this must be the case?

                • McFliper

                  Universities are crown entities, so their accounts are online.

                  Basically, they usually have internal accounting policies so they “pay” for lecture theatres, IT, labs, all that good stuff from university central services. Large lectures need larger buildings, smaller tutorial rooms are cheaper by the hour. And they transfer those costs to the students through fees.

                  ISTR that student fees (incl the govt portion) are a large component of uni income, but only around half of it.

                  • Take Otago University as an example.

                    They say they have about 18,000 full-time students
                    http://www.otago.ac.nz/about/quickstats.html#student

                    For arguments sake, lets say they are all taking first-year BA papers which amounts to approx $5,000p/a (of course some courses cost a whole lot more than that, and overseas students are paying more again)
                    http://www.otago.ac.nz/study/fees/

                    This amounts to $90,000,000 per year to cover all the expenses.
                    If the University is a Crown entity, they are paying rent to whom? The Crown?

                    I have my doubts as to what the real costs of a course of study are, and suspect that there is a fair amount of profit being made in these institutes for the Government.

                    It appears that the Government is being “generous” in supplying students with loans in order to get profit now and then further profit later (in the form of higher taxes).
                    Very generous indeed.

                    • McFliper

                      Any profit goes to the university, not the government central coffers. The rent is an internal university accounting thing so each department has to meet its own costs on an annual basis (although they do rent extra facilities where needed). Personally, I think that sucks a bit because it makes departments focus as degree factories filling supply/demand fads rather than education as an esoteric good. Oh, and department heads become as obsessed about an artificial bottom line as small business owners.

                      The 2011 annual report gives domestic tuition income as $91mil (nice estimate :)). Total income was $592,394,000. Ah, ok “government grants” was $200mil, and the bulk of that would be student-related funding, so that’s about 50% of total income related to teaching.

                      The net surplus was $27mil, or about 5 or 6% of income. Not exactly a huge margin, but responsible for contingencies (i.e. expected enrollments vs students who turn up on the day, getting shafted unexpectedly by Marsden Fund grants, etc).

                      My opinion on government double-tapping is that they want students to pay for the “private good” value of their education, which to me reduces the incentive to actually get an education that will provide the public good of an educated population. Universities exist to exist, rather than as direct revenue generators, but I know of a few people who got a long term degree and all the while their schoolmates were getting a modest but healthy income in jobs that required good performance and little more than operators’ certificates, e.g. forklift driving.

                      A couple of them regret getting an education, which is what we don’t want in this country. They get better paying jobs, but spend years playing catchup particularly on compounding retirement savings. Hell, I’m down multiple tens of thousands of dollars on that alone, let alone the loan itself.

      • blue leopard 6.1.2

        Additionally:
        ” I don’t think it is unreasonable that there should be some level of private investment in it. I think the SL scheme we have at the moment is a good compromise.”

        People who are educated, not only provide a much needed service to society, they are also usually in a higher tax bracket. I do not think this “income generating” quality of education is factored into the “good compromise” conclusion.

        • Lanthanide 6.1.2.1

          Effectively you’re saying that when you earn in the higher tax bracket, all of that tax you’re paying there goes back to paying for your education at that point.

          Ok, even if we accept that: how are you going to deal with people getting an education on the state who skip off overseas and therefore don’t pay any of this tax?

          • blue leopard 6.1.2.1.1

            I’m saying that when some bright spark came up with the idea of making people go into debt for their education, I don’t believe ALL the costs were factored in. I believe if they were, then this approach wouldn’t be pursued, let alone called “generous”.

            What is the Government doing now about the students going overseas and not paying back the debt they owe?

            • Lanthanide 6.1.2.1.1.1

              If you go overseas, your student loan starts accruing interest at 7%. There used to be a 2 year honeymoon period and they’re dropping it to 1 year.

              They’ve also been hitting up ex-pat students with overdue debt recently and apparently it has been pretty successful, targeting people who live in Oz.

              http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/money/7715188/IRD-scoops-up-32m-in-student-loan-debt

              “Every dollar spent on the pilot scheme has returned $11.40 of taxpayers’ money.

              In the next 2 years, the IRD will extend the campaign to about 57,000 other borrowers, with the focus mainly on Australia and the United Kingdom.”

              • McFliper

                I have two issues with this. Beyond the fact that people are expected to pay for their education before they know if there’s a “private good” factor at all.

                Firstly, all this means is that people have an incentive to go somewhere that their debt isn’t as legally enforceable as Aus.
                Secondly, accruing the interest and delivering a bill increases the incentive to disappear overseas and never return.

                If there’s no cost to pay, there’s not that particular fiscal barrier to returning.

                I’d like people to get experience overseas for ten years or so and then return as very well qualified and experienced NZers. Help with the doctor shortage. A massive public good in that.

                • Lanthanide

                  Yes, but at the same time it’s a good little lever to encourage graduates to stay in NZ.

                  Certainly it’s much better than the ridiculous right-wing whingeing about “middle-class welfare”, where they suggest putting interest back on student loans. If that was the case, I would likely be in Australia already and my Phd boyfriend definitely would be.

                  • McFliper

                    I reckon we win when graduates go off on an extended OE and then come back with new skills and ideas we don’t have here.

      • Plan B 6.1.3

        Higher education can be paid out of a progressive taxation system. Putting children in debt is a crime against our children one for which they will not forgive us for.

  6. Why 7

    Why not roll back the tax cuts twice?
    Just to get things moving in the right direction.
    I also agree with the idea that higher incomes via higher education will pay back to society via paying more tax.

  7. Don’t know if this has been suggested above?
    But how about taxing the biggest sacred cow – financial transactions?

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Revolutionary art in Palmerston North
    Last night I was a judge at the May Day Cup, an annual theatrical event which celebrates International Workers Day. The event was organised by stalwart unionist Dion Martin and included a range of performers competing for the Cup. This year… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    19 hours ago
  • Revolutionary art in Palmerston North
    Last night I was a judge at the May Day Cup, an annual theatrical event which celebrates International Workers Day. The event was organised by stalwart unionist Dion Martin and included a range of performers competing for the Cup. This year… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    19 hours ago
  • Andrew Little visits Zaatari refugee camp
    Leader of the Opposition, Andrew Little, has visited the largest Syrian refugee camp in the world, Zaatari in Jordan, a day after seeing New Zealand troops at Camp Taji in Iraq. Mr Little spent several hours in the camp, meeting… ...
    2 days ago
  • Com Com’s Z Energy decision anti-competitive
    The Commerce Commission’s decision to allow Z Energy to buy Caltex can only undermine the competition in the fuel industry that is needed to ensure New Zealanders pay the lowest price for petrol, Labour’s Consumer Affairs spokesperson David Shearer says.… ...
    2 days ago
  • Com Com’s Z Energy decision anti-competitive
    The Commerce Commission’s decision to allow Z Energy to buy Caltex can only undermine the competition in the fuel industry that is needed to ensure New Zealanders pay the lowest price for petrol, Labour’s Consumer Affairs spokesperson David Shearer says.… ...
    2 days ago
  • OAG raps Govt over the knuckles on HNZ contracts
    The Government has been rapped over the knuckles by the Auditor General over its failure to properly manage $2.3m of contracts and conflicts of interest in relation to a merchant banker advising them on the state house sell-off, says Labour’s… ...
    3 days ago
  • OAG raps Govt over the knuckles on HNZ contracts
    The Government has been rapped over the knuckles by the Auditor General over its failure to properly manage $2.3m of contracts and conflicts of interest in relation to a merchant banker advising them on the state house sell-off, says Labour’s… ...
    3 days ago
  • Brownlee must step in as EQC spin exposed
    Gerry Brownlee needs to step in after EQC’s desperate spin in the wake of yesterday’s landmark settlement has been exposed by its own documents, says Labour’s Canterbury spokesperson Megan Woods. “Yesterday’s settlement showed that thousands of homes may not have… ...
    3 days ago
  • Brownlee must step in as EQC spin exposed
    Gerry Brownlee needs to step in after EQC’s desperate spin in the wake of yesterday’s landmark settlement has been exposed by its own documents, says Labour’s Canterbury spokesperson Megan Woods. “Yesterday’s settlement showed that thousands of homes may not have… ...
    3 days ago
  • OIO must explain Argentine pollution prosecutions
    The Overseas Investment Office (OIO)has questions to answer about how it safeguarded our sensitive land by allowing foreign investors with criminal prosecutions to purchase Onetai Station in Taranaki, says Labour’s Land Information spokesperson David Cunliffe.   “Rafael and Federico Grozovsky… ...
    3 days ago
  • Aussie banks in NZ should ban lending to offshore buyers
    ASB, Westpac and ANZ must confirm whether or not they will continue to fund the over-heated property market by lending to non-resident offshore home buyers, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “This issue has arisen because their parent banks have… ...
    3 days ago
  • Aussie banks in NZ should ban lending to offshore buyers
    ASB, Westpac and ANZ must confirm whether or not they will continue to fund the over-heated property market by lending to non-resident offshore home buyers, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “This issue has arisen because their parent banks have… ...
    3 days ago
  • Murray McCully needs to come clean over Tokelau ferry debacle
    Foreign Minister Murray McCully needs to come clean on why a New Zealand aid-funded vessel intended to service the Tokelau Islands is delayed, over budget and failed its sea trials, Labour’s Foreign Affairs spokesperson David Shearer says. “The new ship… ...
    3 days ago
  • Full independent inquiry needed to save New Zealand’s reputation
    Revelations that John Key's personal lawyer and trust advisor led a lobbying campaign to shut down a review of New Zealand's foreign trust regime makes the case for a full scale independent inquiry a matter of urgency, Labour's Finance spokesperson… ...
    3 days ago
  • Full independent inquiry needed to save New Zealand’s reputation
    Revelations that John Key's personal lawyer and trust advisor led a lobbying campaign to shut down a review of New Zealand's foreign trust regime makes the case for a full scale independent inquiry a matter of urgency, Labour's Finance spokesperson… ...
    3 days ago
  • Andrew Little visits NZ troops in Iraq and refugees in Jordan
    Opposition Leader Andrew Little has visited New Zealand troops at Camp Taji, Iraq. Mr Little also met with Iraqi Defence Minister Khaled Al-Obedih and senior military officials from the Coalition forces in Iraq. He now heads to Jordan to see… ...
    4 days ago
  • Workplace death toll still too high
    It’s a damning indictment on the Government that as workers gather to remember their lost workmates on Worker’s Memorial Day, New Zealand’s workplace death toll is still far too high, Labour’s Workplace Relations and Safety spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway says. “At… ...
    4 days ago
  • Workplace death toll still too high
    It’s a damning indictment on the Government that as workers gather to remember their lost workmates on Worker’s Memorial Day, New Zealand’s workplace death toll is still far too high, Labour’s Workplace Relations and Safety spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway says. “At… ...
    4 days ago
  • Minister must come clean on implications of landmark settlement
    Gerry Brownlee has urgent and serious questions to answer in the wake of today’s landmark EQC settlement, which potentially has major implications for thousands of Cantabrians, says Labour’s Canterbury spokesperson Megan Woods. ...
    4 days ago
  • Mossack Fonseca links to OIO approvals must be investigated
    The Minister for Land Information must investigate and disclose how many applications to the Overseas Investment Office (OIO) have links to Mossack Fonseca, says Labour’s Land Information spokesperson David Cunliffe. “Labour can now reveal the OIO approved an application from… ...
    4 days ago
  • Mossack Fonseca links to OIO approvals must be investigated
    The Minister for Land Information must investigate and disclose how many applications to the Overseas Investment Office (OIO) have links to Mossack Fonseca, says Labour’s Land Information spokesperson David Cunliffe. “Labour can now reveal the OIO approved an application from… ...
    4 days ago
  • Govt complacency leaves RB no room to cut
    The Government has put the economy in a holding pattern, leaving the Reserve Bank Governor with little room to manoeuvre as he tries to balance a rampant housing market with non-existent inflation, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Graeme Wheeler… ...
    4 days ago
  • Govt complacency leaves RB no room to cut
    The Government has put the economy in a holding pattern, leaving the Reserve Bank Governor with little room to manoeuvre as he tries to balance a rampant housing market with non-existent inflation, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Graeme Wheeler… ...
    4 days ago
  • Dam not out of doldrums yet
    Ruataniwha Dam promoters Hawke’s Bay Regional Investment Company (HBRIC) still has hurdles to clear and a lot of work to do before ratepayers and taxpayers will have confidence in the scheme, says Labour’s MP for Ikaroa-Rāwhiti Meka Whaitiri.“We need sustainable… ...
    4 days ago
  • New study shows Smith’s insulation fails Kiwi kids
    A new Otago University study shows Nick Smith’s inadequate insulation standards will see hundreds of children unnecessarily hospitalised for housing-related illnesses every year, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. ...
    5 days ago
  • Government out of touch on foreign trusts
    John Key’s poor handling of the foreign trusts issue is starkly revealed in a poll today which shows the majority of Kiwis are worried about the country being a tax haven and almost half think the issue has been badly… ...
    5 days ago
  • Government out of touch on foreign trusts
    John Key’s poor handling of the foreign trusts issue is starkly revealed in a poll today which shows the majority of Kiwis are worried about the country being a tax haven and almost half think the issue has been badly… ...
    5 days ago
  • Biggest trade deficit for 7 years a warning for Govt
    The biggest trade deficit for seven years shows the Government can’t be so complacent about the economy and must take action to diversify and encourage exports, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “The biggest driver has been the fall in… ...
    5 days ago
  • Biggest trade deficit for 7 years a warning for Govt
    The biggest trade deficit for seven years shows the Government can’t be so complacent about the economy and must take action to diversify and encourage exports, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “The biggest driver has been the fall in… ...
    5 days ago
  • Government’s record on climate change under fire
      The Royal Society’s latest report on climate change has made it clear that it believes the Government’s current approach to climate change is inadequate, says Labour’s spokesperson on Climate Change Megan Woods.  “The report, ‘Transition to a low-carbon economy… ...
    5 days ago
  • Government’s record on climate change under fire
      The Royal Society’s latest report on climate change has made it clear that it believes the Government’s current approach to climate change is inadequate, says Labour’s spokesperson on Climate Change Megan Woods.  “The report, ‘Transition to a low-carbon economy… ...
    5 days ago
  • Mainfreight director agrees with Labour on rail funding
    Richard Prebble – in the past accused of ruining rail and now a director of Mainfreight – agrees with Labour that secure funding for KiwiRail is the best way to minimise congestion in our major cities, says Labour’s SOEs spokesperson… ...
    5 days ago
  • Mainfreight director agrees with Labour on rail funding
    Richard Prebble – in the past accused of ruining rail and now a director of Mainfreight – agrees with Labour that secure funding for KiwiRail is the best way to minimise congestion in our major cities, says Labour’s SOEs spokesperson… ...
    5 days ago
  • Government to Reserve Bank – Rock or Hard Place?
    The Government’s complacency on the housing crisis and the economy has put the Reserve Bank Governor in a no-win position as he contemplates the OCR tomorrow, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Graeme Wheeler is stuck between a rock and… ...
    5 days ago
  • Government to Reserve Bank – Rock or Hard Place?
    The Government’s complacency on the housing crisis and the economy has put the Reserve Bank Governor in a no-win position as he contemplates the OCR tomorrow, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Graeme Wheeler is stuck between a rock and… ...
    5 days ago
  • John Key’s land tax could push up rents
    A land tax proposed by John Key as the answer to the housing crisis could push up rents and risks having no effect on skyrocketing prices, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “The Government needs to explain why the thousands… ...
    6 days ago
  • Government should ban foreign speculators
    The Prime Minister’s musings about a land tax on non-resident buyers is just more tinkering, and the Government should just ban foreign speculators as the Australian Government has done, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “This is classic John Key.… ...
    6 days ago
  • Government must protect Pharmac as promised
    John Key must tell New Zealanders that he will not bow to pressure from wealthy drug companies or their US negotiators and put Kiwi lives at risk, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says.   “News reports today have the drug… ...
    6 days ago
  • Action not words, needed on housing speculation
    John Key should be taking action to crack down on speculation in our overheated housing market, instead of random musings on land tax, Labour Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford said.  "John Key suggested today on TVNZ's Q and A programme that… ...
    1 week ago
  • Tertiary education cost rising 7x faster than inflation
    New figures show the cost of tertiary education is rising seven times faster than inflation, putting post-school education out of the reach of many, Opposition Leader Andrew Little says.  “Figures release this week show how much more students or their… ...
    1 week ago
  • Buying Lotto is not an arts funding strategy
    The Government must rethink the way the arts are funded after falling Lotto sales has left the sector with declining resources and increasingly vulnerable, Labour’s Arts, Culture and Heritage spokesperson Jacinda Ardern says.  “Our arts sector is in a sorry… ...
    1 week ago
  • Parents hit in pocket by Government under-funding
    Parents and families are left forking out more and more for their kids’ education as a direct result of Government under-funding, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.  “The latest data shows that the cost to families of primary and secondary… ...
    1 week ago
  • Scientists ‘gasping for oxygen’ under National
     Steven Joyce's claims to be creating a science and innovation hub in New Zealand are a sham based on PR fluff, says Labour's Science and Innovation Spokesperson David Cunliffe.  “A damning critique of the science funding model by the New… ...
    1 week ago
  • Scientists ‘gasping for oxygen’ under National
     Steven Joyce's claims to be creating a science and innovation hub in New Zealand are a sham based on PR fluff, says Labour's Science and Innovation Spokesperson David Cunliffe.  “A damning critique of the science funding model by the New… ...
    1 week ago
  • Water for grass
    Last Saturday, my colleague Eugenie Sage took me for a drive across the Canterbury Plains. I had seen from the air the landuse changes across the plains in recent times; a patchwork of crops and stock raising has been transformed… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    1 week ago
  • Water for grass
    Last Saturday, my colleague Eugenie Sage took me for a drive across the Canterbury Plains. I had seen from the air the landuse changes across the plains in recent times; a patchwork of crops and stock raising has been transformed… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    1 week ago
  • Thousands of invalid votes likely after National refuses to change rules
    National’s refusal to make it easier to enrol and vote could result in tens of thousands of votes continuing to be ruled invalid at general elections, Labour’s Justice spokesperson Jacinda Ardern says. The Justice and Electoral select committee today released… ...
    1 week ago
  • Social Development stats don’t add up
    Today’s figures released by the Ministry of Social Development show that despite a drop in the number of beneficiaries, fewer people are going into paid employment or study, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Fonterra sticks with high pollution goal of increasing milk supply
    This week’s reported comments by Fonterra chair John Wilson that dairy “volumes were only going to keep increasing”  are troubling. Mr Wilson was supporting a potential renegotiation of the New Zealand-China Free Trade Agreement (FTA). Under the FTA dairy products such… ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage
    2 weeks ago
  • Coleman’s ‘efficiencies’ strangling health
    New Zealand’s district health boards have made ‘efficiencies’ of more than $672 million over the past five years at the expense of everything from new drugs to elective surgery, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “This is a body blow for… ...
    2 weeks ago

Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere