web analytics

How To Get There 15/12/19

Written By: - Date published: 7:00 am, December 15th, 2019 - 33 comments
Categories: Deep stuff - Tags:

 

This post is a place for positive discussion of the future.

An Open Mike for ideas, solutions and the discussion of the possible.

The Big Picture, rather than a snapshot of the day’s goings on. Topics rather than topical.

We’d like to think it’s success will be measured in the quality of comments rather than the quantity.

So have at it!

Let us know what you think …

33 comments on “How To Get There 15/12/19”

  1. gsays 1

    Gardening is a highly political activity.

    Following my fleeing the hospitality industry, and looking to get kitchen life out of my veins, I have found refuge in a retirement village.

    My role is gardener/lawn mower, maintenance etc.

    I am aware of how contentious mowing lawns can be for some especially on this thread.

    So in the context of politics and gardening, politics is the art of compromise.

    Most of the residents I have had exchanges with like the grass tidy, and 'weeds' not to be seen.

    I met a resident who has different views to the mainstream. Her tiny backyard is a gorgeous cacophony of life, complimentary plants, food scraps in differing states of decomposition, pots, barrels and tables groaning with burgeoning life.

    As she is in a newish villa, her garden soil is not much more than a clay pit littered with some building supply remnants, a thin layer of topsoil and the aforementioned 'compost'.

    In my ventures to make charcoal (another yarn of success and many mistakes learnings), I have a good amount of tiny charcoal bits that I would like to give as bio-char.

    I am aware of needing to charge/inoculate the charcoal so it doesn't lock up existing soil nutrients.

    I am curious as to what is the best to use from: worm castings, a weed tea (dock and comfrey) and chook poo. These are the resources I have available at home.

    How long do these things need before it is introduced to the soil, should I mix them all together?

    Bigger picture, I would like to get composting/wormfarm happening on site, as we create 4 cubic metres of green waste a week, which we pay to get picked up.

    I understand compost was tried in the past but was stopped because…rats.

    Is there a unit/system that looks clean and tidy and is able to handle a good amount of biomass.

    I would like to present this idea in the new year to management and need not to startle/upset the middle class in their backyards.

    • Robert Guyton 1.1

      "Only dead fish go with the flow", I read.

      Go the " resident who has different views to the mainstream"!

      I suggest mixing it all together and getting it out there, gsays! I suspect the administrators will favour a commercial, rotating bin, so let them buy some and get going. It doesn't really matter much; once the compost is sufficiently degraded and no longer of interest to rats, you'll be able to spread it everywhere and the resulting healthy plants will win you favour, giving you a platform on which you can build the next phase!

    • WeTheBleeple 1.2

      With the charcoal: you could mix it with all your ingredients (chook poo, plant matter including aforementioned 'weeds'), and compost it – the char being the 'brown' component of compost and the rest the green. Let it get hot then cool down and it should be good to go. In future adding it to any dedicated composting process will improve the compost, reduce losses of biomass while composting, and improve worm activity when it hits the soil. In that manner the char goes where the gardener goes, sequestering carbon and improving soil long term.

      You could make a static compost bin (not turned). It doesn't get hot and kill weed seeds but it makes compost. Basically a two bin set up side by side when one is full start on the next by the time it's full the first should be good to go. You add the days food scraps then twigs leaves paper card straw and grass clippings on top. Continue in that manner. The rats might be kept out with mesh but remember you want to be able to get the front off to remove the compost. You wan't one of these bins to take a years worth, then it sits a year. When calculating size remember there will be significant losses of biomass as it processes, especially if you let black soldier flies get in.

      Hot compost turns over much faster (a couple of months in warm weather) so can take much more volume/time for a similar sized system. But it requires a three bin set up to go smoothly, and consistent turning (every few days). You build the entire pile at once, then turn it from one bin to the other (while the third bin is for finishing). Always finish a pile at each end in this system, the centre is required for turning the next lot haha.

      These are very different animals. If your aim is the best compost it requires the three bin method: it's more work, but will process/yield a lot more volume too. If you want volume processed in a relatively small space – the three bin method. If your volume is not so large but you just want to redirect a waste stream to useful product, two bins lazy method works in a pinch.

      • gsays 1.2.1

        Thanks WTB for yr response.

        The inoculated bio char makes great sense as the brown/carbon layer in compost, obvious when someone points it out.

        The solution may be to contribute to an existing composting scheme off site. I will try the local council and see what they know.

    • weka 1.3

      Good work gsays!

  2. Dennis Frank 2

    I'm not a sailor, but often see contemporary politics in terms of navigation. Our shifting global context, resurgent nationalism, ethnic divides & culture wars, seem equivalent to a mesh of cross-currents in which only the weak go which way the wind blows.

    Survival requires a deeper gnosis than the education system provides, and the story of the Hawaiian navigator told by the editor of the Harvard Review, Christina Thompson, shows us how it works. She's married to a Maori "Seven, whose real name is Tauwhitu – whitu, or some cognate thereof (fitu, hitu, itu, hiku, being the universal word for seven in Polynesia…)," and lives with her family just outside of Boston.

    Her book Sea Peoples was published earlier this year and I've just read the copy in our local library. Real good! The publisher describes it as "the quest to understand who first settled the islands of the remote Pacific, where they came from, how they got there, and how we know". Each chapter provides a lucid comprehensive overview of each stage, spanning many centuries, weaving trends in interpretation with historical accounts. Crucial is when dispassionate research in acadaemia converged with indigenous experience in the formation of the Polynesian Voyaging Society (Hawaii, early 1970s).

    Originated by this Californian anthropologist: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Finney the collaboration built the Hokulea, a working model of the type of ocean-going canoe required to reproduce the inter-island voyages, and recruited a Micronesian who still possessed inherited expertise to navigate. Nainoa Thompson was the young student of the Micronesian who set out to integrate the western & traditional methods. His maiden voyage as navigator in 1980 provides this account:

    “The canoe was in the doldrums, the sky was pitch black, it was pouring, and a twenty-five-knot wind was coming first from one direction and then another. The crew were looking to him for direction, but Nainoa was exhausted and had lost any clear sense of which way to go. Then, “I suddenly felt this warmth come over me,” he writes. “The sky was so black I couldn’t see the moon, but I could feel where it was… I directed the canoe on a new course and then, just for a moment, there was a hole in the clouds and the light of the moon shone through – just where I expected it to be.”

    “Nainoa describes this as the moment when he realized he could tap into something “beyond the analytical, beyond seeing with my eyes,” something he could not explain “from a scientific point of view”… intuition – but for Nainoa it was more like knowing in a different way. He cites the Hawaiian term na’au, which means, literally “entrails” or “gut” and refers to the part of the body that, in some Polynesian traditions, is viewed as the “immediate organ of sensation” and the place “where all impressions are first received”. This visceral form of gnosis has been reported amply from various historical sources and countries, enough to be identified as an attribute of humanity, even if more latent than manifest.

    “For Nainoa… that he was thinking not just with his conscious mind but with his body, in some sense feeling his way across the ocean – was a sign that he was coming closer to navigating in “the ancient way”.” Neuroscientists have been discovering this non-local nature of the human mind, and sufficient reports from the frontier have emerged in the past couple of decades to invalidate the old idea that the mind is produced solely by the brain. The lesson, for us, is that gnosis around politics must be based on feelings about where we are going collectively. How to get there is contingent upon incorporating this gnosis.

    • Robert Guyton 2.1

      That's an excellent post, Dennis, thanks!

      • Dennis Frank 2.1.1

        Glad you enjoyed it, Robert. I may get a chance to add another relevant message from the same source later on…

      • Dennis Frank 2.1.2

        "It was a stunning achievement. Without maps or charts or instruments or recording devices, without even paper and pen, an apprentice navigator – the first from Hawaii in at least half a century – had piloted a canoe more than 2,500 miles, spanning more than 35 degrees of latitude, and made landfall". He'd been trained by the Micronesian expert, who sailed with them but intervened only once to change a decision by the apprentice.

        That was right at the very end before landfall, when the apprentice directed the canoe to turn around due to failing to read an environmental clue – one not taught in his training. The expert had to reverse the decision or the voyage would have failed to reach the intended destination. The evening before, they "had seen birds flying south, heading home for the night, which meant the canoe was still north of where they wanted to be".

        Next morning they saw a bird flying south. Nainoa thought that meant they had sailed past the island during the night – birds fly away from land to go fishing in the morning. The Micronesian had seen a little fish in the beak of the bird, which meant it was returning to land to feed it's young. He told the apprentice to sail that way for an hour. They did, and saw the island in front of them.

        So the lesson for politics is that navigation through challenging cultural trends must be accompanied by the ability to read environmental clues correctly. Since it is human nature to misinterpret cultural signals, reading our social environment accurately in dire times is an essential survival skill.

  3. Heather Grimwood 3

    could residents be provided with bokashi buckets to deal with kitchen waste ( the rat- encouraging stuff) as guess most goes into waste water system via insink grinders presently. which I have always thought should be banned.

    • gsays 3.1

      Bokashi came up in the conversation and could be part of an improvement.

      • WeTheBleeple 3.1.1

        My experience with bokashi is largely favorable. Just incorporate the finished product into the soil, no root crops till the second year. It's quick and painless once you start making your own and have a system worked out.

  4. WeTheBleeple 4

    Some amazing climate innovation here:

    https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/ice-stupa-sonam-wangchuk/index.html

    A man making wee glaciers to keep land in water through summer. Right out of the box and into the record books.

  5. Jenny How to get there 5

    The role of leadership

    You could plan not to drive. But of course if everyone else is driving….

    Plan not to drive

    As a Vision Zero region, Auckland Transport wants to make sure everyone gets home safely. According to Police, the Friday before Christmas is one of the worst days of the year for drink-driving.

    Throughout the year, AT works with Police to reduce drink-driving and one key initiative is to provide free public transport before Christmas so that people across Auckland can have a drink after work.

    It’s part of the wider ‘Plan not to drive’ campaign being rolled out across the city this summer.

    Auckland Mayor Phil Goff says the initiative is a great way to ensure Aucklanders are able to enjoy the festive period safely.

    “We know from Police that the Friday before Christmas is one of the worst days of the year for drink-driving. We're working with Police to reduce that and one key initiative is to provide free public transport on Friday 20 December so that people all across Auckland can get home safe for Christmas.”

    https://ourauckland.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/articles/news/2019/12/get-home-for-free-on-20-december/?fbclid=IwAR0tM7bt747ZC1YDvqQXUhUqtp-29kZV7vuFc2SwjDOMXpIP7qHDwxFa0CE

    The planet needs to get home safely too.

    Come on Phil, how about it?

    It's Christmas in Kansas

    Kansas City becomes first major American city with universal fare-free public transit

    December 5, 2019

    Martin Cizmar

    https://www.435mag.com/kansas-city-becomes-first-major-american-city-with-universal-fare-free-public-transit/?fbclid=IwAR2JX52N1mTj0EW_1rcUbgg7Sa4KMZBinzG0K7XJTHZKdtr10kmevAzlxZ0

  6. Jenny How to get there 6

    Individual actions are good, but what we really need is leadership from the top.

    You could plan not to drive. But of course if everyone else is driving….

    Plan not to drive

    As a Vision Zero region, Auckland Transport wants to make sure everyone gets home safely. According to Police, the Friday before Christmas is one of the worst days of the year for drink-driving.

    Throughout the year, AT works with Police to reduce drink-driving and one key initiative is to provide free public transport before Christmas so that people across Auckland can have a drink after work.

    It’s part of the wider ‘Plan not to drive’ campaign being rolled out across the city this summer.

    Auckland Mayor Phil Goff says the initiative is a great way to ensure Aucklanders are able to enjoy the festive period safely.

    “We know from Police that the Friday before Christmas is one of the worst days of the year for drink-driving. We're working with Police to reduce that and one key initiative is to provide free public transport on Friday 20 December so that people all across Auckland can get home safe for Christmas.”

    https://ourauckland.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/articles/news/2019/12/get-home-for-free-on-20-december/?fbclid=IwAR0tM7bt747ZC1YDvqQXUhUqtp-29kZV7vuFc2SwjDOMXpIP7qHDwxFa0CE

    It's Christmas in Kansas

    Kansas City becomes first major American city with universal fare-free public transit

    December 5, 2019

    Martin Cizmar

    https://www.435mag.com/kansas-city-becomes-first-major-american-city-with-universal-fare-free-public-transit/?fbclid=IwAR2JX52N1mTj0EW_1rcUbgg7Sa4KMZBinzG0K7XJTHZKdtr10kmevAzlxZ0

    The planet needs to get home safely too.

    Come on Phil, how about it?

    Fare Free Auckland all year round

  7. Jenny How to get there 7

    How to get there (literally)

    Free transit is just the beginning

    by James Wilt Nov 29, 2019

    ……Last week, bus riders in Vancouver were refusing to pay fares until TransLink offered a fair contract to transit workers, while activists in Montreal marched for a transit-focused Green New Deal. Others in Toronto plastered the city with beautiful posters calling for free transit and proper funding of the TTC. Fare strikes and rallies for free transit are scheduled in several cities for November 29 – the same day as the global climate strike. Transit workers are striking against their private employer in Washington, D.C. while Vancouver SkyTrain workers voted 96.8 per cent in favour of job action……

    https://briarpatchmagazine.com/blog/view/free-transit-is-just-the-beginning

    (Apart from a pathetic one day public relations exercise). How does our Mayoral Christmas grinch react to such struggles?

    Dispute escalates: Tense scenes as striking drivers try to block bus
    11:02 am on 11 December 2019

    …..Services on some of Auckland's main routes have been cancelled until Christmas after NZ Bus locked out its drivers for refusing to take fares.

    https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/405261/dispute-escalates-tense-scenes-as-striking-drivers-try-to-block-bus

    Genuine city leaders would instead be taking the side of the drivers and refusing to let their contractor lock out drivers for refusing to take fares. And not hire strike breakers to replace them.

  8. Jenny How to get there 8

    Auckland buses go into reverse.

    The fight over the fare box.

    Auckland goes backwards.

    Auckland bus, train and ferry prices hiked by up to 7 per cent

    21 Jan, 2019 12:48pm

    ……North Shore ward councillor Richard Hills said Auckland Transport's fare increases are excessive and unsustainable for many people struggling with the cost of living….

    …….Hills said despite public patronage growing steadily, year-on-year increases to fares will discourage the use of public transport, and make it harder to reduce congestion.

    Public Transport Users Association (PTUA) organiser Jon Reeves said they also strongly oppose the fare increases.

    "They aren't justified. We have had this big fuel tax which was given to all Aucklanders last year on the premise that it would be funding better public transport, and actually all we are getting is another lemon to bite on," he said…..

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12193733

    • Incognito 8.1

      People love getting worked up by and about headlines. They know it but still fall for it.

      The average fare increase is 2 per cent, though some travellers will pay more.

      • Jenny How to get there 8.1.1

        I don't write the headlines. But the point is made, Auckland is going backwards on Public transport.

        • Incognito 8.1.1.1

          I don't write the headlines.

          What a strange thing to say when you parrot the headline in an unthinking way.

          If you had done a bit of balanced and critical analysis you would have realised that an average increase of 2% means that some increases are, in fact, less than 2%.

          Indeed, clicking on the handy link provided in the NZH article shows that many fares won’t change at all and some will even drop.

          https://at.govt.nz/about-us/news-events/changes-to-public-transport-fares-from-sunday-10-february/

          So, here are a few alternative headlines for you to ponder:

          Auckland bus, train and ferry prices hiked by an average of 2 per cent

          Many Auckland bus, train and ferry prices remain unchanged

          Auckland bus, train and ferry prices plummet by up to 1 per cent

          • Jenny How to get there 8.1.1.1.1

            What gets me is that our city locks out bus drivers from their jobs for refusing to collect fares. And at Christmas .When this is what the city should be doing.

            Then the city does what the bus drivers are doing but only on one evening, Christmas Eve,.

            The hypocrisy is astounding

            • Incognito 8.1.1.1.1.1

              Please provide a link because I think you’ve got it wrong about Christmas Eve.

            • veutoviper 8.1.1.1.1.2

              Hi Jenny

              Re free fares, not sure about Christmas Eve but the RNZ National News Bulletn at 9am today, Friday 20 Dec, included a short item at about 3 minutes in that Auckland buses would be free from 4/4.30 pm today in the hopes that people would use PT rather than cars after celebrating the end of their work year tonight.

              Here is the link for you and hope it helps;but it will probably be shortlived as they usually don't save hourly news bulletins for long

              <a href="https://www.rnz.co.nz/programmes/news-bulletin/story/2018727815/radio-new-zealand-news&quot; rel="nofollow ugc">https://www.rnz.co.nz/programmes/news-bulletin/story/2018727815/radio-new-zealand-news</a&gt;

              Re Christmas Eve and/or Christmas Day, I had a quick Google look for you but could not find anything re this or anything more about today's free buses in Auckland.

              However, I am a Wellingtonian and know that for many years we have had free buses etc here on Christmas Day; but there is nothing on the Metlink website about this. So maybe it is the same for Auckland – a tradition rather than a formal thing where they don't formally advise the free fares on certain days on the AT website. There is lots on the AT website about the recently introduced free travel for children at weekends so kudos to them for that move.

              Best wishes – I don't bother reading or commenting here much these days but saw the 'request' to you shortly after hearing the 9am news bulletin. This site reminds me of "school" these days and I left school, college/high school and University (Grad and Post Grad) behind many decades ago.

            • Incognito 8.1.1.1.1.3

              What gets me is that you call out hypocrisy but cannot get your facts right.

              Assuming you were referring to free PT in Auckland on Friday night, you could have provided this link: https://at.govt.nz/homefree

              The reasons for providing free PT have absolutely nothing to do with the employment dispute. In other words, not only you were making up shit but you also believed your own shit.

              Is this how we get there?

  9. Jenny How to get there 9

    Christmas in Kansas



  10. Jenny How to get there 10

    Xmas in Auckland

    …..Auckland bus hell with mass cancellation till Christmas

    What’s going on?

    Yesterday saw the cancellation of thousands of bus trips and a lot of people standing around at Auckland bus stops looking puzzled after services operated by NZ Bus – Auckland’s biggest bus operator, covering about a third of all routes – were cancelled following industrial action. Routes are focused in central Auckland, the north and west, and include routes along along Dominion Road, Sandringham Road, Mt Eden Road and Manukau Road, as well as the Outer and Inner Link services, aka the orange and green buses.

    But they’re running again now?

    No. They’ve been cancelled indefinitely. The morning commute tomorrow could be bedlam.

    Which services have been cancelled?

    A lot. An estimated 70,000 passenger trips are kaput.

    https://thespinoff.co.nz/auckland/08-12-2019/cheat-sheet-auckland-bus-chaos-as-services-cancelled-en-masse/

    What is our city leaders response?

    One day free bus rides on Christmas Eve. (that is if there are any buses running)

    • Dennis Frank 10.1

      Postmodernism. Under modernism, society was meant to be organised, so order prevailed. People have moved on. That's why the authorities have carefully created a system in which order is balanced by chaos. People like variety.

      That's why you get signs like this nowadays: Sausage's. Copywriters now illiterate? Maybe – they've been through the education system, so it's hard to blame them. Blame the teachers instead. But more likely they know that in postmodernism language is a movable feast, and folks now prefer to make it up as they go along…

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Vaping legislation passes
    Landmark legislation passed today puts New Zealand on track to saving thousands of lives and having a smokefree generation sooner rather than later, Associate Health Minister, Jenny Salesa says. The Smokefree Environments and Regulated Products (Vaping) Amendment Bill regulates vaping products and heated tobacco devices. “There has long been concern ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • Government repeals discriminatory law
    A discriminatory law that has been a symbol of frustration for many people needing and providing care and support, has been scrapped by the Government. “Part 4A of the New Zealand Public Health and Disability Amendment Bill (No 2) was introduced under urgency in 2013 by a National Government,” Associate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • More competitive fuel market on the way
    Kiwi motorists are set to reap the benefits of a more competitive fuel market following the passing of the Fuel Industry Bill tonight, Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods says.  “This Act is where the rubber meets the road in terms of our response to the recommendations made in the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • Government delivers on rental reforms promise
    The Government has delivered on its promise to New Zealanders to modernise tenancy laws with the passing of the Residential Tenancies Amendment (RTA) Bill 2020 today, says Associate Minister of Housing (Public Housing), Kris Faafoi. “The Residential Tenancies Act 1986 was out-dated and the reforms in the RTA modernise our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • New rules in place to restore healthy rivers
    New rules to protect and restore New Zealand’s freshwater passed into law today. Environment Minister David Parker and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor welcomed the gazetting of the new national direction on freshwater management. “These regulations deliver on the Government’s commitment to stop further degradation, show material improvements within five years and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    10 hours ago
  • Foreign Minister announces new Consul-General in Los Angeles
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters has announced the appointment of Jeremy Clarke-Watson as New Zealand’s new Consul-General in Los Angeles. “New Zealand and the United States share a close and dynamic partnership, based on a long history of shared values and democratic traditions,” Mr Peters said. “Mr Clarke-Watson is a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    11 hours ago
  • Rental reforms provide greater support for victims of family violence
    Victims of family violence can end a tenancy with two days’ notice Landlords can terminate tenancies with 14 days’ notice if tenants assault them Timeframe brought forward for limiting rent increases to once every 12 months Extension of time Tenancy Tribunal can hear cases via phone/video conference Reform of New ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    11 hours ago
  • Apprenticeships support kicks off today
    Two employment schemes – one new and one expanded – going live today will help tens of thousands of people continue training on the job and support thousands more into work, the Government has announced. Apprenticeship Boost, a subsidy of up to $12,000 per annum for first year apprentices and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    11 hours ago
  • Infrastructure to transform Omokoroa
    The Government is funding a significant infrastructure package at Omokoroa which will create 150 new jobs and help transform the Western Bay of Plenty peninsula, Urban Development Minister Phil Twyford announced today. Phil Twyford says the Government is investing $14 million towards the $28 million roading and water package. This ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    12 hours ago
  • Bill passes for managed isolation charges
    The Bill allowing the Government to recover some costs for managed isolation and quarantine passed its third reading today, with charges coming into force as soon as regulations are finalised. Putting regulations into force is the next step. “The COVID-19 Public Health Response Amendment Bill and its supporting regulations will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    12 hours ago
  • Unemployment drop shows Govt plan to protect jobs and support businesses is working
    Today’s unemployment data shows the Government’s plan to protect jobs and cushion the blow for businesses and households against the economic impact of COVID-19 was the right decision, Finance Minister Grant Robertson says. Stats NZ said today that New Zealand’s unemployment rate in the June quarter – which includes the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • New role to champion reading for children
    A new role of New Zealand Reading Ambassador for children and young people is being established, Prime Minister and Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Jacinda Ardern and Minister for Internal Affairs and for Children, Tracey Martin announced today. The Reading Ambassador, announced at a Celebration of Reading event at ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • Funding boost for Community Law Centres
    Community Law Centres will receive a funding boost to meet the increased need for free legal services due to COVID-19, Justice Minister Andrew Little said. The $3.5m funding is for the next three financial years and is additional to the almost $8 million for Community Law Centres announced in Budget ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • New Zealand joins initiative to boost women’s role in global trade
    New Zealand has joined Canada and Chile in a new trade initiative aimed at increasing women’s participation in global trade. Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker, together with Canada’s Minister for Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade Mary Ng, Chile’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Andrés Allamand, and Chile’s Vice ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Government provides $2.2m to heritage buildings for quake strengthening
    Building owners around New Zealand have benefited from the latest round of Heritage EQUIP funding with grants totalling $2,230,166. “The Heritage EQUIP grants for seismic strengthening assist private building owners to get the professional advice they need to go ahead with their projects or support them to carry out the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Better hospital care for Northland babies and their whānau
    •    New paediatric facilities, including a Special Baby Care Unit •    Up to 50 extra inpatient beds  •    New lab facilities  Northland babies and their whānau will soon have access to improved hospital care when they need it with Health Minister Chris Hipkins today confirming new paediatric facilities and more ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    16 hours ago
  • Green light for Wellington and Wairarapa in $220m nationwide cycleways package
    People walking and cycling between Featherston and Greytown, or along Wellington’s Eastern Bays will soon have a safe shared path, as part of a $220 million shovel-ready cycleways package announced by Associate Transport Minister Julie Anne Genter. “During lockdown we saw many more families and kids out on their bikes, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    17 hours ago
  • New Zealand expresses condolences on passing of Vanuatu High Commissioner
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters today extended New Zealand’s condolences following the death of Vanuatu’s High Commissioner to New Zealand, Johnson Naviti, who passed away yesterday afternoon in Wellington. “Our thoughts are with the High Commissioner’s family and colleagues during this difficult time. This is a terrible loss both to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government announces allocation of three waters funds for councils
    The Government has today set out the regional allocations of the $761 million Three Waters stimulus and reform funding for councils announced by Prime Minister Hon Jacinda Ardern this month.  "I want to thank Councils around the country for engaging with the Central Local Government Steering Group who have been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Funding boost for students with highest learning support needs
    Students with high and complex learning needs, as well as their teachers and parents, will benefit from a substantial increase to Ongoing Resourcing Scheme (ORS) funding, Associate Education Minister Martin announced today. “Nearly $160 million will go towards helping these students by lifting their base support over the next four ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Govt connecting kiwis to affordable, healthy food
    Funding for innovative projects to connect Kiwis with affordable, safe and wholesome food, reduce food waste, and help our food producers recover from COVID-19 has been announced today by Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. “COVID-19 has seen an increasing number of families facing unprecedented financial pressure. Foodbanks and community food service ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Getting infrastructure for housing underway
    Eight shovel-ready projects within Kāinga Ora large-scale developments, and the Unitec residential development in Auckland have been given the go-ahead, Minister for Housing Dr Megan Woods announced today. Megan Woods says these significant infrastructure upgrades will ensure that the provision of homes in Auckland can continue apace. “The funding announced ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Napier walk and cycleway to improve safety
    The Government is funding a new separated walking and cycleway path along Napier’s Chambers and Ellison streets to provide safer access for local students and residents across Marine Parade and State Highway 51, Transport Minister Phil Twyford and Police Minister Stuart Nash announced today. Funding of $2.7 million has been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • PGF creates more than 10k jobs, success stories across NZ
    More than 13,000 people have been employed so far thanks to the Coalition Government’s Provincial Growth Fund, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones has today announced. The number of jobs created by Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) investments has outstripped the 10,000 jobs target that the Government and Provincial Development Unit ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Inaugural seafood awards honour sustainability
    Scientists and innovative fishing operators from Stewart Island and Fiordland to Nelson, Marlborough and Wellington have been honoured in the first ever Seafood Sustainability Awards. Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash has congratulated the winners of the inaugural Seafood Sustainability Awards held at Parliament. “The awards night honours six winners, from a wide ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Climate resilience packages for regions
    The Government is providing an investment totalling more than $100 million for regions to protect against and mitigate the effects of climate change, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones have announced. Six regions will receive funding from the $3 billion allocated to infrastructure projects from the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Southern Waikato shovel ready projects get the green light
    Three major local projects at Te Kuiti and Otorohanga have been given the money to get moving after the impact of Covid 19, says the Minister of Māori Development Hon Nanaia Mahuta.  The projects range from a Sports Centre for Te Kuiti, a redevelopment of the Otorohanga  Kiwi House and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand extends Middle East and Africa peace support deployments
    The Coalition Government has extended three New Zealand Defence Force deployments to the Middle East and Africa by two years, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters and Defence Minister Ron Mark announced today.  “These deployments promote peace in the Middle East and Africa by protecting civilians and countering the spread of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Govt progress on climate change essential, risk assessment shows
    The release of the National Climate Change Risk Assessment shows that the progress this Government has made to solve the climate crisis is essential to creating cleaner and safer communities across New Zealand. “Because of this report, we can see clearer than ever that the action our Government is taking ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • $10m sport recovery fund open for applications
    The second round of the Community Resilience Fund is now open for applications for sport and recreation organisations experiencing financial hardship between 1 July and 30 September 2020. “The fund opens today for five weeks – closing on September 6. The amount awarded will be decided on a case-by-case basis ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Rakitū Island declared latest predator free island
    Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage today declared Rakitū Island, off the coast of Aotea/Great Barrier Island, predator free. “I’m delighted to announce that with rats now gone, Rakitū is officially predator free. This is a major milestone because Rakitū is the last DOC administered island in the Hauraki Gulf Marine ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Funding to restore significant Māori sites in the Far North
    The Provincial Growth Fund is investing $8.75 million to restore significant historic sites at Ōhaeawai in the Far North, upgrade marae and fund fencing and riparian planting. Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones made the announcements following a service at the historic St Michael’s Anglican Church at Ōhaeawai today.  Just ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Big boost for Chatham Islands’ economy
    The Chatham Islands will receive close to $40 million for projects that will improve its infrastructure, add to its attraction as a visitor destination, and create jobs through a planned aquaculture venture, Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones has announced. “The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on the islands, first ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • More initiatives to reduce energy hardship
    The Government is delivering more initiatives to reduce energy hardship and to give small electricity consumers a voice, Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods said today. “In addition to the initiatives we have already delivered to support New Zealand families, we are responding to the Electricity Price Review with further ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Turning the tide for hoiho/yellow-eyed penguin
    Government, iwi, NGOs and rehabilitation groups are working together to turn around the fortunes of the nationally endangered hoiho/yellow-eyed penguin following a series of terrible breeding seasons.  The Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage helped launch the Five Year Action Plan at the annual Yellow-Eyed Penguin symposium in Dunedin today. “I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Taskforce ready to tackle tourism challenges
    The membership of the Tourism Futures Taskforce has now been confirmed, Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis announced at an event at Whakarewarewa in Rotorua today. “The main purpose of the independent Tourism Futures Taskforce is to lead the thinking on the future of tourism in New Zealand,” Kelvin Davis said. Joining ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Investing in the tourism sector’s recovery
    More than $300 million in funding has been approved to protect strategic tourism businesses, drive domestic tourism through regional events and lift digital capability in the tourism industry, Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis announced today. A $400 million Tourism Recovery Package was announced at Budget 2020, and with today’s announcements is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Permits to be required for exporting hard-to-recycle plastic waste
    From 2021 permits will be required for New Zealanders wanting to export hard-to-recycle plastic waste. The Associate Minister for the Environment, Eugenie Sage, today announced the requirements as part of New Zealand’s commitments to the Basel Convention, an international agreement of more than 180 countries which was amended in May ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Growth in new building consents shows demand is still high
    The building and construction sector is still showing strong growth, with the number of new dwellings consented up more than 8 per cent compared to last year, reflecting a welcome confidence in the Government’s COVID-19 response package, Minister for Building and Construction Jenny Salesa says. “While it is still too ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • $23 million for Bay of Plenty flood protection
    Government investment of $23 million for Bay of Plenty flood protection will allow local communities to address long-standing flood risks and provide jobs, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced in Rotorua today. These projects are being funded by the Infrastructure Reference Group’s (IRG) shovel ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago