web analytics

Economic credibility – mote and beam

Written By: - Date published: 7:11 am, November 8th, 2011 - 20 comments
Categories: economy, labour, national - Tags: , , ,

Is there an “aggressive recovery”? No. Are we “roaring out of recession”? No. Have we had a double credit downgrade from international rating agencies? Yes. So the Nats’ so called “competent economic management” was already pretty much a myth.

But now as the focus of attention moves towards costing the policies, promises and projections of the major parties moving in to the election, the Nats’ economic credibility has been further mauled. Two excellent pieces yesterday tell different parts of the tale (and how it is – or rather isn’t – being reported). Here’s Rob Salmond:

Spreadsheet Troopers: The Battle Rages On

National aggressively points the finger at Labour while admitting $2.6b in mistakes under its breath.

Did you enjoy your weekend of dorky people with dueling fiscal spreadsheets and confused reporters trying to play umpire? Me neither. The latest as at 5:46pm Sunday is that National has another, newer spreadsheet, which says the cost of Labour’s policies is $15.6b. Its earlier spreadsheet said the hole was $17.2b. Labour says $3.6b.

First, notice that National has admitted to blowing out its previous costings by billions of dollars. The total of National’s conceded mistakes is $2.6b. This is the $1.6b difference between its two overall figures, plus the $1b Labour has allocated for an as-yet unannounced policy that National did not know about when it did its first figures.

So National tacitly admits to $2.6b in mistakes. When there was a hint on Saturday that Labour’s figures had a $400m error, there were newspaper headlines specifically proclaiming it to the nation. But oddly today there are no headlines today lambasting National for mistakes totaling over six times as much. Nothing much on last night’s news, either. No doubt this is partly because of the cunning 5:46pm Sunday release of National’s new spreadsheet. Ever feel like you’re getting played, o fourth estate?

It’s worth noting that the argument over foregone dividends from asset sales doesn’t affect Labour’s numbers. It affects how much Labour wrote-down National’s forecast by as their point of comparison. It’s remarkable that so many journalists seem to be confused on this since Labour’s fiscal strategy spells it out quite clearly.

And here’s Gordon Campbell:

On National’s asset sales debacle

The concession by Finance Minister Bill English that National may not get the $5-7 billion it expected from its asset sales programme is a hammer blow to the government’s credibility. A less charitable view would be that having made an ideological commitment to the sales process, English is now talking down the likely sale price that the corporate sector will have to pay for getting their hands on them.

That’s the bind the government has always been in with this idiotic policy. For political reasons, English has to set the asking price for the assets low enough to allow a few more Kiwi contenders into the bidders circle. As soon as he does, this means that far more New Zealanders – ie, the 90% of Kiwis whodon’t invest in the sharemarket – will no longer be getting the best price for the assets they have built up over many decades. …

The admission by English is very damaging. Last week, Labour got slammed (justifiably) for its initial inability to explain how its election costings stack up. In the end, the alleged $17 billion hole in Labour’s books came down to quibbling over a $300-400 million shortfall, which is little more than a rounding error in the overall context of the government accounts. The gap between $5 billion and $7 billion however is far more serious, especially since National has already banked the likely returns in its election costings, and earmarked them for spending on new schools and hospital running costs over the next five years. All round the country, teachers and nurses should now be picketing John Key, and demanding he show them the money. …

Right now, the government is peddling a wildly unpopular asset sales policy that makes little economic sense. That’s because the proceeds won’t be used to reduce debt, but will be frittered away on daily running costs. The full dividend stream will be foregone in perpetuity, when borrowing to cover the short term need is a cheaper, more sustainable option. The selldown generates no viable economic returns – not even from the bit earmarked for irrigation, where Cabinet papers show the estimated returns to be only 6.4% – apart from oh, some spurious, ideologically based claims that the selldown will enhance economic performance. (Thanks, but the state energy companies are already performing really well, and Air New Zealand is hardly a poster child for the economic blessings of privatisation.)

To cap it off, the government is taking this suicidal route in a context of a depressed local market, and when the international scene is in turmoil – thus all but guaranteeing fire sale prices for some of the country’s blue chip assets. That’s even before we start to measure the likely impact of further privatisation of the electricity system on the voter’s power bills.

So…if English doesn’t really know what the returns will be, does he have a reserve price for these assets where he will withdraw them from the market – and if so, what is it? What’s his bottom line for say, Meridian? Just asking.

Gordon Campbell’s piece should be required reading for every so-called political and economic commentator in the country, and Rob Salmond gets right to the heart of the disparities in reporting. The Nats’ are desperate to have the media focus stay on any mote in Labour’s eye, and ignore the beam in their own.  In the interests of informed choice, let’s hear both sides of the story…

20 comments on “Economic credibility – mote and beam ”

  1. Gosman 1

    “Gordon Campbell’s piece should be required reading for every so-called political and economic commentator in the country,”

    Ummmm… why? He is a left wing political commentator. His opinion over Asset sales is no more or less valid than any othe left wing political commentator. He certainly doesn’t make any earth shattering points.

    What he fails to deal with is the fact that if the price of the SOE stake is lower it is likely the return over the next few years will be as well because that is the main driver in determining the price of the assets.

    Also when did Capital expenditure become part of daily running costs? Gordon Campbell is an economic illiterate based on this piece.

    • Colonial Viper 1.1

      I think people should read the Gordon Campbell piece and decide for themselves if the rationale and analysis he puts forward is worthy. I believe it to be.

      Gosman you make a Key mistake here – by implying that National should accept a lower price on the electricity company sell off because a lower price must mean that the returns from the companies will be lower (for a few years).

      Here its obvious that you are actually the real moron.

      By believing that selling the assets off for cheap, a cheaper deal for ShonKey’s investor mates must then mean that they will drop power prices and that New Zealanders will buy less power.

      Really sorta stupid. Power use is going up, not down. ShonKeys investor mates want our strategic power assets cheap, and then they will maximise power prices to us in order to maximise their returns and the flow of NZ money going overseas.

      That’s capitalism, don’t you understand that? And it’ll hurt NZ.

      • Gosman 1.1.1

        Ah Colonial Viper :).

        I notice you haven’t addressed the question I posed you yesterday about the wisdom of purchasing foreign equities with borrowed overseas funds when the World economy is about to go into a global meltdown.

        Perhaps you would like to address this issue of the Labour Party mortgaging our future to place bets in the Global Capitalist Casino economy?

        • marsman 1.1.1.1

          Ah Gosman, yawn.

        • Draco T Bastard 1.1.1.2

          Really, all that comes down to is a future government being bold enough to default on the borrowings. Same as with the massive borrowings that NAct have caused and will cause in the future if they get back in.

        • Kevin Welsh 1.1.1.3

          If the world economy is going into meltdown, then why the hell would you sell strategic assets?

        • Colonial Viper 1.1.1.4

          Gosman, speaking of mortgaging our future, you know National has added a $37B mortgage to the country’s future in less than 3 years, don’t you?

          Perhaps you would like to address this issue of the Labour Party mortgaging our future to place bets in the Global Capitalist Casino economy?

          I agree with you here and believe that we should distance ourselves from the Global Capitalist Casion economy.

          The best way to do that is to invest in NZ (not sell it off), reform the RBA, and take back control of the NZ banking system

          • Gosman 1.1.1.4.1

            Ummmm…. Colonial Viper the NZ Super Fund has over half it’s assets invested outside of New Zealand.

            Labour is not promising to either reform the NZ Banking system or the RBA.

            So given the demise of the Global financial system that you believe is imminent, is it really wise that Labour is going to borrow billions of dollars which will be invested offshore?

            You could perhaps take DTB’s view. That we should default on the borrowing at some stage in the future. You gotta love Left wing economic thinking sometimes.

            • Draco T Bastard 1.1.1.4.1.1

              When you loan someone nothing money, you’re taking the risk that you’re not going to get it back.

              It’s not left wing economics but standard free-market doctrine.

            • McFlock 1.1.1.4.1.2

              it’s okay – it’s short-selling them like Goldman Sachs 🙂

    • Ed 1.2

      I need your help here Gosman. I can see that political bias could be something we need to be aware of, but are you saying that any left wing or right wing political commentator automatically has no opinions more of less valid than any other? Or could you give me a list of authorised independent commentators who have more valid views?
      Gordon Campbell may have missed a recent policy announcement – interviewed on radio yesterday, Ann Tolley said that the proceeds would be used for school buildings for spending that was not already budgeted for – in particular ‘leaky home” problems that otherwise may have to be done over a much longer period. That may affect their planned goverment finances, but are you saying that we should not take any account of Tolley as she is right wing?
      Labour’s numbers show that even allowing for some borrowing to provide the money that would otherwise come from asset sales, we would be $2.6 billion better off by the time we get debt paid off – as well as still having the assets. National haven’t shown any numbers to dispute this. Perhaps you could explain why it is a good idea to sell an asset that is providing a good return to invest in investments with a lower return. I would really appreciate your help on this; I have never quite understood why National want to borrow to spend money on the Orewa highway that has a lower investment return than the cost of the borrowing – how does that work, Gosman?
       

    • mik e 1.3

      Gooseman you lie like PinoKeyo. The energy companies have increased returns every year since I can remember and thats a long time .
      Energy companies are one of the few better performing assets any where in the world and they are our best performing companies right across the NZ company sector other than the foreign owned banks
      More spin coming from the right even though now National may not be able to sell Assets at fire sale prices even
      these are cash flow companies as well which makes them more valuable than ordinary companies

  2. In Vino Veritas 2

    Why should this be required reading? It looks to me like a personal opinion piece with a rudimentary analysis (if it could even be called that) on asset sales. There are a dozen posters to this blog that could have written this.

    Just as a matter of interest, he says that 90% of NZ’rs don’t invest in the sharemarket. But 1.6 million are in kiwisaver. And doesnt Mr Campbell think that their Kiwisaver schemes will invest in these assets, making a great proportion of NZ’rs indirect investors?

    Mr Campbell in the article also refers to Rod Oram, who opines that it would be unwise for an investor to invest in more than one, let alone three. Best they have a look at say, Infratil, a NZ listed company that specialises in infrastructure.

    • Colonial Viper 2.1

      Just as a matter of interest, he says that 90% of NZ’rs don’t invest in the sharemarket. But 1.6 million are in kiwisaver. And doesnt Mr Campbell think that their Kiwisaver schemes will invest in these assets, making a great proportion of NZ’rs indirect investors?

      Tiny indirect investments in ACC and the Cullen Fund don’t count the same as personal portfolios the wealthy have.

      Although in general terms I am extremely dubious about large retirement funds – many have been getting stolen and wiped out by the Financial Terrorists, of late.

      • Gosman 2.1.1

        “Although in general terms I am extremely dubious about large retirement funds – many have been getting stolen and wiped out by the Financial Terrorists, of late.”

        Do you happen to have examples of the many that have been stolen and wiped out?

        • mik e 2.1.1.1

          Brashes Huljich wealth management.

          • Colonial Viper 2.1.1.1.1

            lol

            Also note the charges laid against Bank of New York Mellon, accusing it of clipping the ticket on every pension fund currency transaction made for the last several decades, effectively stealing billions from retirees.

            What BNYM did was look back over each trading day, and assign the pension funds with the WORST prices of the day while the bank kept the BEST prices of the day for itself.

      • In Vino Veritas 2.1.2

        “Tiny indirect investments in ACC and the Cullen Fund don’t count the same as personal portfolios the wealthy have”.

        Colonial, this is not a rebuttal of my argument though. A good proportion of NZ’rs will in fact have an indirect shareholding in these assets via their Kiwisaver schemes. And Kiwisaver schemes will undoubtably invest in these assets. Therefore, the assertion made by the writer is incorrect.

  3. seeker 3

    “So the Nats’ so called “competent economic management” was already pretty much a myth.”

    Is this why?

    “The claims that the ultra-rich 1% make for themselves – that they are possessed of unique intelligence or creativity or drive – are examples of the self-attribution fallacy. This means crediting yourself with outcomes for which you weren’t responsible. Many of those who are rich today got there because they were able to capture certain jobs. This capture owes less to talent and intelligence than to a combination of the ruthless exploitation of others and accidents of birth, as such jobs are taken disproportionately by people born in certain places and into certain classes.

    The findings of the psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of a Nobel economics prize, are devastating to the beliefs that financial high-fliers entertain about themselves. He discovered that their apparent success is a cognitive illusion. For example, he studied the results achieved by 25 wealth advisers across eight years. He found that the consistency of their performance was zero. “The results resembled what you would expect from a dice-rolling contest, not a game of skill.” Those who received the biggest bonuses had simply got lucky.

    Such results have been widely replicated. They show that traders and fund managers throughout Wall Street receive their massive remuneration for doing no better than would a chimpanzee flipping a coin. When Kahneman tried to point this out, they blanked him. “The illusion of skill … is deeply ingrained in their culture.” George Monbiot U.K. Guardian 7-11-11

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/nov/07/one-per-cent-wealth-destroyers

    Now who is “in denial” and “not focussed on reality” Mr.ChimpKey and your National party followers? (quotes by j. hartevelt this pm on stuff)

    I certainly don’t think it is Phil Goff and the many thoroughly ‘focussed on reality’ commenters on this site.

  4. anne 4

    The article should be sent to the media for printing in papers,however its very difficult to get the media to print or screen anything that critisizes key and their corrupted,negligent practices with
    tax payers money,the media in nz should not be biased,but they could have had a handout like sky tv or fonterra,meat industry,media works,yachting,bmw’s fiasco,scf etc

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • More medicines for New Zealanders, thanks to Govt’s Budget boost
    Health Minister Andrew Little is welcoming news that two more important medicines are set to be funded, thanks to the Government’s big boost to the country’s medicines budget. “Since coming into Government in 2017, the Labour Government has increased Pharmac’s funding by 43 per cent, including a $71 million boost ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    27 mins ago
  • Government delivers ACC change to support 28,000 parents
    The Maternal Birth Injury and Other Matters Bill passes Third Reading – the first amendment to ACC legislation of its kind From 1 October 2022, new ACC cover to benefit approximately 28,000 birthing parents Additional maternal birth injuries added alongside new review provision to ensure cover remains comprehensive Greater clarity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    12 hours ago
  • Further cuts for East Coast tarakihi limits to rebuild numbers faster
    Commercial catch limits for East Coast tarakihi will be reduced further to help the stock rebuild faster. “Tarakihi is a popular fish, and this has led to declining levels over time. Many adjustments have been made and the stock is recovering. I have decided on further commercial catch reductions of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    13 hours ago
  • New Ambassador to Colombia announced
    Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of diplomat Nicci Stilwell as the next Ambassador to Colombia. “Aotearoa New Zealand’s relationship with Colombia is fast growing with strong links across education, climate change and indigenous co-operation,” Nanaia Mahuta said.  “Trade is a key part of our relationship with Colombia, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    13 hours ago
  • 3000 more RSE workers to ease workforce pressures
    The Government continues to respond to global workforce shortages by announcing the largest increase in over a decade to the Recognised Seasonal Employer Scheme (RSE), providing 3000 additional places, Immigration Minister Michael Wood and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor have announced. The new RSE cap will allow access to 19,000 workers ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • Sanctions on more of the Russian political elite
    Further sanctions are being imposed on members of President Putin’s inner circle and other representatives of the Russian political elite, as part of the Governments ongoing response to the war in Ukraine, says Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta. “Ukraine has been clear that the most important action we can take to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • New Principal Youth Court Judge appointed
    Judge Ida Malosi, District Court Judge of Wellington, has been appointed as the new Principal Youth Court Judge, Attorney-General David Parker announced today. Born and raised in Southland, Judge Malosi graduated from Victoria University of Wellington and spent her legal career in South Auckland.  She was a founding partner of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Visitor arrivals highest since pandemic began
    Overseas visitor arrivals exceeded 100,000 in July, for the first time since the borders closed in March 2020 Strong ski season lifts arrivals to Queenstown to at least 90% of the same period in 2019 Australia holiday recovery has continued to trend upwards New Zealand’s tourism recovery is on its ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    16 hours ago
  • Language provides hope for Tuvalu
    Climate change continues to present a major risk for the island nation of Tuvalu, which means sustaining te gana Tuvalu, both on home soil and in New Zealand Aotearoa, has never been more important, Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio said. The Tuvalu Auckland Community Trust and wider Tuvalu ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Minister Sio to attend Asian Development Bank meeting in Manila
    Associate Foreign Affairs Minister Aupito William Sio travels to the Philippines this weekend to represent Aotearoa New Zealand at the 55th Annual Meeting of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) Board of Governors in Manila. “The ADB Annual Meeting provides an opportunity to engage with other ADB member countries, including those ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • United Nations General Assembly National Statement
    E ngā Mana, e ngā Reo, Rau Rangatira mā kua huihui mai nei i tēnei Whare Nui o te Ao Ngā mihi maioha ki a koutou katoa, mai i tōku Whenua o Aotearoa Tuia ki runga, Tuia ki raro, ka Rongo to pō ka rongo te ao Nō reira, tēnā ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New strategy unifies all-of-Government approach to help Pacific languages thrive
    A united approach across all-of-Government underpins the new Pacific Language Strategy, announced by the Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio at Parliament today. “The cornerstone of our Pacific cultures, identities and place in Aotearoa, New Zealand are our Pacific languages. They are at the heart of our wellbeing,” Aupito ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Upgrades for sporting facilities ahead of FIFA Women’s World Cup
    Communities across the country will benefit from newly upgraded sporting facilities as a result of New Zealand co-hosting the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023. The Government is investing around $19 million to support upgrades at 30 of the 32 potential sporting facilities earmarked for the tournament, including pitch, lighting and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Partnership supports climate action in Latin America and Caribbean
    Aotearoa New Zealand is extending the reach of its support for climate action to a new agriculture initiative with partners in Latin America and the Caribbean. Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced a NZ$10 million contribution to build resilience, enhance food security and address the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Landmark agreement for Māori fisheries celebrates 30th year
    The 30th anniversary of the Fisheries Deed of Settlement is a time to celebrate a truly historic partnership that has helped transform communities, says Parliamentary Under-Secretary to the Minister for Oceans and Fisheries Rino Tirikatene. “The agreement between the Crown and Māori righted past wrongs, delivered on the Crown’s treaty ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government backs initiatives to cut environmental impact of plastic waste
    The Government has today announced funding for projects that will cut plastic waste and reduce its impact on the environment. “Today I am announcing the first four investments to be made from the $50 million Plastics Innovation Fund, which was set last year and implemented a 2020 election promise,” Environment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Call for expressions of interest in appointment to the High Court Bench
    Attorney-General David Parker today called for nominations and expressions of interest in appointment to the High Court Bench.  This is a process conducted at least every three years and ensures the Attorney-General has up to date information from which to make High Court appointments.  “It is important that when appointments ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Depositor compensation scheme protects Kiwis’ money
    New Zealanders will have up to $100,000 of their deposits in any eligible institution guaranteed in the event that institution fails, under legislation introduced in Parliament today. The Deposit Takers Bill is the third piece of legislation in a comprehensive review of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand Act and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New fund to help more Pacific aiga into their own homes
    The Government has launched a new housing fund that will help more Pacific aiga achieve the dream of home ownership. “The Pacific Building Affordable Homes Fund will help organisations, private developers, Māori/iwi, and NGOs build affordable housing for Pacific families and establish better pathways to home ownership within Pacific communities. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • More than 100,000 new Kiwis as halfway point reached
    Over 100,000 new Kiwis can now call New Zealand ‘home’ after the 2021 Resident Visa reached the halfway point of approvals, Minister of Immigration Michael Wood announced today. “This is another important milestone, highlighting the positive impact our responsive and streamlined immigration system is having by providing comfort to migrant ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Maniapoto Claims Settlement Bill passes third reading – He mea pāhi te Maniapoto Claims Settl...
    Nā te Minita mō ngā Take Tiriti o Waitangi, nā Andrew Little,  te iwi o Maniapoto i rāhiri i tēnei rā ki te mātakitaki i te pānuitanga tuatoru o te Maniapoto Claims Settlement Bill - te pikinga whakamutunga o tā rātou whakataunga Tiriti o Waitangi o mua. "Me mihi ka ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • 50,000 more kids to benefit from equity-based programmes next year
    Another 47,000 students will be able to access additional support through the school donations scheme, and a further 3,000 kids will be able to get free and healthy school lunches as a result of the Equity Index.  That’s on top of nearly 90% of schools that will also see a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Healthy Active Learning now in 40 percent of schools across New Zealand
    A total of 800 schools and kura nationwide are now benefitting from a physical activity and nutrition initiative aimed at improving the wellbeing of children and young people. Healthy Active Learning was funded for the first time in the inaugural Wellbeing Budget and was launched in 2020. It gets regional ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech at 10th meeting of the Friends of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty
    Kia Ora. It is a pleasure to join you here today at this 10th meeting of the Friends of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty. This gathering provides an important opportunity to reiterate our unwavering commitment to achieving a world without nuclear weapons, for which the entry into force of this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech for Earthshot Prize Innovation Summit 2022
    Kia ora koutou katoa Thank you for the invitation to join you. It’s a real pleasure to be here, and to be in such fine company.  I want to begin today by acknowledging His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales and Sir David Attenborough in creating what is becoming akin ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New accreditation builds capacity for Emergency Management Volunteers
    Emergency Management Minister Kieran McAnulty has recognised the first team to complete a newly launched National Accreditation Process for New Zealand Response Team (NZ-RT) volunteers. “NZ-RT volunteers play a crucial role in our emergency response system, supporting response and recovery efforts on the ground. This new accreditation makes sure our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Govt strengthens trans-Tasman emergency management cooperation
    Aotearoa New Zealand continues to strengthen global emergency management capability with a new agreement between New Zealand and Australia, says Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty. “The Government is committed to improving our global and national emergency management system, and the Memorandum of Cooperation signed is another positive step towards ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Christchurch Call Initiative on Algorithmic Outcomes
    Today New Zealand, the USA, Twitter, and Microsoft, announced investment in a technology innovation initiative under the banner of the Christchurch Call.  This initiative will support the creation of new technology to understand the impacts of algorithms on people’s online experiences.  Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms play a growing role in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • JOINT PR: Trans-Tasman Cooperation on disaster management
    Hon Kieran McAnulty, New Zealand Minister for Emergency Management Senator The Hon Murray Watt, Federal Minister for Emergency Management Strengthening Trans-Tasman cooperation on disaster management issues was a key area of focus when Australia and New Zealand’s disaster management ministers met this week on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Ministerial Conference on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • More transparency, less red-tape for modernised charities sector
    The Charities Amendment Bill has been introduced today which will modernise the charities sector by increasing transparency, improving access to justice services and reducing the red-tape that smaller charities face, Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector Priyanca Radhakrishnan said. “These changes will make a meaningful difference to over 28,000 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Pacific visas reopened to help boost workforce
    Work continues on delivering on a responsive and streamlined immigration system to help relieve workforce shortages, with the reopening of longstanding visa categories, Immigration Minister Michael Wood has announced.  From 3 October 2022, registrations for the Samoan Quota will reopen, and from 5 October registrations for the Pacific Access Category ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Queen Elizabeth II Memorial Day Bill passes into law
    The Bill establishing Queen Elizabeth II Memorial Day has passed its third reading. “As Queen of Aotearoa New Zealand, Her Majesty was loved for her grace, calmness, dedication, and public service. Her affection for New Zealand and its people was clear, and it was a fondness that was shared,” Michael ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New investor migrant visa opens
    The new Active Investor Plus visa category created to attract high-value investors, has officially opened marking a key milestone in the Government’s Immigration Rebalance strategy, Economic Development Minister Stuart Nash and Immigration Minister Michael Wood have announced. “The new Active Investor Plus visa replaces the previous investor visa categories, which ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New wharekura continues commitment to Māori education
    A new Year 1-13 designated character wharekura will be established in Feilding, Associate Minister of Education Kelvin Davis announced today. To be known as Te Kura o Kauwhata, the wharekura will cater for the expected growth in Feilding for years to come. “The Government has a goal of strengthening Māori ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • National minute of silence for Queen Elizabeth II
    A national minute of silence will be observed at the start of New Zealand’s State Memorial Service for Queen Elizabeth II, at 2pm on Monday 26 September. The one-hour service will be held at the Wellington Cathedral of St Paul, during a one-off public holiday to mark the Queen’s death. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to the Climate Change and Business Conference
    Tēnā koutou i tēnei ata. Good morning. Recently I had cause to say to my friends in the media that I consider that my job is only half done. So I’m going to take the opportunity of this year’s Climate and Business Conference to offer you a mid-point review. A ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government enhances protection for our most-productive land  
    Enhanced protection for Aotearoa New Zealand’s most productive land   Councils required to identify, map, and manage highly productive land  Helping ensure Kiwis’ access to leafy greens and other healthy foods Subdivision for housing on highly-productive land could still be possible in limited circumstances  The Government has today released a National ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Kieran McAnulty to attend Asia-Pacific Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction
    Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty will travel to Brisbane this week to represent Aotearoa New Zealand at the 2022 Asia-Pacific Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. “This conference is one of the most important meetings in the Asia-Pacific region to progress disaster risk reduction efforts and increase cooperation between ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Trade and Agriculture Minister to travel to India and Indonesia
    Minister of Trade and Export Growth and Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor will travel tomorrow to India and Indonesia for trade and agricultural meetings to further accelerate the Government’s growing trade agenda.  “Exploring ways we can connect globally and build on our trading relationships is a priority for the Government, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Poroporoaki: Cletus Maanu Paul (ONZM)
    E te rangatira Maanu, takoto mai ra, i tō marae i Wairaka, te marae o te wahine nāna I inoi kia Whakatānea ia kia tae ae ia ki te hopu i te waka Mātaatua kia kore ai i riro i te moana. Ko koe anō tēnā he pukumahi koe mō ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago