web analytics

Fonterra and Fletcher Building

Written By: - Date published: 2:05 pm, February 9th, 2018 - 54 comments
Categories: business, Conservation, Economy, Environment, farming - Tags: ,

New Zealand only has two businesses of world-competitive scale that are also majority owned by New Zealanders: Fonterra, and Fletcher Building.

As Fran O’Sullivan notes, Fonterra’s China plan is far from clear. Its’ Australia plan is also far from clear.

As Bryan Gaynor notes, Fletcher are in really serious trouble. Serious on the scale similar to that which led to the breakup of Fletcher Challenge several decades ago.

It was only in 2016 that Fonterra and Fletchers were two of the most profitable companies that we had.

By number of employees, Fletcher and Fonterra are also in New Zealand’s top three.

They are our most important private companies. And they appear to have lost their way and put much of their value and our wellbeing at risk.

Back in the day, faced with such developments central government would have called one of those almighty summits together to generate a sense of coherence about where such massive parts of our economy, our society, and our environment, were pushing New Zealand. Anderton and Clark would have, and did.

Both Fonterra and Fletcher Building have dominated their respective industries, and evolved with them, for long enough that we should be able to trust them to plan and succeed over a far greater time horizon than governments ordinarily operate.

Yet trade deals and R&D grants are no substitute for a common direction – a strategy – which recognises the vulnerability and latent potential for New Zealand of these two enterprises. Neither of their corporate leaders retains much credibility.

It’s time for this government to call them both out, very loudly, and show that the Labour-led coalition doesn’t just focus on more generous tax redistribution and stronger social support: this government needs to show that it is responding to a clear market failure in commercial strategy, start to give faith back to their global customers, and hold these two most powerful local businesses to public account. In its absence from Fonterra and Fletcher Building, this government needs to show leadership.

54 comments on “Fonterra and Fletcher Building ”

  1. Jack Ramaka 1

    I was told Fletcher’s are over 80% foreign owned, haven’t checked their share registry lately however someone like J B Were the Stockbrokers would be able to clarify that ?

  2. Ad 2

    Forgot to mention.

    If Fonterra is really audited and then restuctured and carved up, there is aboslutely no way the local constructor market will have a shit show of building enough houses, or enough public transport, to do even part of this government’s housing and transport policies.

    So I hope Fletchers has Minister Twyford, MIBIE, and NZTA’s full attention.

  3. Herodotus 3

    And don’t forget this
    No responsibility on Fletcher EQR for shoddy quake repairs, contract suggests
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/71124031/no-responsibility-on-fletcher-eqr-for-shoddy-quake-repairs-contract-suggestsHow well our elected reps look after the voter over the corporate !!

  4. Bill 4

    Just as an aside on the slogans of those protesters… no they can’t.

    What is it with people? They think physics sits back and says “I’ll designate this here carbon as “nice” carbon and put it over here out of the way, while this here “bad” carbon – well, that’s going to make things a bit hot under the collar, innit?” 🙄

    • weka 4.1

      true, although technically if you plant more trees than you burn you’re in a negative carbon scenario, and in a world that was dropping fossil fuels fast that might be a useful thing. Not that we could run industrial, export milk powder economies based on that mind. And we’re not dropping fossil fuels fast enough.

    • Rosemary McDonald 4.2

      “Just as an aside on the slogans of those protesters… no they can’t.”

      Can you hold that thought Bill? I need to check with an expert in the field…but it may be a goer…Later. 😉

      • Bill 4.2.1

        🙂 Aye. It may be a goer. Or then again…

        Sarah Mandera, Kevin Andersona, Alice Larkin, Clair Gough and Naomi Vaughan …

        Taking the requirement of 70EJ p.a. of dedicated BECCS by 2050 and comparing this with the capacity of world’s largest non-nuclear thermal power station (5.6GW) illustrates starkly the scale of deployment assumed [in IPCC scenarios]. By 2050 there would need to be at least 500 fully-BECCS power stations of a size equivalent to the largest thermal plant currently in operation on the planet. Given the fledgling biomass and CCS industry, there is no prospect of a significant roll out of such large biomass plants before 2025 at the very earliest. Even under such unprecedented optimism, there would still need to be one BECCS power station (the size of the largest conventional thermal plant today) constructed and commissioned every eighteen days and for twenty five years in order to deliver the 70EJ of BECCS by 2050. Given that most large modern thermal power stations typically have a capacity of 1 to 2 GW, and again assuming a high annual load factor, a more realistic, but still highly ambitious, capacity for biomass plants would suggest construction and commissioning up to two large BECCS plants each week for a quarter of a century.

        • Rosemary McDonald 4.2.1.1

          How about local solutions to local problems? Because Bill, we have some truly awesome researchers right here in Godzone.

          We’re talking about replacing coal with woodwaste and forestry residues in Fonterra milk drying plants….

          http://nzjf.org.nz/free_issues/NZJF53_4_2009/6B50C54A-C7E0-4775-ACC8-0EBC47004F64.pdf

          “Bioenergy from forestry” Peter Hall, Scion

          Burning woodwaste directly for heat is more energy efficient than converting it to biofuel. Estimates back in 2005 were in the region of 26 PJ of energy available in forestry residues and wood processing waste in New Zealand.

          According to this…https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/farming/agribusiness/68714710/fonterra-a-large-scale-coal-user

          the dairy industry burns about 513,000 tonnes of coal per year.

          You’d need to burn approximately 1million tonnes of wood waste to produce the same amount of energy as heat. (depending on moisture content and other factors) If you’re incentivised to haul this wood waste out of the pine forest (where it is currently rotting and sending tonnes of CO2 and CH4 into the atmosphere) we have easily got enough available to replace coal in the dairy industry.

          If Fonterra switched to woodwaste, they would need to close their coalmines permanently. For ever.

          There would possibly/probably be some re modelling of boilers needed and in the long term one might even consider growing biomass closer to the factory to save on trucking.

          This might help too… it has a chart…https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/fossil-fuels-energy-content-d_1298.html

          The feasibility (or lack of) of BECCS to single handedly save us all from climate change apocalypse is a much, much larger discussion.

          • Bill 4.2.1.1.1

            Swapping out one carbon source of energy for another does nothing towards averting 2 degrees. We have a carbon budget, and just as coal or gas diminishes that budget when we burn it, so does wood or other bio-fuels.

          • Draco T Bastard 4.2.1.1.2

            (where it is currently rotting and sending tonnes of CO2 and CH4 into the atmosphere)

            And while it’s rotting it feeds the forest and down stream plants. Taking it out and burning it would likely cause major ecological disruption.

            • Rosemary McDonald 4.2.1.1.2.1

              true, but while bark and leaves/pine needles contain nutrients, the wood itself is nutrient poor.

              No more ecological disruption taking the wood waste than harvesting the trees for timber…do it at the same time…leaving the bark and needles behind.

  5. weka 5

    “Back in the day, faced with such developments central government would have called one of those almighty summits together to generate a sense of coherence about where such massive parts of our economy, our society, and our environment, were pushing New Zealand. Anderton and Clark would have, and did.”

    What were some examples?

  6. weka 6

    “Both Fonterra and Fletcher Building have dominated their respective industries, and evolved with them, for long enough that we should be able to trust them to plan and succeed over a far greater time horizon than governments ordinarily operate.”

    I like the idea of government intervening proactively, but have to say that both Fonterra and Fletchers were designed for creating the problems they have. i.e. they were never to be trusted. Fonterra for obvious environmental reasons, Fletchers for their involvement in tying up the building industry and preventing lower cost housing and more varied supply chains. We pay a price for the domination model.

  7. Antoine 7

    > Back in the day, faced with such developments central government would have called one of those almighty summits together to generate a sense of coherence about where such massive parts of our economy, our society, and our environment, were pushing New Zealand.

    I would expect that in such a situation, Fonterra or Fletchers would either:

    (a) decline to attend, or
    (b) turn up and spin the Government some reassuring bullshit, or
    (c) turn up and ask for a hand out

    A.

    • Ad 7.1

      In the previous incarnation, the diary industry held out and persuaded the government to form Fonterra itself.

      The Clark government also generated the Fast Forward Fund, a $$billion plus agriculture research and development fund with the pastoral sector braodly.

      National’s approach was to fund irrigation directly, and rail directly, to support Fonterra.

      They assisted Fletchers’ indirectly through the entire Christchurch rebuild set of arrangements.

      • Antoine 7.1.1

        That’s right, so if Fonterra rocks up to a meeting, they’re only going to be wanting more assistance.

        A.

        • Draco T Bastard 7.1.1.1

          Private business, throughout history, has only managed to survive with government help.

          And the end result has been the collapse of society.

          • Antoine 7.1.1.1.1

            Whateva

            My point is that central Govt can’t reasonably expect to drive Fonterra or Fletchers’ strategy, and nor should it.

            A.

            • Draco T Bastard 7.1.1.1.1.1

              Fonterra and Fletchers obviously can’t.

              Thing is, we actually do need the capabilities as represented by Fletchers. We need to be able to build at a pace that allows people and business to be well housed. We probably don’t Fletchers per se. Probably need research into building practices and materials.

              Fonterra? Well, we probably don’t need them in their present incarnation. What we need is a centralised research institute that researches the best farming practice which then filters that out to the farmers. Researches high value end products from farm produce and develops the capability to produce them.

              I’d say that the government is probably the best option for both. MoW to replace Fletchers, a government replacement for Fonterra and an R&D of a billion dollars per year or so for research on each.

            • Ad 7.1.1.1.1.2

              Antoine, the government was at the core of the formation of both Fonterra and Fletchers. Fonterra is fully a creature of the government. There are fat trails of Cabinet papers about what Fonterra should do, how the formative legislation should achieve it, and what the formative legislation required it to achieve.

              There are several histories of the Fletcher family, Fletcher Challenge, and Fletcher Building. Look them up and educate yourself on how closely the state and Fletchers have built each other up.

              We’ve been a state-market hybrid country for all but 30 of our 180 years.

  8. greywarshark 8

    The diary industry is dying out. No-one writes meaningful memoirs these days – the police might raid you and read all your secrets.

  9. ropata 9

    NZ building industry being shafted.

    Employers say there are labour shortages that force them to go overseas. But construction sector wage inflation was just 2.0% last year. Does. Not compute. Migration suppresses wage inflation. The market is not allowed to respond with higher wages to drive higher productivity https://t.co/V7qLs63BnZ— Bernard Hickey (@bernardchickey) February 8, 2018

    Hickey is quoting this tweet:

    Chinese tradies: Company says not given tender opportunity https://t.co/WYH6meOzrn @TomFurleyNZ— Jane Patterson (@janepatterson) February 8, 2018

    • Ed 9.1

      New Zealand has become a slave state

    • Keepcalmcarryon 9.2

      Absolutely true, how do we change it?

      • ropata 9.2.1

        Nationalise core infrastructure. Apply massively punitive taxes on foreign ownership of land. Take China to the WTO for breaching free trade agreements. Deport thousands of useless students and unskilled migrants. Deport communist spies. Make it harder for Aussie banks to do business here and clip tickets for doing fuck all. Bring back industry wide compulsory unionism. Get rid of criminal corporations like HSBC. Increase the numbers of labour inspectors and enhance their powers to shut down dodgy operators.

    • Exkiwiforces 9.3

      Yep, this was always eventually going to happen when those dump Tories back in the 90’s stuff up the Trade training and the Farm Cadetship scheme, brought in the ECA and let the so-called free market, user pays to dictate instead of the whole of government and industry base training in under the old scheme.

      But then again the last Labour did sweet F All about the appending disaster that was slowly developing and that was without the earthquakes. The useless Tories again let the market dictate by bring overseas tradies, dumbing down the education, workers rights/ training instead of investing the New Zealand workers. This type of shit would’ve never happen here in Australia and I won’t be hold my breath with this Labour Government fixing the problem when you look at the previous record of the last Labour Government with it middle class latte set.

      When was the last time a Labour Government look after the work class which was the backbone of the Labour Party?

      • ropata 9.3.1

        The 1990s Nats only saw the costs not the investment value of having skilled tradesmen. Then their fucken leaky homes scandal and dodgy developers ruined the Auckland property market, and Clark’s Labour allowed it to continue, then Key’s National really opened the floodgates and the market became corrupted with money laundering, property flipping, land banking, an obscene orgy of greed. Meanwhile Kiwi families were made homeless by earthquakes and poverty and forced to sleep in garages or in cars.

        Time to start jailing those who continue making money from this cycle of exploitation and market manipulation.

        As for Australia — yeah right.

        A terrific review and summary of my book Game of Mates. https://t.co/Wr1NTBFauW Get the book via https://t.co/J8mu3aG8qT pic.twitter.com/e7M0cE27qJ— Cameron Murray (@DrCameronMurray) February 8, 2018

        • Exkiwiforces 9.3.1.1

          If Bruce was smart he would get an accountant as there are ways to beat the James of the world. It was the first piece of advice the uncles and cousins said to me when move to Oz in 98, second piece of advice use the bloody trains in Sydney or get the hell out of Sydney, 3rd piece advice live within your means and save for a rainy day so when the housing market tanks as it always does then buy a house or get the hell out Sydney and Dads advice was join a bloody union.

          The system can be beating if you pay it smart and are prepare to take the odd risk here and there. Getting Blown up, getting shot at, doing peacekeeping etc, is probably not the way to do it. But it can be done

          The free market is never going to work, nor is a full on government intervention either. Its a 50/50 each way this way its keep everyone honest and when the market goes a little bit silly then the Government steps in. What I see in NZ now, in some ways it makes sad and angry, but i’m glad I got out while I did as some of my cohort are stuck in a rut in Hornby some doing better than others and some are …. can’t think of the right words.

          • ropata 9.3.1.1.1

            Unfortunately not everyone is smart or lucky enough to get good advice and help along the way. The game is rigged against working people.

            Of course everyone should work and take opportunities, but it’s deeply immoral that hard working people are stuck in poverty & paying too much in rent and expenses.

            • Exkiwiforces 9.3.1.1.1.1

              The funny thing the Uncles and cousins comments is that they are Tory voters that have turned.

              You are right the whole thing is rigged especially what I see in NZ since the free market clowns are running the show and it would be nice to get it back on a even keel.

              What I seen in Christchurch on my last visit was quite awful to say the least and it was the reason why I stay in the North Island this time round in Nov last year as visiting CHCH makes me sick in the guts. I’ve seen some shit in 3rd word countries but in a develop country like NZ only the States treats it lower economic people as bad as NZ does now and that’s a real eye opener especially in Sin City.

              • ropata

                Sorry to hear that. I lived in CHC for 10 years, left just before the earthquakes. Wages are generally pretty shit in the South Island, much better in WLG or AKL. CHC has a surplus of young idiots looking for trouble.

                I stayed in the eastern suburbs: Wainoni, Parklands, New Brighton for the most part. Didn’t hang around Hornby much, didn’t like it. The city is going to be rebuilding for a long time. Dunno what happened to King Gerry’s glorious plans for the CBD. Things are moving pretty slow. Didn’t help that National decided to act like a land banker to keep their mates property values intact.

                • Exkiwiforces

                  When I last visited CHC I was expecting a lot of cranes dotting the landscape, underground and above services getting repaired. But after seeing it for first hand NACT’s were telling porky pies, when Dad and I bump of dad’s old works mate from the City Council Water Dept the stories that dads mate was saying about the problems they were in counting out in the East Suburbs and parts the CBD, and being told to take short cuts to keep costs down due the pollies at National and Local level was like WTF. Anyway he said was glad to take his retirement because the pressure he was under to sign off work that sub- standard, was just morally and unethical he knew down the track it have be rip up again and be replace again due to a blow out, lost of pressure etc.

                  As for the land grab by the NACT’s again is morally wrong when within the four avenues you had over 100 plus landlords pre earthquake down to a handful and when you look at that handful they all NACT supporters so go figure.

                  What National did CHC is going to happen to the Coast, Wellington, Hawkes Bay and when a volcano goes pop again in Auckland the buggers will do the same again.

                  Its may understanding that since the CHC earthquakes that the Tories still didn’t restart the funding for EQC when they stop it back in 90 and mind you last Labour government can share some of the blame as well.

  10. ropata 10

    Teuila Fuatai: A more durable alternative to fly-in workers

    Great points in here about NZ's boom-bust construction sector. It lends itself to a short term approach and relying on contractors and migrants for quick-on and quick-off business structures. https://t.co/fQg0VYDH4j— Bernard Hickey (@bernardchickey) February 9, 2018

  11. Jack Ramaka 11

    The Free Market under Neoliberalism is a fallacy, the game is rigged, especially in the building supplies market ?

    Monopolies and oligopolies exist here in NZ and are encouraged and endorsed by Government.

    • ropata 11.1

      The “free” market is a myth as players will use power/information asymmetry to gain market advantage and conspire to rip off the public. We need the Commerce Commission and consumer protections and regulations to constrain the cowboys.

      A decent market can only exist with decent government and market participants who are relatively honest and uncorrupted.

      • Ad 11.1.1

        Especially in a small state like New Zealand’s, the government has usually been the prime creator of markets. Granted there have been a few exceptions, but the degree of structuring successive governments have had to do to actually get specific markets going, let alone ensure that they function even half-successfully, is right up there. Starting with the Treaty of Waitangi as the biggest, but even if we just sum up the 19th century, the government shapes whole markets including:

        – Immigration
        – Railways
        – Land and farming
        – Electricity
        – Water
        – Banking

        And then on to the 20th century, where as the scale, force,and ambit of the state quickly expands, so too do the kinds of markets it needs to form and regulate …

        …sometimes by force, but usually with simply excellent payments to a small set of the right people, time after time.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Celebrating the success of Prime Minister’s Oranga Tamariki Award winners
    The achievements of a group of young people who have been in care or involved in the youth justice system have been recognised at the Oranga Tamariki Prime Minister Awards, Minister for Children Kelvin Davis said. A total of 25 young people were present at the Awards ceremony along with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    9 hours ago
  • DevNet 2022: Keynote address
    Whakataka te hau ki te uru, Whakataka te hau ki te tonga. Kia mākinakina ki uta, Kia mātaratara ki tai. E hī ake ana te atakura. He tio, he huka, he hauhū. Tihei Mauri Ora!   Tēnā koutou katoa. Thank you to the University of Auckland for hosting this DevNet ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    13 hours ago
  • Community voices amplified in fight against alcohol harm
    Alcohol licensing hearings will become more accessible and less adversarial as the Government removes barriers preventing community voices from being heard, Justice Minister Kiri Allan said today. A Bill making targeted changes to the licensing process in the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 has been introduced to the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • GOVT to provide further funding to Ruapehu Alpine Lifts
    The Government has decided to advance a further $6 million bridging funding to allow time for MBIE through Kanoa-RDU to support the development of an alternative commercial solution. “Following discussions with affected stakeholders, including other creditors and iwi, it has become clear that more time is needed to further explore ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Government delivers safer roads for Waimakariri
    Associate Minister of Transport Kieran McAnulty was in Waimakariri this morning to mark the beginning of work on a $41 million programme to improve road safety in the Waimakariri district. “The projects started today is critical for the people of Waimakariri as it will address the stretch of SH1 between ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • International tourists bring over $1b into economy
    Spend from all international visitors totalled $1.03 billion in the September 2022 quarter Holidaymakers spent $479 million Visitors for friends or relatives spent $292 million Tourism Electronic Card Transactions spend in 8 regions (out of 16) was higher than October 2019 levels pre-COVID The release of the International Visitor Survey ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    21 hours ago
  • Launch of Te Ara Paerangi Future Pathways
    E ngā mātāwaka, E ngā iwi o te motu, Tēnā koutou katoa. Ko Ayesha Verrall ahau, Te Minita mō te Rangahau, Pūtaiao me te Auahatanga. Tēnā koutou i runga i te kaupapa o te wā, Nō reira, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tatou katoa.   Acknowledgements It is a privilege ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Reform of science system to build better future for New Zealand
    The Government has set the direction for a future-focused science system says Research, Science and Innovation Minister Dr Ayesha Verrall. Our research, science and innovation system will be geared towards tackling New Zealand’s big challenges such as climate change, environmental degradation and the complex health and problems that undermine wellbeing. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Te Rohe o Rongokako Joint Redress Bill Third Reading I Te Pānuitanga Tuatoru o te Pire mō te Puret...
    Te Pānuitanga Tuatoru o te Pire mō te Puretumu Ngātahi mō Te Rohe o Rongokako I te rā nei, i Pāremata, ka oti te tuatoru me te whakamutunga o ngā pānuitanga o te Pire mō te Puretumu Ngātahi mō te Rohe o Rongokako. Ko tā te pire, he whakatinana i ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Hi-tech New Zealand strawberries on the horizon
    New Zealanders will be able to enjoy spray-free strawberries grown through a hi-tech new system almost all year round through a Government-backed pilot project based in Foxton, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced. “We’re focussed on innovations that lift the sustainability and productivity of our food and fibre sector and this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Cadetships programme continues to empower whānau Māori
    Since July 2022, more than 610 cadets across 35 programmes have been approved, up from the 499 cadets approved by this time in the last financial year. The programme is growing. “The Cadetship programme’s ongoing success comes down to treating our young people with mana so that they can achieve ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New rules for offshore detention complete Govt response to Operation Burnham inquiry
    The government has announced a new set of rules to ensure proper and humane treatment of people detained by Police, Defence forces, or other New Zealand agencies during offshore deployments. The Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta says the new framework for offshore detention delivers on the fourth and final recommendation accepted ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • 19 new townhouses for whānau in need in Lower Hutt
    Associate Minister of Housing (Māori Housing) Peeni Henare today visited Kahungunu Whānau Services and their newly purchased 19 townhouses in Taita, Lower Hutt. “Through the Government’s Te Kahui Māori Housing programme, Tātai Mokopuna Holdings Limited (the asset holding company of Kahungunu Whānau Services)  was granted a $7.1 million Māori housing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government backs greater competition in building supplies to reduce costs for Kiwis
    The Government will take action to increase competition in the residential building supplies sector, says Building and Construction Minister Dr Megan Woods and Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Dr David Clark, following the release of the Commerce Commission’s market study final report. “We asked the Commerce Commission to review our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Royal Commission to draw lessons from pandemic response
    A Royal Commission to prepare New Zealand for future pandemics through lessons learned from COVID-19 has been announced by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern today. “Every country in the world has grappled with COVID-19 and there was no playbook for managing it,” Jacinda Ardern said. “It had been over 100 years ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Minister Sio to discuss Pacific development priorities
    Associate Foreign Affairs Minister Aupito William Sio travels to Indonesia this week to represent Aotearoa New Zealand at the Indonesia Pacific Forum for Development and the 15th Bali Democracy Forum. “Attending these international meetings enables Aotearoa New Zealand to connect with our partners kanohi ki te kanohi, or face to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Changes to partner work visas deferred to April 2023
    Changes to partner work visas that were set to come into effect in December 2022 have been deferred to April 2023, Immigration Minister Michael Wood has announced today. “I have made the decision to defer these changes to April 2023,” Michael Wood said. “Our Government wants to provide greater certainty ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Building Act changes put the environment at the heart of how we build
    The Government is taking action to reduce waste and lower emissions from the building and construction sector in significant Building Act amendments announced today. “This Government is proud to put the environment at the heart of how New Zealand builds. By enabling mandatory energy performance rating requirements for buildings, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Govt’s medicines boost paying off for New Zealanders
    Pharmac’s plan to fund the cystic fibrosis medicine Trikafta is another example of the Government’s boost to the medicines budget helping New Zealanders, says Health Minister Andrew Little. “Pharmac, not politicians, makes the decisions on what treatments to fund, but politicians decide what funding to provide to Pharmac, and health ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Better transport choices for New Zealanders
    Forty-six councils across Aotearoa New Zealand, from large metro centres to small provincial towns, will receive funding to implement more transport options for communities, as part of the Transport Choices package 2022-24, Transport Minister Michael Wood announced today. “The Government is upgrading New Zealand’s transport infrastructure system to make it ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Te Rangiwaituhi – Maniapoto apology
    Mihi Ko taku rourou iti a haere, maringi kai whenua Ko taku rourou iti a haere, maringi kai moana kia mau ki te kawau māro, whanake ake! kō Maniapoto e! Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa   Greetings and Thanks As we gather here this morning I want to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Maniapoto receives Crown Apology – Ka whakawhiwhia ki a Ngāti Maniapoto te Whakapāhatanga a ...
    Kua tukuna e te Pirimia, e Jacinda Ardern, i te taha o te Minita mō ngā Take Tiriti o Waitangi, a Andrew Little, te Whakapāhatanga a te Karauna ki a Ngāti Maniapoto mō āna mahi o mua i takahi i te Tiriti o Waitangi. I tū te hui i Te ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Big online platforms to pay fair price for local news content
    The Government will legislate to require big online digital companies such as Google and Meta to pay a fair price to New Zealand media companies for the local news content they host and share on their platforms, Minister of Broadcasting Willie Jackson announced today. The legislation will be modelled on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government to remove entrenchment from Three Waters legislation
    The Government will fix the Water Services Entities Bill this week by removing the entrenchment clause that was voted on during committee stages, Leader of the House Chris Hipkins announced today. “It was a mistake to put the entrenchment clause in and the Government will fix the issue as soon ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • 10 new whare for Ngāi Tāmanuhiri kaumātua and whānau in Te Muriwai
    Associate Minister of Housing (Māori Housing) Peeni Henare joined Ngāi Tāmanuhiri and the wider Toitū Tairāwhiti collective, at the opening of 10 new homes built for kaumātua and whānau in Muriwai today.   “Every whare that is built and whānau that is transferred from inadequate housing to a warm dry ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Joint statement: Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand Foreign Minister Consultations
    Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs, Senator the Hon Penny Wong welcomed Aotearoa New Zealand's Minister for Foreign Affairs, Hon Nanaia Mahuta to Canberra today for biannual Australia – Aotearoa New Zealand Foreign Minister Consultations. The Ministers acknowledged the unique strength of the relationship between Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand, reaffirmed the shared ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Funding boost for kaupapa Māori response to homelessness
    Associate Minister of Housing (Homelessness) Marama Davidson has announced a significant funding boost today for kaupapa Māori approaches that support whānau into housing. $24.7 million will be allocated to support the delivery of He Ara Hiki Mauri – a tangata whenua-led response to homelessness. “Homelessness is not inevitable. By working ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Appointment of Judge of the High Court
    Auckland barrister David Gary Johnstone has been appointed a judge of the High Court, Attorney‑General David Parker announced today. Justice Johnstone graduated from the University of Auckland in 1991 with a BCom/LLB(Hons), and joined Bell Gully as a solicitor, practising in general commercial litigation. During 1993 and 1994 he studied at the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • MAIHI Whare Wananga celebrates innovative approach to Maori Housing
    New Maori Housing dashboard for better data sharing and better outcomes New development training programme to grow sector capability Associate Minister of Housing (Maori Housing) Peeni Henare today attended the annual MAIHI Whare Wananga hosted by Toitu Tairawhiti Housing Limited in Kaiti.   “Our MAIHI Whare Wananga is an opportunity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New mental health facility a step closer for Gisborne
    Health Minister Andrew Little was at Gisborne Hospital today to mark the next step of Te Tairāwhiti’s new Te Whare Awhiora mental health facility build. The Health Minister turned a sod to mark the start of groundworks at the site, in preparation for the placement of a mauri stone. “The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • More rural broadband for regional communities
      New contracts will improve around 30,000 broadband connections in rural homes and communities Govt on track to see 99.8% of all New Zealanders receive access to improved broadband as a result of various connectivity programmes by the end of 2023, including those targeting rural regions Applications open for one-off ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Tauranga region to benefit from new funding and financing tool
    Tauranga will be the first region to use a new Government tool to raise funding for much-needed infrastructure. A Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) will be used to raise finance from private markets, which is then repaid via the levy on those who benefit from the infrastructure. The finance raised by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New committee established to drive better public health outcomes
    Some of the country’s most difficult health issues will be tackled by a newly established public health advisory committee, whose members have now been appointed. Associate Minister of Health Dr Ayesha Verrall says the new Public Health Advisory Committee will investigate and help address long-term health challenges facing Aotearoa. “We ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government and sector back innovative regional and wool projects
    $2.17 million for new food and fibre ventures in Taranaki $2.24m to develop high-value, sustainable cashmere industry $233,000 to prototype an acoustic, knitted textile product from strong wool for high-end commercial and residential interiors.  $530 million co-invested with business through the Sustainable Food and Fibre Futures fund  The Government closes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Statement on the death of Sir Murray Halberg
    New Zealand has lost one our true sporting icons with the passing of Sir Murray Halberg, Grant Robertson, Minister of Sport and Recreation said today. “Sir Murray was an extraordinary athlete. His gold medal in the 5000m at the Rome Olympic Games in 1960 has been immortalised as part of New ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Ministerial talks in Canberra to progress trans-Tasman relationship
    The importance of cooperation in the Pacific to support the region’s recovery and resilience will be a focus of formal talks in Canberra tomorrow between the Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta and her Australian counterpart Penny Wong. Nanaia Mahuta will meet Senator Wong for the second formal Foreign Ministers’ Consultations following ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Iwi and Government partnership delivers more rental homes for Pāpāmoa whānau
    Associate Minister of Housing (Māori Housing) Peeni Henare attended the official opening of 10 new rental homes built for working whānau of Ngā Pōtiki ā Tamapahore in Pāpāmoa today. “The Bay of Plenty region is one of many regions facing significant housing challenges and this Government is taking action by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government investment to support growth of Māori businesses and jobs in the primary sector
    Total exports by Māori businesses have grown by 38% since 2017 to $872 million, with the majority from the food and fibre sector Launch of Rautaki mo te Taurikura action plan to support the continued growth of Māori food and fibre sector Support for Māori agribusiness innovation and workforce development ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government to address child abuse system failings
    The Government is adopting the majority of recommendations from an independent review into the actions of government agencies leading up to the death of 5-year-old Malachi Subecz, Minister for Children Kelvin Davis announced today. Following Malachi’s murder at the hands of his caregiver in 2021, Dame Karen Poutasi was appointed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • More tools to help Police deal with fleeing drivers
    Increase the maximum driver licence disqualification period for a second offence of failing to stop or remain stopped, from 12 months to between 12 months and 24 months; Amend the Sentencing Act 2002 so that a vehicle can be forfeited on conviction for failing to stop. Offenders could have their ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago