web analytics

Doing Shearer’s job for him

Written By: - Date published: 9:30 am, November 27th, 2012 - 54 comments
Categories: housing, labour, spin - Tags:

I’m tired of watching Labour flounder over how it will build $300K homes in Auckland. The answer’s simple: they’ll mostly be apartments, units, and townhouses. Not much land cost. Reduced build cost per dwelling. Check out Trade Me, houses for sale in Auckland, 2 bedrooms+, priced $250-$300K. There’s hundreds (but not enough). Clearly, it can be done.

Now, how hard was that?

lprent: Not hard. I did the exercise for my apartment and the town houses next door this morning. Took only a few minutes to pull up the relevant data.


54 comments on “Doing Shearer’s job for him”

  1. felix 1

    Pity Shearer doesn’t take any notice of The Standard, otherwise he’d be up and running with these lines by this afternoon…

    • Yeah, but then he’d be running with lines from the same people that resort to cheap insults and ad homs to denigrate those that don’t agree with the party line.

    • David H 1.2

      Why all the kerfuffel over the bloody land / house price in Auckland ? Surely it’s irrelevant. All you have to say is the house prices are 300,000 on AVERAGE. Because it don’t cost 300k to build in Dunedin or Invergiggle etc etc Yes I know they want the lions share in Ak, but with apartments and smaller 1 & 2 bedroom houses, then you can get houses closer, and therefore you can have an average price.

  2. lprent 2

    Looks like Zet woke up with the same irritation that I had.

  3. BM 3

    Families in apartments, hows that going to fit with the Kiwi psyche.
    Where are the kids going to play, ride their bikes?

    Are we thinking some sort of council estate set up with a shared green area.

    To be honest, for a policy that’s going to cost over 2 billion dollars of money I’m appalled at the back of an envelope planning that has gone into this
    Shows a total disregard of tax payers money and what a pack of chimps the policy developers in Labour are.

    • felix 3.1

      You mean like a park? Sounds awfully socialist eh wot?

      Seriously though, how do you think people live in large cities now?

      • BM 3.1.1

        Are kiwis at that point though, I don’t think they are.
        Another 10- 20 years, maybe.

        Also rather blows out the cost projections if you need to include a large park in every development.

        • Lightly

          10-20 years is when this housing project will be complete (remember, 2 years to the next election, a year plus to get the legislation etc going)

        • Shane Gallagher

          Ah – but the people coming to live in Auckland are mostly immigrants – who will happily live in a nice townhouse or apartment with communal parks and green spaces. It is the experience of life and the quality that is important. Most people funnily enough don’t want to spend significant amounts of their lives commuting.

          And why are we not putting the gardens on the roofs?
          – okay definitely for wealthy people on that blog, but you get the idea – you know with a bit of kiwi-know-how and number 8 wire ingenuity we could do something a lot cheaper… 🙂

          • lprent

            I’m actually that rarity – a native Aucklander. I grew up on quarter acre half gallon pavlova paradise in Mt Albert. Would never go back to a house

            I live in and love being in an apartment. I’m distinctly not interested in a housing being anything more than where I relax or work when we’re at home. So it is as Spartan as I can get Lyn to agree to.

            • Hami Shearlie

              I think that for singles, couples and younger retired folk, apartments are great! But for people with children and/or pets, and older people who are at home most of the time, they could get very claustraphobic! All depends on what you’re used to I guess! Even a unit with a small fenced yard is preferable if you have children – nothing like watching from the kitchen as they jump on the trampoline and have fun. Having to go out to a park and sit there waiting for them every time just wouldn’t suit a busy working mother, when she needs to be preparing dinner etc!

              • Draco T Bastard

                Having to go out to a park and sit there waiting for them every time just wouldn’t suit a busy working mother, when she needs to be preparing dinner etc!

                So, your argument against apartments is that they would require the adults to socialise with their children?

                • karol

                  Actually, it’s likely that families living in the same relatively small area could share child-caring.  They then could give each other a bit of a break by alternating between adults taking a small group of children to the park.

        • lprent

          If you build through most existing built up Auckland then the parks are already there. For that matter so are the roads, water, storm water, and the sewage. They’ll need upgrades, but that is likely to be a awful lot cheaper than putting in a whole new subdivisions.

          Just up the road from me, there is Western Park. A few blocks over there is Grey Lynn park.

          Where I grew up in Mt Albert there were several parks within a few blocks. Not to mention Mt Albert Grammer grounds down the road and Mt Albert volcano….

    • rosy 3.2

      BM you need to get out of your NZ psyche more. If you can’t go and visit any of the cities that are built with medium density housing, at least go and look some up. The ‘most livable cities’ lists will do. It’s not too hard to then go and find examples of housing and green space options e.g. Vienna.

    • Shane Gallagher 3.3

      Actually there are some really amazing communal shared green areas with townhouses around the outside – like a miniature town park – in Europe. The houses are kept private with some clever sight line arrangements and the children get to play in a well-supervised safe space. It creates a little community. We don’t have to re-invent this – it has been done already in lots of places around the world. You just adapt the idea for your locality.

      You can also do this with apartments (or flats as they are called in Scotland) I am thinking of a new build where I lived – where you had a big flat complex overlooking a inner square with a children’s playground, barbeque area (that was a bit aspirational in Edinburgh…) and garden. It was really nice. There was an indoor communal area for parties etc. as well – kind of like a community hall but in the complex which opened up onto the inner square.

      Anyhow – this is easy stuff – anyone who, say, has lived in lots of foreign countries may well have seen such kind of things, for example, when they were working with the UN… 🙂

      • BM 3.3.1

        I can see some good points, have to be gated communities though.

        • rosy

          “have to be gated communities though”
          No. They don’t.

          • BM

            Yes they do, otherwise you’ll end up with all sorts of scum hanging out in your “backyard”.

            • rosy

              Believe me, they don’t. Unless you think Aucklanders are less civil than people in other parts of the world.

            • locus

              if everyone’s ‘backyard’ had a decent park and playground, people wouldn’t have to leave their own neighbourhoods to find one.

              furthermore if there are beggars or drunks hanging out in parks… ‘scum’ as you call them…. the likely reason is that you have created a society where the rich live in gated communities

            • McFlock

              Your elitist loathing of those less fortunate than you is showing. 

        • lprent

          …have to be gated communities though..

          Bullshit. I guess you have never lived in them?

          Most townhouses around Auckland are just in normal housing with access to the street.

          Most apartment blocks use a card for the front door and for the parking. It is usually hard to get in the parking without a card because it is a real pain having someone parking in your space. Getting in through the front door is usually pretty easy – just ask on the speaker.

          But I’ve never seen an apartment that has a guard sitting at the door in the US style. I suppose that some paranoids might have them in town although god knows why.

          • BM

            I see this sort of development as similar to a retirement village, most of those are locked or fenced.
            If you don’t live there, what are you doing there?

            Also what’s wrong with having a gate, I have one on my property, I don’t see the issue.

            • lprent

              …to a retirement village, most of those are locked or fenced

              The characteristic of “gated communities” in places like the US is the ridiculous levels of manned security and outright paranoia that they have.

              We have a front door with a card to open it. So you have a gate. Do you have a armed guard to go with it?

            • rosy

              What are you doing there? Taking the shortest route to schools, parks, shop, restaurant…..

              You might see retirement-style complexes, and there is no reason why some shouldn’t be so. I look out my window and see public roads and public spaces, and the more people around the less mischief there is.

      • locus 3.3.2

        you’re so right….i’ve lived in quite a few cities around the world and the best by far are those that have had the foresight to build communal playgrounds and parks to equally high standards in both poor and rich neigbourhoods

    • Fortran 3.4

      Who will own the apartments ?
      Generally due to ground sharing they are leashold, with lease adjustments (up) regularly and incur common corporate maintenance costs born by the owners and passed on to the lessees.
      Carparking (often 2 cars now) is an expensive accommodation in apartments and takes up huge space, and are underground parks really safe ?

      • lprent 3.4.1

        Don’t know where you’re writing your diversions from. But in Auckland leasehold really only exists in the CBD and a few wee plots in the inner city. Unlikely to be an issue where these properties are likely to be built.

        There is a nice little act called the (from memory) strata titles act. Read that and quell your fears.

      • Draco T Bastard 3.4.2

        Carparking (often 2 cars now) is an expensive accommodation in apartments and takes up huge space,

        That’s easy – don’t supply parking (yeah, it’s a search but there’s so much good info there on how bad parking really is) and make sure that they have access to excellent public transport.

        • TheContrarian

          Sure but you should make allowance for the fact someone might want to own a car.

          • Draco T Bastard


            If you go through that search that I linked you will find that removing requirements for car parks has resulted in developers building a lot of places without car parks and that people like them. If people actually want a car park they can always specify it on the plans or buy an existing house with a car park. I didn’t say to make them illegal – just not to include them.

  4. Ant 4

    They’ll probably be prefabricated to cut down on labour costs and build time. But that won’t stop Key using the time and labour of bespoke McMansion builds.

  5. indiana 5

    Wow apartments! What are the plans to protect these new home owners from the ever increasing body corporate costs…the costs people never get anything back for. I wonder if these buildings will be like the housing estates of the UK? Slum anyone?

    • karol 5.1

      Well designed, medium density housing, is not the same as many of those high-rise slum-like estates in the UK.  Try Melbourne as a comparison, or even terraced housing in the UK. 

      But, if you are looking at high-rise apartments, there are some pretty expensive, well-maintained ones in cities all over the world. 

    • lprent 5.2

      If you don’t buy a place with lifts, pools, or gyms and they’re medium rather than high density then the body corporate fees aren’t that expensive.

      Of course if you think that everyone should be able to have these things then I can see where your problem lies.

      The big problem back in the 90’s (apart from the National governments useless deregulation that caused leaky buildings), was that there wasn’t a high enough provision for future building maintenance. Consequently many buildings are having to pay catchup now at much higher rates than if they’d be paying the right amount all the way through.

  6. I felt the same frustration when Phil Goff blundered the numbers. THE NUMBERS WERE AVAILABLE BEFORE THE DEBATE, I saw them.

    • Lightly 6.1

      if you believe the old guard, it was all Cunliffe’s fault – but the truth is that Goff just fluffed it.

      • Pascal's bookie 6.1.1


        And as it was revealed post election that English’s numbers were “not even a best guess , just a guess”; the whole play appears to have been the Rovian, ‘attack them on your weak point’ strategy.

  7. Tom Gould 7

    I can now see how come you are the spin man on housing for team ‘C’. Great advice. You could get maybe 10 shoe box apartments on a $400k section in Te Atatu. Simple maths means that’s only $40k per housing unit. Actually, the more you cram onto the site, the lower the average land cost component. Genius. Even a $10m site in the CBD becomes affordable if you build the tower block high enough.

    • lprent 7.1

      Read my post for some real numbers rather than the ones you haul out of your arse. You really are a bit of a dickhead aren’t you?

    • Lightly 7.2

      people do build apartments on million dollar plots. The apartments are can be nice if built right – what’s the problem?

      • lprent 7.2.1

        I figured out that the land where my apartment and 59 others is on a $5.1 million dollar plot of land. The land’s rateable value was $85k per apartment.

        Looks like some people can’t do maths.

  8. BeeDee 8

    Why should Labour spell out the details ahead of time? You can bet the present govt is putting people hard at work to find an alternative plan. They were trounced!

  9. KhandallaMan 9

    Annette is the Spokesperson for Housing. Like with economic matters, Shearer is fronting in order to improve his personal ratings.  
    Annette’s electorate has a very high median income and I suspect that many of the Auckland housing and social  issues are beyond her experience. 


    • David H 9.1

      So Shearer is going to do a Key, to get his ratings up. And be there for All the good things and announcements. And let someone else take the fall.

  10. lefty 10

    It has always been important to have a good mix of housing.

    This means actually finding out what people want and need, not just acting on what we think they need.

    Many people will happily live in apartments, with or without access to green spaces.

    Others can’t, or don’t want to.

    It took many years for the Housing Corp to realise it needed to have bigger state houses for Pasifeka families because of the number of children many have and because they often like to live in an extended family situation. Remember this is a group with some of he biggest housing needs and an apartment or small townhouse is not what they need.

    Some Asian migrants are happy to live in an inner city apartment others are not.

    I live in a West Auckland suburb of fairly new houses mainly valued at $450,000 – 600,000. About two thirds of the people on my street are migrants living a dream where they have their own backyard to care for and garden in, and for their children to play in. So it doesn’t pay to assume migrants want to jam into the inner city.

    I have lived in a number of ways at different periods of my life ranging from squats in European cities to shearers quarters in isolated NZ, inner city Auckland suburbs with the typical Ponsonby lifestyle (before it got taken over by the rich pricks) and outer suburbs with a nice big section.

    Each of those was suitable for the particular period of my life.

    After our children left home my partner and I decided to buy an inner city apartment.

    We hated it.

    No space, not enough room when the kids came visiting, no garden, a rip off body corporate structure (common in NZ) and a feeling of having no control over how our surrondings were.

    We managed to sell again just before the apartment market crashed and gratefully retreated to the much maligned suburbs.

    I realise others love the apartment life and it is the right choice for many but I think it pays to think carefully before we (or our political parties) determines how people want to live and what sort of housing they need.

  11. QoT 11

    See, I’m still leery of any Labour “for the struggling Kiwis” policy which doesn’t rule out Stephie and Max Key getting into their first homes on the government’s dime.

    But even I can still appreciate the power of a quick&dirty key message and agree that it’s fucking ridiculous that Shearer’s team didn’t come up with this one ahead of time. Isn’t that how media management works?

Recent Comments

Recent Posts


  • September benefit figures disappointing
    The Government is out of touch with the reality that fewer people are going off the benefit and into employment or study, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni.  “The quarterly benefit numbers for September are concerning. They show that ...
    3 days ago
  • MFAT officials refuse to back Prime Minister on Saudi sheep claims
    An Ombudsman’s interim decision released about the existence or otherwise of legal advice on the multimillion dollar Saudi sheep deal shows MFAT has failed to back up the Prime Minister’s claims on the matter, says Labour MP David Parker. “The ...
    3 days ago
  • Nats still planning to take Housing NZ dividend
    Housing New Zealand’s Statement of Performance Expectations shows that the National Government intends to pocket $237m from Housing New Zealand this year including a $54m “surplus distribution”, despite promises that dividends would stop, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “After ...
    4 days ago
  • Parliament must restore democracy for Ecan
    Parliament has a chance to return full democracy to Canterbury with the drawing of a member’s bill that would replace the Government’s appointed commissioners with democratically elected councillors, says Labour’s Canterbury Spokesperson Megan Woods. “In 2010, the Government stripped Cantabrians ...
    4 days ago
  • Police struggle to hold the line in Northland
    Labour’s promise of a thousand extra police will go a long way to calming the fears of people in the North, says the MP for Te Tai Tokerau Kelvin Davis.  “Police are talking about the Northland towns of Kaitaia and ...
    4 days ago
  • Urgent action on agriculture emissions needed
    Immediate action is required to curb agricultural emissions is the loud and clear message from Climate change & agriculture: Understanding the biological greenhouse gases report released today by the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment, says Labour’s Climate Change spokesperson Megan ...
    5 days ago
  • Super Fund climate change approach a good start
    Labour Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson and Climate Change Spokesperson Dr Megan Woods have welcomed the adoption of a climate change investment strategy by the New Zealand Super Fund. “This is a good start. It is a welcome development that the Super ...
    5 days ago
  • Raising the age the right thing to do
    The announcement today that the Government will leave the door open for young people leaving state care still means there is a lot of work to do, says Labour's Spokesperson for Children, Jacinda Ardern "The Government indicated some time ago ...
    5 days ago
  • Coleman plays down the plight of junior doctors
    Junior doctors are crucial to our health services and the industrial action that continues tomorrow shows how desperately the Government has underfunded health, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “Jonathan Coleman’s claim that he has not seen objective evidence of ...
    5 days ago
  • Inflation piles pressure on National and Reserve Bank
    While many households will welcome the low inflation figures announced today, they highlight serious questions for both the National government and the Reserve Bank, Labour’s  Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson said.  "While low inflation will be welcomed by many, the ...
    6 days ago
  • Officials warned Nat’s $1b infrastructure fund ineffective and rushed
    Treasury papers show the Government rushed out an infrastructure announcement officials told them risked making no significant difference to housing supply, says Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford.  “Like so much of National’s housing policy, this was another poll-driven PR initiative ...
    6 days ago
  • More cops needed to tackle P
    New Police statistics obtained in Written Questions show John Key is losing his War on P, highlighting the need for more Police, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little.  “New Zealanders expect serious action on P but today’s hodgepodge of half-measures won’t ...
    7 days ago
  • MBIE docs show country needs KiwiBuild, not Key’s pretend “building boom”
    John Key’s spin that New Zealand is in a building boom does not change the massive shortfall in building construction as new MBIE papers reveal, says Labour Party housing spokesperson Phil Twyford.  “We can fix the housing crisis, by the ...
    7 days ago
  • 1 in 7 Akl houses now going to big property speculators
    Speculators are running riot in the Auckland housing market making life tougher for first home buyers, says Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford.  Newly released data from Core Logic shows a 40 per cent increase in the share of house sales ...
    1 week ago
  • Labour mourns passing of Helen Kelly
    Helen Kelly was a passionate advocate for working New Zealanders and for a safe and decent working life, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says.  “Helen Kelly spent her adult life fighting for the right of every working person to ...
    1 week ago
  • Andrew Little: Speech to the Police Association Conference 2016
    Police Association delegates, Association life members and staff, representatives from overseas jurisdictions. Thank you for inviting me here today. The Police Association has become a strong and respected voice for Police officers and for policing in New Zealand. There is ...
    2 weeks ago
  • 1,000 more police for safer communities
    Labour will fund an extra 1,000 Police in its first term to tackle the rising rate of crime, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “Labour will put more cops on the beat to keep our communities safe. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Call for all-party round table on homelessness
    Labour is calling on the Government to take part in a roundtable meeting to hammer out a cross-party agreement on ending homelessness.  Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford said the country wanted positive solutions to homelessness, and wanted the political parties ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Working people carrying the can for the Government
    Today’s announcement of a Government operating surplus is the result of the hard work of many Kiwi businesses and workers, who will be asking themselves if they are receiving their fair share of growth in the economy, Grant Robertson Labour ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Breast cancer drugs should be available
    Labour supports the Breast Cancer Aotearoa Coalition’s campaign for better access to cancer treatments as more patients are denied what is freely available in Australia, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “In the last three years, PHARMAC’s funding has been ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Community law centres get much needed support from banks
      New Zealand’s network of community law centres, who operate out of more than 140 locations across the country, have today received a much needed boost, says Labour’s Justice spokesperson Jacinda Ardern.  “After more than 8 years of static funding ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Just 18 affordable homes in Auckland SHAs – It’s time for KiwiBuild
    New data revealing just 18 affordable homes have been built and sold to first home buyers in Auckland’s Special Housing Areas show National’s flagship housing policy has failed and Labour’s comprehensive housing plan is needed, says Leader of the Opposition ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Pasifika wins big in Auckland elections
    The Labour Party’s Pacific Candidates who stood for local elections in Auckland came out on top with 14 winners, says Labour’s Pacific Island Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio. “Our candidates have won seats on one ward, four local boards, two ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Seven7 hikoi to stop sexual violence
    2 weeks ago
  • Road toll passes 2013 total
    The road toll for the year to date has already passed the total for the whole of 2013, raising serious questions about the Government’s underfunding of road safety, says Labour’s Transport spokesperson Sue Moroney.  “According to the Ministry of Transport, ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Bay principals slam charter school decision
    A letter from Hawke’s Bay principals to the Education Minister slams the lack of consultation over the establishment of a charter school in the region and seriously calls into question the decision making going on under Hekia Parata’s watch, says ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government needs to act on voter turnout crisis
    With fewer than 40 per cent of eligible voters having their say in the 2016 local elections, the Government must get serious and come up with a plan to increase voter turnout, says Labour’s Local Government Spokesperson Meka Whaitiri. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Inquiry presents solutions to homelessness – Govt must act
    Labour, the Green Party and the Māori Party are calling on the Government to immediately adopt the 20 recommendations set out in today's Ending Homelessness in New Zealand report. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • A good night for Labour’s local government candidates
    It has been a good night for Labour in the local government elections. In Wellington, Justin Lester became the first Labour mayor for 30 years, leading a council where three out of four Labour candidates were elected. Both of Labour’s ...
    2 weeks ago
  • More contenders for fight clubs
    Allegations of fight clubs spreading to other Serco-run prisons must be properly investigated says Labour’s Corrections spokesperson Kelvin Davis. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Minister runs for cover on job losses
    Māori Development Minister Te Ururoa Flavell’s refusal to show leadership and provide assurances over the future of the Māori Land Court is disappointing, given he is spearheading contentious Maori land reforms which will impact on the functions of the Court, ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Kiwisaver contribution holiday not the break workers were looking for
    The number of working New Zealanders needing to stop Kiwisaver payments is another sign that many people are not seeing benefit from growth in the economy, says Grant Robertson Labour’s Finance spokesperson. "There has been an increase of 14 ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Fight Club failings
    The Corrections Minister must take full responsibility for the widespread management failings within Mt Eden prison, says Labour’s Corrections spokesperson Kelvin Davis. ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Rethink welcomed
    The Labour Party is pleased that Craig Foss is reconsidering the return of New Zealand soldiers buried in Malaysia, says Labour’s Foreign Affairs spokesperson David Shearer. “For the families of those who lie there, this will a welcome move. The ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Disappointment over UN vote
    Helen Clark showed her characteristic drive and determination in her campaign to be UN Secretary General, and most New Zealanders will be disappointed she hasn't been selected, says the Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. "Helen Clark has been an ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Māori need answers on Land Court job losses
    Māori landowners, Māori employees and Treaty partners need answers after a Ministry of Justice consultation document has revealed dozens of roles will be disestablished at the Māori Land Court, says Ikaroa-Rāwhiti MP Meka Whaitiri. ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Key’s ‘efficiencies’ = DHBs’ pain
          John Key’s talk of ‘efficiencies’ ignores the fact the Government is chronically underfunding health to the tune of $1.7 billion, says Labour’s Acting Health spokesperson Dr David Clark.       ...
    3 weeks ago
  • More than 1,300 schools to face budget cuts
    The latest Ministry of Education figures reveal thousands of schools will face cuts to funding under National’s new operations grant funding model, says Labour's Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins. ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Speculation fever spreads around country
    House prices in Wellington, Hamilton and Tauranga are going off as a result of uncontrolled property speculation spilling over from the Auckland market, says Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford.  “Speculators who have been priced out of Auckland are now fanning ...
    3 weeks ago
  • New Zealand lags on aid targets
      The National Government needs to live up to its commitments and allocate 0.7 per cent of Gross National Income on development assistance, says Labour’s spokesperson on Pacific Climate Change Su’a William Sio.  “The second State of the Environment Report ...
    3 weeks ago
  • War on drugs needs more troops
    The Minister of Police must urgently address the number of officers investigating illegal drugs if she is serious about making a dent in the meth trade, says Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart Nash.  “Answers from written questions from the Minister show ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Doctors strike symptom of health cuts
    The notice of strike action issued by the junior doctors today is the result of years of National’s cuts to the health system, says Labour’s Associate Health spokesperson Dr David Clark. ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Government starves RNZ into selling Auckland asset
    Just weeks after TVNZ opened its refurbished Auckland head office costing more than $60 million, RNZ (Radio New Zealand) has been forced to put its Auckland office on the market to keep itself afloat, says Labour’s Broadcasting spokesperson Clare Curran. ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Government must be more than a bystander on the economy
    Despite what he might think John Key is not a political commentator, but actually a leader in a Government who needs to take responsibility for the conditions that mean a rise in interest rates, says Labour’s Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson.  “John ...
    3 weeks ago