web analytics
The Standard
Advertising

Towards a more inequal New Zealand

Written By: - Date published: 7:41 am, February 27th, 2013 - 30 comments
Categories: class war, minimum wage - Tags:

The average CEO got a 10% pay rise last year. The average worker got 2.6%. Minimum wage workers will get 1.9% – a 25 cent an hour token gesture. And 30,000 fewer of us have jobs than a year ago and are not earning at all any more. And now we learn the finance sector sucked $440m more out of us last year – a total of $4 billion. No wonder the planes to Aussie are full.

30 comments on “Towards a more inequal New Zealand”

  1. geoff 1

    My guess is the next unemployment figure is going to be over 8%, or that the participation rate is even lower. Maybe both!

    • fatty 1.1

      Moving to OZ at this time of the year is pretty tempting, I’m sure many are going to leave.
      Perhaps its time Labour started campaigning in Australia – how many of their voters are living over there now?..If people continue to jump the ditch, 2014 will become more difficult to win. Getting kiwis in Aussie to vote will be difficult…they have BBQs, beer, pockets full of cash and sun to distract them.

      • Austral.Asian 1.1.1

        Stereotypes, fatty.

        Some remember their heritage .. for a while, but the daily struggle for survival
        in a slowing Australian economy soon takes precedence.

        • fatty 1.1.1.1

          What do you mean stereotypes?
          I think you missed my point…I have no idea what your point is

  2. johnm 2

    An economy of well paid conceited and arrogant chiefs, but declining numbers of braves and the remaining braves getting shafted by the chiefs. Not a happy tribe with a good future. :-(

  3. vto 3

    The minimum wage should be raised each year by the larger of politicians annual salary increases or CEO’s annual pay increases.

    Why not?

    What would be unfair about it?

    Gosman? tsmithfield? burt the spurt? anyone?

  4. Weta 4

    Zetetic .. the correct grammar in Aotearoan English should be

    “Towards a More *Unequal* New Zealand”.

    Have you read Golding’s “Lord of the Flies” ?

    It is a great analogy for what is happening at the moment.

  5. Coronial Typer 5

    Anyone got GINI measurements to compare NZ with specific Australian states?

    Is inequality really an emigration driver? Would have thought opportunity would be a more pertinent motivator.

    • fatty 5.1

      yes, my guess is that opportunity is the reason people go to Australia. But, the reason there are no opportunities here is that we have too much inequality.
      So, opportunity is the reason, but inequality is the cause

      • Draco T Bastard 5.1.1

        As the wealth accumulates into fewer and fewer hands the opportunities available decline as those with the wealth hang on to it more and more.

  6. So NZ signed a deal with the US with regards to our food safety. What does that mean? Well, for starters the second guy at the FDA is a Monzanto guy and guess what? We are going to cut some red tape with regards to “potential” regulatory burden: What does that mean? Watch Farmageddon and find out!

    • TheContrarian 6.1

      Yeah, don’t think you are on the right page, conspiracy boy.

      • Tom 6.1.1

        To TheContrarian: Has Monsanto, the FDA, the USA, the NZ and/or any other government directly or indirectly instructed or requested that you write supporting any of their actions, policies or positions, or helped to organize or in any way supported you in making any writings?

  7. Polish Pride 7

    Well you have a govt which is right of centre and deals in corporate welfare.
    You like all countries have a monetary system.
    Those on the left want to redistribute wealth away from the wealthy in the form of taxation to various social programmes and benefits (unemployment, sickness and so on)

    Those on the right want to redistribute wealth in the opposite direction.
    The mechanisms that they use to do this are..
    Taxation which is then used to redistribute wealth away from workers to the shareholding class through corporate welfare and tax breaks.
    The other mechanism that they use is the company CEO. His/her role is to have the corporation running as ‘efficiently’ as possible.
    The tools he/she uses to do this are:
    Restructures – designed to take out layers of middle management on mass.
    Automation – designed to replace the jobs that workers do enabling further restructures to eliminate more of the companies workforce whilst retaining or in some cases increasing productivity (machines and computer systems can work 24/7 and don’t require a lunch break.
    Offshoring – designed to send those jobs that are still required, overseas where pay rates are lower and labour laws are more flexible or non existent.
    Govt Grants and tax breaks – free money from the tax payer. But you need to be in the right industry to be able to take advantage of this one.
    In order to ‘incentivise’ CEOs to achieve these goals they are paid higher and higher sums. This is why you have a more and more unequal system. But you always will with the current system.

    The other thing the right does is keep the middle class focussed on
    A: how much money the left wants to take from them in the way of taxes for their social policies
    B: the number of Unemployed receiving a benefit and contributing nothing to society (beneficiaries bad)
    C: That it is businesses and corporates that supply much needed jobs (Jobs good, Corporations good, beneficiaries bad, left wing govt wanting to take more of your money bad).

    Of course you have more than half of the working and middle class that buy the rhetoric and vote right. Then because of the effects of the Rwing policies that lead cuts to things that the workers and middle class need. Things like health education, public service etc. All of this including cuts to benefits leads to less people working, less money being spent in the economy, businesses find it harder, not as much profit, have to lay off staff through restructure, less people spending money, economy shrinks………..Until people again decide to vote left.

    This whole process is then repeated over and over in many countries around the world.
    This is the reason that all we ever do is shift a little to the right, then a little to the left, then right, then left
    But nothing ever really changes
    It is the Left vs Right paradigm and is why the system fails to ever fix the real problems we face. (It can’t) and why the system doesn’t work.
    But you will persist and will continue to cry Left Left Left. And when your party is in power you will think that all is right with the world again.
    The problems won’t get fixed (I don’t mean tinkered with, I mean fixed) they never do.
    Then they will inevitably be voted out and replaced by the R wing govt again.
    You will scratch your heads and ask why?
    You will say we must do this or we must do that, You will say our leader is shit, we must replace him/her.
    All the while not realising that it is just that time within the system, and while the current system remains it will never change. +

    Can the problems we have be fixed. Yes of course! But not by Labour or National. Not by Mana, the Greens or any other political party. And of course not by the current system.

    • Colonial Viper 7.1

      The hammer of climate change and energy depletion is coming down.

      Pretty soon the accumulated billions of the wealthy ain’t going to be worth what they think its worth.

      • Polish Pride 7.1.1

        Yes there could very well be more and more devastating weather events that will affect and potentially kill millions but we have already seen evidence around the world in many countries of militarisation of the police force, changes to legislation to remove freedoms and increase survelance. The smaller the population becomes, the easier it is to control. For many, what you say might well be the case. For those at the top I don’t think that this will matter. Hell if I was them it would be part of the plan.

    • Draco T Bastard 7.2

      Can the problems we have be fixed. Yes of course! But not by Labour or National. Not by Mana, the Greens or any other political party.

      A political party could fix them if they got into government and they were willing to accept tat the current system doesn’t work and thus be willing to replace the current system

      Don’t see that happening with the current political parties though :(

      • Polish Pride 7.2.1

        DTC – This I do agree with and for it to even be possible a significant percentage of the population would need to wake up to and understand the failings of the system.

        • Draco T Bastard 7.2.1.1

          That’s why we have sites like this – to help educate people about the shortcomings of the present system. Once people know that and start questioning even more then enough will, eventually, become knowledgeable enough to demand such a change. The problem is that the people who believe otherwise are trying to prevent that needed change.

  8. Polish Pride 8

    Please don’t be surprised by this. This is the system you continue to vote for each time.

    • Colonial Viper 8.1

      You don’t get to vote for “the system” in NZ elections. Well, except very occasionally through MMP referenda etc

      • Polish Pride 8.1.1

        You know my thoughts on this – your vote is participation in and therefore tacit approval of the system

        • QoT 8.1.1.1

          ‘Cause Gods forbid anyone even attempt incremental improvements instead of raeg-quitting when they can’t have earthshattering regime change overnight.

          • Polish Pride 8.1.1.1.1

            perhaps you should read my original post again. Perhaps you should inform those living in poverty and those in war torn countries just wait a few more centuries were busy making incremental changes here.
            The changes that need to be made will not be made by any of the existing parties. None of them have the first clue on what the problems are that a good system needs to solve.
            Here’s a clue it’s neither of the problems mentioned above.

          • Polish Pride 8.1.1.1.2

            Perhaps you should reread my original post. The system is incapable of solving the problems. Better yet send out a memo to all those living in poverty, living with war, living in substandard housing or not able to afford a house, just hang on a few more centuries, we’re busy making incremental changes over here.

            The current parties will not solve the problems. They do not even know the primary problem that the system needs to solve. At best they tinker around the edges (this will be the incremental changes you refer to) and make changes that will improve something a tad for one group but create another problem elsewhere.

            Sorry but things are getting worse not better and it is time to stop pissing about with incremental changes. What I am doing is hardly rage-quitting I simply have my eyes open to the failings of the system and the parties within it so prefer to spend my time and energy helping people understand why things are getting worse, not better and will only continue to do so. I see no point in supporting (voting) something that will not give us the outcomes we want and will result in making a section of the populations lives worse in doing so by the actions of which ever party is in power.

          • Polish Pride 8.1.1.1.3

            apologies for the double post – my screen crashed on submitting the first one so I didn’t think it had registered.

  9. Michael 9

    New Zealand currently leads Australia in the race to the bottom. Low wages and relatively high living costs drive migration from NZ to Oz. The picture may be starting to change with the slowdown in the Australian economy, especially if it extends to the minerals sector. If employment opportunities in Oz contract, look for signs of NZers desperate to return home – and of the Oz government keen to see them go.

  10. The Chairman 10

    Simon Bridges announced a 25-cent increase in the minimum wage, saying he wanted to balance protecting low income earners, employers, and jobs.

    He said there comes a point when you are putting people out of jobs and was clear $15 an hour would put people out of jobs.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/busi ness/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&o bjectid=10867938

    There also comes a point when the question needs to be asked, how long can we continue to sustain poorly performing businesses that can’t afford to pay a living wage?

    These poor investment choices, paying poor returns, are a drag on our overall economy.

    When are we going to address that balance?

    We can’t afford to continue paying low wages to sustain poorly performing businesses.

    A correction is required.

    Lifting the minimum wage will help drive the required change in investment.

Important links

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

1 2 3 7

  • 50 cents? Makes no sense.
    The minimum wage rose by 50 cents this month from 14.25 to 14.75. While it’s a small step towards ensuring minimum workers get a fair share, it’s important to remember that real wages only rose 1.5% while productivity rose by… ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche MP
    8 hours ago
  • The Serco corrections circus
    It should seem obvious to employers, private or public, that it’s important to do what you can to retain your best, most experienced staff. They make life easier for you because they’re effective, attentive and often respected by those around… ...
    GreensBy David Clendon MP
    10 hours ago
  • Time for NZ to prohibit the killing of great apes
    That ban was widely hailed, and spurred efforts in other countries to get similar bans. However, apes are still being exploited, abused and killed, both in captivity and in the wild. Examples of cruelty, neglect and abuse abound. Apes are… ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers MP
    3 days ago
  • Auckland building consents: Tragic
    The only word to describe the latest building consent figures for Auckland is ‘tragic’, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “Whatever the Government is doing to address the Auckland housing crisis, it is clearly not working. ...
    3 days ago
  • A whiff of a new biosecurity scandal?
    A pest which could create havoc for New Zealand’s horticulture and agriculture sector must be as much a focus for the Government as hunting out fruit flies, Labour’s Biosecurity spokesperson Damien O’Connor says. “While the Ministry for Primary Industries is… ...
    3 days ago
  • Government shrugs off health sector crisis
    Despite new evidence showing that cuts to health spending are costing lives the Government continues to deny the sector is struggling, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says. “Health services in New Zealand are in crisis. ...
    4 days ago
  • Parata lowered the bar for failing charter school
    When Hekia Parata became aware that the Whangaruru charter school was experiencing major problems her first action was to drop standards by reducing the number of qualified teachers they had to employ, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins has revealed. “Hekia… ...
    4 days ago
  • National not being straight about the economy
    John Key and Bill English need to be straight with New Zealanders about the damage their failure to diversify the economy is doing, after new figures show export growth plunged due to a collapse in dairy exports, says Grant Robertson.… ...
    4 days ago
  • Mind the Gap
    This week the International Monetary Fund released a report on the wider economic value in closing the gender pay gap. When even the bastions of free-market economics start to raise concerns about gender pay gaps, we have to realise how… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    4 days ago
  • Labour will hold National to parental leave promise
    Labour will hold National to its promise to increase the support given to new parents of premature, multiple birth and babies born with disabilities, Labour’s paid parental leave campaigner Sue Moroney says. "I am naturally disappointed that after battling for… ...
    5 days ago
  • It was all just pillar talk
    Steven Joyce’s confession that he can no longer guarantee a pillar-free design for the New Zealand International Convention Centre shows the Government has abandoned its dream of creating an ‘iconic’ ‘world-class’ structure, says Labour Economic Development spokesperson David Clark. “Steven… ...
    5 days ago
  • Australians move on offshore speculators
    John Key might want to have a quiet word with Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott about Canberra's just-announced crack down on offshore speculators when he visits New Zealand this week, Labour's Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says."Tony Abbott's centre right government… ...
    5 days ago
  • Government at odds on overseas driver crashes
    National backbencher Jacqui Dean has spoken out about overseas driver crashes, putting herself at odds with Prime Minister John Key who is on record as saying it’s not a big issue, Labour’s Transport spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “I’m not surprised… ...
    5 days ago
  • Human Rights and the Palestine Crisis
    Last week I heard two Palestinians speak at Wellington events about the ongoing crisis in their country. Samar Sabawi spoke to a full house about the history of Palestine and gave us a lucid and disturbing account of the situation… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    5 days ago
  • Time to take real care of our kids
    An Amnesty International report has once again criticised New Zealand’s track record on looking after our kids, Labour’s Children’s spokesperson Jacinda Ardern says. The annual report, which looks at global human rights abuses highlights not only the fact that high… ...
    5 days ago
  • John Key wrong about Labour’s war vote
    John Key’s desperate claims that the former Labour Government didn’t put combat troop deployment to a Parliamentary vote are simply wrong, Labour’s Defence spokesperson Phil Goff says. “It was disgraceful that the Prime Minister ran rough shod over democracy and… ...
    5 days ago
  • Māori language bill needs work
     It is clear that the first draft of the Māori Language Bill was about structures and funding rather than the survival of te reo Māori, Labour’s Māori Development Spokesperson Nanaia Mahuta says.  “Labour is pleased that the Minister of Māori… ...
    5 days ago
  • Report proves troubled school shouldn’t have opened
    The long-awaited release of an Education Review Office report into Northland’s troubled Whangaruru charter school proves it should never have been approved in the first place, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “This report identifies problems with absenteeism and disengaged… ...
    6 days ago
  • Reply to PM’s statement on deploying troops to Iraq
    “The decision of any Government to send troops to a conflict zone is a very serious one, and it is right that this House takes time to consider it, to debate it, and, ideally, to vote on it, but we… ...
    6 days ago
  • Minister must take action on death trap slides
    Workplace Relations Safety Minister Michael Woodhouse must take urgent action to ensure inflatable amusement rides don’t become death traps for children, Labour’s spokesperson on Labour Relations Iain Lees-Galloway says. “No one wants to stop kids having fun, but horror stories… ...
    6 days ago
  • Manus Island and the New Zealand Government
    This week the Greens have participated in awareness activity about Manus Island, the refugee camp on an island in Papua New Guinea where Australia dumps asylum seekers. John Key says that he has every confidence in the Australian Government’s claim… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Election Inquiry – Getting accessible voting on the agenda
    James Shaw has been doing a series of blogs on the Election Inquiry into last year’s general election.  I thought this was a great opportunity to raise an issue very dear to me – accessible voting. Last year’s general election… ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers MP
    2 weeks ago
  • RMA changes no solution to Christchurch housing
    Housing will continue to be a big issue in 2015. The latest Consumer Price Index, released last month, shows both good news and bad news on the housing front. After years of being the most expensive place to build a… ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Saving kokako in South Auckland’s Hunua Ranges
    It is amazing that you can hear the song of the endangered North Island kokako in South Auckland’s Hunua Ranges, less than 50 kms from the central city. A heavy schedule of policy workshops at the Green Party’s Policy… ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Let’s not turn a blind eye to human rights
    The Cricket World Cup has just opened in New Zealand, and it’s an opportunity for us to shine on the world stage. International sport can be a chance for us to build relationships with other countries, and examine what it… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Its Just Not Cricket
    This week it was my privilege to work with Sri Lankan Tamil communities in this country and host Australian journalist and human rights advocate Trevor Grant. I knew a bit about Trevor from his biography but I didn’t know just… ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Time for NZ to #BeCrueltyFree
    The Government is about to progress the final stages of the Animal Welfare Amendment bill. This will be our last opportunity to get changes made to improve the bill to ensure a better outcome for animals. I have put forwards… ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers MP
    2 weeks ago
  • We want access!
    Access to buildings is a big issue for many New Zealanders. It looks like that, due to the hard work and persistence of people in the disability community, the Government may finally be starting to take access to buildings seriously.… ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Greens call on Super Fund to divest from fossil fuels
    The Green Party today called on the New Zealand Superannuation Fund (the Fund) to divest from fossil fuels, starting immediately with coal. The call was accompanied with a new report, Making money from a climate catastrophe: The case for divesting… ...
    GreensBy Russel Norman MP
    2 weeks ago
  • Young Kiwis’ housing crisis
    Shelter is a fundamental human need along with food, water and clean air. All humans need adequate shelter; it’s a human right. Warm, safe, stable accommodation is critical for young people to be able learn and grow and just be.… ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie MP
    3 weeks ago

Removed at the request of The Daily Blog.
Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere