web analytics

Waldegrave responds to ‘Living Wage’ critique

Written By: - Date published: 3:17 pm, February 5th, 2014 - 45 comments
Categories: Economy, wages - Tags: ,

Charles Waldegrave has slammed Brian Scott’s critique of the method used to calculate the Living Wage in New Zealand.

In a detailed and interesting analysis, he addresses the databases used to develop the Living Wage and compares the New Zealand approach with that of other countries. He shows Scott’s critique, and that of the Treasury, lack an informed understanding of the definition of a living wage and confuse market wage rates and welfare transfers.

He also demonstrates how Scott selectively applies international comparative data and consistently misapplies the use of Statistics New Zealand’s Household Economic Survey database. Further, he states Scott provides no evidence for his assertions about the negative impacts of the living wage on workplace morale and productivity.

Waldegrave cites the evidence of the balance of studies that have shown positive business and economic outcomes from living wage policies internationally.

*The living wage level was set at $18.40 per hour in February 2013. Scott’s paper has been given prominence on David Farrar’s Kiwiblog 3 January 2014

 

 

 

45 comments on “Waldegrave responds to ‘Living Wage’ critique”

  1. Disraeli Gladstone 1

    “It is not suggested that the minimum wage be lifted to the level of the living wage.
    They are quite separate entities.”

    I sometimes feel like that get lost in translation to both the left and right. The right goes “oh no! look at this massive increase” and the left goes “everybody gets it!”

    It shouldn’t be statutorily enforced. I like the London scheme which is similar to a fair trade badge. You get the logo if you pay the living wage. I’d certainly tailor that knowledge into where I shop.

    • framu 1.1

      thats pretty much my view as well (living wage, not minimum wage)

      yes the market can decide – and the purchaser is as much a part of the market as the employer (and the use of the badge is a good idea). But theres no reason why the govt (who is a player in the market too) cant lead the way

      it will only work by showing it works and by building the expectation and demand. It wont work and is too easily undone if its a top down imposed thing

    • McFlock 1.2

      personally, I’d want very good reasons why the minimum wage is not set at a living-wage level.

      As always ( 🙂 ) I’d be looking for a phased increase rather than a blanket dictat, but everyone is entitled to live in dignity and participate in society. That includes a right to work 35-40 hrs per week, and to work only 35-40hrs per week.

      I was amused that Waldegrave’s response had to continually address the fact that tories have no idea what “dignity” means, and that it’s not the same as “minimum”.

      • weka 1.2.1

        “but everyone is entitled to live in dignity and participate in society”

        What would you do with benefit rates in that case?

        • One Anonymous Knucklehead 1.2.1.1

          +1 Weka.

          Set benefit rates at living wage rates. Or don’t you want to live in high waged economy? Politics of envy handicap?

        • McFlock 1.2.1.2

          probably along the lines of what oak said above, especially for longer term benefits. Ideally the unemployment benefit is a bridging benefit, but that requires full employent policies

      • Lanthanide 1.2.2

        The only argument I could think for why the living wage should not be the minimum is that the living wage is targeted at families with particular assumptions in mind. There are many single people or small families that could ‘live’ well on a lesser amount, and similarly many families that would need more than the calculated living wage to ‘live’ well, particularly if they have high-needs family members.

        Of course the minimum wage should be $15, preferably $16, so the leap from there to $18.40 isn’t all that much.

        • just saying 1.2.2.1

          …there are many single people or small families that could ‘live’ well on a lesser amount,…

          Sure,
          If they were puritans, exceptional budgeters, already set-up with low miaintenance, free or affordable accomodation, and hit no unexpected bumps along the road….ever

          Unless you mean short-term……but for many, many, people, it’s not. And even short term in the best of all possible circumstances, why shouldn’t workers be allowed to splurge a little – have a nice meal, a holiday once in a while…..

          • Lanthanide 1.2.2.1.1

            Sure,
            If they were puritans, exceptional budgeters, already set-up with low miaintenance, free or affordable accomodation, and hit no unexpected bumps along the road….ever

            Note that I’m suggesting a minimum wage of $16, and that therefore someone who was single could ‘live well’ for $16/hour.

            If you’re saying that the difference between $16 and $18.40 is so marked that all of the things you’ve mentioned here are true, for a single person, then I can only conclude that you would also consider $18.40 to be too little to raise a family on, which is what the living wage was calculated for.

            • just saying 1.2.2.1.1.1

              If you are working fulltime on $16 per hour an extra $2.40 per hour is not “chump change” it could mean you could afford to see the dentist, for example.

              Btw, I live quite well on less because I’m pretty well-set-up (though not a puritan). But when that bump comes I’m fucked, and you know what? – that’s an incessant life-sapping stress.

          • gem 1.2.2.1.2

            +1 But somehow the commensurate argument about the top of the scale never gains traction; i.e why on earth does the head of an SOE need 50 times or more the minimum wage? The double standard is a bit like John Galbraith’s ‘private opulence and public squalor’, except now we have a quasi corporate public sector where the head of the postal service gets 28 times the minimum wage.

        • karol 1.2.2.2

          It evens out in the long run as people’s circumstances change. Most single people will eventually have children. Most people with children will eventually be empty nesters. Several along the way will have others to care for – older people, injured, sick or disabled, etc.

          Good if one can have a few good times before having children. Maybe also save a little.

          • Lanthanide 1.2.2.2.1

            Yes, savings is a good point I hadn’t really considered.

            Anyway, I said that was the only argument I could think of, I’m not necessarily putting that forwards myself. Like I said in the post, I’m in favour of a minimum wage of $16, and I see $2.40 as being chump-change on top of that (extra 15%), so while I wouldn’t necessarily support a raise to $18.40, I also wouldn’t oppose it.

        • stargazer 1.2.2.3

          “the living wage is targeted at families with particular assumptions in mind. There are many single people or small families that could ‘live’ well on a lesser amount, and similarly many families that would need more than the calculated living wage to ‘live’ well, particularly if they have high-needs family members.”

          the living wage is based on a family of 2 adults & 2 children, with one person working 40 hours per week & the other working 20 hours per week. a single person wouldn’t be getting the wage from the additional 20 hours. the living wage also takes into account working for families entitlements. a single person without kids would not get any working for families payments.

          so taking both those things into account, a single person would be getting a significantly lesser amount in terms of their overall income. bigger families would get a higher working for families entitlement, so a higher level of overall income.

          • Lanthanide 1.2.2.3.1

            Thanks stargazer, I wasn’t aware of those specific details.

            In that case yes, $18.40 for a single person seems like a reasonable rate.

    • KJT 1.3

      A minimum wage should be at the same level as a “living” wage.

      Why should your employees, subsidise, your business?

      Capitalism 101. Businesses which cannot pay the true costs of the resources they use, including people, should be allowed to fail, to make room for those who can use their inputs more effectively.

      • Disraeli Gladstone 1.3.2

        The true costs of the resources they use (people) is not the living wage. The true cost isn’t even the minimum wage. It would be what the market decides (probably far below the minimum wage).

        That’s why we have statutory guarantees on a wage limit because capitalism would lead to an effective minimum wage that would be far too low.

        So, no. Not really Capitalism 101.

  2. One Anonymous Knucklehead 2

    Waldegrave clearly doesn’t understand how right wing facts work. His work has been subjected to a process of denial therefore it is flawed. No fact-based analysis can compete with this.

    • Macro 2.1

      Sad but true.

    • QoT 2.2

      At some point we really do have to let go of the idea we can convince the right with facts. They don’t want the people at the bottom of the ladder to have fulfilled, satisfying lives. They cannot be reasoned with on this point.

      • One Anonymous Bloke 2.2.1

        I think the best strategy is to make their arguments the subject of ridicule.

      • RedLogix 2.2.2

        Yes. When I contemplate the gulf between the two ways of thinking – I’m tempted by the idea that there must be some irreducible genetic difference. By alas therein lies the madness of eugenics.

        I have this clear memory of an old picture from a mountain equipment catalog from the 1980’s. It was a gorgeous photo of a climber casually cooking dinner, while ensconced in a suspended bivvy dangling on one of the massive vertical faces in the Yosemite. The contrast between the eerie exposure of his position, with the domestic familiarity of what he was doing was the striking element. The caption said, “humans are the most adaptable species”.

        I guess that is what I hang onto – that we are all inherently capable of adapting to new circumstances. Change the circumstance and most people will change with it.

        Humans have arrived at one of the extremes of our adaptability. We’re an highly agonist, hierarchical and competitive society, and we are so heavily adapted to it we have trouble imagining an alternative. Or perhaps more to the point, most people have so much personal energy invested into the adaptation they really cannot let go.

        It’s my observation that it’s takes something bigger than the individual to trigger that letting go, to allow the possibility of transformation. Traditionally it has been a belief in a strong leader, the tribe, village, state or race which energises us. Or a belief system, benign or otherwise, such as the almost universal religious experience.

        Yet none of these traditional modes of transformation seem adequate any longer.

        OAK – yes but ridicule goes bpth ways.

        • greywarbler 2.2.2.1

          Red Logix
          +100

          • karol 2.2.2.1.1

            Then it just becomes a nasty, aggressive, slanging match.

            Best just to keep repeating your values and position – sometimes with facts, at other times with humour, at other times just the position, etc – there is no one way that fits all responses/contexts.

            • greywarbler 2.2.2.1.1.1

              That’s a Good simple little adage to remember karol. Well put, I think I’ll keep it. It’s a bit like How to implement a mission statement.

            • One Anonymous Bloke 2.2.2.1.1.2

              Yeah plus one Karol. Suit the tactics to the terrain.

        • One Anonymous Bloke 2.2.2.2

          RedLogix, are you sure we haven’t just adapted to having lots of cheap energy? The true range of our adaptability is determined by our environment. Easy to survive in the tropics. At the poles, in the deserts, not so much.

          As for a trans-formative experience, hang on to your hat, Dorothea.

          • RedLogix 2.2.2.2.1

            Yes and no. The Innuit have managed just fine in the Arctic and the Kalahari San thrive in an environment quite the opposite.

            What would not survive so well without cheap energy is all the technology. (Right now I’m working in an innovative mining area which is addressing urgent challenges around how to extract minerals from increasingly lower-grade ores without the energy costs going beserk – so your comment makes perfect sense from that perspective.)

            What does interest me a lot is that when you look beyond the relatively narrow confines of our own current society there are a myriad other possible ways of living. We keep making the mistake of thinking that because we have constructed a highly competitive, hierarchical, individualistic society and because people have adapted to this – that this is the ONLY way people can behave. That’s just flat-out not true.

            Almost all behaviour (as distinct from our motivations) is a social construct and is a result of the circumstances we construct and tolerate. Change these circumstances and people’s beahviour will adapt with an extraordinary flexibility.

            Jared Diamond (who I keep on referencing) used the example in his book Collapse. How Societies choose to Succeed or Fail used the example of an isolated group on a tiny, remote Eastern Pacific atolls who faced with environmental collapse chose to ban the raising and eating of pigs. This was a very big and difficult decision for them to make – but enabled them to survive an otherwise almost certain collapse.

            Part of Diamond’s argument is that when the decision-making elites of a society become too isolated, insulated, from the conditions of ordinary people – then it becomes impossible for them to make these challenging and critical reconfigurations essential to adaptation. Which always results in social collapse.

            It has been of course a religious belief in the god of progress that has sustained our society in it’s present configuration. When that god fails us – right about the time the oil fails – we will be desperately in need of a wholly new and transformative ‘idea bigger than ourselves’ to shape the way we behave.

            • One Anonymous Bloke 2.2.2.2.1.1

              That’s my point: the “transformative ‘idea bigger than ourselves’ to shape the way we behave”, will be our environment, as always.

              The price of oil and the costs of climate change loom large.

              • Colonial Viper

                Problem is, the environment is a highly lagging indicator.

                By the time it’s obvious to ordinary people in ‘advanced western nations’ how changed (for the worse) things have become in the global environment, it will be far too late.

  3. Tracey 3

    But joyce says that labour and greens are lying about the numbers. He wouldnt lie.

    • Macro 3.1

      Yeah! The lying bastards! I mean what do they know about wages and living?? Whereas Joyce knows how to live it up – and pay minimal wages.

      • One Anonymous Knucklehead 3.1.1

        Pretty sure any payroll administered by Steven Joyce would be a monumental fuckup. Not a dig at Novopay – his feeble ideology is the only connection he has with that.

        Nah, I’m saying he lacks the day-to-day diligence and care too.

  4. greywarbler 4

    I was interested in who this Brian Scott is. He is not Graham Scott from Treasury in case anyone thought that. And found some interesting links and quotes as well which I throw in to show attitudes from various people in society.

    http://www.tvhe.co.nz/2014/01/03/some-links-against-a-living-wage/
    The Visible Hand in Economics – Matt Nolan

    One site said he was a – Researcher Brian Scott
    From Home Paddock summary – But Brian Scott who has recently completed a Bachelor of Commerce and Administration with first class honours, has done a very thorough critique of the living wage proposal.

    On HomePaddock – In the critique.
    P 33 10 About the Author
    Brian Scott, 50, is currently taking a middle-age gap year after successfully completing four years of tertiary study at the Victoria University of Wellington. On completion Brian was awarded a Batchelor of Commerce and Administration (1st Class Honours), majoring in Information Systems. In addition to the degree, Brian was also awarded a prestigious “Excellence Award” which recognises the achievements of the top five percent of Business School graduates. He is not, and has never been, a member of any political party or movement.
    The BCA (Hon) is a research degree, with a focus on research and critical thinking.
    brianscotthamilton@gmail.com
    http://homepaddock.wordpress.com/2014/01/03/living-wage-already-raised/

    Then from stuff – http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/columnists/9606501/Living-wage-policy-is-poor-solution-to-complex-problem
    Wellington City Council’s adoption of a living wage policy represents a failure of governance, writes Nicola Young.
    “Mayor Celia Wade- Brown has defended this Alice in Wonderland approach”
    (Nicola Young is a Wellington city councillor. Last month she attempted to delay the implementation of the minimum wage to allow for consultation. Her motion was defeated eight votes to five.)

    And following on but eagerly pushing forward is dahdah – Lindsay Mitchell: Living wage critique
    lindsaymitchell.blogspot.com/2014/01/living-wage-critique.html‎
    Jan 3, 2014 – Brian Scott has published a critique of the so called Living Wage, and it … No all we need is a half-way competent economist to point out what every business- owner and every job-creator in NZ knows: … February 3 in history.

    (Unfortunately Brian Scott has never been in involved in any movement. Pity he didn’t move his brain more aside from the channel of Commerce towards Humanity when he was tudying.)

  5. adam 5

    Blah blah blah – f&^k the labour market. Wages have been going backwards for years. A minimum wage is a joke, it means victory for bad bosses and slack, nasty owners. Ffs come on people, if you going to work for someone else they need to pay you and pay your fair. It seems to me all this statistical analysis is a smoke screen so employers can carry on being ass-holes.

    If your not getting $27 a hour – why are you getting out of bed?

    Plus screw the moaning right wing d*&kwads if there so good with money, why does the economy keep collapsing? And why do they keep making the middle class and poorest classes pay for their bloody mistakes?

  6. freedom 6

    here is a simple table of income realted info doing the rounds today, might be useful to some.
    https://scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/l/t1/q71/s720x720/71612_10152260667576477_1557799566_n.jpg

    As broadstrokes go it is quite clear, so let’s not be too pedantic on it

    • weka 6.1

      Very useful table.

      How come the person running Housing NZ earns half the person running Superannuation? (and other discrepancies).

  7. tricledrown 7

    Who less than half of the lotteries commissioner!

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Apple likely owes back taxes here too
    The European Commission has ruled that Apple owes €13bn in back taxes there. It’s likely that Apple owes New Zealand our fair share of back taxes too. The New Zealand Government collected close to $11 billion in taxes for companies ...
    frogblogBy Julie Anne Genter
    1 hour ago
  • What it’s like to be a drug addict
    Today is International Overdose Awareness Day. Nearly every week in New Zealand a person dies from an overdose. Overdose deaths are completely preventable but people need access to Naloxone – a drug used to prevent fatalities – which hasn’t been readily available. The ...
    2 hours ago
  • PJ Harvey has announced two New Zealand shows
    Photo: Christine Goodwin Off the back of her latest album The Hope Six Demolition, PJ Harvey has announced that she will be heading to New Zealand for two shows in late January. She’ll play Auckland’s Logan Campbell Centre ...
    3 hours ago
  • Zoning reform: Is the Unitary Plan any good? (2 of n)
    This is the second post in an ongoing series on the politics and economic of zoning reform. The first part looked at the costs, benefits, and distributional impacts of reforming urban planning rules to enable more development. This part takes ...
    Transport BlogBy Peter Nunns
    5 hours ago
  • Zoning reform: Is the Unitary Plan any good? (2 of n)
    This is the second post in an ongoing series on the politics and economic of zoning reform. The first part looked at the costs, benefits, and distributional impacts of reforming urban planning rules to enable more development. This part takes ...
    Transport BlogBy Peter Nunns
    5 hours ago
  • Gordon Campbell on the challenges of Keytruda funding
    First published on Werewolf All year, the availability of the new generation of anti-cancer drugs in New Zealand has been driven by political decisions, as much as by medical ones. Because patients with advanced melanomas made a lot of the ...
    13 hours ago
  • An update on methane emissions from fracking (in the US)
    A relatively large number of research publications has appeared in the peer-reviewed literature since we last updated our readers on fracking and methane, CH4, emissions. We cannot discuss them all here. However, in summary, it can be concluded from these ...
    14 hours ago
  • New charter schools create inequity and waste public money
    30 August 2016 The announcement today by the Under-Secretary to the Minister of Education that two new charter schools are to open is yet another barrier to equality says the PPTA. The schools will open in Hamilton and Napier in ...
    18 hours ago
  • Celebrating and supporting new arrivals to New Zealand
    One of the things that often gets thrown around the immigration debate is the value of immigrants economically. How much – in dollar terms – are immigrants contributing to their economy? How much – in dollar terms – are immigrants ...
    frogblogBy Denise Roche
    20 hours ago
  • Celebrating and supporting new arrivals to New Zealand
    One of the things that often gets thrown around the immigration debate is the value of immigrants economically. How much – in dollar terms – are immigrants contributing to their economy? How much – in dollar terms – are immigrants ...
    frogblogBy Denise Roche
    20 hours ago
  • On track for failure on renewable energy
    Back in 2007, Helen Clark committed New Zealand to a target of 90% renewable electricity generation by 2025. When they were elected in 2008, National adopted this target and included it in their national energy strategy. But according to MBIE's ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    21 hours ago
  • Domino’s delivery drone kills six at wedding
    Despite the hiccup, Domino’s New Zealand is calling today’s delivery a success, as the pizza was delivered, on time, to its intended destination. A collateral damage incident has occurred in Papakura today during a routine test of one of Domino’s ...
    The CivilianBy admin
    21 hours ago
  • Top 10 stories of the month – August 2016
    In case you missed something, here's our most read stories for the month.   1. Coming Out To My Dad, The Dairy Farmer Supplied. As part of the anthology The Greatness of Dads, food writer/actor Sam Mannering reflects on the hardest ...
    21 hours ago
  • Bland Eyed Soul: Analysing Brand Key
    It was a toss-up between posting this or my short fiction story “John Key goes to prison”. I will post the story some other time. While doing research for a few upcoming KP posts on Asia I was distracted on ...
    21 hours ago
  • Bland Eyed Soul: Analysing Brand Key
    It was a toss-up between posting this or my short fiction story “John Key goes to prison”. I will post the story some other time. While doing research for a few upcoming KP posts on Asia I was distracted on ...
    21 hours ago
  • Andrew Little changes mind about marijuana legalisation after supporter offers him a joint
    CLICK TO ENLARGE: Andrew Little published this poster to his Facebook page earlier today. Labour Leader Andrew Little, who recently expressed his distaste with the idea of relaxing laws on marijuana for recreational use, says he’s changed his mind, after ...
    The CivilianBy admin
    22 hours ago
  • Havelock North outbreak – what might have caused it
    The cause of the contamination in Havelock’s water remains unclear. It has been established that bacterial contamination from a ruminant animal (cow, deer, or sheep) resulted in people becoming ill. We also know heavy rain and surface flooding occurred just before ...
    frogblogBy Catherine Delahunty
    23 hours ago
  • Havelock North outbreak – what might have caused it
    The cause of the contamination in Havelock’s water remains unclear. It has been established that bacterial contamination from a ruminant animal (cow, deer, or sheep) resulted in people becoming ill. We also know heavy rain and surface flooding occurred just before ...
    frogblogBy Catherine Delahunty
    23 hours ago
  • Havelock North outbreak – what might have caused it
    The cause of the contamination in Havelock’s water remains unclear. It has been established that bacterial contamination from a ruminant animal (cow, deer, or sheep) resulted in people becoming ill. We also know heavy rain and surface flooding occurred just before ...
    frogblogBy Catherine Delahunty
    23 hours ago
  • Submit!
    The Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee has called for submissions on the New Zealand Intelligence and Security Bill. You can submit online at the link provided, or in hardcopy toForeign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee Secretariat Parliament Buildings Wellington ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 day ago
  • How to earn ‘good’ returns on your KiwiSaver
    The National Government admitted last week that it will not be taking any responsibility for KiwiSaver funds that invest in cluster bomb, landmine, and nuclear weapons manufacturers. New Zealanders care deeply about whether or not their money is being used ...
    frogblogBy Julie Anne Genter
    1 day ago
  • A wheely suitcase in Europe #7: Gijon to Santiago de Compostela.
    We left Gijon and drove our rental westward on the A8 highway. Our destination? Santiago de Compostela. Our route? Illustrated below (source). Asturias is a beautiful part of Spain that mixes coastline and mountains to create a potent visual cocktail. ...
    Transport BlogBy Stu Donovan
    1 day ago
  • Polity: Burgergasm the second
    Wellington On A Plate, the capital’s citywide culinary festival, ended on Sunday. And once again the city’s burger competition far outshined the more refined offerings in terms of popularity.This year I faced strong domestic advice to avoid last year’s eleven-burgers-in-a-fortnight ...
    1 day ago
  • Hoist by their own petard
    Back in 2009 Parliament passed a new Immigration Act. One of the "features" of the new Act was a massive increase in what the Act terms "absolute discretion" - the power to make a decision without having to give reasons. ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 day ago
  • Hard News: LATE: From #Slacktivism to Activism
    This coming Monday evening, I'm chairing the next in this year's season of LATE events at Auckland Museum. As the title, From #Slacktivism to Activism, suggests, it's something of a reprise of the LATE I chaired two years ago, The Age ...
    1 day ago
  • Red Shift: Labour Reorients Itself Toward Small Business.
    "Meet The New Boss - Same As The Old Boss" The key question of Grant Robertson's "Future of Work" inquiry has been: What must Labour do to guarantee employers a steady supply of productive workers as New Zealand and ...
    1 day ago
  • Is Harry Potter a Democratic Party stooge?
    Will a rat return a favour? Do handbags make you less generous? Is Harry Potter a Democratic Party stooge? We’ve delved into the far reaches of academic endeavor to answer questions you never knew you wondered about, and bring fresh ...
    1 day ago
  • The Future Of Workers.
    Unions? - Please Explain: Grant Robertson subtitled his address to Labour's second "Future of Work" conference “Building Wealth from the Ground Up”. Any common sense reading of that title would predict a fulsome measure of worker participation in the exercise, which, ...
    1 day ago
  • The Future Of Workers.
    Unions? - Please Explain: Grant Robertson subtitled his address to Labour's second "Future of Work" conference “Building Wealth from the Ground Up”. Any common sense reading of that title would predict a fulsome measure of worker participation in the exercise, which, ...
    1 day ago
  • Speaker: After the Apocalypse
    Three years ago, Clinton Logan sold all his possessions, leased out his house in New York state and set out on his motorcyle. The New Zealander, who had spent most of the past 20 years building a software company, decided "it ...
    1 day ago
  • Speaker: After the Apocalypse
    Three years ago, Clinton Logan sold all his possessions, leased out his house in New York state and set out on his motorcyle. The New Zealander, who had spent most of the past 20 years building a software company, decided "it ...
    1 day ago
  • Airport RTN: a quick first step
    AT have now put the SMART study documents on their site, here. There’s a lot to review there and this post is not a look at the whole report and its conclusions, but rather is a response to the problem of ...
    Transport BlogBy Patrick Reynolds
    1 day ago
  • Airport RTN: a quick first step
    AT have now put the SMART study documents on their site, here. There’s a lot to review there and this post is not a look at the whole report and its conclusions, but rather is a response to the problem of ...
    Transport BlogBy Patrick Reynolds
    1 day ago
  • Airport RTN: a quick first step
    AT have now put the SMART study documents on their site, here. There’s a lot to review there and this post is not a look at the whole report and its conclusions, but rather is a response to the problem of ...
    Transport BlogBy Patrick Reynolds
    1 day ago
  • The South Auckland Experience under the Super City
    With the Super City approaching its sixth year and Aucklanders about to go through their third elections for the unitary Auckland Council, how is South Auckland faring? The new Auckland Council earmarked two areas for regeneration: the central city; and ...
    Briefing PapersBy Ben Ross
    1 day ago
  • Reimagining Journalism – The book launch
    Today’s post is the text of the speech I gave yesterday in Christchurch for the launch of Don’t Dream It’s Over - Reimagining Journalism in Aotearoa, which I edited along with Emma Johnson, Sarah Illingworth and Barnaby Bennett. Stop me ...
    Bat bean beamBy Giovanni Tiso
    2 days ago
  • Reimagining Journalism – The book launch
    Today’s post is the text of the speech I gave yesterday in Christchurch for the launch of Don’t Dream It’s Over - Reimagining Journalism in Aotearoa, which I edited along with Emma Johnson, Sarah Illingworth and Barnaby Bennett. Stop me ...
    Bat bean beamBy Giovanni Tiso
    2 days ago
  • Gordon Campbell on the Judith Collins charm offensive
    Column – Gordon Campbell S uddenly, Judith Collins is everyone’s new best friend. It isn’t an election year, but the Corrections/Police Minister is treating 2016 as an opportunity for a political makeover. The former stern-faced law and order toughie ...
    2 days ago
  • Gordon Campbell on the Judith Collins charm offensive
    Column – Gordon Campbell S uddenly, Judith Collins is everyone’s new best friend. It isn’t an election year, but the Corrections/Police Minister is treating 2016 as an opportunity for a political makeover. The former stern-faced law and order toughie ...
    2 days ago
  • Will Housing Prices Crash?
    Two eminent but retired Reserve Bankers, Don Brash and Arthur Grimes, have argued that house prices should halve. I am not sure whether they actually mean it or are just vividly pointing out that house prices are about double the ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    2 days ago
  • Auckland Law Revue strikes again
    Nice. Gotta love ’em. – P ...
    The PaepaeBy Peter Aranyi
    2 days ago
  • Auckland Law Revue strikes again
    Nice. Gotta love ’em. – P ...
    The PaepaeBy Peter Aranyi
    2 days ago
  • Andrew Little – Labour Party would welcome renegotiation of TPPA
    In a speech on international affairs, Labour Party leader Andrew Little has said Labour would welcome renegotiation of the TPPA if it does not pass in the US this year. “Labour would welcome the chance to be part of resumed ...
    Its our futureBy Barry Coates
    2 days ago
  • Australia should reject the TPP
    Dr. Patricia Ranald, Director of the Australian Fair Trade and Investment Network (AFTINET) argues that the TPP is about giving new rights to global multinationals and removing the rights of governments to regulate in the public interest. http://www.smh.com.au/comment/we-should-reject-the-transpacific-partnership-agreement-20160810-gqpb52.html The post ...
    Its our futureBy Barry Coates
    2 days ago
  • TPP won’t improve US Security
    The case for the TPP being made in the US now rests on the national security argument – if the US doesn’t get TPP, China will lead on setting trade rules, and this will be a security threat to the ...
    Its our futureBy Barry Coates
    2 days ago
  • TPP won’t improve US Security
    The case for the TPP being made in the US now rests on the national security argument – if the US doesn’t get TPP, China will lead on setting trade rules, and this will be a security threat to the ...
    Its our futureBy Barry Coates
    2 days ago
  • A group of leading Australian economists have criticised recent free trade deals and argue that their benefits have been overstated. This echoes criticism of MFAT’s reliance on speculative modelling. Without their misleading assumptions, the analysis would have shown net costs for ...
    Its our futureBy Barry Coates
    2 days ago
  • A group of leading Australian economists have criticised recent free trade deals and argue that their benefits have been overstated. This echoes criticism of MFAT’s reliance on speculative modelling. Without their misleading assumptions, the analysis would have shown net costs for ...
    Its our futureBy Barry Coates
    2 days ago
  • Nuclear testing is not a path to security and peace
    Today marks the International Day against Nuclear Tests. Since 1945, more than 2000 nuclear tests have been carried out at more than 60 locations around the globe. Nuclear weapons were designed and tested to be the ultimate doomsday weapon, setting a legacy ...
    2 days ago
  • California has urged President Obama and Congress to tax carbon pollution
    Last week, the California state senate passed Assembly Joint Resolution 43, urging the federal government to pass a revenue-neutral carbon tax: WHEREAS, A national carbon tax would make the United States a leader in mitigating climate change and the ...
    2 days ago
  • California has urged President Obama and Congress to tax carbon pollution
    Last week, the California state senate passed Assembly Joint Resolution 43, urging the federal government to pass a revenue-neutral carbon tax: WHEREAS, A national carbon tax would make the United States a leader in mitigating climate change and the ...
    2 days ago
  • NZ fisheries depend on the environment – they should protect it
    The attitude of the fishing industry and the National Government to our oceans, and the life within it, still amazes me. Like many New Zealanders, I find it perplexing that an industry which depends entirely on the long-term health of ...
    frogblogBy Eugenie Sage
    2 days ago
  • Bigger is not always better with local government reform
    I have written previously about the overwhelming opposition expressed by local councils and community members to the latest Local Government reforms.  The Select Committee heard more submissions this week, specifically about some of the unintended consequences that may arise from ...
    frogblogBy Jan Logie
    2 days ago
  • Bigger is not always better with local government reform
    I have written previously about the overwhelming opposition expressed by local councils and community members to the latest Local Government reforms.  The Select Committee heard more submissions this week, specifically about some of the unintended consequences that may arise from ...
    frogblogBy Jan Logie
    2 days ago
  • This new play is here to remind you that the pay gap still exists in 2016
    Boys Will Be Boys director Sophie Roberts on the depressing reality of being a woman at work in New Zealand. Photo: Supplied Director Sophie Roberts is in the first week of rehearsal for Boys Will Be Boys when ...
    2 days ago
  • Hard News: Medical cannabis: a polling experiment
    Yet another opinion poll has reflected a public mood for change in our laws around cannabis – and this one has an interesting wrinkle.The new poll was conducted by UMR for the reform group Start the Conversation between July 29 ...
    2 days ago
  • Hard News: Medical cannabis: a polling experiment
    Yet another opinion poll has reflected a public mood for change in our laws around cannabis – and this one has an interesting wrinkle.The new poll was conducted by UMR for the reform group Start the Conversation between July 29 ...
    2 days ago
  • An anti-fluoride trick: Impressing the naive with citations
    One way to make an article look impressive is to use citations – the more you use, the more impressive. Well, so some people think. Some of the over 140 references in Geoff Pain’s article. These references impress some people ...
    2 days ago
  • ‘The trick is to learn not to feel guilty about it’
    Ashleigh Young on why it’s OK – important even – to spend time away from writing.   As is clear on the front cover of Ashleigh Young’s new book Can You Tolerate This?, her essays are undeniably personal, but ...
    2 days ago
  • Hard News: Reimagining Journalism
    Five o'clock on a Sunday is not generally thinking time for me, but yesterday was different. That was the kick-off for Reimagining Journalism, a WORD Christchurch panel discussion I chaired with Cate Brett, Paula Penfold, Duncan Greive, Morgan Godfery and ...
    2 days ago
  • Hard News: Reimagining Journalism
    Five o'clock on a Sunday is not generally thinking time for me, but yesterday was different. That was the kick-off for Reimagining Journalism, a WORD Christchurch panel discussion I chaired with Cate Brett, Paula Penfold, Duncan Greive, Morgan Godfery and ...
    2 days ago
  • HOP in detail
    As mentioned this morning, at Auckland Transport’s board meeting today there is an interesting paper giving an overview of the HOP system, which AT say is the third largest financial transaction system in the country. Here are some of the figures ...
    2 days ago
  • HOP in detail
    As mentioned this morning, at Auckland Transport’s board meeting today there is an interesting paper giving an overview of the HOP system, which AT say is the third largest financial transaction system in the country. Here are some of the figures ...
    2 days ago
  • ‘It’s sort of about the end of the world’: The Veils’ Finn Andrews talks Total Depravity
    The Veils’ frontman gives us a track-by-track insight into the band’s just-released new album, Total Depravity. Photo: Supplied This is part of a regular series called Verse Chorus Verse which sees local artists break down the stories behind ...
    2 days ago
  • Why I don’t fear the robot apocalypse
    Being in Christchurch made me realise how reliant I am on Google Maps whenever I’m out of the tiny patch of Wellington I’m familiar with. Maps doesn’t really work in Christrchurch – every time I tried to use it the ...
    DimPostBy danylmc
    2 days ago
  • Absolutely Fabulous-ly Ugh
    The white boomer rebel is a farce.     Fox Searchlight Pictures/BBC Films The Absolutely Fabulous movie has been out for three weeks, and is now entering the end of its cinema run. Thank God. I have the ...
    2 days ago
  • Profits, Dividends or Customers?
    The Herald made a valiant attempt to explain last Friday how Air New Zealand had managed to produce a record $663 million profit.  They quoted the Chief Executive, Christopher Luxon, as attributing the result to the tourist boom, the fall ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    2 days ago
  • From Student Farce To American Tragedy.
    The Governor: "With his wing-collars up and his undergrad gown on, he looks like a cross between Dracula and Batman". Paul Gourlie wasn’t interested in the votes of the student “activists” who wore badges and carried placards. The votes ...
    2 days ago
  • What’s going on at NZ Fashion Week?
    Underdressed and overrated, The Wireless sent Lucy Zee to rub shoulders with the most stylish attendees of New Zealand Fashion Week. Presented and produced by Lucy Zee. Video shot and edited by Eddy Fifield. This content is brought to ...
    2 days ago
  • Even worse
    I spent the weekend in Christchurch at the (excellent) Word festival, and someone reminded me of poetry – although technically song lyrics – even worse than McGongall’s: I don’t want to see a ghost It’s a sight that I fear ...
    DimPostBy danylmc
    2 days ago
  • Even worse
    I spent the weekend in Christchurch at the (excellent) Word festival, and someone reminded me of poetry – although technically song lyrics – even worse than McGongall’s: I don’t want to see a ghost It’s a sight that I fear ...
    DimPostBy danylmc
    2 days ago
  • August 16 AT Board Meeting
    Today the Auckland Transport Board have their latest meeting and I’ve taken a look through the reports to pull out the interesting bits. Firstly and surprisingly the agenda for the closed session is surprisingly bare. The only non-regular item is Tamaki ...
    2 days ago
  • 2016 SkS Weekly Digest #35
    SkS Highlights... Toon of the Week... Quote of the Week... Graphic of the Week... Rebuttal Article Update... He Said What?... SkS in the News... SkS Spotlights... Coming Soon on SkS... Poster of the Week... SkS Week in Review... 97 ...
    3 days ago
  • Sunday reading 28 August 2016
    ‘Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, AWNS-19410723-34-27’ Hi y’all and welcome to Sunday Reading. Here’s a collection of stuff I found interesting over the week. Please add your links in the comments below. Whoops, we forgot to build housing. During ...
    Transport BlogBy Kent Lundberg
    3 days ago
  • Sunday reading 28 August 2016
    ‘Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, AWNS-19410723-34-27’ Hi y’all and welcome to Sunday Reading. Here’s a collection of stuff I found interesting over the week. Please add your links in the comments below. Whoops, we forgot to build housing. During ...
    Transport BlogBy Kent Lundberg
    3 days ago

Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere