web analytics
The Standard

Special pleading from the Electricity Authority

Written By: - Date published: 10:17 pm, June 6th, 2013 - 35 comments
Categories: cost of living, david parker - Tags:

Dr Brent Layton of the Electricity Authority has produced a 28-page paper to refute the claims of Molly Melhuish, Dr Geoff Bertram and Bryan Leyland that “the Authority’s approach is a light-touch approach to regulating the electricity markets.”

He says Geoff Bertram’s  chart, showing that other countries’ residential prices have stayed steady or fallen while New Zealand’s have doubled, is “misleading”.  Then he produces his own chart, which shows that other countries’ residential prices have stayed steady or fallen, while New Zealand’s have doubled. Both rate of increase and size of increase are higher in New Zealand than anywhere else.

He claims that to claw back the excess-profit-based revaluations of the past decade would “breach the regulatory compact” established when ECNZ was broken up.  But he has no record to show what that regulatory compact was.  If you go back you’ll find that (a) Max Bradford expected prices to fall following his reforms; and (b) Labour’s Energy Policy 2000 explicitly targeted supply of electricity “at least possible cost”.  The regulatory compact has been breached by the gentailers – all Labour proposes to do is roll back that breach. David Parker has this comment:

Dr Layton crafts arguments about some implicit but undefined regulatory bargain when ECNZ was split up. This is grasping at straws. You would think what is proposed (by Labour) will not pay production costs plus a fair return on capital, when it actually does. You would think new generation choices were being regulated rather than efficiently exposed by competitive tender. You would think that retail competition is being curtailed, when it is being encouraged.

Layton says that forcing prices and asset values down will have a “chilling” effect on weak, fearful investors.  He neglects to take account of the chilling effect for a Porirua family of having their power disconnected in the middle of winter because they can’t pay the bill.  The ‘”chilling” metaphor is particularly inapt when used to defend wealth transfers from the poor to the rich.

35 comments on “Special pleading from the Electricity Authority”

  1. Brent Layton is yet another conflicted commentator who supports the status quo like his job depends on it, because his job does depend on it. As it stands, and apart from the obvious self-interest, his commentary breaches the bounds of credibility with its complete reliance on theoretical arguments, unproven assertions and contradictory statements. It’s a complete joke, and only National’s cheerleaders refuse to see it.

  2. Grumpy 2

    Molly Melhuish was an energy lobbyist used by the pro-Bradford forces to push through the Bradford reforms. She was a frequent guest in the hallowed halls of major players such as Southpower with prime movers such as Laurie, Hodge and darling of the Greens, Roger Sutton.
    It appears she has now changed her mind but her credibility is not in the same league as Leyton.

    • ghostwhowalksnz 2.1

      Max Bradford is still alive and working in Wellington as a lobbyist.

      I think hes behind a lot of the misinformation , both about his so called reforms and the current NZ Power.

      I see his hand in musings f rom Farragoblog about what a wonderful success his now discredited split up of the sector was

    • lprent 2.2

      So what. Don’t you learn from experience. I do when I see the difference between the theoretical vs the practice.

      Evidently Langton is so dependent on his job that it is affecting his ability to do that. He wrote a paper that starts with the theoretical economic model that we were sold and then proceeds to spend the rest of his paper making excuses about why it did not.

      Back when Max Bradford was mooting these reforms, I was uncertain about the effects downstream myself. What was used to push for the reforms was that the precept that privatising parts of the sector would make it more efficient for residential and industrial consumers. It has done the opposite.

      1. Would cause the capital investment to be made to prevent the shortage/glut problem of the previous decades.
      It did not. What we got was smaller capital investments into less capital intensive plants with higher operational costs. We also got steadily closer to the production limits of peak power usage. This is because there hasn’t been a major base load investment since the 80s. The effect is that the system is now configured towards delivery of cheaper base load to industrial, especially heavy industrial consumers while ensuring the residential users get gouged by more expensive peak power from high cost plant.

      2. The productivity of delivery from the private sector would be better than the state system.
      That turns out not to be the case. The electricity sector is now far more bloated with people than it ever was – most of the increase is from sales people. Most of these people are concentrated in the residential market and have to be paid for with higher prices. They certainly don’t add anything to the productivity of the sector except for drawing wages.

      3. That prices would fall from privatising the sector.
      They have not. Prices in all sectors have either remained static or risen. When you look at Layton’s figure 11 where he hides the rise in a interestingly selective graph you see that inflation adjusted power prices have been steadily rising in NZ because of points 1 & 2 and the skimming from the sector from dividends and managerial wages. Meanwhile if you did the same graph showing trend lines from start to finish, you’ll find that pretty much every other country has either static or diminishing power prices. Exactly as was displayed in the indexed prices graph he was criticising.

      We have now had about 15 years of steady prices rises in real terms and virtually no new baseload capacity. I’d call that a failure in terms of what was promised when the sector was partially privatised.

      If you don’t think so, then rather than trying to shoot the messanger for what she was doing 15 years ago, then why don’t you explain how it does fulfill the bullshit that the electorate was sold on? While I’m waiting I’ll go and support for regulating the sector to induce the required types of capital investment.

      • Grumpy 2.2.1

        I agree that the current electricty market is an artificial one, one that pricing is based on an arbitrary return on assets.
        It is high overhead, duplicated rubbish. molly’s position may well be correct and is close to my own but to laud her as some kind of expert is wrong. Either she was wrong then or she is wrong now, either way she is wrong.

        • Draco T Bastard 2.2.1.1

          Either she was wrong then or she is wrong now, either way she is wrong.

          Warning, logic fail detected.

        • lprent 2.2.1.2

          Haven’t read her stuff from the 90’s. Only started reading it some time after 2007. Was looking at the logic rather than the person.

          So what you are saying is that she has long experience with the electricity market? 😈

          Personally I have come to the conclusion that the natural monopolies inherent in the electricity market would make the “natural market” either a monopoly or a cozy duopoly. The competition we have in our system is what is artificial. You only have to look at the degree of implicit collusion that is naturally occurring amongst “competing” firms in almost every area to realise how strong the monopolizing principle is.

  3. Ad 3

    Here’s a quandary from the left: on the one hand, a philosophy of resource austerity from the Greens that tells us we should use a minimum of the world’s resources (particularly water), because it is the right thing to do.

    And on the other hand from the right, a philosophy of austerity that tells us we should use only the world’s resources (particularly water) we can afford.

    There hasn’t been a whole lot of dialogue between the two in this country. The Labour-Green energy policy to me (although I hated its timing) is at least an attempt to be both nationally coherent and price-competitive. It’s at least an invitation to start reconciling two different kinds of permanent austerity together.

    Dr Layton should lift his dialogue to that level.

    • Tom Gould 3.1

      The right say that no-one owns water, whereas the left say that everyone owns water. So the right say it’s free and the left say it’s not. A free resource is pretty attractive to a corporate in the water business – hydro generation or irrigation for example. Could this be crony capitalism?

  4. jps 4

    Good response from Parker. BTW, its Bryan Leyland – Geoff is the Waikato academic.

  5. ghostwhowalksnz 5

    What surprises me is this convoluted reasoning from Layton

    “But it is easy to see that if the Code was changed in this way generators would
    quickly adjust the way they set their offers. In order to maximise their returns
    they would estimate the highest price needed to fully satisfy demand and, if
    they are happy to be dispatched at that price because it is above their actual
    marginal cost, they would pitch their offer at just below that price. ”

    So he says they will game the system to extract highrer prices !

    And yet the current system allows that as well, but he doesnt see that

    • ghostrider888 5.1

      invested interests

    • burt 5.2

      I think he sees that very clearly – but unlike some he seems to also see that this Muldoon era proposal won’t stop what is already happening.

      Guess he’s not singing from the party song sheet pretending that some half baked failed model from yesteryear will work.

      • One Anonymous Knucklehead 5.2.1

        “Failed”? Yesteryear”?

        Neither of these apply to NZPower. Is there some vague remote chance that you might try a reality based argument for once?

        We need better wingnuts.

    • tracey 5.3

      Isn’t it good that he has pointe dit out so the new law can be drafted accordingly

      ““breach the regulatory compact” established when ECNZ was broken up.”

      It won’t breach anything if it is a legislative change. That’s like saying we can’t change any law because it will breach the implicit certainty of having the last law.

  6. geoff 6

    I do wonder if at least some of the rightwing parasites have acknowledged amongst themselves that they’ve sucked too much blood from the punters in punterland.
    The country is increasingly resembling a cadaver and it must have crossed the minds of a few wealthy/powerfuls that it’s probably not in their own interests to actually kill the shackled victim.

    • Tim 6.1

      +1
      (I figure a +1 is OK as I serve out my self-imposed ban from commenting – which I think expires Monday)

      • Tim 6.1.1

        Oh…. and in sympathy for Morrissey … “over on Open Mike” (as the uber-connected would say),
        NZ’s greatest friend to ‘the diversity of mankind’ and the Universe (Jum Mora, and every man’s best friend), seems to be taking a break this Friday, in favour of the ‘Plagiarist-in Chief”. We’ll no doubt see the rediffusion of Oirush ‘pearls of wisdom’ as She (the femme version of the Devil) pumps up her MSM presence.

        (Jum – do the decent thing and follow that other wudda/cudda/shudda been ‘nicest man on the planet’ – (ex RNZ) to the land of the commercial, and the right wing apologencia.)

  7. burt 7

    The ‘”chilling” metaphor is particularly inapt when used to defend wealth transfers from the poor to the rich.

    Yep, when Labour were last in power defending billions in generation profits by saying it was OK because it was generating state revenue rather than private profit – The poor who were unable to pay their power bill must have been very happy that they were forced to turn their heaters off and not pay tax rather than turn their heaters off and not pay CEO’s… How warm they must have been inside knowing that….

    • One Anonymous Knucklehead 7.1

      …and how good is it that they finally got around to doing something about it.

      • burt 7.1.1

        Yeah, cause the same political party that justified forcing old people to shiver by telling them it was for a good cause (state revenue) will suddenly realise they have an election to win and promise that they now care… Must be nice to suddenly not need the revenue they once needed – where is it coming from now ??? A printing press perhaps ?

        • One Anonymous Knucklehead 7.1.1.1

          The economy always does better under Labour led governments (yes, it does), that increases the tax take. I expect the top tax rate to go up too, and of course there’s the CGT.

          Your bitterness is showing; do you have the “time for a change” blues? 😀

          • ghostrider888 7.1.1.1.1

            or Amnesiac Sneaky Feelings 😀

          • burt 7.1.1.1.2

            Right… So the last two Labour governments leaving the economy in recession is a little point that has slipped past you. Guess it’s easy to forget the facts when chanting “Labour good – National bad” like a brainless partisan Knucklehead.

            • McFlock 7.1.1.1.2.1

              8 years of growth followed by the GFC is what you judge Labour on vs National vs Labour.

              I agree that the first ACT government was a fuckup economically (not to mention socially, culturally, ethically, philosophically or practically), though.

        • tracey 7.1.1.2

          As opposed to under the current regime we get increasing power costs and reduced dividends tot he state. I can see how you think that might be a better option burt.

        • tracey 7.1.1.3

          Like the Americans?

    • George D 7.2

      Yeah, Cullen was a evil bastard quite often, prioritising revenues over the good of the country. It’s the same reason TVNZ was allowed to continue its dollar-chasing decline, at the expense of an intelligent and informed public.

      The right of the Labour Party were not sufficiently beaten down to see a return to a fair NZ. 30 years after the start of the Roger Douglas experiment, I think we’re finally beginning to see policies from Labour which reject it completely.

      • tracey 7.2.1

        He caused the Nats much angst because they actually agreed with so much of what he did. maybe that’s why they knighted him 😉

      • Colonial Viper 7.2.2

        30 years after the start of the Roger Douglas experiment, I think we’re finally beginning to see policies from Labour which reject it completely.

        Shit I missed that. Where was the Labour press release on
        – Return to compulsory unionisation
        – Policies of full employment
        – Return of a government Rural Bank and State Insurance
        – Massive government incentives for added value exporters.
        – An unemployment benefit above the poverty line
        – The return of SOEs to non profit public entities
        – True free to air non commercial public broadcasting
        – Free tertiary education
        – etc

    • woodpecker 7.3

      Sooooo. The moneys better off in the pockets of the CEO’s. Good old trickle down eh Burt.

  8. Shaz 8

    Well Fisked Mike – Smithed perhaps!

    The paper reminds me of what my Dad used to say about spurious arguments. “It all makes good sense but only if you start from the premise that the moon is made of green cheese”. The basic fact is the electricity supply regime in NZ is broken in more ways that can be counted on a set of human digits. First of all if the MOM advocates have their way then energy pricing has a chilling effect on investors who want to invest in things other than electricity. The spot pricing for wholesalers buyers is a nonsense, pricing that ignores the cost of production is counter to common sense, pricing that takes no account of carbon intensity and pricing policies that discourage managed use is near criminal. Policies that discourage production at the margins and discourage new startups by small operators are costing NZ dear in jobs, energy security and innovation. How do I loathe thee – let me count the ways :-( .

    Finally I’ve heard Geoff Bertram talk on this issue of power pricing several times and the points made by Mr Leyland are simply not the points he makes.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Troubled school wanted $25,000 dollars to fence farm
    The troubled Whangaruru charter school asked Hekia Parata for $25,000 to fence the school farm at the expense of spending on teaching, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “This unbelievable revelation comes hard on the heels of Hekia Parata’s decision to… ...
    3 hours ago
  • Troubled school wanted $25,000 dollars to fence farm
    The troubled Whangaruru charter school asked Hekia Parata for $25,000 to fence the school farm at the expense of spending on teaching, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “This unbelievable revelation comes hard on the heels of Hekia Parata’s decision to… ...
    3 hours ago
  • Government report on sexual & family violence a good first step
    Yesterday the Government released the cabinet paper on progress on the work programme of the Ministerial Group on Family Violence and Sexual Violence. Along with the Human Rights Commissioner and Women’s Refuge, I really welcome the report. I’m relieved that… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    3 hours ago
  • Government report on sexual & family violence a good first step
    Yesterday the Government released the cabinet paper on progress on the work programme of the Ministerial Group on Family Violence and Sexual Violence. Along with the Human Rights Commissioner and Women’s Refuge, I really welcome the report. I’m relieved that… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    3 hours ago
  • Prisoner voting disqualification and the Bill of Rights Act
    In 2010, National rammed the Electoral (Disqualification of Sentenced Prisoners) Amendment Bill through Parliament. Paul Quinn’s Member’s Bill existed because Paul Quinn thought anyone who’d been imprisoned was a serious offender, and serious offenders had ‘forfeited’ their right to vote.… ...
    GreensBy David Clendon MP
    6 hours ago
  • Mainfreight ‘appalled’ by Government’s rail madness
    The Government has been given a serve by New Zealand-based international trucking and logistics firm Mainfreight which says it lacks a national transport strategy, and has treated rail badly, Labour's Transport spokesperson Phil Twyford says. The company has told shareholders it… ...
    23 hours ago
  • National’s Health and Safety Reform Bill: less safety and fewer rights at...
    The New Zealand Council of Trade Unions is embarking on a campaign to fight the changes that weaken the Health and Safety Reform bill. As part of the campaign the CTU has organised vigils with the display of 291 crosses… ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche MP
    1 day ago
  • All options need to be put on meat sector table
    Farmers must be given every assurance that all potential risks have been considered before Silver Fern Farms opens its door to foreign equity, Labour’s Primary Industries spokesperson Damien O’Connor says. “The ongoing saga involving the meat sector and amalgamation has… ...
    1 day ago
  • Flag the referendum if 50% or more don’t vote
    Labour has moved to have the second flag referendum canned if the first attracts fewer than half the eligible number of voters, Opposition Leader Andrew Little says. “John Key has already wasted more than $8 million on his vanity project… ...
    1 day ago
  • 90,000 cars reclassified in botched ACC ratings
    New figures obtained by Labour show the ACC Minister’s botched motor vehicle levy system has resulted in 90,000 vehicles having to be reclassified so far – at a cost of $6 million, Labour’s ACC spokesperson Sue Moroney says. “Nikki Kaye’s… ...
    1 day ago
  • Brutal health cuts confirmed, crucial services suffer
    Chronic under-funding by National has seen the health budget slashed by $1.7 billion in just five years, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. A report by Infometrics, commissioned by Labour, shows health funding has been cut in four of the… ...
    2 days ago
  • Meth ring under Serco’s nose
    The news that two Serco inmates have been arrested for helping to run a methamphetamine ring from prison should be the final straw and see their contract cancelled, says Labour’s Corrections Spokesperson Kelvin Davis. “National has stood by Serco despite… ...
    2 days ago
  • Ministers failing women and their own targets
    New figures showing just five Ministers have met the Government’s own reduced targets for appointing women to state sector boards is evidence National is failing Kiwi women, Labour’s Women’s Affairs spokesperson Sue Moroney says. “The Ministry for Women’s 2015 Gender… ...
    2 days ago
  • Charges up for some as funding up for grabs
    A proposal being considered by the Government would see some people having to pay more for health care and district health boards forced to fight amongst themselves to fund regional health services, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says “Information leaked… ...
    2 days ago
  • Stop experimenting on kids
    The trouble with the Charter school model is that it is a publicly funded experiment on children. The National Government has consistently put its desire to open charter schools ahead of the safety of the children in them, ignoring repeated… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    3 days ago
  • Bank puts the squeeze on mid Canterbury farmers
    News that an unnamed bank in Ashburton has put a receiver on notice over financially vulnerable farmers will send a chill through rural New Zealand, says Labour’s Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson. “The Government needs to work with  New Zealand’s banks… ...
    3 days ago
  • Key is trading away New Zealand land and homes
    John Key yesterday admitted what National dishonestly refused to confirm in Parliament last week – he is trading away New Zealand’s right to control who buys our homes and land, says Opposition leader Andrew Little. “The Prime Minister must now… ...
    3 days ago
  • Razor gang takes scalpel to health
    Plans by the Government to take a scalpel to democratically elected health boards are deceitful and underhand, coming just months after an election during which they were never signalled, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says “Leaked documents reveals a radical… ...
    3 days ago
  • Spin lines show a department in chaos
    Corrections Spin Doctors sending their place holder lines to journalists instead of responding to serious allegations shows the scale of chaos at the department over the Serco scandal, says Labour’s Corrections Spokesperson Kelvin Davis. “As more and more serious allegations… ...
    5 days ago
  • Court ruling shows law should never have been passed
    A High Court ruling that a law banning prisoners from voting is inconsistent with a properly functioning democracy should be a wake-up call for the Government, Labour’s Justice spokesperson Jacinda Ardern says. In an unprecedented ruling Justice Paul Heath has… ...
    6 days ago
  • Judicial Review Gamble Pays Off for Problem Gambling Foundation
    Congratulations are due to the Problem Gambling Foundation (PGFNZ) who have won their legal case around how the Ministry of Health decided to award their contracts for problem gambling services to another service provider. Congratulations are due not just for… ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche MP
    6 days ago
  • Environmental Protection Agency appoints GE advocate as new CEO
    This week, the Environmental Protection Authority Amendment Bill passed its first reading in Parliament. The Bill puts protection of the environment into the core purpose of the Environmental Protection Authority. This month, Dr Allan Freeth, the former Chief Executive of… ...
    GreensBy Steffan Browning MP
    6 days ago
  • Charanpreet Dhaliwal death demands genuine health and safety reform
    The killing of a security guard on his first night on the job is exactly the kind of incident that National’s watered-down health and safety bill won’t prevent, says Te Atatu MP Phil Twyford. The coronial inquest into 22-year-old Charanpreet… ...
    6 days ago
  • Arbitrary sanctions hit children hardest
    Increasing numbers of single parents are being penalised under a regime that is overly focussed on sanctions rather than getting more people into work, Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni says. “Figures, obtained through Parliamentary questions show 3000 more sanctions,… ...
    6 days ago
  • Hekia just won’t face the facts
    Hekia Parata’s decision to keep troubled Whangaruru Charter school open despite being presented with a catalogue of failure defies belief, goes against official advice and breaks a Government promise to close these schools if they were failing, says Labour’s Education… ...
    6 days ago
  • No more silent witnesses
    Yesterday I attended the launch of a new initiative developed by and for Asian, Middle eastern and African youth to support young people to name and get support if there is domestic violence at home. The impact on children of… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    6 days ago
  • Single Use Plastic Bags campaign – Some wins and some green-washing
    As we near the end of Plastic Free July I’m nearing the conclusion of my Say No To Plastic Bag tour when I will have completed all 30 of my public meetings. The campaign was designed to work with community… ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche MP
    6 days ago
  • Single Use Plastic Bags campaign – Some wins and some green-washing
    As we near the end of Plastic Free July I’m nearing the conclusion of my Say No To Plastic Bag tour when I will have completed all 30 of my public meetings. The campaign was designed to work with community… ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche MP
    6 days ago
  • Minister must take responsibility for problem gambling debacle
    The Government’s handling of the Problem Gambling Foundation’s axing in a cost-cutting exercise has been ham-fisted and harmful to some of the most vulnerable people in society, Associate Health Labour spokesperson David Clark says.“Today’s court ruling overturning the axing of… ...
    7 days ago
  • Labour will not support TPP if it undermines NZ sovereignty
    The Labour Party will not support the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement unless key protections for New Zealanders are met, Opposition leader Andrew Little says.“Labour supports free trade. However, we will not support a TPP agreement that undermines New Zealand’s sovereignty. ...
    1 week ago
  • Coleman can’t ignore latest warnings
    Resident doctors have advised that a severe staffing shortage at North Shore Hospital is putting patients’ lives at risk, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. “They say a mismatch between staffing levels and patient workloads at North Shore has… ...
    1 week ago
  • ACC must remove barriers to appeals
    The Government must prioritise removing barriers to justice for ACC claimants following a damning report by Acclaim Otago, Labour’s ACC spokesperson Sue Moroney says. “ACC Minister Nikki Kaye must urgently scrap her flawed plan to remove claimant’s right to redress… ...
    1 week ago
  • Six months’ paid parental leave back on the agenda
    Six months’ paid parental leave is back on the agenda and a step closer to reality for Kiwi parents after Labour’s new Member’s Bill was pulled from today’s ballot, the Bill’s sponsor and Labour MP Sue Moroney says. “My Bill… ...
    1 week ago
  • Sole parents at risk of having no income
    New requirements for sole parents to undertake a reapplication process after a year is likely to mean a large number will face benefit cancellations, but not because they have obtained work, Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni says. “Increasing numbers… ...
    1 week ago
  • Juking the Welfare Stats Again
    Last week the government’s major initiative to combat child poverty (a paltry $25 increase) was exposed for what it is, a lie. The Government, through the Budget this year, claims to be engaging in the child poverty debate, but instead,… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    1 week ago
  • OCR rate cut a result of flagging economy
    The Reserve Bank's decision to cut the Official Cash Rate to 3 per cent shows there is no encore for the so-called 'rock star' economy, says Labour's Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson.   "Today's interest rate cut comes off the back… ...
    1 week ago
  • Reboot to an innovation economy, an Internet economy and a clean economy
    In my short 33 years on this planet we’ve seen phenomenal technological, economic and social change, and it’s realistic to expect the next 33 will see even more, even faster change. You can see it in the non-descript warehouse near… ...
    GreensBy Gareth Hughes MP
    1 week ago
  • Bill that puts the environment into the EPA passes first hurdle
    A Bill that puts the environment squarely into legislation governing the Environmental Protection Authority passed its first reading today, says Meka Whaitiri.  “I introduced this member’s bill as the current law doesn’t actually make protecting the environment a goal of… ...
    1 week ago
  • Key’s KiwiSaver deception exposed
    KiwiSaver statistics released today expose John Key's claim that the cutting of the kickstart payment "will not make a blind bit of difference to the number of people who join KiwiSaver” to be duplicitous, says Labour Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson.  “Official… ...
    1 week ago
  • Minimum Wage Amendment Bill to protect contractors
    All New Zealanders should be treated fairly at work. Currently, the law allows non-employment relationships to be used to get around the minimum wage. This is unfair, says Labour MP David Parker. “The Minimum Wage (Contractor Remuneration) Amendment Bill, a… ...
    1 week ago
  • Bill raises bar to protect Kiwi farmland
    The Government’s rubber-stamping of every one of the nearly 400 applications from overseas investors to buy New Zealand farm land over the last three years proves tougher laws are needed, Labour MP Phil Goff says. “In the last term of… ...
    1 week ago
  • Costly flag referendum should be dumped
    John Key must ditch the flag referendum before any more taxpayer money is wasted, Opposition Leader Andrew Little says. “Millions of dollars could be saved if the Prime Minister called a halt to this hugely expensive, and highly unpopular, vanity… ...
    1 week ago
  • Nats letting Serco off scot free
    Government members have prevented Parliament’s Law and Order select committee from getting answers out of a senior Serco director about the fight clubs being run at Mt Eden prisons, says Labour’s Corrections Spokesperson Kelvin Davis. “At today’s Law and Order… ...
    1 week ago
  • Charter school experiment turns into shambles
    The National Government’s charter school experiment has descended into chaos and it’s time for Hekia Parata to stop trying to cover up the full extent of the problems, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “The Education Minister must release all… ...
    1 week ago
  • Disconnect between rates and income must be fixed
    Local Government New Zealand’s 10 Point Plan is a chance to stop the widening chasm between the rates some households are charged and their ability to pay, Labour’s Local Government spokesperson Su’a William Sio says. “There is a huge disconnect… ...
    1 week ago
  • Parole and ‘surviving the first year’
    “Intensive psychological treatment and early release to parole is far more effective at reducing reoffending among high risk prisoners than serving out the full prison sentence.” That’s reportedly the finding of Surviving the First Year, a recently-released study into Corrections’… ...
    GreensBy David Clendon MP
    1 week ago
  • Parole and ‘surviving the first year’
    “Intensive psychological treatment and early release to parole is far more effective at reducing reoffending among high risk prisoners than serving out the full prison sentence.” That’s reportedly the finding of Surviving the First Year, a recently-released study into Corrections’… ...
    GreensBy David Clendon MP
    1 week ago
  • If it’s good enough for Lake Taupō…
    Nick Smith supports helping farmers transition away from dairying and agrees we must set nitrogen caps that limit the number of animals on farms. He says this strategy is “world leading”. However we need action and pressure from him, on to… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    1 week ago
  • The importance of swamp kauri for climate research
    As early as 2010, international climate scientists were expressing concern at the rate of ancient swamp kauri extraction in Northland. Swamp kauri provides one of the best sources in the world for measuring climate fluctuations over the last 30,000 years.… ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage MP
    1 week ago
  • Govt needs to heed warnings on med students
    The Government is being urged to act on advice it has received about the negative impact its seven year study cap will have on hundreds of medical students, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. “The 7EFTS lifetime limit unfairly disadvantages… ...
    1 week ago

Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere