Daily Review 29/08/2017

Written By: - Date published: 5:30 pm, August 29th, 2017 - 53 comments
Categories: Daily review - Tags:

Daily review is also your post.

This provides Standardistas the opportunity to review events of the day.

The usual rules of good behaviour apply (see the Policy).

Don’t forget to be kind to each other …

53 comments on “Daily Review 29/08/2017”

  1. Ed 1

    I hope Winton deals to the perpetrators of dirty politics.
    Who are the guilty ones?

    Trolley?
    Bennett?
    English?
    Joyce?
    Collins?

    Ede?
    Eagleson?

    This is a crime.
    The police must get involved and get prosecutions.

    • Pat 1.1

      H) all of the above?

      • And on top of all that the sequel to the Todd Barclay affair raises its head again in the NZ Herald today…

        Bill English fought to have his police statement over Todd Barclay …
        http://www.nzherald.co.nz › New Zealand

        PM’s office sought to have his Todd Barclay police statement withheld …
        https://www.stuff.co.nz/…/pms-office-sought-to-have-his-todd-barclay-police-statement-…

        • tracey 1.1.1.1

          So, the guy who forgot he even made a statement to the police did the following

          “But the documents released to NZME show repeated requests to scrub English’s involvement entirely.

          “No other person involved in the investigation is able to be identified – why only Mr English? Instead of categorising people, why don’t you refer to witnesses as interested parties?” a representative of his office wrote to Police.

          The representative said the text messages between English and electorate chairman Stuart Davie were communications between “two private individuals”.

          “The text communication involved Mr English as a member of the National Party, communicating with another member of the National Party.”

          • greywarshark 1.1.1.1.1

            Sounds familiar. Wasn’t there something like – I was speaking as a private individual at the relevant time, not as the PM. Bronagh must have got confused FTTT and asked Jonkey to wear either his top hat, or his peaked cap so she knew which persona.

          • Gabby 1.1.1.1.2

            This ‘representative’ couldn’t have been the offspring of a bird of prey I suppose.

        • Pat 1.1.1.2

          lol…great minds think alike….was going to post that before….beat me to it so heres another…..

          http://werewolf.co.nz/2017/08/bill-english-the-forgotten-history/

        • Carolyn_nth 1.1.1.3

          Felix Marwick tweeted this arvo:

          It’s interesting all these Ministers were told about Peters’ super, yet Police Ministers, past & present, weren’t told about the Barclay inq

    • tc 1.2

      That would be nationals police ? Relax and watch Winnie serve it back with interest.

    • Hongi Ika 1.3

      They won’t find anything.

  2. tracey 2

    Prime News

    English announces parental leave. No challenge or analysis.

    Jacinda announces tertiary changes – Bill gets to rubbish it, students get asked with favour and non favour (one calling it a bribe)

    Not so much of a mention that Bill voted against it only a few months ago

  3. weka 3

    anyone got a short recap of the Peters thing from today?

  4. weka 4

    Lovely piece of urban street design for traffic flow that takes the safety of cyclists into account.

    Also, no helmets, which makes me realise we have mandatory helmet laws in NZ because we design transit routes to regularly put cyclists in very dangerous situations (potential head injury/death). But it doesn’t have to be that way,

    • joe90 4.1

      Biking while Dutch.

      • Eco maori 4.1.1

        I new a very good radar and boat Tec get killed back in the day what a waste . Any deaths are not on get the trucks off our roads

      • Blackcap 4.1.2

        I have lived in Holland for a while. Cycling is in the DNA. Kids often cycle more than 15 kms to go to school, rain hail or shine. The geography helps, the country is flatter than a pancake. Cyclists also have right of way at a lot of places where they share the road, but more importantly cyclists are immune to prosecution, so motorists do their darndest to avoid hitting a cyclist. Legally the motorist is always at fault.

        • Adrian 4.1.2.1

          Yes totally immune to the point that if they run into the back of you while you’re waiting in a car at an intersection you’re at fault.
          And don’t they fucking know it, the most arrogant arseholes around,the Dutch cyclists treatment of pedestrians is also absolutely appalling . To the point of bloody near running them over.
          Disclaimer, I’m a cyclist and married to a Dutch girl.
          The lesson ; don’t give too much power and consequence-free leeway to any group.

      • ianmac 4.1.4

        And no fancy lycra to mess the view. Just busy people biking on upright high handlebar basic gearless bikes. Christchurch you missed a real opportunity.

        • joe90 4.1.4.1

          Seems lycra and the head down bum up style is the problem.

          We had the opportunity to cycle in a number of North American cities in 2015, including Washington D.C., Montreal, Philadelphia, and Los Angeles. And it was through the mixed experiences of sharing their streets with locals that we began to observe a seldom-discussed measure of a city’s bike-friendliness: the speed at which its cyclists travel.

          In short, the slower the people on bikes were moving, the more mature the bicycle culture, and the better the conditions for cycling. Inversely, in regions that had failed to prioritize two-wheeled travel as a mode of transportation, getting on a bike was still seen as a sport predominately done by males moving long distances at fast speeds. We don’t have anything against the latter, but mass uptake requires a distinct shift from subculture to a more mainstream and normalized approach.

          http://www.vancitybuzz.com/2016/01/praise-slow-cycling/

          http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/brent-toderian/upright-bike-vancouver_b_5831752.html

      • Molly 4.1.5

        Worth watching to see how the Dutch got their cycling paths. For the impatient, a grassroots movement as a response to a large number of fatalities – particularly of children.

        And an elegant example of transport engineering: The Hovenring.

  5. tracey 5

    Very cool Weka. Mind you they legalised cannabis too.

  6. Herodotus 6

    Why did the police seek these unlawful means to find out Who Rawshark is
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11911784
    Could they not ask Sir John, especially as the case is still open !!
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11350747
    Police told the Herald that the Rawshark inquiry remained an “open” file although no officers are currently assigned to the investigation

  7. And spare a thought for the good folks down at Eketahuna !

    ” Eketahuna hasn’t had a GP for 30 years and the closest hospital is nearly an hour away at Palmerston North – a trip complicated by the indefinite closure of the Manawatu Gorge Road because of landslips ” …

    ” A train line runs through the township but have been no passenger services for 30 years. Its only user is the Eketahuna Express, a steam train which makes occasional trips from Palmerston North ”….

    I would call your attention to the ‘ 30 years’ in both cases.

    3 decades.

    The same time-frame that Douglas introduced neo liberalism and all our State owned assets were flogged off at bargain basement prices to moneyed NZ oligarchs and foreign multinational’s…

    Article was in the NZ Herald :

    Heartbeat: Eketahuna makes a community-led recovery – NZ Herald
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz › New Zealand

    So lets all keep that in mind as a case in point about the ‘neo liberal reforms’ and just what we are fighting for this coming election.

  8. Muttonbird 8

    What a frightening prospect a Nat/NZF government would be after Peters attacking English on the texts and English attacking Peters with an MSD leak.

    I’m assuming the usual suspects will see nothing wrong with a government made up of these two corrupt and dysfunctional fiefdoms.

    • Ed 8.1

      Can’t see that alliance happening now.

      • Muttonbird 8.1.1

        I can. They are both so corrupt and hungry for power that this will just be another dirty deal done to them

        • Ed 8.1.1.1

          They have quite different visions for the he country.

        • WILD KATIPO 8.1.1.2

          I dunno so much. Peters gets a bee in his bonnet and doesn’t let go. He didn’t like Key one bit and he still hasn’t forgiven National for stitching him up and working to knock him out of parliament.

          And he doesn’t have a particular love for the Dippers brand of neo liberalism , either. In fact , quite the opposite.

  9. ScottGN 9

    Some interesting poll findings coming out for the Māori seats from Māori TV. The Māori Party is polling well in Te Tai Hauāuru which they may take back off Labour (thus ensuring they have a place in the next parliament whatever else happens). Labour look to be holding Ikaroa Rāwhiti which would see Marama Fox out of parliament. And Labour look to be in a strong position in Te Tai Tonga.
    http://www.newshub.co.nz/home/election/2017/08/it-s-all-on-polling-for-three-maori-electorates-released.html

    • DSpare 9.1

      That is a huge margin of error at 4.89%! Which in Te Tai Hauāuru puts Tamati between 47-57%, to Rurawhe’s 34-44%, plus 11.5% (9-14 at half margin guesstimate) undecided. The party vote in that electorate is definitely in Labour’s favour though, so this seems strategic.

      Have to wonder about the increase in NZF party votes between 2014 to 2017 in all three polled electorates. It is only greater than the margin or error in Te Tai Tonga (and with the different sample sizes, I’m a bit cautious about any conclusions from that; given I don’t know what other polling methods have changed between the two). With NZF’s plan of abolishing the Māori seats, this seems a bit like kererū voting for Matariki.

    • Bearded Git 9.2

      Green Party vote holding up well in all of those seats which is encouraging.

    • swordfish 9.3

      Cheers ScottGN

      Hadn’t seen that. Yep interesting findings

      But …. Need to be a little wary here

      As DSpare argues – margin of error

      Eg Te Tai Hauāuru with Tamati ahead

      The 2014 Reid Research poll for Te Tai Hauāuru had the Māori Party candidate leading Labour’s Adrian Rurawhe by 3 points – Rurawhe ended up winning by 8 points

      Similarly the 2014 RR suggested Labour’s Party Vote in Te Tai Hauāuru would be 12 points higher than the Māori Party’s – but on Election Day Labour triumphed by a huge 25 point margin

      • swordfish 9.3.1

        Having said that – RR’s 2014 polling was at least a little more accurate for some of the other Māori seats

  10. joe90 10

    A cautionary tale about the tech hub nonsense.

    .

    Richard Florida, one of the most influential thinkers about cities in postwar America, wants you to know that he got almost everything about cities wrong.

    If you live in an urban center in North America, the United Kingdom, or Australia, you are living in Richard Florida’s world. Fifteen years ago, he argued that an influx of what he called the “creative classes” — artists, hipsters, tech workers — were sparking economic growth in places like the Bay Area. Their tolerance, flexibility, and eccentricity dissolved the rigid structures of industrial production and replaced them with the kinds of workplaces and neighborhoods that attracted more young people and, importantly, more investment.

    His observations quickly formed the basis of a set of breezy technical solutions. If decaying cities wanted to survive, they had to open cool bars, shabby-chic coffee shops, and art venues that attract young, educated, and tolerant residents. Eventually, the mysterious alchemy of the creative economy would build a new and prosperous urban core.

    Today, even Florida recognizes that he was wrong. The rise of the creative class in places like New York, London, and San Francisco created economic growth only for the already rich, displacing the poor and working classes. The problems that once plagued inner cities have moved to the suburbs.

    […]

    After fifteen years of development plans tailored to the creative classes, Florida surveys an urban landscape in ruins. The story of London is the story of Austin, the Bay Area, Chicago, New York, Toronto, and Sydney. When the rich, the young, and the (mostly) white rediscovered the city, they created rampant property speculation, soaring home prices, and mass displacement. The “creative class” were just the rich all along, or at least the college-educated children of the rich.

    https://jacobinmag.com/2017/08/new-urban-crisis-review-richard-florida

    • Jenny Kirk 10.1

      well – that happened here as well, joe 90. Ponsonby, Titirangi, Grey Lynn – all examples of that happening here.

  11. Molly 11

    … Glen Innes, Pt Chev, Mangere Bridge, Kingsland, Newton, Onehunga…. quite a lot of Auckland is changing in this way.

  12. adam 12

    Right wing terrorist getting a pass.

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