How To Get There 21/7/19

Written By: - Date published: 7:00 am, July 21st, 2019 - 27 comments
Categories: Deep stuff - Tags:

 

This post is a place for positive discussion of the future.

An Open Mike for ideas, solutions and the discussion of the possible.

The Big Picture, rather than a snapshot of the day’s goings on. Topics rather than topical.

We’d like to think it’s success will be measured in the quality of comments rather than the quantity.

So have at it!

Let us know what you think …

27 comments on “How To Get There 21/7/19”

  1. Robert Guyton 1

    “the future will look back on us as gods …  lucky gods blessed by supermarket cornucopias, torrents of accessible information, warm clothes that weigh nothing, extended life-spans, wondrous machines.”

    https://dark-mountain.net/now-we-are-ten/

  2. Robert Guyton 2

    "Single vision—the shrill and dogmatic insistence that real knowledge can only come through the material senses, and must never be understood as anything but the random acts of dead matter and mindless energy in a dead and mindless cosmos—pervades contemporary industrial civilization.  It’s because we’re so used to thinking in these terms that we’ve gotten so good at manipulating matter and energy, but it’s also because we’re so used to thinking in these terms that we’ve done such a dismal job of maintaining the balance of the living planet on which our own lives depend. "

    https://www.ecosophia.net/notes-nature-spirits-part-two-living-world/?fbclid=IwAR3JtiLqzuT7LLQoN3VuiyY6JpQGk3Jopf9UxpB_2yBHdPvQSx2HXi3X2ss

  3. Robert Guyton 3

    "In the same way, Demeter was always closely associated with the soil, to the extent that recent research has shown that sacred groves of Demeter were consistently planted in places well suited to stop soil erosion.

    When Christian zealots backed up by the power of the Roman state ordered the groves of Demeter cut down, they plunged Greece into an ecological catastrophe that can still be measured in thick layers of eroded topsoil on the bottom of the Aegean Sea, and caused population levels in Greece to crash by around 50% over the centuries immediately after: a reminder that when traditional lore claims a god or a goddess will punish certain kinds of impiety very harshly indeed, that claim may not be as superstitious as it looks."

    • gsays 3.1

      This makes me think of Collapse, a book by Jared Diamond.

      He looks at several societies through the ages and why they disappeared.

      Cutting down the trees was a common factor…. it's only with typing that that I think of us current humans and our propensity for biggering and ridding the planet of trees on the way.

  4. Robert Guyton 4

    I can't seem to interest anyone at all todaysmiley

    How about this?

    "Crows are really smart. I’ve seen an article about a murder of crows (that’s the technical name for a flock!) that brings money to a woman who feeds them. They started bringing shiny things in exchange for bread — lots of crows do that — but when one smart crow brought a twenty dollar bill, and the woman used it to buy some really nice bread for them, they caught on instantly and started bringing her every loose bill they could find."

    • Pat 4.1

      get out of here!….true story?

      • Robert Guyton 4.1.1

        It's a story. I wondered at the non-shininess of paper money and why the crow that presented it was "smart". The claim that "lots of crows do that (bring shiny things to exchange for bread) made me realise that I don't know much about crows and their interactions with humans. I suspect, from what I've read, that they are very clever and personable. "Crow" as a trickster figure of mythology, is likened to Maui, our indigenous scallywag. As an aside, it's interesting to think about the legend of maui slowing the sun, giving the people more time to achieve things during the day, being cited a description of Pacific people's voyagers to the north where the days are longer.

  5. Robert Guyton 5

    Or this?

    "At one place on their route, where two such paths crossed, the hindmost duck stopped at the cross-paths, stood still there, and did not follow the others. Soon the other ducks noticed that, and the lead duck came back to the cross-paths where the hindmost duck stood. They quacked at one another in turn for quite a while, much as two humans might discuss something together at length. Eventually the lead duck returned to his position at the head of the file, reversed direction, and led the file of ducks back to the cross-paths and down the other path. This time the hindmost duck fell in at the end of the file, and off they went."

  6. AB 6

    Robert at 4.0. How long till the crows work out that buying the bread directly is more efficient, and leaves them with surplus cash to invest? Will they buy up bakeries and ticket clip the distribution of bread to other crows?  Is capitalism natural' in the animal kingdom?

  7. Jenny - How to Get there? 7

    Free public transport

    Leave the car at home

    No more traffic jams

    Good for the wallet.

    Good for the environment.

    Find a new way ‘how to get there’

    No stress, no hassle

    Discover a sense of freedom and community that you hadn't realised you didn't have.

    leave the car at home': how free buses are revolutionising one French city

    https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2018/oct/15/i-leave-the-car-at-home-how-free-buses-are-revolutionising-one-french-city?fbclid=IwAR1UrBqp3i9thWo5HWr_-iZNaGup5DDvkcfq5ri-2l-vieAEjE7XgI7N2WU

    Hamilton mayor Andrew King wants free public transport for all city residents

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/waikato-times/news/113981382/hamilton-mayor-andrew-king-wants-free-public-transport-for-all-city-residents?fbclid=IwAR2d1KZjVgFFRg8WLv5BR9IRoTA5wtjCO0DgMlV3Xs2YRee6Z7CwVO1hLSw

    • Sabine 7.1

      Department of Alpes Maritimes – the famous Cote d'Azur/Vallee du var up to Marseille arecurrently at 1.5 euro for any ride anywhere whithin the confines of the department or within a 74 min span. This includes changes from tram to bus etc. 

      the city of nice – very much like akl wedged in between the mediteranee and the alpes de provence – about ten years ago ripped up all of its street and build a comprehensive tram / bus network.  And yes, people cried, and now they are very happy about it. 

      https://en.nicetourisme.com/bus-and-tramway

      In germany one can write of the cost of public transport at their end of hte year taxes,  and those that work for Work lease companies have a higher write of component then those that are employed directly, and often time employers helped with the cost as well to minimise the need for employee carpark. Also lots of prices for groups, cheap prices for weekends and such. 

      https://www.expatolife.com/public-transport-in-germany/

       

      In Holland – Hilversum – where i worked for Nike, when the company build its new european Headquaters – they were restricted in the amount of land they could use for Carparks, but the regional train services immediatly added more trains from A'dam, Utrecht and Hilversum to account for the extra 1000 people using the utilities per day.

      https://www.holland.com/global/tourism/plan-your-holiday/getting-around-in-holland/public-transport/travel-by-train.htm 

      It can be done with the right mind set. And that is what is missing here, the right mind set. 

      When one adds the cost of getting stuck in a car for several hours each day, the cost of petrol, of lisencing the car and of maintaining it it makes no fiscal sense to drive one. But so as long as busses and trains are expensive, badly maintained, manned by people who are underpaid, over worked and expendable public transport is something that is only for 'poor' people. 

       

      If we want to get people out of cars, and even better not ever getting a car, free or near free public transport is a must.  And while we are at, a luxury tax on any car that is not needed but only there for 'luxury' and 'status'. 

      As for hte howlers of who will pay for this, we can pay for roads, accidents, road rage and the likes or we can pay for free public transport. And this is a real choice. 

  8. Ad 8

    How was the Riverton Winter Festival?

    I'll diarise it for next year.

    • Robert Guyton 8.1

      Hi Ad; the Midwinter Market is run by another group, and while we contribute (I lit a dozen lanterns in the window of the Environment Centre and met and gret all evening) it's not so much to our taste, with mainly "markety" trinkets for sale and so on. It depends upon what you like. There was a Sri Lankan couple cooking and selling food and I liked that a lot!

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