Daily Review 28/07/2015

Written By: - Date published: 6:00 pm, July 28th, 2015 - 29 comments
Categories: Daily review - Tags:

John Key Deep dreaming

(The above is a photograph of John Key subject to Deep Dreaming treatment)

Daily review is also your post.

This provides Standardistas the opportunity to review events of the day.

The usual rules of good behaviour apply (see the Policy).

Don’t forget to be kind to each other.

29 comments on “Daily Review 28/07/2015”

  1. Sabine 1

    an interesting diary on daily kos about Sanders campaigning in Louisiana the reddest part of the bible belt.

    WE should read it and take it too heart.

    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/07/27/1406007/-Louisiana-What-For

    Quote: was among the 5K or so who gathered at the Pontchartrain Center tonight to hear Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders make his pitch of economic populism and opportunity expansion in deep red Louisiana.

    Why, exactly? The chances of our state’s eight electoral votes going to any Democratic presidential candidate are slim to none and the pros from Dover of both parties have long treated our state, quite rightly, as an unnecessary stopover. So why would the senator from Vermont bother with li’l ol’ Kenner, no matter how enthusiastic the Orleanians in from next door may cheer?

    The senator opened by addressing that very question, and reiterated the truth demonstrated by fellow Green Mountaineer Howard Dean: if you’re everywhere, they have to fight you everywhere. It’s 50-state and it’s smart, and the senator from Vermont understands how stupid we were (the president and his chief of staff were) to stop persuing it.

    “My colleagues in the Democratic Party have made a very serious mistake,” said the senator tonight in Kenner. “They’ve written off half of America. Where people work 40, 50 hours and can’t get out of poverty, where kids have no food, where people have no health care… That’s where we should be!”

    And, true to form. the candidate never budged from the core message he believes can win over a new majority coalition: wealth and income inequality are no myth and no accident. They are the result of carefully-planned corruption of the political process by a very wealthy few.

    ———————————————————————————————————————–

    and for us it should be the same, we should fight them everywhere, united and with purpose, as this might very well the last time we get a chance.

    • Draco T Bastard 1.1

      wealth and income inequality are no myth and no accident. They are the result of carefully-planned corruption of the political process by a very wealthy few.

      QFT

      And it was the Labour Party that brought those corrupt policies here in the 1980s.

      • Sabine 1.1.1

        No it was not “The Labour Party”, it was a subset of very rich people that got themselves richer.
        ‘The Labour Party’ is made of all sorts of people.

        and it was some 35 years ago, and frankly in Germany the sell out was made by a conservative, and in the States it was an Actor disguising as a President.

        at some stage we have to look forward instead of repeating the Mantra that It is all Labours fault.

      • Sabine 1.1.2

        No it was not “The Labour Party”, it was a subset of very rich people that got themselves richer.
        ‘The Labour Party’ is made of all sorts of people.

        and it was some 35 years ago, and frankly in Germany the sell out was made by a conservative, and in the States it was an Actor disguising as a President.

        at some stage we have to look forward instead of repeating the Mantra that It is all Labours fault.

        edit: we need to understand and accept that the people that are selling us out will come in all colours and in all parties, heck…..how hard can it be to understand that?

        Do I believe that the Labour Party is going to save us? No, i don’t . Never did. But I believe that we are on the threshold to misery if we don’t take back our Parties, and that involves the Labour Party and the Green Party (and I am sorry the current Green Party is not the one from Jeanette Fitzsimmons and Rod Donald) and we need to fight for every vote and we need to be united.

        The guys that sold out this country don’t have a party allegiance. They have allegiance to the one that pays the bills.

        • Draco T Bastard 1.1.2.1

          Yes, it was the Labour Party that brought those policies in. I remember it quite well.

          That said, yes, we have to plan getting rid of them but, unfortunately, the present Labour Party doesn’t seem to keen on the idea.

    • Ad 1.2

      Such romance!
      Note from the article: “and not a single vote was turned”.

      Only a few weeks ago people here were begging for Syriza to get in because a whole new dawn had arrived. Whoops!

    • dukeofurl 1.3

      This just naive talk.

      Sanders is only there for TWO reasons, one to raise money. The second reason is primaries elect the candidate and in that case Louisiana matters as much as other smaller states.
      In the actual election Nov next year, unlikely both major candidates will spend much time there as its pretty firmly in GOP camp.

  2. Just watched an ad on TV1 selling a vaccine for shingles? WTF?
    It said 1 in 3 get them, and more chance as you get older, had a woman saying the pain was a 9 to 10.
    Is this turning us into hypochondriacs?
    And just when medicine is going to go up in price.

    • Lanthanide 2.1

      Only 2 countries in the world allow direct advertising of prescription medicines to the public. One of them is America.

    • BM 2.2

      Shingles is no laughing matter.

      Shingles virus attacked a nerve line on my face and I was damn lucky it didn’t end up in my left eye, if that had happen there was a high chance I’d have gone blind in that eye.

      Also completely fucks you for about a month.

      • Clemgeopin 2.2.1

        “Also completely fucks you for about a month”

        How does it come?

        • BM 2.2.1.1

          If you’ve ever had chicken pox there’s a 30% chance you’ll get shingles.

          Shingles is localized chicken pox, the chicken pox virus never actually goes away, apparently it stays dormant in the nerve endings and then for what ever reason can can suddenly reactivate itself.

          Apart from the blisters, itching, pain you get hit by waves of severe tiredness like you haven’t sleep for days, all you want to do is go to sleep but you can’t, really nasty virus.

          http://www.webmd.com/vaccines/features/shingles-chickenpox

  3. Michael 3

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/politics/news/article.cfm?c_id=280&objectid=11488237

    Mr Little said: “We said Pharmac and its purchasing model had to be protected. Extending the patents doesn’t protect the Pharmac model.”

    He said that if drugs remained under patent and cost too much, then Pharmac would not buy them and New Zealanders would miss out.

    Asked whether that meant Labour could not support the deal, he said: “If that bottom line isn’t met, then we don’t support the TPP.”

    The TPP does not need Labour’s support to be ratified, but Government may seek cross-party support on the legislation which would confirm the deal.

    Mr Little said he could not comment on whether a future Labour government would pull out of the TPP because the contents of the deal were not yet known.

    He said Labour had a number of options if it entered Government, which included “fixing” the agreement or leaving it altogether.

    Labour’s trade spokesman David Parker said he was confident that Labour could renegotiate the deal if it did not serve New Zealanders’ interests.

    Trade deals usually required a country to give six months’ notice before pulling out.

    ——————
    Labour has said the TPPA has crossed one of their bottom lines and in Government they could re-negotiate or pull out if things aren’t satisfactory.

    • Colonial Viper 3.1

      Labour’s trade spokesman David Parker said he was confident that Labour could renegotiate the deal if it did not serve New Zealanders’ interests.

      This is la-la land stuff. Get all nations back around the table, and convince the US Congress to approve changes??? Never happening.

      • Draco T Bastard 3.1.1

        Yep, that was pretty much what I was thinking. Once we’re in it the only option we’d have removing ourselves from it. The real problem is that Labour actually does want the FTA as they’re still as ideologically attached to free-trade as National and so they won’t actually do that.

        • Tony 3.1.1.1

          So just out of curiousity, what plan would you propose for economic growth as an alternative to free trade?

          • Draco T Bastard 3.1.1.1.1

            1. Don’t need FTAs for free trade. All we really need to do is put in place standards that the other countries have to meet to be allowed to trade with us
            2. The TPPA isn’t really a free trade agreement. It’s more of a free-capitalists agreement
            3. Infinite growth on a finite planet is impossible so I would say we need to go to a steady state economy. Please note, a steady state economy does not prevent economic development, IMO, it would encourage it far more than a growing economy
            4. IMO, Free-trade actually gets in the way of that development

      • BM 3.1.2

        Just shows what an asshat Parker is.

        Can’t believe he actually said that.

      • Michael 3.1.3

        Well I personally support the free-trade aspect of things – if we could get access to protected dairy markets it’d be great. But I don’t support losing sovereignty. And I think Labour has a similar position, which I agree with. I wouldn’t want them to be a protectionist, anti-free trade party. But I also don’t want them to be a neoliberal, pro-MNC party. I think the position they have taken is the right one.
        They may as well say they would negotiate for fairer conditions – and if they can’t – then they said that NZ could leave. which is fair enough

    • Ad 3.2

      Parker is a softock.
      would be better as a bureaucrat.

  4. Draco T Bastard 4

    Thurrock Council terminates Serco outsourcing contract five-years early

    While not elaborating on the savings that he believes the council will make as a result of bringing the functions in-house, he added: “It is clear that there will be major savings of between £3.5m and £4m every year… we are looking at all of our outsourced services and staff – Billfinger, for example – with a view to closely examining the advantages and disadvantages of bringing them back in house … or not.”

    So, paid out the contract early and will still save money and they’re looking for more in other outsourcing contracts. I suspect we could see similar savings here in NZ if we looked at our outsourced government services.

    • dukeofurl 4.1

      Spark had outsourced its entire computing services with EDS ( now HP) for over 10 years.

      Bought it back in house or just outsourced small parts not sure which.

      Found even moving a computer across the office would cost plenty, and any changes in staffing which reduced numbers didn’t save any computing costs

  5. Wow! Just got my 50th follower on twitter. I think that’s more than any twitterer ever! Not sure what @No1BeiberFan thinks she’s gonna get out of it, but it’s a TRP, maaan.

  6. Draco T Bastard 6

    Hard left actually a retired teacher with a duffle coat

    An MI5 source said: “Hobbs may appear harmless but he could easily join the Labour party and vote for Jeremy Corbyn, who has hardline Stalinist policies like cheaper train fares.”

    • Anne 6.1

      The ‘source’ has got to be joking….. surely. I mean if it’s true, what has train fares got to do with a long dead despot called Stalin? Shock’n awe. 😯

  7. Draco T Bastard 7

    This article is about jacking and how businesses are looking at active defenses. When they say that they’re talking about hacking the hackers, hacking back:

    After a spate of devastating attacks, companies and governments are mounting a fightback to reinforce their defences, and find more active ways to neutralise the threats from attackers. But the technical advantage lies with the attackers, while legal and political considerations limit how far potential victims can go.

    “There is an unprecedented level of interest in active defence and frustration with the reactive approach,” says James Lyne, global head of research for Sophos, a web security specialist.

    Which raises the question of how long it will be before businesses have a legal right to hack.

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