web analytics

Bogus bullsh*t on the costs of copy and counterfeit

Written By: - Date published: 8:00 am, April 19th, 2010 - 10 comments
Categories: copyright - Tags: , , ,

Over the last decade or two there have been some extraordinary claims about the cost of copying and counterfeiting on businesses and economies. However there has been little information that hasn’t had some pretty major and almost certainly incorrect assumptions.

The US Government Accountability Office (GAO) has released a report (PDF) done on under the provisions of the PRO-IP law. It doesn’t sound too promising at being able to get any kind of even moderately accurate measures.

According to experts we spoke with and literature we reviewed, estimating the economic impact of IP infringements is extremely difficult, and assumptions must be used due to the absence of data. Assumptions, such as the rate at which consumers would substitute counterfeit goods  for legitimate products, can have enormous impacts on the resulting estimates and heighten the importance of transparency

Commerce and FBI officials told us they rely on industry statistics on counterfeit and pirated goods and do not conduct any original data gathering to assess the economic impact of counterfeit and pirated goods on the U.S. economy or domestic industries. However, according to experts and government officials, industry associations do not always disclose their proprietary data sources and methods, making it difficult to verify their estimates.

The US government really doesn’t appear to have done much work on the issue. When the study looked for the sources.. Well you’d have to read this and weep…

Three commonly cited estimates of U.S. industry losses due to counterfeiting have been sourced to U.S. agencies, but cannot be substantiated or traced back to an underlying data source or methodology.

First, a number of industry, media, and government publications have cited an FBI estimate that U.S. businesses lose $200-$250 billion to counterfeiting on an annual basis. This estimate was contained in a 2002 FBI press release, but FBI officials told us that it has no record of source data or methodology for generating the estimate and that it cannot be corroborated.

Second, a 2002 CBP press release contained an estimate that U.S. businesses and industries lose $200 billion a year in revenue and 750,000 jobs due to counterfeits of merchandise. However, a CBP official stated that these figures are of uncertain origin, have been discredited, and are no longer used by CBP. A March 2009 CBP internal memo was circulated to inform staff not to use the figures. However, another entity within DHS continues to use them.

Third, the Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association reported an estimate that the U.S. automotive parts industry has lost $3 billion in sales due to counterfeit goods and attributed the figure to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The OECD has also referenced this estimate in its report on counterfeiting and piracy, citing the association report that is sourced to the FTC. However, when we contacted FTC officials to substantiate the estimate, they were unable to locate any record or source of this estimate within its reports or archives, and officials could not recall the agency ever developing or using this estimate.

These estimates attributed to FBI, CBP, and FTC continue to be referenced by various industry and government sources as evidence of the significance of the counterfeiting and piracy problem to the U.S. economy.

The GAO looked at a rather large number of surveys and estimates by various bodies and people. They didn’t sound too happy with the methodology of any of them.

While experts and literature we reviewed provided different examples of effects on the U.S. economy, most observed that despite significant efforts, it is difficult, if not impossible, to quantify the net effect of counterfeiting and piracy on the economy as a whole. For example, as previously discussed, OECD attempted to develop an estimate of the economic impact of counterfeiting and concluded that an acceptable overall estimate of counterfeit goods could not be developed. OECD further stated that information that can be obtained, such as data on enforcement and information developed through surveys, ‘has significant limitations, however, and falls far short of what is needed to develop a robust overall estimate.’ One expert characterized the attempt to quantify the overall economic impact of counterfeiting as ‘fruitless,’ while another stated that any estimate is highly suspect since this is covert trade and the numbers are all ‘guesstimates.’

Reading the report was fascinating with a strongly discernible sense of frustration by the GAO. It is only 41 pages and quite legible for the layperson. It gives a better idea about the current state of the duplication debates than anything else I’ve seen.

ars technicia, one of my favorite technology sites reviewed the report with the appropriate title of “US government finally admits most piracy estimates are bogus“.

Why is the government even looking into this issue? It’s all due to the PRO-IP Act, which passed under President Bush and has led President Obama to appoint an Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator within the White House. Part of the IPEC’s duties include gathering data on piracy and counterfeiting, and current IPEC Victoria Espinel is now rounding up that data. The GAO report is part of this process, and it certainly doesn’t make industry estimates look compelling.

This is ironic for a bill that was backed by the big rightsholders; even its acronym, the PRO-IP Act, shows what it was supposed to do. But, by hauling the black art of “piracy surveys” into the light, the PRO-IP Act is forcing rightsholders to tone down some of their more specific and alarmist rhetoric.

None of this is to say that piracy and counterfeiting aren’t real problems. The GAO accepts that the problem is “sizeable,” but it also points out just how much bad data is used to produce these studies. Actual dollar figures and job loss numbers should be handled with extreme care and a good bit of skepticism; the GAO also noted that numerous experts told it that “there were positive effects [from piracy on the economy] and they should be assessed as well.”

This is a helpful, level-headed review from the GAO, one that (hopefully) brings some of the debates over digital infringement into saner territory.

Unfortunately these bogus studies and numbers have been framing the debate leading up to the current ACTA talks. Quite simply no-one appears to have even a remote handle on the scale and costs of various types of violations of copyright, trademark, and patent.

The only thing that you can be sure of is that if someone starts putting numbers to the costs, then they’re almost certainly wrong, and probably wrong by orders of magnitude. It is likely that they will quote from one of the studies looked at in this report or using a methodology derived from it. Quite simply, those studies are probably all pretty bogus. This means that treaties and law based on these false numbers are probably as likely to do economic harm as they are to do good.

Lawmakers should really be looking at overhauling the basis of intellectual property from the ground up based on the current and probable future technologies. They shouldn’t be swayed by the protestations of lobbyists waving their latest surveys full of questionable numbers and assumptions.

In the end result, in my opinion, most businesses affected by counterfeiting and copying need to look at their business models to find out how to satisfy the consumers of their product more effectively. The costs of duplication, distribution, and even marketing are reducing as the information age takes hold. Generally this is not being reflected in the prices of many products because of inadequate and increasingly obsolete business models. This leaves a significant differential that the counterfeiters exploit. That is the problem that needs to be addressed.

I’d suggest that people have a read of the body of work that Clare Curran has been writing at Red Alert on copyright and ACTA.

hat-tip: Draco T Bastard in comments and Quoth The Raven in comments at Red Alert

10 comments on “Bogus bullsh*t on the costs of copy and counterfeit ”

  1. Quoth the Raven 1

    I linked to this one a while back, but it’s relevant here: Yet Another (Yes, Another) Study Shows File Sharers Buy More

    Pretty much every single non-industry-backed study has shown this same thing, but just for the record, here’s yet another study showing that those who engage in unauthorized file sharing end up buying more media. The study, looking at the UK (home of the new proposal to kick people off the internet), wasn’t even close. Those who engaged in unauthorized file sharing tended to spend £77 on media per year, while those who did not spent about £44. And yet file sharers are the enemy? And the industry wants to kick them offline so they discover less new content? How will that help?

    • lprent 1.1

      That has been the case with me. I’ll frequently get some music on some media given to me by a friend, play it a few times, dig some more off youtube, and then buy 6 albums from Amazon. When the lumps of plastic arrive here, they will get stripped on to my linux workstation and then the plastic is filed with all of the other useless plastic that I have to cart around and store for the benefit of some dick-arse music company.

      The music will get backed up onto my linux laptop with an extra copy on the external HDD. If it is really lucky it may earn a place of honour on my iphone.

      Quite simply I want to pay for the content and download it. I’m uninterested in paying for the plastic and packaging. I’m uninterested in playing around with DRM because it is obnoxious crap that gets in my way and seldom ever works, especially on linux, or when I shift motherboards. I don’t mind paying for music, but i really can’t stand the crap and inflated prices for stuff I don’t use, need, or want.

      Which reminds me. Does anyone have an alternative to that pile of software bloat called iTunes? Using it to load music to the iPhone is an exercise in futility. It really doesn’t seem to understand the idea that I have a lot of computers and all I want it to do is store a playlist of a thousand or so tracks at a time on the iPhone.

      • Draco T Bastard 1.1.1

        AFAIK, iTunes (which I refuse to use because it’s bloody horrible) is a proprietary piece of software and copying it’s functions will land you in court. This will cost you a large chunk of money and there’s no guarantee that you’ll be able to market your software. Actually, I’d go so far as to say that it would be almost impossible for you to market your software.

        End result: Bloody horrible software that can’t be improved through competition due to the monopolistic restrictions placed upon it by capitalism.

        There’s a reason why I keep saying that government should set standards*. Once set, nobody creating to that standard can be taken to court. This would actually bring about the benefits of competition that are presently being actively repressed by the capitalist model.

        * Please not: I said set standards not create them. They would also need to be international standards.

      • Rich 1.1.2

        Sell your iPhone and get a Nexus One.

        Mind you, it’s over a grand, isn’t as slick as Appl€ product and mine hasn’t arrived yet, but when it does, I’ll be able to write programs and distribute them without a veto from Apple.

      • Quoth the Raven 1.1.3

        I stay away from Apple altogether.

  2. ropata 2

    The venerable Winamp has the ability to sync an iPod, dunno about an iPhone. Used it for yonks.
    Then I used Songbird for a while, it’s quite a nice open source iTunes imitation with some great features but it feels bloated too.
    (I gave up and went back to iTunes, it’s annoying but good for finding podcasts and free stuff)
    (4000+ songs on my iPod Classic, mostly CD rips, honest! 🙂

    • lprent 2.1

      Tried Songbird. From memory it’d do an iPod, but not an iPhone (which was kind of weird).

      Winamp, I’ll bet doesn’t have a linux version. I used to use MediaMonkey when I booted in windoze to fill an iPod.

      The other problem with iTunes is that it doesn’t run well under WINE, and so to use it on any of my machines apart from the mac mini that is powering the TV, I have to start up a virtualbox with bloody iTunes sucking the life out of it.

  3. felix 3

    Nah, winamp is strictly windoze (the clue is in the name) but it’s supposed to run pretty good under WINE.

    Tried this one? XMMS I haven’t but apparently it’s based on winamp. Don’t know about ipod/iphone support.

  4. Descendant Of Smith 4

    Copyright infringement estimates are also not the same thing as lost revenue.

    If a 10 year old kid has several thousand songs on his PC that he has taken off the internet that hardly represents less sales. The ten year old kid (most likely) didn’t have the income to buy them in the first place.

    If I convert my purchased DVD to Divx so I can stream it over my home network via my Xbox it’s quite clear I was never going to go and buy a Divx copy even if it was available – which it’s not.

    If I convert my unavailable punk rock records from the 70’s to MP3 I can now presumably do this under the current law which allows for format shifting.

    There was a Q&A around format shifting at the time.

    The big hypocrisy was always when Apple sold Ipods all over the world which allowed you to copy your music to them and were sold for that purpose without any legal protection for people to do this in most countries they were sold in.

    Didn’t see Sony or any other record company threatening to take Apple to court for providing the means to pirate their music.

    Format Shifting

    Why is there a format shifting provision and why is it limited to sound recordings?

    The new format shifting provision responds to the concern that people want to transfer music they have legitimately bought onto different devices to take advantage of new technology. It also recognises this has been common practice for a long time.

    The markets for audio visual works and music are evolving, they are different. There are numerous business models for audiovisual works that do not apply to music. Theatrical release, commercial rental (both physical and online models), free-to-air TV and pay TV do not have counterparts of any significant extent for music. It is also unlikely that consumption of audio visual works “on the move” using mp3 players and the like will ever be as ubiquitous as for music. It is not, therefore, possible to simply apply the conclusions reached about music to audio visual works.

    Does the Act specify any special conditions that must be adhered to when format shifting?

    Yes, you may only copy music that has been lawfully acquired for your personal use or the personal use of a member of the same household where you live. You can only make one copy for each music playing device that you own (that is your CD player, your iPod etc), Furthermore, you must retain both the original copy of the music from which the format shift copy was made and the copy you make under the format shifting provision.

    The changes to the Act do not legitimise the copying of music for friends or online file-sharing; both actions remain an infringement of copyright.

    Can the copyright owner specify any conditions for format shifting?

    Yes, the default position under copyright law allows copyright owners and users to contract out of the format shifting exception. If music is bought subject to conditions, for example, the number of copies that can be made for personal use, then those conditions will override the format shifting exemption in the Act.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Strengthening the relationship with India
    The Foreign Minister says an historic visit to Aotearoa New Zealand by the Indian Foreign Minister provides an opportunity to strengthen the relationship in areas like people to people exchanges and climate action. Nanaia Mahuta today welcomed Minister of External Affairs Dr. Subrahmanyam Jaishankar with a mihi whakatau ceremony and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 hour ago
  • Prime Minister’s Christmas Card Competition
    It’s that time of year again! If you’d like to help design the Prime Minister’s official Christmas card, here’s how to take part: Draw, paint, sketch or craft an image you’d like to see on the front of this year’s Christmas card. It can be anything you want – ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • Construction starts on Taranaki’s largest ever roading project
    Associate Minister of Transport Kieran McAnulty was joined this morning by Ngāti Tama, local councillors and board members, project representatives, and community to mark the official start of construction on Taranaki’s largest ever roading project, Te Ara o Te Ata: Mt Messenger Bypass. “The work started today will make sure ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 hours ago
  • Hundreds to benefit from additional maternal health support
    The Government’s Budget 2022 investment of $10.1 million over four years in maternal mental health will result in better and more widely available care for new and expectant mothers around the country. The funding will be invested to fill gaps in care identified by last year’s maternal mental health stocktake ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Planting forests that are good for nature, climate, and the economy
    Public consultation opens on how forests are managed through the National Environmental Standards for Plantation Forestry (NES-PF), including: Giving local councils more control over where forests are planted   Managing the effects of exotic carbon forestry on nature Improving wildfire management in all forests. Addressing the key findings of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 hours ago
  • Trade Minister heads to CPTPP Commission Meeting
    Minister for Trade and Export Growth, Damien O’Connor will travel to Singapore this week for the Sixth Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) Commission Meeting. “Continuing to build on our export growth is a key part of the Government’s economic plan. Our two way trade with the CPTPP bloc accounts ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Strong Government books leave New Zealand well placed amid global challenges
      Deficit half of forecast at $9.7 billion; Deficits as a percentage of GDP running better than during GFC Net debt at 17.2 percent of GDP lower than Australia, UK, US and Canada. Core expenses $2.8 billion lower than forecast. Increased expenditure during year due to COVID-related expenses through unprecedented ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Ministers outline next phase of Milford Opportunities Project
    The Milford Opportunities Project is entering its next phase following a productive visit to Piopiotahi to hear directly from tourism operators, iwi and the unit undertaking feasibility planning, says Conservation Minister Poto Williams. In June 2021 Cabinet approved $15 million to fund the next stage of the Milford Opportunities Project, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Digital tools to make family violence support widely available
    Associate Minister for Social Development and Employment Priyanca Radhakrishnan has officially launched a suite of new digital tools to support people affected by family violence. “Family violence is a scourge on our society and violent behaviour of any kind is absolutely unacceptable. We are taking the important steps to modernise ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Plan for big boost in GP training numbers
    More support is being given to New Zealand medical graduates training to be GPs, as the Government continues its push to get more doctors into communities. “Growing the number of GPs is vital so we can fill today’s gaps and make sure we’ve got the doctors we need in the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • 142,000 Kiwis helped by Healthy Homes Initiative
    Hospitalisations reduced by 19.8 percent School attendance increased by 3 percent Employment increased by 4 percent 100,000 interventions delivered, including insulation, heaters, curtains and repairs Nationwide rollout expected to be complete by the end of the year More than 31,000 children, pregnant people and 111,000 of their family members are ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Minister of Defence departs for Middle East
    Minister of Defence Peeni Henare has today departed for the Middle East where he will visit New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) personnel deployed within the region, including in Operation Gallant Phoenix in Jordan and the Multinational Force and Observers mission on the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. The Minister will also undertake ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government funds work to clean up six contaminated sites
    The Government has announced funding to clean up six contaminated sites to reduce the risk to public health and protect the environment.    “These six projects will help protect the public from health risks associated with hazardous materials, so New Zealanders can live in a cleaner, safer environment.” Environment Minister David Parker ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government partners with industry to reduce agricultural emissions
    New Zealand’s effort to reduce agricultural emissions has taken a step forward with the signing of a memorandum of understanding by Government with agribusiness leaders, in a joint venture as part of the new Centre for Climate Action on Agricultural Emissions, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced. The Ministry for Primary Industries signed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Vosa Vakaviti sustains generations of Fijians
    The enduring strength and sustainability of Vosa Vakaviti is being celebrated by the Fijian community in Aotearoa New Zealand during Macawa ni Vosa Vakaviti – Fijian Language Week, which gets underway today. “This year’s theme, ‘Me vakabulabulataki, vakamareqeti, ka vakaqaqacotaki na vosa Vakaviti’, which translates as ‘Nurture, Preserve and Sustain ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New Zealand condemns Russia’s annexation attempts
    New Zealand condemns unequivocally Russia’s attempts to illegally annex Russia-occupied regions of Ukraine, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says. “We do not recognise these illegal attempts to change Ukraine’s borders or territorial sovereignty,” Jacinda Ardern said. “Russia’s sham referenda in Luhansk, Donetsk, Kherson and Zaporizhzhia are illegitimate, and have no legal ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government provides confidence to those seeking an adventure
    With our borders opened and tourists returning, those seeking out adventurous activities can do so more safely due to the steps we’ve taken to improve the health and safety regulatory regime for adventure activities, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood has announced.  “We are seeing international visitor numbers begin ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New hospital opens for Wellington children
    A new children’s hospital that officially opened in Wellington this morning offers the region’s children top-quality health care in one place, Health Minister Andrew Little says. Te Wao Nui has been built with a $53 million contribution from benefactors Mark Dunajtschik and Dorothy Spotswood, with the Government contributing another $53 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • More single-use plastics banned from tomorrow
    Single-use plastic cotton buds, drink stirrers and most plastic meat trays are among single use plastics banned from sale or manufacture from tomorrow. “This is the first group of the most problematic plastic products to be banned in a progressive phase out over the next three years,” Environment Minister David ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech to NZDF Command and Staff College
    It’s a pleasure to join you today – and I extend a particular welcome to Marty Donoghue (a member of the Public Advisory Committee on Disarmament and Arms Control) and Athena Li-Watts (interning with me this week) who are also joining me today. On the face of it, some ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Milestone of half a million mental health sessions delivered
    The Government’s flagship primary mental health and addiction programme Access and Choice has hit the milestone of delivering more than 500,000 sessions to New Zealanders needing mental health support. Health Minister Andrew Little made the announcement at ADL – Thrive Pae Ora in Cromwell which provides mental wellbeing support services ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government continues to future-proof arts, culture and heritage sector
    The Government has announced further support for the recovery and resilience of the arts, culture and heritage sector as part of its COVID Recovery Programme’s Innovation Fund. “We’re continuing to secure the recovery of our arts, culture and heritage in Aotearoa New Zealand by supporting transformational initiatives across the motu,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government steps up kauri protection
    The Government is delivering on an election commitment to protect kauri in our northern forests through the new National Pest Management Plan (NPMP) for the forest giant and the allocation of $32 million of funding to back the coordinated effort, Biosecurity Minister Damien O'Connor and Associate Environment Minister (Biodiversity) ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Russia’s Ukraine referenda a sham
    Aotearoa New Zealand does not recognise the results of the sham referenda in Russia-occupied regions of Ukraine, Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta says.  “These so-called referenda were not free or fair, and they very clearly were not held in accordance with democratic principles,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “Instead, they were hastily organised ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Govt invests in New Zealand’s wine future
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has officially opened New Zealand Wine Centre–Te Pokapū Wāina o Aotearoa in Blenheim today, saying that investments like these give us cause for optimism for the future. Funding of $3.79 million for the Marlborough Research Centre to build a national wine centre was announced in 2020, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Appointment of Judges of the Court Martial Appeal Court
    Attorney-General David Parker today announced the appointment of Colonel Craig Ruane, Commander Robyn Loversidge, and James Wilding KC as Judges of the Court Martial Appeal Court. The Court Martial Appeal Court is a senior court of record established under the Court Martial Appeals Act 1953. It is summoned by the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government strengthens measures to combat migrant worker exploitation
    Offence and penalty regime significantly strengthened New infringement offences for non-compliance Public register of individuals and businesses that are found guilty of migrant exploitation New community-led pilot to educate migrants workers and employers of employment rights Implemented reporting tools successfully brings exploitation out of the shadows Take-up of protective visa ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Livestock exports by sea to cease
    The passing of a Bill today to end the export of livestock by sea will protect New Zealand’s reputation for world-leading animal welfare standards, Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor said. “The Animal Welfare Amendment Bill future-proofs our economic security amid increasing consumer scrutiny across the board on production practices," Damien ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Extra measures to increase census turnout in 2023
    3500 census workers on the ground, twice as many as last census More forms to be delivered – 44% compared to 3% in 2018 Prioritisation of Māori and other groups and regions with lower response rates in 2018 Major work to ensure the delivery of a successful census in 2023 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Shining the light on screen workers
    Improved working conditions for workers in the screen industry is now a reality with the Screen Industry Workers Bill passing its third reading today, announced Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood. “It’s fantastic to see the Screen Industry Workers Bill progress through Parliament. The new Act will strengthen protections ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Mental health resources for young people and schools launched
    Associate Minister of Education (School Operations) Jan Tinetti and Associate Minister of Education (Māori Education) Kelvin Davis have today launched two new resources to support wellbeing, and the teaching and learning of mental health education in schools and kura. “Students who are happy and healthy learn better. These resources ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Progress continues on future-proofing Auckland’s transport infrastructure
    Transport Minister Michael Wood has welcomed the latest progress on Auckland’s two most transformational transport projects in a generation – Auckland Light Rail and the Additional Waitematā Harbour Connections. Auckland Light Rail and Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency have named preferred bidders to move each project to their next phase, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government supports local innovation in homelessness prevention
    Ten successful applicants in round two of the Local Innovation and Partnership Fund (LIPF) Close to $6 million allocated as part of the Homelessness Action Plan (HAP) Māori, Pasefika and rangatahi a strong focus Round three opening later this year with up to $6.8 million available. Government is stepping up ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • More medicines for New Zealanders, thanks to Govt’s Budget boost
    Health Minister Andrew Little is welcoming news that two more important medicines are set to be funded, thanks to the Government’s big boost to the country’s medicines budget. “Since coming into Government in 2017, the Labour Government has increased Pharmac’s funding by 43 per cent, including a $71 million boost ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government delivers ACC change to support 28,000 parents
    The Maternal Birth Injury and Other Matters Bill passes Third Reading – the first amendment to ACC legislation of its kind From 1 October 2022, new ACC cover to benefit approximately 28,000 birthing parents Additional maternal birth injuries added alongside new review provision to ensure cover remains comprehensive Greater clarity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Further cuts for East Coast tarakihi limits to rebuild numbers faster
    Commercial catch limits for East Coast tarakihi will be reduced further to help the stock rebuild faster. “Tarakihi is a popular fish, and this has led to declining levels over time. Many adjustments have been made and the stock is recovering. I have decided on further commercial catch reductions of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Ambassador to Colombia announced
    Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of diplomat Nicci Stilwell as the next Ambassador to Colombia. “Aotearoa New Zealand’s relationship with Colombia is fast growing with strong links across education, climate change and indigenous co-operation,” Nanaia Mahuta said.  “Trade is a key part of our relationship with Colombia, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • 3000 more RSE workers to ease workforce pressures
    The Government continues to respond to global workforce shortages by announcing the largest increase in over a decade to the Recognised Seasonal Employer Scheme (RSE), providing 3000 additional places, Immigration Minister Michael Wood and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor have announced. The new RSE cap will allow access to 19,000 workers ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Sanctions on more of the Russian political elite
    Further sanctions are being imposed on members of President Putin’s inner circle and other representatives of the Russian political elite, as part of the Governments ongoing response to the war in Ukraine, says Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta. “Ukraine has been clear that the most important action we can take to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Principal Youth Court Judge appointed
    Judge Ida Malosi, District Court Judge of Wellington, has been appointed as the new Principal Youth Court Judge, Attorney-General David Parker announced today. Born and raised in Southland, Judge Malosi graduated from Victoria University of Wellington and spent her legal career in South Auckland.  She was a founding partner of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago