web analytics

How would Key make wages drop?

Written By: - Date published: 10:01 pm, February 28th, 2008 - 51 comments
Categories: john key, national, workers' rights - Tags: , ,

Having read our coverage of John Key’s ‘we would love to see wages drop‘ line my brother asked ‘but how can a government make wages drop?’ The answer is obvious to those of us who know about this kind of stuff but my brother’s question, along with Colin Espiner’s naïve statement that ‘[a PM] has no control over wages’, made me realise that how a government would make wages drop if it were so inclined is not clear to everyone. So, for my brother, Colin, and anyone else, an explanation of how a government can bring down wages:

The first thing to realise is that inflation will do most of the work for you. As a wage dropping government you don’t actually have to bring down wages in nominal terms. You just hold them still or have them increase at less than the rate of inflation. The number of dollars in people’s back pockets stays the same, it may even rise, but the purchasing power of those dollars will be gradually eroded.

How could Key make incomes increase below inflation? Well, he could follow the example of the last National government:

  • Cut benefits or don’t adjust them for inflation;
  • Hold the minimum wage steady, that will not only make the incomes of those earning the minimum wage decrease after inflation but will also help hold down the incomes of those on wages near the minimum wage;
  • Hold down public sector wages by cutting funding, this will also hold down wages in similar private sector jobs (National frequently complains about public sector pay increases);
  • Weaken labour law, say, by weakening employees’ ability to pool their power in unions to balance the inherent power the employer has in the work relationship (as National did in 1991 with the Employment Contracts Act) or by giving employers the ability to ‘fire at will’ (as National now wants to introduce with its 90 Day No-Rights policy);
  • And, through public spending cuts and the flow-on drop in consumer demand from the reduction in people’s wages, create higher unemployment, putting further downward pressure on wages through labour competition (this is exactly what happened in the 1990s)

For these changes, you need to manufacture the consent of the public, you need a threat that needs defeating.

A good one is ‘welfare dependency’: there are all those ‘bludgers’ (0.3% of adults have been on the unemployment benefit longer than a year, and falling) if we cut benefits dependency won’t be so ‘comfortable’ (apparently, $180 a week is comfortable).

Another is the bugbear of the unions: paint them as ‘third parties’ trying to interfere in otherwise harmonious employer-employee relationships, rather than the voluntary, democratic workers’ organisations they are.

But Key seems to be setting up inflation as the threat (listen to his interview with Havoc and look at that full “we would love to see wages drop’ quote again). Wage rises are inflationary is the line. The solution will be to not increase benefits and the minimum wage to match inflation, and to refuse public sector pay increases; which means less consumer demand across the economy. This does mean less inflation; it also means ordinary kiwis are poorer. Unions will naturally protest. Strike action will increase. The answer to this ‘union militancy’ will be to limit union power through legislation.

They did it in 1990 and nine years later most people’s incomes were lower after inflation. Key just needs to repeat the formula (in more moderate form, naturally) and ‘hey, presto!’ he’s delivered on his promise and dropped wages. Pretty simple, really.

51 comments on “How would Key make wages drop? ”

  1. Gooner 1

    Under Labour:

    Interest rates: up – highest in developed world
    Inflation: up – constantly above RB’s band
    House prices: up – most unaffordable in the world
    Petrol prices: up – highest ever, becoming unaffordable
    Food prices: up – dairy prices even more so, becoming unaffordable
    Mortgagee sales: up
    Collapsed finance companies: up – unprecedented, billions lost
    Number of public servants: up by 000’s

    Business confidence: down, to record levels.

    Nuff said.

  2. Murray 2

    These posts on John Key wanting wages to drop are becoming a little tiresome. I thought some of you would be smart enough to work out by now why he wants wages to drop. As you are not as smart as I have given you credit for I will spell it out for you. John Key wants wages to drop so more people will qualify for WFF. That should fit real well with you socialists.

  3. Daveo 3

    Thanks for spelling that out Steve. It’s bound to get the righties wound up but it’s important to have it on the record.

  4. James Kearney 4

    Key made the same statement as Espiner about having no power to drop wages when he was on Havoc’s show today.

    So Key says he can raise wages but he can’t drop them, and he won’t tell us how he will raise them – just that he’ll cut taxes. Isn’t it time the media started asking him to back up his rhetoric with some actual substance?

  5. Gooner 5

    Key can also leap a tall building in a single bound and stop a speeding bullet between his teeth.

  6. IrishBill 6

    As I understand it he can also help tank the economy of an entire nation by fucking with its dollar!

    Captcha: “nearby Privateer”, does this mean John is lurking?

  7. James Kearney 7

    Gooner- laugh all you like but this has all been done before. It’s basic economics for a party that represents the interests of employers.

    The difference between Pierson’s post and your comment is that National has never leapt a tall building in a single bound or stopped a speeding bullet between its teeth. It has dropped our wages.

  8. Dark Watcher 8

    Typical lefties you forgot to mention that John Key will give workers the ongoing tax cuts Klark has denied them for the last 9 years. After tax incomes will rise every year under National.

  9. Gooner 9

    James – well I happen to think that a government cannot drop wages.

    But it can put policies in place that affect the level of them I guess. So you’re saying that Labour’s policies will have the affect of raising wages, but that National’s will do the opposite.

    But if you look at my first comment (sarcasm of it put to one side) you might see what the policies of Labour have done that affect wages: that real wages – purchasing power – cannot have improved with those statistics.

    Now I do happen to believe, and will give Labour credit for this, that some of those statistics are outside the control of a New Zealand government, Labour included. But unfortunately for Labour that won’t wash with Joe Punter in the beltway.

  10. You forgot the biggie: monetary policy. Adjust the Reserve Bank’s PTA to target a narrower inflation range, and remove the clause saying that attempts to combat inflation should not adversely affect output, employment etc. Then sit back and watch them Brash the economy and throw people out of work.

    This is exactly what was done in the mid-90’s, when the Reserve Bank (under Brash) hit the brakes every time unemployment looked like it would go below 7%. Gotta keep a “reserve army of labour” around on the breadline, just so people can’t ask for more…

  11. naturalpartyofgovt 11

    OK points for banging on this for all its worth.

    Probably Key meant to say or did say he wanted the gap in wages to drop and either elided “gap” or was misquoted.

  12. Razorlight 12

    This John Key quote/misquote is, as many have now said, is becoming very tiresome.

    It was valid and appropriate to bring it up in the first place but now you are beginning to sound like a child throwing a tantrum in their bedroom when noone is listening. Besides myself and half a dozen others, noone is listening.

    For Labour to get back in this race, they through you have to answer why under Labour these 8 things have happened (thanks gooner)

    Interest rates: up – highest in developed world
    Inflation: up – constantly above RB’s band
    House prices: up – most unaffordable in the world
    Petrol prices: up – highest ever, becoming unaffordable
    Food prices: up – dairy prices even more so, becoming unaffordable
    Mortgagee sales: up
    Collapsed finance companies: up – unprecedented, billions lost
    Number of public servants: up by 000’s.

    These are the answers which must be answered because what John Key may or may not have said is gaining no traction.

    WAKE UP LABOUR OR THIS ELECTION CAN BE CONCEEDED NOW

  13. outofbed 13

    “House prices: up – most unaffordable in the world’
    bollocks

  14. Razorlight 14

    Rob

    Thank you for attempting to answer the issues raised by Gooner.

    Labour cannot attempt to highlight the positive statistics as evidence of their policies working, and in the same breath blame the negatives on volatile world conditions. It doesn’t wash after 3 terms in ofice. What is worst than that is Clark trying to blame things on a budget delivered 17 years ago. She has had 8 budgets to fix the problems Richardson raised.

    The point of this rare post by me is tell you to be realistic here. The electorate likes John Key and in my opinion they like him because he is an alternative to Clark and Labour. The electorate has turned off them for obvious reasons.

    To have any chance, Labour has to defend their record, the good and the bad. Admit their mistakes, say why things aren’t working and how they are going to improve them.

    This tactic of attacking a popular politician is not working. Time to change tact and start telling us why Labour deserves another 3 years.

  15. r0b 15

    Gooner had a list:

    Interest rates: up – highest in developed world

    Certainly among the highest – it’s pretty dynamic. But this has advantages as well as disadvantages. And it in terms of historical context, it was much worse in the 80’s and generally worse in the 90s.

    Inflation: up – constantly above RB’s band

    Slightly above, but the RB band is very conservative.

    House prices: up – most unaffordable in the world

    I agree that affordability is a serious problem. But note (1) that “unaffordable” is a measure that includes an assessment of income – NZr’s need higher wages!, and (2) Labour has moved to release new policy on this very recently.

    Petrol prices: up – highest ever, becoming unaffordable

    As they are world wide. Peak oil and “instability” in certain oil producing countries. You should have a word to GWB about this.

    Food prices: up – dairy prices even more so, becoming unaffordable

    Agreed also that this is an issue.

    Mortgagee sales: up

    Cyclic. There has been too much frothy speculation in the property market. Damn that capitalism eh! The Nanny State should regulate it all.

    Collapsed finance companies: up – unprecedented, billions lost

    Don’t exaggerate, NZ co.s don’t have “unprecedented billions”. Finance co.s are also linked to the world economy, and I don’t know if you’ve happened to notice, but there is a bit of a world wide crash going on, driven by the American sub-prime mortgage collapse (and all of the fanciful financial “innovations” that were insanely leveraged on that market).

    Number of public servants: up by 000’s

    Don’t be lazy, what are the figures, and in what areas?

    Business confidence: down, to record levels.

    Poor dears, they’d be silly not to be worried in the current world climate! However, this too is cyclic, and by no means at a record low (you big fibber).

    Nuff said.

    No, you forgot some stuff:

    Unemployment at a decades low.

    Crime rates significantly falling.

    GDP growth better than under National.

    Numbers on benefits at a low and falling.

    Minimum wage up every year for eight years.

    Long term savings and investment up (via Cullen Fund and KiwiSaver).

    International measures of:
    – the health system, ahead of Australia, Canada and the USA
    – educational levels high
    – ease of doing business, among best in the world
    – second best in the world (after Denmark) in terms of low corruption
    – and so on…

    There, now it’s ’nuff said.

  16. r0b 16

    Razorlight

    Thank you for attempting to answer the issues raised by Gooner.

    No problem. It’s interesting homework to look into these kinds of issues. A wee while back there was a very similar thread on KBB, which was also interesting (wish I’d remembered it sooner).

    http://kiwiblogblog.wordpress.com/2008/01/31/whales-questions/

    Labour cannot attempt to highlight the positive statistics as evidence of their policies working, and in the same breath blame the negatives on volatile world conditions.

    It certainly can! It certainly can when claimed negatives really are emergent from world conditions (I mean – petrol prices – puhlease!). It certainly can when positives really are emergent from domestic conditions (low unemployment, low crime).

    It doesn’t wash after 3 terms in ofice.

    No, you’re confusing different issues there. Personally I agree that the effect of the ’91 budget, although real, is a very difficult story to sell.

    The point of this rare post by me is tell you to be realistic here. The electorate likes John Key and in my opinion they like him because he is an alternative to Clark and Labour. The electorate has turned off them for obvious reasons.

    Agreed that the polls are currently with Key. I think we would strongly disagree about what the “obvious reasons” are however.

    To have any chance, Labour has to defend their record, the good and the bad. Admit their mistakes, say why things aren’t working and how they are going to improve them.

    I agree, they have to not be distracted, and get on with good, competent government. The occasional media commentator has even noticed that that is exactly what Labour are doing:

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/4405821a1861.html

    This tactic of attacking a popular politician is not working.

    I agree, but once again don’t confuse Labour and The Standard. Despite various energetic ranting by some, they are distinctly separate beasts! Labour does its thing, The Standard does its own, both have a place in the grand scheme of things.

    Time to change tact and start telling us why Labour deserves another 3 years.

    I think you can expect to hear a fair bit of exactly that in the months ahead.

    Goodnight.

  17. AncientGeek 17

    Dim Watcher:

    Typical lefties you forgot to mention that John Key will give workers the ongoing tax cuts Klark has denied them for the last 9 years. After tax incomes will rise every year under National.

    Oh yes – please point to the national party policy document detailing this?

    What you have at present is some vague waffling with no detail. This allows you to read whatever you want into it. There are also quite a lot of weasel words slowly coming out about how difficult it will be.

    It is a standard political tactic. What I’m also interested in is exactly how much debt is likely to be incurred, bearing in mind that at present it looks like Key seems to be promising to keep all of the big money items that have come in over the last 8 years.

    Question is – how credulous are you? I have a used bridge I could interest you in….

  18. Santi 18

    Steve Pierson, Professor of English: your article is lame, weak and misleading.

    An effective way of dropping wages is the method used by Michael Cullen. Keep taxation high and DO NOT adjust the brackets to cater for inflation. In this way the tax net will keep catching more and more hopeless people who cannot escape their greedy Labour rulers.

    That’s what happened over the past nine years. Cullen is the real bastard in this story.

  19. higherstandard 19

    Rob

    I agree people should not bandy figures around wantonly

    Regarding growth in the public service one figure I have close to hand is as below

    The “core public service” is expanding at four times the rate of the public health and education sectors, a Government survey shows.

    The annual survey, released by State Services Commissioner Mark Prebble, shows the number of core public servants grew from 42,047 last year to 44,335 in the year to June 30 – an increase of 5 per cent.

    Nice to know that we have this many people gorging at the public teats.

  20. Daveo 20

    I can understand the right’s frustration here. All this talk about the complexity of macroeconomics and the control governments have over wages… wouldn’t it be so much easier and infinitely more simplistic if we just whinged all day about when we’re going to get our tax cuts?

  21. Attemping to make a mountain out of a mole hill via misunderstanding is getting a little tiresome.
    Rising incomes of course is easy- cut taxes, especially for those on $20K or less. Neither Cullen nor English however will do that due to cost- its actually cheaper to give tax cuts to those in upper income brackets but then you end up spending more on welfare for those lower down.
    Anyway there are bigger issues right now than attempted frame ups of Key.
    The Kiwidollar tipping over 81 cents springs to mind. It can’t go on like this or those rosy emplyoment figures will start going backwards very soon.

  22. Monty 22

    You desperate socialists going on about this make me laugh – it is like there are 12 nutters all shouting at the establishment but in a sound proof room. No one is hearing you. There are bigger stories out there including where did the poodle get the $100k from – and why is he lying about it – yes – your poodle is a liar.

    And in this he will also drag Labour down further. And of course the other big story you are desperate to ignore – the Polls – usually there has been a post on the polls – but not this time – ignore the bad news because it is wrong? Well Parliament resumes next week – and things are going to get worse. The Owen Glenn issue is just not going to disappear.

    So carry on about John Key and his misquote – but do not forget – you are shouting is a sound proof room.

  23. Steve Pierson 23

    Savant. Yeah monetary policy tightening has a similar effect and you can use the inflation demon as your justification (like you say, it was part of the policy mix in the 1990s), should have mentioned it but my post was already 500 words and wanted to keep it in the less technical stuff.

  24. Steve Pierson 24

    Gooner etc. wages have risen in inflation-adjusted terms under Labour(that means their buying power has increased), and that’s despite inflationary pressures such as record high crude oil prices and dairy prices, which the governemtn obviously cannot influence.

    Under National, most people got poorer, under Labour most people have got richer. Simple as that.

    captcha: boys downwind – so we can’t smell them approaching?

  25. Steve Pierson 25

    Monty. For someone who is criticising us for not covering the NZF donation story, you’re not following it yourself very well.

    No-one has said NZF got a $100,000 donation, they got between $10,000 and $100,000 late last year.

    There is nothing illegal about that under the law then in place. Indeed, National received far far larger anonymous donations regularly.

    There is no evidence to say the money came from Glenn (not that it would matter if it had) apart from some comments from the then NZF President that actually don’t say the money came from Glenn for sure.

    The NZF Treasurer says the money was a transfer of several donations combined into one into NZF’s account.

    Where’s the scandal? So us the scandal and we’ll cover it.

  26. higherstandard 26

    Steve

    Where’s the scandal – suggest you delve into the HBDHB morass something appears extremely whiffy about the goings on behind the scenes – I’m not sure what the real story is but perhaps you should follow this rather than continuing to follow J Keys misquote.

  27. Tane 27

    The important thing here is to get the wage debate going. In case some of you have missed it, there’s a wage gap of 30% between New Zealand and Australia. Once we have a clearer idea of what the government can do to lift wages (or to drop them) then we can have an intelligent discussion.

    As Daveo points out, to date the debate has consisted solely of shrill cries for tax cuts from the right. It’s time politicians and the media realised that’s only one side of a very complex and important debate.

  28. HS – I’d suggest you may not like the result of a HBDHB investigation. I can tell you that it involves some serious conflict of interest if not straight out corruption and there are several senior National party members implicated. You might want to ask yourself why Tony Ryall, one of National’s premier muckrakers is playing the issue down.

    If it was up to me I’d release the report but it appears Labour is sticking with process over politics.

    Captcha: “Graveside sunset” – but the question is for whom…

  29. higherstandard 29

    Robin

    You once again make the mistake that I support any political party it was a genuine comment – I think there is something that stinks behind the scenes here.

    Unlike yourself I have a healthy suspicision of all politicians not just those outside of the labour party.

  30. higherstandard 31

    If I was TDS my reply would more likely have been.

    Cut benefits or don’t adjust them for inflation;

    You say it like it’s a bad thing

    Hold down public sector wages by cutting funding, this will also hold down wages in similar private sector jobs

    A government wouldn’t need to hold wages down just introduce pay increases related to performance and productivity – this would have the same effect however as the level of flatulence from the Public Servants in Wellington cannot really be counted as productivity….. unless they include meteorism as a performance measure.

    Bye Bye must go and do something productive

  31. Robinsod said “You might want to ask yourself why Tony Ryall, one of National’s premier muckrakers is playing the issue down.”

    You call this “playing the issue down”

    http://www.hawkesbay.co.nz/index.php/200802271136/News/Local-News/DHB-sacking-Appalling-political-manipulation.html

    Sheesh ‘Sod, I’d be interested to see what Ryall had to say if he was really going to town on something!

  32. Right, so within 48 hours you’ve gone from “I don’t know who this TDS chap you speak of is” to “if I was TDS” – you are so TDS, bro. For a pro you kinda suck…

    Oh and let me know how Francis is doing (we go back a long way).

  33. higherstandard 34

    Rob no personal abuse please when I was accused of being TDS I looked at some of the previous TDS posts to see what his/her/its views were some of which I agree with some of which I don’t.

    I am not TDS and the only Francis I know is a chap currently licing in Shanghai and one of my kids teachers.

    I like the capture Govs nontoxic ……. has there ever been such a thing ?

  34. I thought you were going to do something productive? It looks like you’re fibbing about that too…

  35. Scribe 36

    RazorLight,

    Labour cannot attempt to highlight the positive statistics as evidence of their policies working, and in the same breath blame the negatives on volatile world conditions.

    So true. A Catholic newspaper I read made the exact same point last week. I pilfer the last few paragraphs here.

    Labour is trumpeting its work to orchestrate the longest period of economic growth in New Zealand since World War II. That is a fact, but how much of that can be attributed to Labour’s policies and how much to world markets and trends?

    If Labour is going to take credit for that growth, should it also be taking the blame for rising interest rates, the huge increase in the cost of dairy products and a housing market that people are predicting will soon be in tatters?

    The Government can’t have it both ways.

    Oh, hang on. This is politics. Our mistake.

  36. r0b 37

    I have been pondering Gooner’s list of criticisms (upthread) some more. This is a long ramble of a post, probably not worth reading, I’m just getting my own thoughts in order. (I’m an economic ignoramus, so some of this will need refining). I think I have three points to make, and a conclusion.

    (1) We have a capitalist economy.

    The government has very little control over food prices, house prices, petrol prices and so on. It could assume more control, but then the Right would scream about the interfering Nanny State, and swear that things should be left to the Free Market. (The Right believes that things should always be left to the Free Market. Right up until the moment things go pear shaped. Then the captains of industry always go rushing to the Government for a handout – it’s happening again in America right now).

    So this covers some of the criticisms on Gooner’s list:
    House prices: up
    Food prices: up
    Mortgagee sales: up
    Inflation: up

    (2) Our economy exists in an international economy.

    The government has effectively no control over the international economy. Financial crashes in America, the price of crude oil, the damaging effects of currency speculation (hmmmm) and so on. This has effects on our economy that the government can’t control.

    This contributes hugely to some of the criticisms on Gooner’s list:
    Interest rates: up
    Petrol prices: up
    Collapsed finance companies: up
    Business confidence: down

    (3) There are domestic / internal things that the government can control (some quickly, some only very slowly). These include:

    – the basics of economy
    – aspects of employment / minimum wage / business environment
    – education system
    – health system
    – welfare system
    – via the above social indicators (such as crime rate)
    – defence and international relations

    It turns out that this scopes out my list of Labour government achievements:
    Unemployment at a decades low.
    Crime rates significantly falling.
    GDP growth better than under National.
    Numbers on benefits at a low and falling.
    Minimum wage up every year for eight years.
    Long term savings and investment up (via Cullen Fund and KiwiSaver).
    International measures of:
    – the health system, ahead of Australia, Canada and the USA
    – educational levels high
    – ease of doing business, among best in the world
    – second best in the world (after Denmark) in terms of low corruption
    – and so on…

    (4) Conclusion.

    Criticisms of this Labour led government are largely for things it can’t control. In areas that it can control it has significant achievements. Hence, this is a very good government.

  37. insider 38

    Just on fuel costs, the government can do something about that such as not impose a 10cpl “regional petrol tax” which will probably turn into a huge slush fund for self important local body politicians with bright ideas but few clues who want to remake their communities in their image.

    It could also stop the biofuels obligation which will add further costs to fuel because it makes selling the stuff a damn sight harder.

    It could also remove the automatic inflation adjustment on the excise rate – that;s the automatic adjustment denied to taxpayers in terms of relief from bracket creep.

    That’s about 15 cpl in one fell swoop.

  38. r0b 39

    The Government can’t have it both ways.

    Don’t be silly, the Government can have it both ways if that happens to be true.

    – Is the government responsible for rising crude oil prices? No.
    – Is the government responsible for rising minimum wage levels? Yes.

    See, both ways if it happens to be true. Now we’re simply arguing about how true it is for a range of issues. See my post above.

  39. r0b 40

    Just on fuel costs, the government can do something about that

    Yes it can (but note that my last post refers to crude prices not fuel costs).

    such as not impose a 10cpl “regional petrol tax’

    It could do that and more, though it would then have a hard job funding roads. But it’s bandaid stuff. Crude is not going to stop going up, the cost of petrol is not going to stop going up. My guess is that within a decade petrol will be ludicrously expensive, and we will all be thinking about adjusting to a post-petrol world. My advice – get a bike. I hardly drive at all these days.

    It could also stop the biofuels obligation which will add further costs to fuel because it makes selling the stuff a damn sight harder.

    As far as I can tell from my brief reading, biofuel is a busted flush. I think we should stay out of it altogether until the situation is clearer.

    That’s about 15 cpl in one fell swoop.

    In the context of what’s coming – that’s chicken feed.

  40. Gooner 41

    Ok, I tend to agree that providing a list and saying it’s all the gummints fault is not very sensible and as someone else said above it is unwise to “bandy figures around wantonly”.

    However, mostly the Joe Publics in the beltway won’t give a stuff when they are paying $100 per week more for their mortgage and will vote accordingly. It is human nature.

  41. r0b 42

    Ok, I tend to agree that providing a list and saying it’s all the gummints fault is not very sensible

    Bravo Gooner.

    However, mostly the Joe Publics in the beltway won’t give a stuff when they are paying $100 per week more for their mortgage and will vote accordingly. It is human nature.

    That’s as may be. Perhaps human nature, the desire to blame the gummint for all the ills of the world, will play itself out. Over time that’s the way it works, the electoral pendulum swings.

    However, if it swings against Labour in the next election, it will be swinging against a competent and successful government that has been very good for NZ. So it goes, so it goes.

  42. higherstandard 43

    bOBBO

    A competent and successful government that has been very good for NZ. You delusional twat.

  43. r0b 44

    bOBBO

    That’s very good HS – did you think it up all by yourself?

    A competent and successful government that has been very good for NZ.

    Yup, agreed.

    You delusional twat.

    What? We seemed to be in agreement there!

  44. higherstandard 45

    I was thinking of quoting Michael Cullen but “Rich Prick” didn’t seem appropriate.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Apartments give new life to former Trade Training hostel
    A building that once shaped the Māori trade training industry will now revitalise the local community of Ōtautahi and provide much needed housing for whānau Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson announced today. The old Māori Trade Training hostel, Te Koti Te Rato, at Rehua Marae in Christchurch has been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    11 hours ago
  • Major step to pay parity for early learning teachers
    Certificated teachers on the lowest pay in early education and care services will take another leap towards pay parity with their equivalents in kindergartens, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said in a pre-Budget announcement today. “Pay parity for education and care teachers is a manifesto commitment for Labour and is reflected ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    11 hours ago
  • New Zealand Wind Energy Conference
    Tēnā koutou katoa Tēnā koutou i runga i te kaupapa o te Rā No reira, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tatou katoa  Thank you Grenville for the introduction and thanks to the organisers, the New Zealand Wind Energy Association, for inviting me to speak this morning. I’m delighted that you ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    13 hours ago
  • Speech to New Zealand Drug Foundation 2021 Parliamentary Drug Policy Symposium
    Speech to Through the Maze: On the road to health New Zealand Drug Foundation 2021 Parliamentary Drug Policy Symposium Mōrena koutou katoa, Tēnei te mihi ki a koutou, Kua tae mai nei me ngā kete matauranga hauora, E whai hononga ai tatau katoa, Ka nui te mihi! Thank you for the opportunity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Govt to deliver lower card fees to business
    Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister David Clark has today announced the Government’s next steps to reduce merchant service fees, that banks charge businesses when customers use a credit or debit card to pay, which is estimated to save New Zealand businesses approximately $74 million each year. “Pre COVID, EFTPOS has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Government support boosts Arts and Culture sector
    Government support for the cultural sector to help it recover from the impact of COVID-19 has resulted in more cultural sector jobs predicted through to 2026, and the sector performing better than forecast. The latest forecast by economic consultancy ‘Infometrics’ reflects the impact of Government investment in keeping people in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Govt takes further action against gang crime
    The Government will make it illegal for high risk people to own firearms by introducing Firearms Prohibition Orders (FPOs) that will strengthen action already taken to combat the influence of gangs and organised crime to help keep New Zealanders and their families safe, Police Minister Poto Williams and Justice Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Thousands of MIQ spaces allocated to secure economic recovery
    Five hundred spaces per fortnight will be allocated in managed isolation facilities over the next 10 months, many for skilled and critical workers to support our economic recovery, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor say. “The Trans-Tasman bubble has freed up more rooms, allowing us to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand Sign Language Week a chance to recognise national taonga
    This week (10 – 16 May 2021) is New Zealand Sign Language Week (NZSL), a nationwide celebration of NZSL as an official language of New Zealand. “We’re recognised as a world leader for our commitment to maintaining and furthering the use of our sign language,” says Minister for Disability Issues ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Economic resilience provides more options in Budget 2021
    Securing the recovery and investing in the wellbeing of New Zealanders is the focus of Budget 2021, Grant Robertson told his audience at a pre-budget speech in Auckland this morning. "The economy has proven resilient in response to COVID-19, due to people having confidence in the Government’s health response to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Pre-Budget speech to BNZ-Deloitte Auckland Breakfast Event
    Thank you for the invitation to speak to you today, and to share with you some of the Government’s thinking leading into this year’s budget. This will be my fourth time delivering the annual Budget for the Government, though the events of the past year have thrown out that calculation. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Rotuman Language week affirms language as the key to Pacific wellbeing
    The first Pacific Language Week this year  makes it clear that  language is the key to the wellbeing for all Pacific people said Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio. “This round of language  weeks begin with Rotuman. As I have always  said language is one of the pillars of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Budget delivers improved cervical and breast cancer screening
    Budget 2021 funds a more effective cervical screening test to help reduce cervical cancer rates A new breast screening system that can proactively identify and enrol eligible women to reach 271,000 more people who aren’t currently in the programme. Budget 2021 delivers a better cervical screening test and a major ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • NZ-France to co-chair Christchurch Call Leaders’ Summit
    New Zealand and France will jointly convene the Christchurch Call Community for a leaders’ summit, to take stock of progress and develop a new shared priority work plan. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and President Emmanuel Macron will co-chair the leaders’ meeting on the 2nd anniversary of the Call, on 14 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New South Wales travel pause to be lifted tomorrow
    COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says the current travel pause with New South Wales will lift tomorrow – subject to no further significant developments in NSW. “New Zealand health officials met today to conduct a further assessment of the public health risk from the recently identified COVID-19 community cases in Sydney. It has been determined that the risk to public ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • March 15 Collective Impact Board appointed
    The voices of those affected by the March 15 mosque attacks will be heard more effectively with the establishment of a new collective impact board, Associate Minister for Social Development and Employment Priyanca Radhakrishnan announced today. Seven members of the Christchurch Muslim community have been appointed to the newly established Board, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • More young Kiwis supported with mental health and addiction services
    Nearly quarter of a million more young New Zealanders will have access to mental health and addiction support in their communities as the Government’s youth mental health programme gathers pace. New contracts to expand youth-specific services across the Northland, Waitematā and Auckland District Health Board areas have been confirmed, providing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New hospital facilities mean fewer trips to Auckland for Northlanders
    Northlanders will no longer automatically have to go to Auckland for lifesaving heart procedures like angiograms, angioplasty and the insertion of pacemakers, thanks to new operating theatres and a cardiac catheter laboratory opened at Whangārei Hospital by Health Minister Andrew Little today. The two projects – along with a new ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Fair Pay Agreements to improve pay and conditions for essential workers
    The Government is delivering on its pre-election commitment to implement Fair Pay Agreements which will improve wages and conditions, as well as help support our economic recovery, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood announced today. Fair Pay Agreements will set minimum standards for all employees and employers in an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Establishment of the new Māori Health Authority takes first big step
    Sir Mason Durie will lead a Steering Group to provide advice to the Transition Unit on governance arrangements and initial appointments to an interim board to oversee the establishment of the Māori Health Authority. This Group will ensure that Māori shape a vital element of our future health system, Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Cycle trails move up a gear in Central
    Work on new and upgraded cycle trails in Queenstown, Arrowtown and Central Otago is moving up a gear as two significant projects pass further milestones today. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has announced new funding for the Queenstown Trails Project, and will also formally open the Lake Dunstan Trail at Bannockburn ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government gives households extra help to reduce their power bills
    Nine community energy education initiatives to help struggling New Zealanders with their power bills are being given government funding through the new Support for Energy Education in Communities (SEEC) Programme.   “Last year we committed nearly $8 million over four years to establish the SEEC Programme. This funding will help ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Picton ferry terminal upgrade consent fast-tracked
    The planned upgrade of the Waitohi Picton Ferry terminal has been approved under the fast-track consenting process.  Environment Minister David Parker today welcomed the decision by the expert consenting panel to approve the Waitohi Picton Ferry Precinct Redevelopment Project.    The project will provide a significant upgrade to the ferry facilities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Quarantine Free Travel with New South Wales paused
    COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins has announced his intention to pause Quarantine Free Travel from New South Wales to New Zealand while the source of infection of the two cases announced in Sydney in the last two days is investigated.  Whole genome sequencing has linked the case yesterday to a recent ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Covid-19 immigration powers to be extended
    The passing of a bill to extend temporary COVID-19 immigration powers means continued flexibility to support migrants, manage the border, and help industries facing labour shortages, Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi said. “Over the past year, we’ve made rapid decisions to extend visas, vary visa conditions and waive some application requirements ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • “Supporting a Trade-Led Economic Recovery”
    Trade Policy Road Show SpeechManukau, Auckland   Kia ora koutou – nau mai, haere mai ki Manukau, ki Tāmaki.   Good morning everyone, and thank you for this opportunity to discuss with you current global challenges, opportunities and the Government’s strategy in support of a trade-led recovery from the economic ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Building consent numbers at an all-time high
    A record 41,028 new homes have been consented in the year ended March 2021 March 2021 consent numbers the highest since the 1940s Record number of new homes consented in Auckland The number of new homes consented is at an all-time high, showing a strong and increasing pipeline of demand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Whānau-centred support for parents and tamariki
    Up to 60 whānau in Counties Manukau will be supported through the first three years of their parenthood by a new whānau-centred model of care, said Associate Health Minister, Hon Aupito William Sio. “Providing this support to young parents is something we have to get right. It’s a priority both ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • NZ backs moves to improve global access to COVID vaccines
    New Zealand welcomes and strongly supports the announcement made by the United States Trade Representative to work for a waiver of IP protections on COVID-19 vaccines at the WTO, Trade Minister Damien O’Connor said. “New Zealand supports equitable access to COVID vaccines for all. No one is safe from the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Tourism communities: support, recovery and re-set plan
    TIHEI MAURI ORA Tuia te whakapono Tuia te tumanako Tuia te aroha Tuia te hunga ora Ki te hunga ora Tihei Mauri ora Ka nui te mihi ki a koutou Tena koutou, tena koutou, tena koutou katoa. Thank you, Hilary and thank you, Chris, and everyone at TIA for this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Support, recovery and re-set plan for tourism communities
    Five South Island tourist communities targeted for specialist support Pressure on Māori tourism operators and Conservation facilities recognised Domestic and international-facing tourism agencies put on more secure footing Long-term plan to re-set tourism with a focus on sustainability, industry standards and regional economic diversification A plan to ensure the immediate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Speech on NZ Rail Plan
    Check against delivery E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā karanga maha o te wa, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa. Ki ngā mana whenua o Taranaki Whānui anō nei aku mihi ki a koutou. Nōku te hōnore kia haere mai ki te whakanuia tēnei huihuinga whakahirahira. Nō ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government hits massive milestone in Violence Prevention & Elimination
    Minister for Family and Sexual Violence Marama Davidson announced a major milestone at a hui in South Auckland today, with the launch of the national engagement process on the prevention and elimination of family and sexual violence. “There is no room for violence in our lives – there is no ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Fee waiver extended for conservation tourism businesses
    Tourism businesses operating on public conservation land will have another six months of fees waived to help them adjust to the downturn in international visitors in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Acting Minister of Conservation Dr Ayesha Verrall has announced. "We acknowledge it has been a difficult year for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • ‘Lua Wave’ to future-proof Pasifika Festivals in Aotearoa
    Pasifika festival organisers will receive additional support to adapt to the COVID-19 environment thanks to the Government’s newly launched ‘Lua Wave’ component of the Pasifika Festivals Initiative, Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “This initiative has not only been to support festival organisers to recover from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Crown accounts show confidence in Govt economic plan
    The Government’s financial accounts continue to reflect the resilience of the economy and confidence in the Government’s economic recovery plan. The Crown accounts for the nine months to the end of March 2021 show both OBEGAL and the operating balance remain better than forecast in the Half Year Economic and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Energy Trusts of NZ Autumn Conference
    It’s a pleasure to be here today. Thank you Karen [Sherry] for the introduction and thanks to the Energy Trusts Executive for inviting me to speak at tonight’s event. It is an exciting time to come to speak to trustees of distribution companies. For many decades the electricity industry was ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New partnership to grow Māori success in STEM
    A new partnership with the Pūhoro STEM Academy will support thousands more rangatahi Māori to participate and succeed in the fields of science, technology, and innovation, Associate Education Minister Kelvin Davis announced today. Since 2016, Pūhoro has worked with Māori students to build their capability and create pathways to employment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Rail builds platform for economic recovery
    Transport Minister Michael Wood and State-Owned Enterprises Minister Dr David Clark today released the Government’s long term vision for a sustainable rail network that supports our economic recovery. New Zealand Rail Plan lays out how the Government is building a resilient, reliable and safe network, as well as the indicative ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • NZ and UK agree to lift the pace of free trade talks
    New Zealand and the United Kingdom have agreed to rapidly lift the tempo of talks, as the two countries enter a new phase in free trade negotiations, Trade and Export Growth Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. “UK Secretary of State for International Trade, Liz Truss, and I spoke today about ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago