web analytics

Govt tries to bully Wellington Council

Written By: - Date published: 8:54 am, December 20th, 2012 - 14 comments
Categories: transport - Tags:

Wellington Council has voted to spend some time looking at a new alternative to the Basin Fly-over plan. The government’s response has been to threaten the council that other transport investment in Wellington – including light rail – will be scrapped unless they get their concrete monstrosity built. In related news, NZTA systemically under-estimates the costs and overstates the benefits of roading projects and builds projects that never should have been built.

14 comments on “Govt tries to bully Wellington Council ”

  1. Twonice 1

    It’s as if building overly costly roads is all part of the natz plan for justifying asset sales to fund them and then drilling all the oil out to power all the new cars..

  2. vto 2

    Yeah, well we are well used to these men trying to bully us around in Chch.

    Think Ecan dictatorship, various earthquake bully tactics by Brownlee, and now schools mashing.

    We have had enough down here and you may have noticed twice recently our local Council completely thumbing its nose at Bozo Brownlee. And such moves have the full support of most everyone in the community. They all applaud the Council ignoring the government.

    So I encourage Wellington to do exactly the same. Just like any bully, simply stand straight up to them, look them in the eye and call their bluff.

    Do it.

    This government has a record of bullying behaviour

  3. Rich 3

    I’d rank having no motorways & no light rail ahead of either motorways+light rail (which is unlikely) or motorways + no light rail.

    Wellington could in any case fund a dedicated busway (way cheaper than light rail and upgradeable) from a congestion charge, which would also limit traffic in the city and remove the need for motorways. I’d also look at restoring the Buckle St corridor as a two-way road and making Ghuznee/Vivian/Cuba/Taranaki access routes only with barriers in the middle, essentially pedestrianising the southern CBD.

  4. Tracey 4

    I hope no one is surprised. When Auckland was being bullied into a SuperCity, many Aucklanders asked others to share our outrage due tot he slippery slope…

  5. Rich 5

    I think you’ll find I for one posted extensively attacking the super-city and CERA.

  6. NoseViper (The Nose knows) 6

    Wellington City Councillor, Iona Pannett, was interviewed on radionz this morning and was a perfect example of an opposing person to a project, taking a reasoned stand and explaining herself in strong but moderate tones. The attitude of NZTA like many of ‘our’ bureaucratic fiefdoms with almost absolute power seems threatening and coercive. Delays on expensive city-changing projects can be necessary to satisfactorily thrash out the method.

    • Rosie 6.1

      Hey NoseViper. I heard that discussion on RNZ this am too. It was reassuring to hear but I do doubt that the NZTA will get the message. Maybe there will be quite a fight. Seems likely that is the direction we’re headed with this. And yes, central govt has taken an overtly bullying stance with AKLD and CHCH, so even more reason to take the gloves off, given the experiences of those cities.
      The basin reserve plans are another a fine example of Nat’s unfathomable silliness around roading.
      In my own unprofessional and uneducated opinion as a driver and public transport user its completely unnecessary. The delay you get at peak times is nothing like the delays you get in AKLD. Having lived there for many years and having driving jobs I know you grow cobwebs sitting in traffic. Getting to and from the WGTN airport just isn’t the drama that its made out to be.
      So why do it?
      If anything is to be done to make the trip a bit more seamless it may require reorganising existing roading, eg, Rich’s idea above, but a flyover/tunnel? no.

      • Rich 6.1.1

        Absolutely. I live in Hataitai and have never been delayed by more than a few minutes at the basin.

        There are many way simpler improvements. Increasing the frequency of Eastern Suburbs buses would be one, and/or having a non-stop airport/CBD service.

  7. Iona Pannett 7

    Thanks for supportive comments and note with gratitude support Labour has given to this campaign. As a Green, it is great to be working with Labour, not against them. A special thanks to MPs Annette King, Grant Robertson and Phil Twyford as well as councillors Paul Eagle and Justin Lester.

  8. infused 8

    It’s not the govt, it’s NZTA. Who got told to pull their head in. Lay off the bullshit for once.

  9. jaymam 9

    Pardon my ignorance since I’ve stayed in Wellington only a few times.
    Why the heck can’t people just continue to drive around the Basin Reserve like they’ve done for years?

  10. KJT 10

    Having cycled a lot in Wellington.

    Why are they still allowed cars?

  11. Lloyd 11

    I went to Wellington Airport today by car.

    Why would you want to construct a four lane road from Wellington City to the airport? The airport’s internal roading system cannot handle the traffic already arriving there. It is far better to slow the traffic down in the choke of the central city than to have a several kilometre long tailback at the airport.

    A better alternative than any road widening would be to extend the excellent rail system of Wellington to the airport. This could be done by cut and cover to Courtenay Place, a new bored tunnel under Mt Victoria from about the Embassy Theatre emerging at the start of Cobham Dive, an elevated track in the middle of Cobham Drive and a bored tunnel under the northern end of airport, with a short length of surface rail to the airport terminal.

    If the cut and cover section was left higher than the existing roads the centre of Wellington could also gain some defences against a Tsunami – two gains for the price of one.

    An extension of the electrified rail system to Palmerston North Airport would solve the problem for travellers of Wellington Airport being fogged in, as Palmerston North is usually open when Wellington is closed, and vice versa. Light rail would not provide this flexibility. Trains would fit the requirement far better than road transport and would be faster airport to airport and cricket at the Basin Reserve would not be affected.

    And when all the fuel has got too expensive for flying or driving we will still have a good sustainable electric powered rail service to the eastern suburbs.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Twenty highlights of 2020
    As we welcome in the new year, our focus is on continuing to keep New Zealanders safe and moving forward with our economic recovery. There’s a lot to get on with, but before we say a final goodbye to 2020, here’s a quick look back at some of the milestones ...
    2 weeks ago

  • Cook Islanders to resume travel to New Zealand
    The Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern and the Prime Minister of the Cook Islands Mark Brown have announced passengers from the Cook Islands can resume quarantine-free travel into New Zealand from 21 January, enabling access to essential services such as health. “Following confirmation of the Cook Islands’ COVID ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Supporting communities and landowners to grow employment opportunities
    Jobs for Nature funding is being made available to conservation groups and landowners to employ staff and contractors in a move aimed at boosting local biodiversity-focused projects, Conservation Minister Kiritapu Allan has announced. It is estimated some 400-plus jobs will be created with employment opportunities in ecology, restoration, trapping, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Border exception for some returning international tertiary students
    The Government has approved an exception class for 1000 international tertiary students, degree level and above, who began their study in New Zealand but were caught offshore when border restrictions began. The exception will allow students to return to New Zealand in stages from April 2021. “Our top priority continues ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Tiwai deal gives time for managed transition
    Today’s deal between Meridian and Rio Tinto for the Tiwai smelter to remain open another four years provides time for a managed transition for Southland. “The deal provides welcome certainty to the Southland community by protecting jobs and incomes as the region plans for the future. The Government is committed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New member for APEC Business Advisory Council
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has appointed Anna Curzon to the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC). The leader of each APEC economy appoints three private sector representatives to ABAC. ABAC provides advice to leaders annually on business priorities. “ABAC helps ensure that APEC’s work programme is informed by business community perspectives ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Govt’s careful economic management recognised
    The Government’s prudent fiscal management and strong policy programme in the face of the COVID-19 global pandemic have been acknowledged by the credit rating agency Fitch. Fitch has today affirmed New Zealand’s local currency rating at AA+ with a stable outlook and foreign currency rating at AA with a positive ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Additional actions to keep COVID-19 out of NZ
    The Government is putting in place a suite of additional actions to protect New Zealand from COVID-19, including new emerging variants, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “Given the high rates of infection in many countries and evidence of the global spread of more transmissible variants, it’s clear that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • 19 projects will clean up and protect waterways
    $36 million of Government funding alongside councils and others for 19 projects Investment will clean up and protect waterways and create local jobs Boots on the ground expected in Q2 of 2021 Funding part of the Jobs for Nature policy package A package of 19 projects will help clean up ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand Government acknowledges 175th anniversary of Battle of Ruapekapeka
    The commemoration of the 175th anniversary of the Battle of Ruapekapeka represents an opportunity for all New Zealanders to reflect on the role these conflicts have had in creating our modern nation, says Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Kiri Allan. “The Battle at Te Ruapekapeka Pā, which took ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Better care for babies with tongue-tie
    Babies born with tongue-tie will be assessed and treated consistently under new guidelines released by the Ministry of Health, Associate Minister of Health Dr Ayesha Verrall announced today. Around 5% to 10% of babies are born with a tongue-tie, or ankyloglossia, in New Zealand each year. At least half can ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Prisoner disorder event at Waikeria Prison over
    The prisoner disorder event at Waikeria Prison is over, with all remaining prisoners now safely and securely detained, Corrections Minister Kelvin Davis says. The majority of those involved in the event are members of the Mongols and Comancheros. Five of the men are deportees from Australia, with three subject to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Pre-departure COVID-19 test for travellers from the UK and the US from 15 January
    Travellers from the United Kingdom or the United States bound for New Zealand will be required to get a negative test result for COVID-19 before departing, and work is underway to extend the requirement to other long haul flights to New Zealand, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins confirmed today. “The new PCR test requirement, foreshadowed last ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • PM congratulates New Year Honour recipients
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has added her warm congratulations to the New Zealanders recognised for their contributions to their communities and the country in the New Year 2021 Honours List. “The past year has been one that few of us could have imagined. In spite of all the things that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • David Parker congratulates New Year 2021 Honours recipients
    Attorney-General and Minister for the Environment David Parker has congratulated two retired judges who have had their contributions to the country and their communities recognised in the New Year 2021 Honours list. The Hon Tony Randerson QC has been appointed a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • New Year’s Honours highlights outstanding Pacific leadership through challenging year
    Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio says the New Year’s Honours List 2021 highlights again the outstanding contribution made by Pacific people across Aotearoa. “We are acknowledging the work of 13 Pacific leaders in the New Year’s Honours, representing a number of sectors including health, education, community, sports, the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • Supporting seniors to embrace technology
    The Government’s investment in digital literacy training for seniors has led to more than 250 people participating so far, helping them stay connected. “COVID-19 has meant older New Zealanders are showing more interest in learning how to use technology like Zoom and Skype so they can to keep in touch ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago