Daily Review 24/01/2018

Written By: - Date published: 5:30 pm, January 24th, 2018 - 23 comments
Categories: Daily review - Tags:

Daily review is also your post.

This provides Standardistas the opportunity to review events of the day.

The usual rules of good behaviour apply (see the Policy).

Don’t forget to be kind to each other …

23 comments on “Daily Review 24/01/2018”

  1. SPC 1

    It’s starting to remind me of 2000 again, when business aided and abetted by the media campaigned against the incoming government.

    This came to an end for two reasons a moderate reform of the ECA and Labour rarely moved in areas where it had no electoral mandate and National’s support fell (neither business nor media wanted to get offside with a government that was going to be returned to office).

    Now we have the incipient attempts to make of an issue of lack of full disclosure of the PM’S circumstance during the coalition talks, and then move onto the issue of an
    impact on the ability of the Labour leader to perform her duties as PM.

    If the real target of this campaign is to destabilise the coalition, it is little wonder that there has been so much squealing about the wake jumping legislation as it would have been easier to pick off members of the NZF caucus than to convince Peters to change his mind. Given that one can suspect that National will look for an “airport/issue” to drive a wedge between the partners.

    National and its supporters have yet to concede they will face a full 3 years in opposition.

  2. TED Talk: Kathryn Shultz: On Being Wrong

    Most of us will do anything to avoid being wrong. But what if we’re wrong about that? “Wrongologist” Kathryn Schulz makes a compelling case for not just admitting but embracing our fallibility.

  3. weka 3

    “Facebook buys government ID authentication startup Confirm”

    snipe, mother of assets 🐾‏Verified account @snipeyhead

    Absolutely nothing can go wrong here.

    • McFlock 3.1

      It was a startup that literally took a pic of an id card, analysed whether it was a genuine ID, and also used the information on the id to autofill data on the client website.

      It doesn’t seem to use any information not on the ID card.

      So basically rather than an email and a credit card, any fb troll will also need someone’s photo id. Or maybe just their own photos of it.

      • weka 3.1.1

        Not really understanding what you are trying to say there McFlock.

        • McFlock 3.1.1.1

          Looking at the twitter thing I got the impression that “Confirm” was actively linked to government databases to assist in the identification of people online, maybe even things like voter records.

          Worst case scenario for that, a FB photo of me smoking what looks like a joint is compared to a driver’s license database, and then other government records like voter enrollment give my last known address to a swat team and they burst through the door because of a “stoner” fancy dress costume.

          But let’s say I wanted to enrol in a bar service course, cocktail mixing sort of thing.

          “Confirm” seems to have simply supplied a system that takes a photo of my NZ drivers license and compares it to what a NZ drivers license should look like (probably had some filters to detect tampering or photoshopping, too). With some text recognition so that my enrolment form for the course also gets automatically filled with my name, address, date of birth (and calculates age), and anything else that is on the card and the enrolment process needs.

          So I’m not entirely sure it makes FB any more big brotherish than it already is. But it would improve its ability to detect sockpuppet accounts which pay FB for services.

          edit: just trying to figure out how it’s likely to go wrong

  4. Pat 4

    “Central banks are now caught in a “debt trap”. They cannot hold rates near zero as inflation pressures build, but they cannot easily raise rates either because it risks blowing up the system.”

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/world/100831022/it-is-frankly-scary-world-financial-system-as-stretched-as-before-2008-crash

    Sigh….all this AND climate change!

    • Pat 4.1

      Monbiot……”So what we do? Next week, barring upsets, I will propose a new way forward. The path we now follow is not the path we have to take.”

      https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jan/24/end-civilisation-take-different-path

      • weka 4.1.1

        Can you please remind us when that gets published?

      • Incognito 4.1.2

        Nice one, thanks.

        I usually read his columns when they appear on his website.

        The framing is slightly off though IMHO; there is no path as such and we are chipping away a path as we go like we’re building an airplane while flying it. There’s no map and our main guide is or should be (…) our moral compass.

        • Pat 4.1.2.1

          Monbiot (along with others) has been foreshadowing an alternative proposal for some months now, perhaps they now have something formed….it cannot harm to consider , moral compass or self interest it matters not.

          • gsays 4.1.2.1.1

            Hey Pat, this is a link a mate sent me.
            It’s a podcast from James Burke on scarcity, nanotechnology,society etc.
            It is on the BBC so it must be true.

            Good food for thought.
            http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09jvfc4

          • Incognito 4.1.2.1.2

            Yes, it will definitely be worth considering. The burning question has been and is what an (not “the”) alternative might look like and what might it be based upon? For example, will it be some kind of rehash of the old or a marriage of ‘good parts’ of other ideologies? Will it be based on core values and creativity? I very much like reading Monbiot although I don’t always agree with him but he does live his life and does write from a deeply-held value system of which he’s very much aware (through lots of ‘living’, thinking & writing). This sets him apart from the ‘average’ person IMHO who happens to think and act, or react more like it, in a much more ‘instinctive’ way without much awareness of their own values and value system. There’s obviously a lot more to be said about this 😉

    • Exkiwiforces 4.2

      I’ll kill your party ever further Pat like I did at Chrissy with this one, I’m predicting there will a 1 to2 major wars within the 5-10yrs and I’m quite happy that I’ won’t be able to get recalled to the colours as i’m getting a Med-discharged.

      • Pat 4.2.1

        depending on how you define ‘major’ thats almost a given

        • Sam 4.2.1.1

          Probably Yemen, Syria, Palestine, pretty much the whole Middle East with Eragon the Stronk putting in some cheap shots is a major war, the Middle East civil war has been raging for some time now. But none of this fits the Mainstream narrative for selling papers.

            • Sam 4.2.1.1.1.1

              There is always regional conflict some where in the world. Some times those conflicts effect strategic assets foreign nation depend on for economic security and effects the world spelling out into major wars vs medium intensive wars. And the Middle East definitely fits the tag of a major war. 50mln refugees created, millions killed, major powers from each continent shaping up. Tens of trillions in industrial output committed to the distruction and distribution of oil wealth amongst ordinary Middle East citizens… All because the west just can’t compete with cheap Middle East oil. IMO…

            • tc 4.2.1.1.1.2

              Is there a more updated one, that’s to 2016.

        • Exkiwiforces 4.2.1.2

          North Asia Box (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China and maybe Russia as its real eyes are on Nth Europe), Middle East Region and Northern Europe (The Baltic States, Finland and Sweden) when the Yanks get suck into North Asia or the MER as Russia will have a free hand as the European NATO members can’t run a chook raffle at the local Bowl’s Club let alone a Boy Scouts bottle drive.

    • Except for the fact that they’re not. The private banks, which have used the near zero interest rates to massively inflate the amount of money in the system, probably are because raising OCR rates on them would put so many of their customers under water that the private banks would fail.

      The problem, yet again, is the creation of money by private banks for profit.

  5. Ad 5

    Tammy Duckworth will be the first US Senator to give birth while in office.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/tammy-duckworth-pregnancy-senator-birth_us_5a67a605e4b0022830078936?ncid=inblnkushpmg00000009

    C’mon America, catch up!

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