web analytics

CTU Alternative Economic Strategy

Written By: - Date published: 4:00 pm, October 30th, 2009 - 24 comments
Categories: economy, workers' rights - Tags:

If you watched the media coverage of last week’s Council of Trade Unions conference you’ll have walked away thinking it was about John Key telling teachers to take a pay cut and some woman threatening to throw a shoe at him.

Entirely missed was the launch of the CTU’s Alternative Economic Strategy. That’s a pity, because at a time when neoliberalism’s failures are more apparent than ever we deserve better than the National-ACT-Treasury echo chamber that currently dominates our economic debate.

Below is a piece from Bill Rosenberg in the latest CTU Economic Bulletin about why the strategy’s needed and how unions and progressive forces can start building a stronger, fairer and more sustainable economic system.

_____

Seeking Alternatives
Bill Rosenberg, CTU Economist

Discussion on an Alternative Economic Strategy was launched at the CTU Biennial Conference last week. It will be considered by affiliates over the next 6 months, with the intention to finalise it in June 2010. There were two papers provided to the Biennial Conference a short discussion paper and a longer background paper with much more detail. Both are available on the CTU website.

The strategy originally arose from requests from affiliates for proposals on an alternative political economy. But it is particularly timely. The global financial and economic crisis has illustrated the recklessness of deregulated capitalism and demands rethinking of economic assumptions, ideas and policies. And for many people in New Zealand and the world, the economy simply does not work for them, whether it is massive inequalities, unacceptable levels of poverty, in New Zealand and around the world, unfair wage systems, or unsustainable demands on our environment.

This is a major crisis in historical terms the worst financial crisis since the 1930s Depression. It grew out of international policies of domestic and international deregulation and particularly the excessive influence of deregulated finance capital in the economy.

The equivalent of almost two months output of the world economy has been lost US$8 trillion. To the extent it has not been as bad as feared, it is because of government stimulus programmes totalling US$5.5 trillion so far in the US, Europe and Asia, which will leave all the governments affected deeply in debt, and workers paying for it. Despite US$1.9 trillion spent internationally to bail out banks, many are back to their old ways and we are still not sure the financial system is stable.

The United Nations estimates that ‘between 73 and 103 million more people will remain poor or fall into poverty’ as a result of the crisis, mainly in East and South Asia. The economies of the richest countries, those in the OECD, are expected to contract by 4.1 percent in 2009 and unemployment is expected to be at 8.3 percent at the end of 2009 and reach 9.8 percent in 2010.

The economic theories which justify the approach to managing an economy which encourages these trends are commonly known as ‘neoliberalism’. They suited the interests of the large corporations which wanted to expand internationally and the finance sector which funded them. Neoliberalism has at its heart the belief that unregulated markets will produce optimal results for an economy, and that there is little role for government other than to set and enforce the rules that allow the market to function. But contrary to what we are told, there are always alternatives.

Looking at New Zealand it is almost exactly 25 years since the 1984 Labour government was elected and brought neoliberal policies to New Zealand. It was unsuccessful even in its own terms, but hugely destructive of society. Despite enormous pain during the late 1980s and 1990s, there have been weak gains.

ctugraph500

Growth in the economy has been weak compared to other OECD countries, such as Australia, as illustrated in the above graph. This is a symptom of weak productivity growth. Companies have relied on low wages rather than investing to increase productivity, which would in turn allow increases in wages. All this means that there are insufficient parts of the economy which can compete internationally. Exports are hindered by an exchange rate driven by international capital movements rather than the real economy. The economy has been very successful at attracting foreign investment, but it is often low quality. Our international liabilities are at unsustainable levels which drive a constantly high current account deficit creating yet more debt which there is insufficient saving in New Zealand to cover.

Worse, though, have been the effects on working people and beneficiaries. We looked at wages in the September Economic Bulletin. Wages have only just kept up with rising prices. They fell in real terms in the early 1980s and never really recovered. Working people’s incomes have missed out on the substantial productivity increases that have occurred since 1980.

This has helped drive the fastest rising inequality in the 1990s in the OECD, and unacceptable levels of poverty. Poverty peaked in 1994, when one measure showed 26 percent of the population in poverty and 36 percent of children. In 2008 up to 18 percent of the population could still be described as living in poverty and 22 percent of children. Income related rents and Working for Families made a difference for people with paid work but not for low income households whose main source of income is from an income-tested benefit or New Zealand Superannuation. These measures stopped inequality growing rather than reversing the trend.

There are a large number of policy proposals in the Background paper. Many are still sketchy and all are up for debate. They are based on principles (detailed in the Background paper) of Fairness, Participation, Security, Improving living standards, and Sustainability; and a three-pillar framework of Sustainable economic development; Decent work and a good life; and Voice: real participation in workplace, economic and community decision-making. Some examples:

  • Government support of firms, with conditions such as employment creation; export or import substitution potential; and industry standard employment agreements
  • Buy back Telecom’s physical network and begin to buy back the electricity system
  • Stabilise the exchange rate through management of international capital flows and currency controls in cooperation with other nations
  • Finance for local investment through Kiwi bonds, and the NZ Super Fund.
  • A new internationalism: emphasising the need for cooperation rather than always a market approach (such as in trade agreements)
  • Introduce a 45% tax rate for incomes over $150,000
  • A capital gains tax exempting primary homes
  • A Green New Deal
  • Flexisecurity combining employment security with employer and worker flexibility and providing 90% income replacement on job loss for the first year and active labour market policies for those out of work
  • The right for workers to require a Pay and Employment Equity workplace assessment
  • Low interest funding for new housing through the Reserve Bank in the short term and in the longer run, creating a National Housing Strategy
  • 6% compulsory employer Kiwisaver contributions (phased in over 4 years)
  • Improved worker participation and depth and diversity of the news media

We hope that these papers provide a useful framework for a healthy and informed debate that will help take the union movement, and progressive forces within New Zealand, forward to a better society.

[The whole document is available here]

24 comments on “CTU Alternative Economic Strategy ”

  1. Jcw 1

    Flexisecurity combining employment security with employer and worker flexibility and providing 90% income replacement on job loss for the first year and active labour market policies for those out of work.

    Perhaps the worst proposal there. Totally unfundable, not to mention it provides disincentive to seek work for an entire year.

  2. Herodotus 2

    As with JCW there are a few items onthis discussion document that worry me, that you are going to far. At least unlike the Labour party you are putting something tangable out there. Many items are very valid. I am affraid that such discussions will be marginalised by far more important issues being driven by personnalities. Some by poor decision making and others as a diversion. e.g trev and his bike, Bill and his house, Jk and his smile & Rodney and his love life.
    I look forward t hearing and hopfully having some input (evan as a blogger input). As I believe that until we have real debate on issues WE ALL LOSE, no matter who is in power.

  3. Bill 3

    They have the gall to header this tosh ‘Seeking Alternatives’?

    Hurry up and find those three pillars chaps! And don’t go running off down that third or fourth way. No, no. Quick! Propose the mysterious ‘no label’ way.

    Everyone else calls it the mixed Capitalist market economy way, but hey, you can’t sell the discredited same old same old if you call it by it’s real name.

    Scandinavian model is Capitalism. Green new deal is Capitalism. Your workers cooperatives are wholly dependent upon a Capitalist financial framework and therefore capitalist And the rest of what I’ve read so far is all regulation and nationalisation.

    And they call themselves unionists?

    What about ending the exploitation? The wage slavery? What about proposing something that is actually progressive rather than diminishing the term by tying it to a soft cock intellectual wank on.

    Pertinent comments on the ‘Treasury Provides cover for Nat’s right Wing Agenda’ thread, but I suspect that effective, straight forward simplicity is the last thing they want.

    • Quoth the Raven 3.1

      And they call themselves unionists?

      They have every right to call themselves unionists. I support unionism (though not the economic proposals above) and worker self-management. Do you think all unionists have to be anti-market like you? In fact I know of many who are pro-free market and members of the IWW.

      Scandinavian model is Capitalism. Green new deal is Capitalism. Your workers cooperatives are wholly dependent upon a Capitalist financial framework and therefore capitalist And the rest of what I’ve read so far is all regulation and nationalisation.

      Agreed witht he first two. But the third is no reason to oppose worker co-ops. Co-ops are great for workers. They still have to raise capital. You can support one and oppose the other. Also the cooperative movement has always had its involvement with mutual banking and credit. I think you may just oppose them becasue they are still market entities.

      • Bill 3.1.1

        Do you know any wobs who are pro capitalist Quoth? I’d sincerely hope not.

        My criticism of this bullshit document might be better put by proposing an alternative title ” How the CTU proposes to save Capitalism”

        On the co-op front, I think that the proposals in the document are fucking ludicrous and would result in co-operatives in name only insofar as they are wedded to profit motive and (it seems) to be utterly dependent on external financial structures for ever and the day. What are the internal structures? do they perpetuate exploitative divisions of labour? I doubt the CTU authors even bothered to ask such fundamental questions

        I’m a strong advocate of workers collectives. You know that, or should do from previous comments I’ve made here. In my experience, workers collectives stand in opposition to exploitative models of capitalist production rather than being ‘feel good’ mimics of those models.

        • Quoth the Raven 3.1.1.1

          Do you know any wobs who are pro capitalist Quoth? I’d sincerely hope not.

          I suppose it depends on your definition of capitalism Bill, but not what most people think of.

          I see no merit in the CTUs plans either.

          The internal structure is important, but by definition it’s going to be at least somewhat better than the standard firm.

          I don’t see any reason to oppose it simply because they need to get external finance. They have to start somewhere.

          • Draco T Bastard 3.1.1.1.1

            When in doubt, use a dictionary – that way there won’t be any confusion…

            hahahahaha

            yeah, right – I was joking 😛

            The problem is that there are, essentially, two meanings for the word capitalism. The first is the one in the dictionary and the second could be defined as financial capitalism which is more concerned with the creation, accumulation and control of money (ie, banking). Bill seems to be more concerned with the latter in this instance than the former but I’m pretty sure he doesn’t like the former either.

            • Quoth the Raven 3.1.1.1.1.1

              To the second. The creation and control of money are operations of the state. Hence the free market argument against fiat money.

            • RedLogix 3.1.1.1.1.2

              The creation and control of money are operations of the state.

              So you’re a Chartalist then?

              You may be interested in Bill Mitchell’s work.

            • Quoth the Raven 3.1.1.1.1.3

              Hadn’t heard of them. I’m merely skeptical of fiat money.

            • RedLogix 3.1.1.1.1.4

              Neither had I until Steven Keen very generously referenced Bill Mitchell here.

              Turns out that the vast majority of money in existence is not govt printed fiat money, not even when leveraged by the famous ‘money multiplier’ effect… most of the money in circulation is pure credit, brought into existence solely through the operation of banks making mortgages, overdrafts and credit cards.

              The vital question I have never been able to satisfactorily answer is, why do privately owned banks have the privilege of creating credit and then charging interest? How did private entities gain this virtual monopoly over money supply?

              The Chartalist argument put simply, restores the right of money creation back to the State where it rightfully belongs.

            • Quoth the Raven 3.1.1.1.1.5

              Red – You can’t escape central banks. They print the money. They’re the banker’s bank. I simply cannot see how they could possibly have the privilege you speak of without central banking. Try reading the relevant chapters of Rothbard’s Mystery of Banking

            • RedLogix 3.1.1.1.1.6

              If Central Bank fiat money was the sole arbiter of money supply then following the classical ‘money multiplier’ effect, the total money supply would be M0 divided by the prevailing Reserve Ratios (typically about 10%). ie M3 = M0/0.1

              But in reality the M3 supply is many, many times this value. It got so out of control by 2005 that the US govt stopped publishing M3 numbers cos they were just plain embarrasing. The fact is that what we really have is a pure credit money supply system, with a small central bank fiat money system retained for cosmetic and ideological purposes.

              Yesterday I posed the question, why is it that everyone gets panicky and obsessive with unions driving wage inflation (when unions have been regulated to an inch of their lives and haven’t driven inflation in decades)… but we blithely accept asset price inflation driven by a lightly regulated banking industry printing uncontrolled amounts of credit?

            • Quoth the Raven 3.1.1.1.1.7

              Red – I’m not an expert on this but I believe the answer comes back to fractional reserve banking. You’ve got to ask yourself how fractional reserve banking could occur to the extent it does now on the free market. The answer as Rothbard notes in that piece is either you enforce a greater reserve or have free banking.

      • rave 3.1.2

        Ravin do you mean IWW as in international wankers of the world?
        Free market unions is an oxymoron. The free market advocates consider all individuals to be sovereign and as soon individuals ‘combine’ (read conspire) to form a ‘union’ they are taking advantage of individuals like Bill Gates and Warren Buffet who of course have a backroom combination going with the Federal Reserve, the military,the media, the church and anyone else who props up the capitalist system.
        The problem with the old recycled AES of the union tops is that it is dumb and doesnt see this reality and hopes that by getting down on its knees and sucking they will get more than a kick in the teeth.
        The crisis wasnt caused by deregulated finance capital, but by a surplus of profits that went into speculation instead of production. And there is nothing in the system to stop this happening again and again until it is thrown out. Regulation is no answer, revolution is.

        • Quoth the Raven 3.1.2.1

          Trust a marxist to call workers wankers.

          Regulation is no answer. I agree there.

          All individuals aren’t sovereign now, but they ought to be. I believe that.

          Free market unions are not an oxymoron. Unions are part of the market. They are private entities involved in bargaining on the market.

          The crisis wasnt caused by deregulated finance capital, but by a surplus of profits that went into speculation instead of production. And there is nothing in the system to stop this happening again and again until it is thrown out. Regulation is no answer, revolution is.

          The causes of the crisis were multiple. You mentioned the federal reserve. Why don’t you look at that and the rest of the state’s role in this crisis. As to the “surplus of profits” one would think considering Marx’s predicitions that in all the time past since his time it would be pretty bloody low by now, or not?

          Evolution not revolution is the answer.

    • roger nome 3.2

      heh – i don’t think the union movement is looking to revisit “Black Tuesday” Billy.

      http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/politics/black-tuesday/the-1912-waihi-strike

      What you’re proposing is NZ to be torn apart by ideological class war. But what you haven’t learned is that kiwis are more interested in rugby and beer than politics, and would rather spend an hour or so shouting drunkenly at their TV screen than tending to a barracade.

      Your approach is lacking in common sense.

  4. Daveo 4

    Bill, I imagine they’re looking to a set of policies that could actually be implemented without socialist revolution.That means working within capitalism for the time being.

    I mean, feel free to argue for socialist revolution if you like, but the CTU doesn’t have the mandate to call for that. Politics is the art of the possible. You want hardline socialism, you go convince enough workers and the CTU will be right behind you.

    • bill 4.1

      Jeez!

      The CTU release a discussion document. I’ll emphasise that….a discussion document on proposals for the future….or possible futures.

      And they have tied and limited the discussion to a perpetuation of Capitalism. That is where my criticism is…on the limitations that have been placed on the discussion.

      I never said they should call for a fucking revolution as some of the comments contend. That, in my opinion, would not be their call to make. Ever.

      But. It’s a discussion document. From a union body. And their horizons seem to be on a par with what I’d expect from a knitting circle or similar.

      It is obvious even from this middle of the roadish pro-social democracy blog that I am most assuredly not alone in being sick and tired of wage slavery; that I am not the only one who is over being forced to participate in the death of my planets living systems in order to avoid acute chronic poverty….killing my planet to live.

      And the institutions that should embody, at least to a degree, the more radical expressions of discontent and hope from the working classes has settled for being complacently and wholly capitalist.

  5. Edosan 5

    I support many of these propositions. A few have me a bit worried though.

    “Government support of firms (with) … import substitution potential”

    -Surely companies remaining competitive is still a good thing right?

    • Daveo 5.1

      Well, they’re a bunch of proposals for discussion at this stage, so I guess by nature they’re wide-ranging and up for debate. I’m not sold on all of them, but I think there are some good ideas in there that are worth wider discussion.

    • Quoth the Raven 5.2

      Sounds like corporate welfare to me.

  6. Edosan 6

    Definately, It’s good to see.

  7. roger nome 7

    I see that the CTU still isn’t advocating for a return to centralised collective bargaining/an Awards sytem. So all workers get in the impossible to unionise, and sizable, small business sector is the minimum wage for protection against exploitation?

    I just don’t see how you can increase worker participation in those work places without having government mandated participation requirements through an Awards system.

    The economics of organising work-places with below 20 workers just doesn’t stack up, and they make up about 30% of paid positions. It’s astounding that the CTU’s vision excludes the working lives of these people.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Quarantine-free travel with Australia to remain suspended for a further 8 weeks
    Suspension to be reviewed again mid to late November Decision brought forward to enable access from Australia to first tranche of around 3000 rooms in MIQ Air New Zealand working at pace to put on more flights from Australia from October    The suspension of quarantine-free travel (QFT) with Australia has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Extra support for Ethnic Communities to share vaccination information
    Extra support is being made available to Ethnic Communities to help them share COVID-19 vaccination information within their communities, Minister for Diversity, Inclusion and Ethnic Communities Priyanca Radhakrishnan said. “We know we need to get every eligible person in New Zealand vaccinated. A fund being launched today will allow for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • School holidays remain unchanged for Auckland region
    School holidays in Auckland will continue to be held at the same time as the rest of the country, starting from Saturday, 2 October, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “I’ve carefully considered advice on the implications of shifting the dates and concluded that on balance, maintaining the status quo ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government continues crackdown on gangs and organised crime
    Operation Tauwhiro extended until March 2022 Since it was launched in February, Operation Tauwhiro has resulted in:   987 firearms seized $4.99 million in cash seized 865 people charged with a firearms-related offence Gangs and organised crime groups will continue to be relentlessly targeted with the extension of Police’s successful ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Speech to Body Positive 'HIV Treatments Update Seminar 2021'
    E ngā mana E ngā reo E ngā iwi Tēnā koutou katoa Ka huri ki ngā mana whenua o te rohe nei. Tēnā koutou. He mihi hoki ki a tatou kua tau mai nei I raro I te kaupapa o te rā. Nō reira tēnā koutou katoa Acknowledgements It’s a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • NZ economy’s strong momentum will support rebound from Delta outbreak; COVID fund replenished
    The economy showed strong momentum in the period leading up to the recent Delta COVID-19 outbreak, which bodes well for a solid economic rebound, Grant Robertson said. GDP rose 2.8 percent in the June quarter, following on from a 1.4 percent increase in the previous March quarter. This was a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Projects create benefits into the future
    Making a well-known lake swimmable and helping to halt the decline of the endangered hoiho/yellow-eyed penguins are among a suite of new projects being supported by the Government’s Jobs for Nature programme across the southern South Island, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “It’s no secret that many of our most ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Opening statement for Whāriki Indigenous Small Business Roundtable
      Kei ngā tōpito e wha o te āo e rere ana te mihi maioha ki a koutou nō tawhiti, nō tata mai e tāpiri ana ki tēnei taumata kōrero mo te ao hokohoko arā mā ngā pākihi mo ngā iwi taketake Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa – Pai Mārire.  ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New members appointed to Kāpuia
    The Government is adding four additional members to Kāpuia, the Ministerial Advisory Group on the Government’s Response to the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the terrorist attack on Christchurch mosques. “I’m looking forward to having Pamela MacNeill, Huia Bramley, Melani Anae and Katherine Dedo  join Kāpuia and contribute to this group’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Timeline confirmed for Emissions Reductions Plan
    Cabinet has agreed to begin consulting on the Emissions Reduction Plan in early October and require that the final plan be released by the end of May next year in line with the 2022 Budget, the Minister of Climate Change, James Shaw confirmed today. “Cabinet’s decision allows organisations and communities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Pay parity pathway for early learning teachers confirmed
    Pay parity conditions and higher funding rates for education and care services will come into force on 1 January, 2022, Minister of Education Chris Hipkins confirmed today. The Government signalled this work in Budget 2021. “From 1 January, 2022, centres opting into the scheme will receive government funding and be ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Speech to the New Zealand Nurses Organisation Conference 2021
    Kia Ora tatau katoa.   Ka tuku mihi ki nga nēhi, He pou Hauora o Aotearoa, E ora ai tatou.   Whakatau mai  I runga i te kaupapa o te ra Te NZNO conference.   Tena koutou tena koutou Tena tatou katoa   Good morning, and thank you inviting me ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government investment in farmer-led catchment groups sweeps past 150 mark
    171 catchment groups have now been invested in by the Government 31 catchment groups in the Lower North Island are receiving new support More than 5,000 farmers are focussed on restoring freshwater within a generation through involvement in catchment groups  Government investment in on-the-ground efforts by farmers to improve land ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Fight to protect kauri on track
    The Government is pitching in to help vital work to protect nationally significant kauri forests in Auckland, Minister of Conservation Kiri Allan says. “Ensuring the survival of these iconic trees for future generations means doing everything we can to prevent the potential spread of kauri dieback disease,” Kiri Allan said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Joint statement of Mr Bernard Monk; Hon Andrew Little, Minister Responsible for Pike River Re-entry,...
    [Note: The Parties have agreed on terms to fully and finally settle the proceeding and will jointly issue the below statement.] At the heart of this litigation are the lives of the 29 men tragically lost at the Pike River mine on 19 November 2010 and to whom we pay ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • More financial support for businesses
    Today’s decision to keep Auckland in a higher COVID Alert Level triggers a third round of the Wage Subsidy Scheme which will open for applications at 9am this Friday. “The revenue test period for this payment will be the 14th to the 27th of September. A reminder that this is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Aotearoa New Zealand provides further humanitarian support for Afghanistan
    Aotearoa New Zealand is providing a further $3 million in humanitarian assistance in Afghanistan, Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta announced today.  “There is significant humanitarian need in Afghanistan, with the crisis disproportionately affecting women and girls,” said Nanaia Mahuta. The UN has estimated that 80% of the quarter of a million ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Innovative te reo prediction tool announced in Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori
    A new Māori language prediction tool will play a key role in tracking our te reo Māori revitalisation efforts, Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson announced today. He Ara Poutama mō te reo Māori (He Ara Poutama) can forecast the number of conversational and fluent speakers of te reo Māori ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Further Government support for people to access food and essential items
    The Government is responding to need for support in Auckland and has committed a further $10 million to help people access ongoing food and other essential items, Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni announced today. This latest tranche is targeted at the Auckland region, helping providers and organisations to distribute ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Half a million Pfizer vaccines from Denmark
    The Government has secured an extra half a million doses of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines from Denmark that will start arriving in New Zealand within days, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. “This is the second and larger agreement the Government has entered into to purchase additional vaccines to meet the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Inland Revenue providing essential COVID support for businesses
    Inland Revenue is seeing increased demand for Resurgence Support Payments and other assistance schemes that it administers, but is processing applications quickly, Revenue Minister David Parker said today. David Parker said the Resurgence Support Payment, the Small Business Cashflow (loan) Scheme and the Wage Subsidy are available at the same ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand marks 20th anniversary of 9/11 attacks
    New Zealand is expressing unity with all victims, families and loved ones affected by the September 11 2001 terrorist attacks, and all terrorist attacks around the world since, including in New Zealand. “Saturday marks twenty years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the United States, which killed nearly 3,000 people ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to SPREP Environment Ministers
    Talofa Honourable Ulu of Tokelau Faipule Kelihiano Kalolo Tēnā koutou katoa and warm Pacific greetings from Aotearoa to your excellencies, ladies and gentlemen. The new science released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on 8 August paints an alarming picture of the projected impacts of climate change on the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Additional Resurgence Support Payments to support business
    Businesses affected by higher Alert Levels will be able to apply for further Resurgence Support Payments (RSP). “The Government’s RSP was initially intended as a one-off payment to help businesses with their fixed costs, such as rent. Ministers have agreed to provide additional payments to recognise the effects of an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • More Dawn Raids scholarships announced
    Details of the ‘Manaaki New Zealand Short Term Training Scholarships’, a goodwill gesture that follows the Government’s apology for the Dawn Raids of the 1970s, were released today by Pacific Peoples Minister Aupito William Sio. “These scholarships that are targeted to the Pacific will support the kaupapa of the Dawn Raids’ ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • One-way quarantine-free travel for RSE workers starting in October
      One-way quarantine-free travel for Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) workers from Samoa, Tonga and Vanuatu starts in October New requirement for RSE workers to have received their first vaccination pre-departure, undertake Day 0 and Day 5 tests, and complete a self-isolation period of seven days, pending a negative Day 5 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Govt boosts Pacific suicide prevention support
    Applications have opened for the Pacific Suicide Prevention Community Fund as the Government acts to boost support amid the COVID delta outbreak. “We know strong and connected families and communities are the most important protective factor against suicide and this $900,000 fund will help to support this work,” Health Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Govt parks the expiry of licenses, WoFs and regos
    As a result of the Delta outbreak, driver licences, Warrants of Fitness (WoFs), Certificates of Fitness (CoFs), vehicle licences (‘regos’) and licence endorsements that expired on or after 21 July 2021 will be valid until 30 November 2021, Transport Minister Michael Wood has announced today. “While this extension won’t officially ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • COVID-19 community fund to provide support for vulnerable women and girls
    Minister for Women Jan Tinetti today announced a $2 million community fund that will provide support for women and girls adversely affected by COVID-19. “We know that women, particularly those who are already vulnerable, are disproportionally affected by the kind of economic disruption caused by COVID-19,” Jan Tinetti said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Next phase of support for Fiji’s COVID-19 response announced
    A further NZ$12 million of support for Fiji’s COVID-19 response has been announced by Foreign Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta today. The package builds on previous tranches of assistance Aotearoa New Zealand has provided to Fiji, totalling over NZ$50 million. “Fiji remains in a very challenging position in their response to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Robotic asparagus harvester aimed at addressing industry challenges
    The Government is backing a $5 million project to develop a commercial-scale autonomous robotic asparagus harvester, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. The Sustainable Food and Fibre Futures fund (SFF Futures) is contributing $2.6 million to the project. Project partner Robotics Plus Limited (RPL) will build on a prototype asparagus ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Additional Pfizer vaccines to arrive tomorrow
    More than a quarter of a million additional doses of the Pfizer vaccine are on their way from Spain to New Zealand, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. The additional doses will arrive in Auckland on Friday morning to help meet the current surge in demand for vaccination. “It’s been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Young people to have their voices heard in Youth Parliament 2022
    The dates and details for Youth Parliament 2022 have been announced today by Minister for Youth Priyanca Radhakrishnan, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. Youth Parliament is an opportunity for 141 young people from across Aotearoa New Zealand to experience the political process and learn how government works. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Boosting support for tertiary students affected by COVID-19
    Students facing a hard time as a result of COVID-19 restrictions will continue to be supported,” Education Minister Chris Hipkins confirmed today. The Government is putting a further $20 million into the Hardship Fund for Learners, which will help around 15,000 students to stay connected to their studies and learning. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • COVID-19: Immediate relief available for Māori and iwi organisations
    The Government has reprioritised up to $5 million to provide immediate relief to vulnerable whānau Māori and communities during the current COVID-19 outbreak Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson announced today. The COVID-19 2021 Whānau Recovery Fund will support community-driven, local responses to gaps in access and provision of critical ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New beef genetics programme to deliver cows with smaller environmental hoof-print
    The Government is backing a genetics programme to lower the beef sector’s greenhouse gas emissions by delivering cows with a smaller environmental hoof-print, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. Informing New Zealand Beef is a seven-year partnership with Beef + Lamb New Zealand that is expected to result in more ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Appointments to the New Zealand Qualifications Authority
    Education Minister Chris Hipkins today announced new appointments to the board of the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA). Former Associate Minister of Education, Hon Tracey Martin, has been appointed as the new Chair for NZQA, replacing the outgoing Acting and Deputy Chair Professor Neil Quigley after an 11-year tenure on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Govt supports residential house building by allowing manufacture of building supplies
    The Government has agreed to allow some building product manufacturing to take place in Auckland during Covid lockdown to support continued residential construction activity across New Zealand. “There are supply chain issues that arise from Alert Level 4 as building products that are manufactured domestically are mostly manufactured in Auckland. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government invests in scientific research to boost economy, address climate change and enhance wellb...
    Research, Science and Innovation Minister Hon Dr Megan Woods has today announced the recipients of this year’s Endeavour Fund to help tackle the big issues that New Zealanders care about, like boosting economic performance, climate change, transport infrastructure and wellbeing. In total, 69 new scientific research projects were awarded over ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Transport to drive economic recovery
    The Government is investing a record amount in transport services and infrastructure to get New Zealand moving, reduce emissions and support the economic recovery, Transport Minister Michael Wood announced today. The 2021-24 National Land Transport Programme (NLTP) was released today which outlines the planned investments Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago