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A king is born: Long Live Inequality!

Written By: - Date published: 10:54 am, July 25th, 2013 - 87 comments
Categories: accountability, class war, climate change, democracy under attack, john key, poverty, same old national, slippery, spin, Spying, uk politics, unemployment, welfare, workers' rights - Tags:

The majority of New Zealanders are facing a very uncertain future:

in a world of peak everything, where there is:

an ongoing decline in easy access to energy resources

exponential growth in population to unsustainable proportions

climate change and instability

an on-going crisis in the capitalist system based on unsustainable bubbles and addiction to “growth”

and so much more ….

And to make matters worse, at such a time New Zealand has,

a government that cares more for the haves than the have-nots

a government that is consistently dismantling democracy (state surveillance, GCSB legislation, abuse of parliamentary urgency)

a government that is removing workers rights and turns its back on workers health and safety (eg continuing deaths of forestry workers)

a government that cuts taxes for the well-off and demonises those already struggling to live on benefits in a world of diminishing job opportunities

a government that is making life harder for the disabled, those for long term injuries and health problems

a government that favours big oil and big tobacco, while gutting the RMA
…. the list goes on….

And at a time when so many controversial political issues are playing out, the NZ MSM has dutifully followed the lead of Britain’s MSM, fueled by the long death of its aristocratic privilege and class divisions.

inequality-is-great-britain1

I’ve mostly dodged the MSM coverage of this royal circus, but an article came to my notice this morning about the useless pennies thrown to the peasants as the royal party continues, filtered through today’s diversionary celebrity culture that foregrounds images of the “youth” and (culturally-defined) “beauty”.

This article by Emily Harle on Left Foot Forward, refers to the sop thrown to babies born on the same day as the (potentially) future king (4.24pm on 22 July 2013 in the UK and, I estimate, 11 hours later in NZ – 3.24am 23 July 2013 – correct me if I am wrong), Harle writes:

Though their names, weights and times of birth were not announced to the world’s media, just over 2,000 other children in the UK have one thing in common with the new Prince: their date of birth. These children will each be given a silver penny by the Royal Mail, recognising their historical link to the baby that will one day be king.

For most of these children, this is where the similarities end.

Harle then goes on to lay out the vast differences between the have and have-not circumstances of these children’s birth, and how, based on evidence of social research, these children’s lives will differ:

Of the 2,000 children who share the Prince’s birthday, 130 will go to private schools, 438will attend schools that ‘require improvement’ and 102 will go to schools that are failing. Of these 102 children at least 66 will not achieve the five A*-C GCSEs seen as increasingly necessary for proceeding in education or finding a job that pays enough.

For most of these children the barriers will not be their lack of ambition, hard work or interest. It will be the external factors that work against them from an early age such as having nowhere safe to do their homework: 226 children of the 2,000 will live in overcrowded, temporary or run down housing and eleven will be homeless.

A shocking 540 children will live in poverty, with 290 of this group experiencing poverty despite having one parent that works. 5 of the 8 children who die before their first birthdays will most likely come from this group. Poor housing and low quality healthcare will play a significant role in this.

Thirteen of the children sharing the Prince’s birthday will be taken into care during their childhood. They will be looked after by around five different sets of carers and nine of them will leave school with no qualifications. These thirteen children will be more likely to receive a criminal record than go to university.

Of the royal baby’s 2,000 buddies, 120 will have a disability and 40 of them will have difficulty accessing the services, support and activities that their able-bodied friends will take for granted. At least 25 of the 2,000 children will be young carers who look after ill or disabled family members. Two of these children will provide more than 50 hours of care each week.

And Harle continues, spelling out the vast inequalities of the UK: a society far from the meritocracy that “neoliberal” propaganda implies.

New Zealand is not that much different, either in its growing inequalities or in having a current that works for the haves at the expense of the have-nots.

Occupy-auckland-poverty

And in NZ, while our power and wealth worshiping PM gushes about the new prince being a future king of NZ, the New Zealand children born within the same 48 hours of the royal baby won’t even get a patronising silver penny.  In fact, NZ’s PM and MSM is more focused on NZ giving the wealthy prince an unnecessary gift, as reported on Stuff:

Prime Minister John Key has offered his congratulations to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on the arrival of their baby.

”I think New Zealanders will be celebrating with the happy couple and it’s great to see the birth of a future king of New Zealand so we wish them all the very best. It will be an exciting time for them.”

Key my work here is done

Meanwhile, many in the NZ MSM attempt to sideline, distort and divert from the evidence of the impact of inequalities and related government policies in NZ, as explained by Anthony Robins here. The evidence of inequalities and their impact in NZ are in Max Rushbrooke’s book, Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis.

87 comments on “A king is born: Long Live Inequality! ”

  1. tracey 1

    But karol. Ceos have crowned english the king. Anyone dare to do a demographic breakdown of those ceos… you know as an example of how far women and non white men have come?

    • King Kong 1.1

      I am sick of this vilification of rich white men. When are you going to work out that we are just better than you.

  2. Colonial Viper 2

    The British Monarchy is an important institution which will play an increasingly important role in the future as influential opinion leaders. This will be during a time that both corporate and political leaders are failing our civilisation.

    The Left has no equivalent influence, answer or replacement for the monarchy. The Left has built nothing which is as robust, resilient or widely popular as the British Monarchy.

    If you asked the British people if they wanted to disband the Monarchy and become a republic, you’d get roughly as many votes as the Lib Dems.

    • karol 2.1

      The current “popularity” of the Brit monarchy is being maintained via the MSM and the related celebrity culture. That is where the power of the elites lie, not with the monarchy per se.

      That is why the monarchy’s PR machine promotes the soap opera of the younger generation of the royal family.

      • Colonial Viper 2.1.1

        Or, you could simply be wrong about the MSM/PR stuff being the root of the monarchy’s popularity, and admit that the British people have a high degree of cross-partisan personal fondness for the royals and for the institution, a fondness which stretches back way before “celebrity culture”.

        • karol 2.1.1.1

          Well, it’s a mix of both.

          Hmmm… the “British people” are not of like mind. There are monarchists and anti-monarchists.

          But the Monarchy has been very adept at adapting to cultural change under Elizabeth’s reign. She used the media of her time of coronation to transition their public image from monarchy to “Royal Family” – images of the nuclear royal family on the lawn with dogs.

          This has now been updated to tap into the celebrity culture dominated media.

          Without this successful use of the media, the monarchy could well have lost public support over the last 50 years.

          • Peter 2.1.1.1.1

            I think that’s C/V’s point, within the monarchy we have both a flexible, adaptable system that does (largely) unify people, and make them happy, as well as something connected to a lot of human tradition (both good and bad, as with anything human).

            • karol 2.1.1.1.1.1

              LOL. Did you read the stats on the inequalities in the UK as quoted in my post, Peter? Unify people? Actually all the Royal Family Soap Opera and Road Show does is present a public face of unity and happiness, while masking lives damaged by poverty and inequality.

              • Peter

                Where does the existence of the royal family stop people from fighting poverty issues? Get rid of it, replace it with a president, and you’ll still have people arguing that this person/this institution is standing in the way of the fight, when really these are just excuses for either a failure to fight the issue, or a failure of tactics in fighting the issue.

                If you want to fight poverty, fight poverty. But it’s got very little to do with the monarchy.

                • wtl

                  Yes, but karol is hardly using this post to say that the monarchy is “the worst thing ever” but simple taking the opportunity to use the royal birth to highlight the inequality in society. What’s so wrong with that?

                  • karol

                    Thanks, wtl.

                    Though my main view is that the “Royal Family” is part of the (Brit and NZ) propaganda machine that legitimises inequality, and masks the destructive impacts of those inequalities.

                    Of course, today’s “Royal Family” is s not solely responsible for it, and there are also places where inequality exists without a monarchy.

                    • wtl

                      Yes, I appreciate your point and I agree that just as the “Royal Family” is used part of the propaganda machine, it can and should be used to highlight inequality, just as you have done.

                      This, of course, doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t fight poverty and inequality in other ways.

                  • Peter

                    Nothing wrong with that, except I still think it’s a straw man, and a real deviation from the things we should be fighting.

                    For instance, if she’d left the royal family out of it, and focused on the core issues of poverty (none of which the monarchy have much power to do anything about!), I’d have been supporting her idea 100%.

                    Instead, I’m debating it!

                    • karol

                      And what would happen if a member (or more) of the royal family decided not to play along? Maybe to give their income to the poor and campaigned for a fairer society?

                  • The Monarchy is the corner stone of the ghastly British class system. In the 1930’s /Britain was only a ring away from having a Fascist King.Many of the Royalty
                    and their aristocratic friends were friendly with Mussolini and close to Hitler .It is well documented and it shows what can happen when one a head of state by birth right..

  3. johnm 3

    Hi Karol
    An impressive summing up of our inequality issue which Key’s government is actively worsening. The U$K is returning to the Dickensian era having rejected the Post WW11 social (Socialist)contract since that woman Thatcher came to power. It has and is disasterously following the US neoliberal model of privatisation of the public’s commonwealth into private hands and in effect has abdicated democracy in favour of a corporate state (The government doesn’t govern for the people or respect their needs but abdicates economic and eventual political power to corporations and business). The same process is happening here with Key contemptuously ignoring the fact that 80% of kiwis reject privatisation of our energy sector and reject the fascist need to spy on our own people. The origin of the neoliberal rubbish dogma in terms of actual implementation the US is on the point of collapse socially and economically and represents extreme inequality. Detroit is now bankrupt. Yet the fools of the English speaking world continue to implement this trashed for the rich dogma to the bitter end NZ in particular with those overpaid monkeys in Treasury.
    The victims must be blamed and made to pay the disabled and unemployed are to be harassed because the richer sector of society does not want to share with perceived useless people and does not believe that investment in them will pay. At the same time the 1% continue to award themselves bigger and bigger salaries and tax cuts. Tax evasion is now a major industry.

    I was born in England the same day as Prince Charles and my parents received a hamper of food and sweets plus a commemorative card. We lived in a council flat which had been built just a few years previously and was in tip top condition rent was controlled according to income. The Thatcher regime sold these off and now people can’t get housing instead there is a get rich by capital gain bubble in the housing sector (As in NZ) as speculators make huge unearned gains from a self inflated bubble. Back in the 50s 60s people were happy even though the UK was a poor country then but there was almost full employment and there weren’t any problems if you were unemployed.
    Then the Greed Machine Tories got in and their destruction was covered by the North Sea Oil bonanza now almost gone. Now the easy money is gone the Tories want to make the poor pay as in the 19c. The Right Wing has never believed in the people’s commonwealth and they inevitably breed deprivation and inequality and call it just the natural order. key is of the same ilk. Does he look like a man who actually worked for his millions? Of course not he represents a corrupt financial system that robs the poor to enrich the haves!
    The British Monarchy is the symbol of a class society. No worries about Stephanie Botterill who committed suicide because of the bedroom tax she doesn’t count, a nobody, just fix your eyes on the pampered elite! 🙁

    • karol 3.1

      Wow, johnm.

      This:
      I was born in England the same day as Prince Charles and my parents received a hamper of food and sweets plus a commemorative card.

      And with your family story, you so aptly expose the myth of unity and happiness some claim as the result of the monarchy.

      • muzza 3.1.1

        And with your family story, you so aptly expose the myth of unity and happiness some claim as the result of the monarchy

        Hi Karol,

        Do large numbers of people actually claim it, or do you think they perhaps are simply unaware of the damage, and have been programmed by the media to such a degree, they are incapable of seeing the obvious?

        Obvious being, the monarchs are a huge contibuter (willing or not) to global suffering, experienced by so many.

        • karol 3.1.1.1

          I said “some” not necessarily the majority. And some commenters on this thread have claimed just that – i.e. they claim monarchy contributes to unity.

          I don’t know what goes on in the majority of people’s heads, only what some people say.

          • muzza 3.1.1.1.1

            I’d be interested to hear the views of those who claim any such, unifying contribution!

            Perhaps they have not though it through!

      • At least you had ‘free fed ” Karol as a kid I lived inna row of houses owned by the then Kings brother .It was a slum and if one did not pay their rent when at home people were thrown out/

        Later in life I indirectly worked for the then Princess Royal (looking after one of her racehorses.
        She was a mean tight fisted old bird who in the two years I “did her horse never once gave me the obligatory tip.

        • karol 3.1.2.1

          Yes, at least johnm’s family got a free feed. I’m not sure what this weeks new borns can do with a silver penny except display it on the mantlepiece.

          Difficult times then TPP, for people who grew up in your neighbourhood. And your experience of the Princess Royal suggests many of that family are keen on holding on to their privilege. There’s generations of extended family hangers on around the Monarch’s nuclear family.

  4. Rich the other 4

    Just more warped logic on this site, nearly as bad as sky city thinking and look what just happened there.
    A K city council has just introduced a policy to restrict pokies in A K .
    The real effect will be to channel more business towards sky city who contributes 2.5% of profit to the community from the operators who they have just penalised who contribute 37.1% ., great green logic.
    Any way let’s face it young George will be treated equally ,no different as the rest of the family .

    • karol 4.1

      Just more warped logic on this site….

      While you have begun your comment by aptly labeling the quality of the rest of your comment – why do you persist with such warped logic in the face of logical arguments by others, supported by relevant and substantial evidence?

      • Rich the other 4.1.1

        Karol ,Logical arguments , what logical arguments ???

        easy energy resources declining, don’t be silly , take a look at California , hundreds of years of oil just sitting there , even our own maui gas resource is about to be reignited with new technology , population, another laugh , the planet could easily sustain another couple of billion, that’s more about than money than overcrowding and climate change , don’t you mean global warming ,yea rite.

        Any way happy birthday George, welcome to the world , it’s not a bad place.l

  5. Peter 5

    What consistently annoys me about anti-monarchy rants is how the monarchy is used as a straw man for the writer’s pet political hates, whether they be inequality, poverty, class, etc. These things will all exist, with or without the monarchy. We need to solve them, but that’s about as far removed from the monarchy as I can imagine.

    I try and think for instance, of the amount of cash that royals raise for charity each year. Yeah, it’d be nice not to rely on that at all, but we live in the real world.

    I’d argue, quite strongly, that the unifying value of constitutional monarchies across diverse cultures is highly useful, and if we are going to worship and venerate something (people like having things to worship, if not the monarchy, then it’ll be a bunch of even less accountable celebrities), it might as well be the British royal family.

    • unicus 5.1

      Its no straw man turd that sits atop the festering classist sewer that is Brittish society – how dare Key pronounce this little maggot king of New Zealand – our forebears escaped from the ghastly debilitating classicism of Europe and the UK two hundred years ago – let the poms slaver over their ridiculous fantasy if they wish – but leave us out of it

      • Tinfoilhat 5.1.1

        Your comment does little to recommend your point of view.

        • Peter 5.1.1.1

          +1

        • unicus 5.1.1.2

          Really ? Are you saying the UK isn’t a classist cesspit

          • Arfamo 5.1.1.2.1

            I don’t care one way or the other. I’m just disappointed they named the blighter George. Common as muck for a name. I was hoping they’d break with tradition and go for something a bit different like Mohammed, or Jacko, or Trevor.

          • Tinfoilhat 5.1.1.2.2

            No I’m saying your bitter and spiteful attack on a baby leaves any point you were trying to make lost in the vitriol.

            • unicus 5.1.1.2.2.1

              Oh dear the poor liitle over pampered pom prat – I couldn’t give a toss what happens in the UK as long as their latest brick in the class wall doesntt show up here expecting to be anyones “king”

              • Tinfoilhat

                By the time he’s King, NZ will likely be a republic or a state of Australia and you’ll likely be long dead so you don’t need to worry your little head about it.

                • Arfamo

                  I’ve gone right off the Royal Family since Thatcher’s funeral. I could tolerate Liz and her spawn till then.

                  • tinfoilhat

                    Why’s that ?

                    • Arfamo

                      They provided a reasonable level of entertainment and Harry even gave the Taliban a sporting chance at a high value target. But Liz never seemed to indicate she had agreed with or supported the policies of that Wrecker Thatcher. Now I reckon it’s time to nationalise the Royal Family, cut their benefit payments, & flog off their assets to overseas corporates.

                    • tinfoilhat

                      Yes I think they should pay their own way when visiting our shores as well.

                      In relation to thatchers funeral I think it’s probably incumbent on the Queen to attend the funeral of a past PM.

                      In relation to nationalising the royals that would be up to the UK citizens and I very much doubt that would be passed at a referendum. in relation to their benefit payments I was under the misunderstanding that they were a cost to the british taxpayer for many years until a friend showed me that they are very significant contributors to the UK tax take, not including the monies that could be argued that they bring in via tourism.

                • unicus

                  I don’t suffer the delusion that I will live forever – or that I need a surrogate or external nobility to preserve my self esteem – I certainly wouldn’t stoop to use the birth of anything to justify a personal fantasy of superiority .

                  Many British people live unfulfilled and demeaning lives – because they accept their own inferiority within a social and psycological class paradime created by the monarchist presence in their society

                  If you dislike like the fact that most New Zealanders don’t believe in that dross or think themselves inferior then its probably time you found somewhere else to live – to put it politely .

                  • tinfoilhat

                    Sorry but I’ve got no idea what either of you are on about if you don’t like the british royal family fine but I can see no reason to let it cause you such angst.

                    • Arfamo

                      They don’t cause me angst. I just don’t like the idea of us paying for the buggers when they tour here. They can afford it themselves. They can flog off some of the embarrassing presents they’ll have put out the back.

                  • karol

                    Having lived in London a long time, I have Brit friends from diverse backgrounds. Most, if not all, of them do not support the monarchy.

                    There are also plenty of Kiwis who do support the monarchy. so I don’t think your generalisations match reality, unicus.

                    I do agree that the class system is firmly entrenched in the social and political structure in the UK. Some of that was also exported here with colonisation and continues today.

                  • One Anonymous Knucklehead

                    If you’re going to criticise psychological paradigms, don’t you think it would be wise to learn to spell them?

                    If I have to choose between agreeing with you and exile, can’t I choose the third option and defend myself against authoritarian bullshit instead?

      • Tracey 5.1.2

        couldn’t you have said that with more feeling, more vitriol?

  6. Peter 6

    There’s also another problem with your argument Karol. If you look back at human history, to a time, arguably, when the world ran on entirely renewable energy (i.e. before fossil fuels). The systems of government we employed then just happened to be monarchies 🙂

    There’s every reason to assume, that as things slow down, we’ll return to past historical practice, for simplicities’ sake.

    Peter

    • karol 6.1

      Talk about warped/shonkey logic.

      And shonkey history. Monarchies have come in various forms, and in different parts of the world at different times. When was there a time before “fossil fuels”? That would before the use of campfires, the bronze age? Iron age?

      Or are you talking about the rise of fossil fuel industry, which arose with the industrial revolution, and around the time European monarchies were consolidating their power.

      Sheesh, at least try to learn something about history before making such nonsensical statements.

      • Peter 6.1.1

        There certainly was a time before the mass use of fossil fuels. That was, for Europe, all history prior to AD1600, and for China, history before about AD1400 (China started using coal a little earlier). You might have had a little coal used on the odd campfire here and there before that, where a natural seam existed, but it was completely insignificant, compared with what we have done for the past 600 years or so.

        • karol 6.1.1.1

          Peter, you said:

          If you look back at human history, to a time, arguably, when the world ran on entirely renewable energy (i.e. before fossil fuels).

          You seemed to be opposing fossil fuel to renewable energy. Wood, peat etc were not renewables and existed a long time before the coal industry.

          Coal was used around Tyneside from at least the 13th Century

          The mined coal was pretty much near to the surface and didn’t need a lot of mining.

          Forms of coal/carbon (variations of that form of fossil fuel) was used well before the medieval period as an energy/heat source.

          Coal was used by the Chinese long before it was used in Europe; coal from the Fushun mine in northeastern China was used to smelt copper as early as 1000 BCE.[16]
          […]
          detected as forming part of the composition of funeral pyres.[20][21] In Roman Britain, with the exception of two modern fields, “the Romans were exploiting coals in all the major coalfields in England and Wales by the end of the second century AD”.[22] Evidence of trade in coal (dated to about AD 200) has been found at the Roman settlement at Heronbridge, near Chester, and in the Fenlands of East Anglia, where coal from the Midlands was transported via the Car Dyke for use in drying grain.[23] Coal cinders have been found in the hearths of villas and Roman forts, particularly in Northumberland, dated to around AD 400. In the west of England, contemporary writers described the wonder of a permanent brazier of coal on the altar of Minerva at Aquae Sulis (modern day Bath), although in fact easily accessible surface coal from what became the Somerset coalfield was in common use in quite lowly dwellings locally.[24] Evidence of coal’s use for iron-working in the city during the Roman period has been found.[25] In Eschweiler, Rhineland, deposits of bituminous coal were used by the Romans for the smelting of iron ore.[22]

          So really, there’s little correlation between fossil fuels, (or non-renewable fuels) and monarchies.

          The “mass use” of fossil fuel is inextricably tied to the rise of industrialisation and capitalism.

    • Draco T Bastard 6.2

      The systems of government we employed then just happened to be monarchies 🙂

      Who do you mean when you say “we”?

      I ask because the most societies throughout history haven’t been monarchies.

  7. Tracey 7

    There’s every reason to assume we will return to a monarchy because previously we had a monarch so stop criticising the monarchy? Interesting construction of ideas.

    Defend don’t defend I just don’t want this country to spend a single further dollar on hosting them, providing security, diverting traffic and police, time off important work to attend dinners for other paid employees such as MPs.

  8. joe90 8

    Grandma had an especially venomous dislike of the Windsor clan and during the 1954 tour refused to join the Stratford town council party to greet the queen, reputedly remarking – that woman’s family have already had two of my sons so I’ll be buggered if I’ll curtsey to the bitch.

    Apparently town counsellor Granddad wasn’t too impressed.

  9. infused 9

    Life isn’t fair…

    • One Anonymous Knucklehead 9.1

      …and the degree to which it is unfair is a policy decision.

    • dumrse 9.2

      Nor is it an egalitarian society.

      • One Anonymous Knucklehead 9.2.1

        Nor is it a sado-culinary commune, and your point is?

        According to The Lancet, New Zealand’s increasing economic inequality and New Zealand’s increasing rate of infectious disease related hospital admissions are linked.

        What is the ideal rate of infectious disease?

  10. moreben 10

    I see the glass is half empty at the Standard.

    Losers.

    • One Anonymous Knucklehead 10.1

      We need better wingnuts. Do you know any?

    • Arfamo 10.2

      You’re signing off on behalf of “Losers”? We don’t get many posters dumb enough to do that.

  11. One Anonymous Knucklehead 11

    Hereditary hierarchy is a “bad thing” – this seems self evident – but it is churlish to celebrate cultural diversity and then denigrate the royal family.

    To put it another way, if the Windsors are symbols of inequality based on the UK’s GINI coefficient, are the Yamatos a symbol of equality based on Japan’s?

    • karol 11.1

      Hereditary hierarchy is a “bad thing” – this seems self evident – but it is churlish to celebrate cultural diversity and then denigrate the royal family.

      Eh?

      That just seems muddled to me.

      Should we be celebrating the monarchy as part of cultural diversity?

      Most of my post is about the coverage the royal birth has had in the MSM. It is part of the diversionary presentation of “circuses”, run through celebrity culture. It works to sideline or mask inequality and legitimise privilege.

      I haven’t particularly denigrated individual royal personages but the monarchist system – the main criticism I made of the monarchy is the sop of the silver coin to other children born in the UK on the same day, in contrast to the way too many Brits are struggling in an increasingly unequal society.

      • One Anonymous Knucklehead 11.1.1

        Yeah, when you leave all the economic arguments – which I think are separate anyway – aside, the monarchy is a fundamental part of British culture – which includes the relentless lampooning they are subject to – not a modern phenomenon.

        • karol 11.1.1.1

          Good heavens. Culture is dynamic and changes.

          I met many many Brits – English, Scots, Wrelsh, irish, who don’t see it as a part of their culture that is worth keeping.

          • Colonial Viper 11.1.1.1.1

            Well if you’re going to ask the Scottish and the Irish about the British Monarchy, yes you will get some widely varying responses 🙂

            • karol 11.1.1.1.1.1

              Well. Indeed. But there’s also quite a few anti-monarchy English – I see you put it at 3:1 below. One third of about 60 million people – still a sizable number of people (around 20 million).

              • One Anonymous Knucklehead

                Where would the Cavaliers be without some Roundheads?

                PS: 3:1 makes them 25% of the population.

                • karol

                  25% – ha! so 15 million, then.

                  • One Anonymous Knucklehead

                    Leaving 75% determined to preserve their particular cultural idiosyncrasy.

                    Not to mention that the Roundheads have been running the place for quite a while now but haven’t seen fit to get rid of the Windsors.

    • dumrse 11.2

      Time to put the glass down now you have it half empty.

      • One Anonymous Knucklehead 11.2.1

        Time you stopped trying to make witty remarks in a conversation you don’t understand.

  12. Steve 12

    Right at the top of the original post by Karol:
    “UK children born on the same day as the new prince will get a silver penny: but there lives will be vastly different.”
    Royalty and Queens English, it is their – their -their not there.
    Penny for your thoughts

  13. TEA 13

    Never fair, we have our own King !
    King Winston the king maker ……

    AIEEEEE !

  14. Binders full of women 14

    I have a vague feeling that Will & Kate prob want to be a bit more low key like the royals in Belg/Spain/Holland/Sweden/Denmark/Norway famous for their cycling- to- work egalitarian streak. I love the royals and would like to see them more in the Euro vein than in the Kardashian style. I don’t think there is a Finnish royal family.

    • Arfamo 14.1

      It’d be great if they’d cycle their way over The Tasman for their next tour here.

  15. Colonial Viper 15

    Monarchy or Republic?

    Brits say 3:1 for the Monarchy. And the tougher times get, the more Brits seem to favour the Monarchy.

    Next.

    • Arfamo 15.1

      They’re probably just thinking if things get any worse as long as they’ve got the monarchy they could always eat the rich.

  16. Murray Olsen 16

    I’ve only ever known one Pom who liked royalty and he was a nasty, slimy prick who got a knighthood on the back of other peoples’ work. On the other hand, they’re bound to be Shearer’s favourite beneficiary family – no one will ever catch them painting their own roofs.

  17. Rodel 17

    I got this strange liking for democracy. Probably from my parents.
    Monarchy seems to be the antithesis of democracy.

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    3 hours ago
  • Support for farmers beefed up ahead of La Niña
    Further funding for feed support services and new animal welfare coordinators will help farmers who continue to feel the effects of an extended drought, says Rural Communities Minister Damien O’Connor. “In March this year, I classified the drought in the North Island, parts of the South Island and the Chathams ...
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    2 days ago
  • Next steps for Christchurch Hospital campus redevelopment
    Canterbury DHB will be better placed to respond to future demand for services and continue to deliver high quality care, with the next stage of the campus redevelopment programme confirmed, Health Minister Andrew Little says. The Government has approved $154 million in funding for the construction of a third tower ...
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    3 days ago
  • Five Power Defence Arrangements Defence Ministers’ Joint Statement
    The Defence Ministers from Australia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and United Kingdom reaffirmed their nations’ continued commitment to the Five Power Defence Arrangements (FPDA), and commended the achievements over the past 49 years as the FPDA moves towards its 50th Anniversary in 2021.  The Ministers recognised the FPDA’s significant role ...
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    3 days ago
  • Jobs for Nature funding protects health of Hawke’s Bay waterways
    A joint Government and Hawke’s Bay Regional Council project will invest $4.2 million to protect local waterways, enhance biodiversity and employ local people, Environment Minister David Parker announced today.   Over two years, the Hāpara Takatū Jobs for Nature project will fence 195km of private land to exclude stock from vulnerable ...
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    3 days ago
  • New Year border exception for seasonal workers in the horticulture and wine industries
    2000 additional RSE workers to enter New Zealand early next year employers must pay these workers at least $22.10 an hour employers will cover costs of managed isolation for the RSE workers RSE workers will be paid the equivalent of 30 hours work a week while in isolation From January ...
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    3 days ago
  • Government increases support for New Zealanders to work in seasonal jobs
    The Government is offering further financial support for unemployed New Zealanders to take on seasonal work. These new incentives include: Up to $200 per week for accommodation costs $1000 incentive payment for workers who complete jobs of six weeks or longer increasing wet weather payments when people can’t work to ...
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    3 days ago
  • Government receives Royal Commission of Inquiry report into the Terrorist Attack on Christchurch Mos...
    Minister for Internal Affairs Jan Tinetti has today received the Royal Commission of Inquiry report into the Terrorist Attack on Christchurch Mosques, and will table it in Parliament on Tuesday December 8. “I know this will have been a challenging process for whānau, survivors and witnesses of the terrorist attack ...
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    4 days ago
  • New Zealand Government to declare a climate emergency
    The Government will declare a climate emergency next week, Climate Change Minister James Shaw said today.                                       “We are in the midst of a climate crisis that will impact on nearly every ...
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    4 days ago
  • Call for urgent action on Pacific conservation
    A declaration on the urgency of the global biodiversity crisis and the need for immediate, transformative action in the Pacific was agreed at a pan-Pacific conference today. The 10th Pacific Islands Conference on Nature Conservation and Protected Areas is taking place this week across the Pacific.  Minister of Conservation Kiritapu ...
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    4 days ago
  • Speech from the throne
    E aku hoa i te ara o te whai, Kia kotahi tā tātou takahi i te kō, ko tōku whiwhi kei tō koutou tautoko mai. Ko tāku ki a koutou, hei whakapiki manawa mōku. He horomata rangatira te mahi, e rite ai te whiwhinga a te ringatuku, me te ringakape ...
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    4 days ago
  • Keynote address to Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand conference
    Speech to the CAANZ conference - November 19, 2020 Thank you, Greg, (Greg Haddon, MC) for the welcome. I’d like to acknowledge John Cuthbertson from CAANZ, the Commissioner of Inland Revenue Naomi Ferguson, former fellow MP and former Minister of Revenue, Peter Dunne, other guest speakers and CAANZ members. I ...
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    5 days ago
  • Expert independent advisory group appointed to strengthen the future of Māori broadcasting
    A panel of seven experts are adding their support to help shape the future of Māori broadcasting, Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson has announced today. “Today I will meet with some of the most experienced Māori broadcasters, commentators and practitioners in the field. They have practical insights on the ...
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    5 days ago
  • Government to review housing settings
    New Zealand’s stronger-than-expected economic performance has flowed through to housing demand, so the Government will review housing settings to improve access to the market, the Finance Minister Grant Robertson announced today. “Our focus is on improving access to the housing market for first home buyers and ensuring house price growth ...
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    6 days ago
  • Crown accounts reflect Govt’s careful economic management
    The better-than-expected Crown accounts released today show the Government’s careful management of the COVID-19 health crisis was the right approach to support the economy. As expected, the Crown accounts for the year to June 2020 show the operating balance before gains and losses, or OBEGAL, was in deficit. However that ...
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    6 days ago
  • Community launch marks next step in addressing racism in education
    The launch of Te Hurihanganui in Porirua today is another important milestone in the work needed to address racism in the education system and improve outcomes for Māori learners and their whānau, Associate Education Minister Kelvin Davis says. Budget 2019 included $42 million over three years to put Te Hurihanganui ...
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    6 days ago
  • Government to consider recommendations on DNA use in criminal investigations
    The Minister of Justice has received the Law Commission’s recommending changes to the law governing the way DNA is used in criminal investigations. The report, called The Use of DNA in Criminal Investigations – Te Whahamahi I te Ira Tangata I ngā Mātai Taihara, recommends new legislation to address how ...
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    6 days ago
  • Speech to Wakatū Nelson regional hui on trade
    First, I want to express my thanks to Te Taumata for this hui and for all the fantastic work you are doing for Māori in the trade space. In the short time that you’ve been operating you’ve already contributed an enormous amount to the conversation, and developed impressive networks.  I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech to Primary Industries Summit
    Thank you for the opportunity to speak to you today about the significant contribution the food and fibres sector makes to New Zealand and how this Government is supporting that effort. I’d like to start by acknowledging our co-Chairs, Terry Copeland and Mavis Mullins, my colleague, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor, ...
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    6 days ago
  • Fast track referrals will speed up recovery and boost jobs and home building
    The Government is taking action to increase jobs, speed up the economic recovery and build houses by putting three more projects through its fast track approval process. “It’s great to see that the fast-track consenting process is working. Today we have referred a mix of potential projects that, if approved, ...
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    7 days ago
  • Papakāinga provides critically needed homes in Hastings
    A papakāinga opened today by the Minister for Māori Development the Hon Willie Jackson will provide whānau with much needed affordable rental homes in Hastings. The four home papakāinga in Waiōhiki is the first project to be completed under the ‘Hastings Place Based’ initiative. This initiative is a Government, Hastings ...
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    1 week ago
  • New Zealand ready to host APEC virtually
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern took over the leadership of APEC earlier today, when she joined leaders from the 21 APEC economies virtually for the forum’s final 2020 meeting. “We look forward to hosting a fully virtual APEC 2021 next year. While this isn’t an in-person meeting, it will be one ...
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    1 week ago
  • Revival of Māori Horticulturists
    The rapid revival of Māori horticulture was unmistakeable at this year’s Ahuwhenua Trophy Awards, with 2020 marking the first time this iconic Māori farming event was dedicated to horticulture enterprises. Congratulating finalists at the Awards, Māori Development Minister Willie Jackson said growing large-scale māra kai is part of Māori DNA. ...
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    1 week ago
  • Emergency benefit to help temporary visa holders
    From 1 December, people on temporary work, student or visitor visas who can’t return home and or support themselves may get an Emergency Benefit from the Ministry of Social Development, Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni announced today. Previously, temporary visa holders in hardship because of COVID-19 have had ...
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    1 week ago
  • School sustainability projects to help boost regional economies
    Forty one schools from the Far North to Southland will receive funding for projects that will reduce schools’ emissions and save them money, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. This is the second round of the Sustainability Contestable Fund, and work will begin immediately. The first round announced in April ...
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    1 week ago
  • Farmer-led projects to improve water health in Canterbury and Otago
    More than $6 million will be spent on helping farmers improve the health of rivers, wetlands, and habitat biodiversity in Canterbury and Otago, as well as improving long-term land management practices, says Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. Four farmer-led catchment group Jobs for Nature projects have between allocated between $176,000 and ...
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    1 week ago
  • Tupu Aotearoa continues expansion to Pacific communities in Nelson, Marlborough, Tasman & Northl...
    Pacific communities in Nelson, Marlborough, Tasman and Northland will benefit from the expansion of the Tupu Aotearoa programme announced today by the Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio. The programme provides sustainable employment and education pathways and will be delivered in partnership with three providers in Northland and two ...
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    1 week ago
  • New primary school and classrooms for 1,200 students in South Island
    Education Minister Chris Hipkins unveiled major school building projects across the South Island during a visit to Waimea College in Nelson today. It’s part of the Government’s latest investment of $164 million to build new classrooms and upgrade schools around the country. “Investments like this gives the construction industry certainty ...
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    1 week ago
  • Minister of Māori Development pays tribute to Rudy Taylor
      Today the Minister of Māori Development, alongside other Government Ministers and MP’s said their final farewells to Nga Puhi Leader Rudy Taylor.  “Rudy dedicated his life to the betterment of Māori, and his strong approach was always from the ground up, grassroots, sincere and unfaltering”  “Over the past few ...
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    1 week ago
  • Prime Minister to attend APEC Leaders’ Summit
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will attend the annual APEC Economic Leaders’ Meeting and associated events virtually today and tomorrow. “In a world where we cannot travel due to COVID-19, continuing close collaboration with our regional partners is key to accelerating New Zealand’s economic recovery,” Jacinda Ardern said. “There is wide ...
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    1 week ago
  • Speech to Infrastructure NZ Symposium
    Tena Koutou, Tena Koutou and thank you for inviting me to speak to you today. This is a critical time for New Zealand as we respond to the damage wreaked by the global COVID-19 pandemic. It is vital that investment in our economic recovery is well thought through, and makes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Pike River 10 Year Anniversary Commemorative Service
    Tēnei te mihi ki a tātau katoa e huihui nei i tēnei rā Ki a koutou ngā whānau o te hunga kua riro i kōnei – he mihi aroha ki a koutou Ki te hapori whānui – tēnā koutou Ki ngā tāngata whenua – tēnā koutou Ki ngā mate, e ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Huge investment in new and upgraded classrooms to boost construction jobs
    Around 7,500 students are set to benefit from the Government’s latest investment of $164 million to build new classrooms and upgrade schools around the country. “The election delivered a clear mandate to accelerate our economic recovery and build back better. That’s why we are prioritising construction projects in schools so more ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Keeping Pike River Mine promises 10 years on
    Ten years after the Pike River Mine tragedy in which 29 men lost their lives while at work, a commemorative service at Parliament has honoured them and their legacy of ensuring all New Zealand workplaces are safe. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern attended the event, along with representatives of the Pike ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Additional testing to strengthen border and increase safety of workers
    New testing measures are being put in place to increase the safety of border workers and further strengthen New Zealand’s barriers against COVID-19, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “These strengthened rules – to apply to all international airports and ports – build on the mandatory testing orders we’ve ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • More public housing delivered in Auckland
    The Government’s investment in public housing is delivering more warm, dry homes with today’s official opening of 82 new apartments in New Lynn by the Housing Minister Megan Woods. The Thom Street development replaces 16 houses built in the 1940s, with brand new fit-for-purpose public housing that is in high ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Agreement advanced to purchase up to 5 million COVID-19 vaccines
    The Government has confirmed an in-principle agreement to purchase up to 5 million COVID-19 vaccines – enough for 5 million people – from Janssen Pharmaceutica, subject to the vaccine successfully completing clinical trials and passing regulatory approvals in New Zealand, says Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods. “This agreement ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Jobs for Nature funding will leave a conservation legacy for Waikanae awa
    Ninety-two jobs will be created to help environmental restoration in the Waikanae River catchment through $8.5 million of Jobs for Nature funding, Conservation Minister Kiritapu Allan announced today. “The new funding will give a four-year boost to the restoration of the Waikanae awa, and is specifically focussed on restoration through ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • New Dunedin Hospital project progresses to next stage
    As the new Dunedin Hospital project progresses, the Government is changing the oversight group to provide more technical input, ensure continued local representation, and to make sure lessons learnt from Dunedin benefit other health infrastructure projects around the country. Concept design approval and the release of a tender for early ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Jump in apprentice and trainee numbers
    The number of New Zealanders taking up apprenticeships has increased nearly 50 percent, and the number of female apprentices has more than doubled. This comes as a Government campaign to raise the profile of vocational education and training (VET) begins. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced ...
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    2 weeks ago