web analytics

If they didn’t want to sell it, we would all own it

Written By: - Date published: 11:30 am, September 5th, 2012 - 85 comments
Categories: act, Maori Issues, national, privatisation - Tags:

The National/Act government wants to sell essential public infrastructure assets that we all own and that returns a public dividend to a few of its mates who have the money, so some of its other mates can clip the ticket on the way.

If water-dependent assets are going to be sold to a few, Maori want their rights regarding water acknowledged and recognised. Fair enough. But if hydro-based power companies were not going to be sold, and stay in public ownership so we all have a stake in them, it becomes much easier to establish exactly what those rights are, and how they should be acknowledged and managed.

It’s private appropriation of public assets that causes the problem. Take that away and the problem is different, and the process of resolution much easier to work through.

Asset sales don’t make economic sense, cultural sense, legal sense, and increasingly political sense.

Time to stop them now, and by the way save the taxpayer a couple of hundred million dollars that otherwise flushes down the drain.

85 comments on “If they didn’t want to sell it, we would all own it ”

  1. Gosman 1

    I’m not sure this logic is sound. Maori are interested in the commercial aspects of water involved in these companies. They would still have this interest even if the State was the 100 percent owner. I have yet to see any major players from the Maori side argue that interest in gaining commercial water rights would diminish if there was no asset sales.

    • mike e 1.1

      Goose Maori were Quite happy to leave water usage off the table so long as everybody benefited now only a few will benefit if it is partially privatised.

  2. Dr Terry 2

    Gosman, have you gained qualifications in logic? If so, you must surely have failed any tests. What you spout about Maori is so frightfully ignorant as to be unworthy of comment. Never fear, however, for Maori will have plenty more to say, so much that even you might care to listen.

  3. fabregas4 3

    I am not sure your understanding of Kaitiakitanga is sound. Maori understand that water is for us all. They are happy for this. But once Key and his mates try to sell it for private gain then they object.

    Try this analogy:

    I let you live in my spare house for free. All good. You rent out a room and get some money for it why shouldn’t I get a share?

    • Mr Burns 3.1

      You mean you think there are people who will let you stay in their home and not charge you?

      What sort of world do you live in?

  4. Uturn 4

    This is not a way to investigate Te Ao Māori in good faith i.e. using it as a pakeha political convenience. Clearly today is going to be wierd.

  5. captain hook 5

    these assets belong to the people of new zealand and not some transient gang of political bludgers who move in and move out taking as much as they can with them.
    why not have a referendum.
    that would be sound logic.

  6. insider 6

    What is essential infrastructure about a coal company?

    If power companies are so essential in terms of govt ownership, how do countries like the US, UK and Aus manage stable and efficient and cheap power systems without owning them?

      • insider 6.1.1

        And yet the US tends to outperform us in terms of fewer supply interruptions and their power is significantly cheaper too. And NZ performance is better now than it was under a national system.

        • Colonial Viper 6.1.1.1

          What bullshit assertions. ENRON anyone. US infrastructure is falling apart. They have a two trillion dollar infrastructure deficit.

          And what about the widespread blackouts experienced in the US in July in the middle of the heatwave.

          Someone is dreaming.

        • Draco T Bastard 6.1.1.2

          …and their power is significantly cheaper too.

          I think you’ll find the correct terminology is that profits aren’t as high and power provided as a national service could do without the profits altogether.

          And NZ performance is better now than it was under a national system.

          Bollocks.

          http://www.skmconsulting.com/to-do-news/Archive/The-Auckland-CBD-Power-Failure.aspx
          http://www.nbr.co.nz/article/updated-power-outage-auckland-s-cbd-fixed-120199
          http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/6132091/Ninety-per-cent-of-power-restored

          • insider 6.1.1.2.1

            Do you know what SAIDI, SAIFI and CAIDI are? Look them up and compare the 90s to the present to see how reliability is trending.

            But thanks for pointing out all those failures by ‘people’ owned monopolies.

            • Draco T Bastard 6.1.1.2.1.1

              Do you know what SAIDI, SAIFI and CAIDI are?

              Will wonders never cease? We learn things and thus do things better. Amazing111!!1

              But thanks for pointing out all those failures by ‘people’ owned monopolies.

              The failure is the business model that we’ve had forced upon us over the last three decades. Have the power companies publicly owned and run as a public service and those failures are likely to disappear.

              BTW, your distraction didn’t work. You said that NZs power system was better now, I proved that it isn’t.

              • insider

                Make up your mind. In the one post you both accepted “We learn things and thus do things better” and ‘proved’ that it isn’t better. I’m not quite sure how a couple of isolated power cuts in isolated locations is proof that things are somehow worse than weekly rolling power cuts over months and months across a much wider geography. It seems a highly unusual proof.

                • Draco T Bastard

                  “We learn things and thus do things better”

                  That was the physical aspect. The management has gone to hell.

                  I’m not quite sure how a couple of isolated power cuts in isolated locations is proof that things are somehow worse than weekly rolling power cuts over months and months across a much wider geography.

                  /facepalm

                  You’re either truly as stupid as you make out or you’re wilfully misinterpreting what’s happening. The ones in the 1970s were planned to take into account limited resources – basic, real world economics. The latter ones were unplanned outages caused by crappy management which itself was brought about by the neo-liberal revolution we had in the 1980s.

        • mike e 6.1.1.3

          california through the 90;s and early 2000’s

    • tc 6.2

      Imagine how much cheaper it’d be without profit taking private interests and the regulatory oversight required to keep them in some form of balance.

      Aus is cheap because they burn valleys of coal and you’d be surprised how inefficient the entire system here is. The grid and distribution systems itself use SCADA type systems to ensure power keeps running with little human intervention.

      They’re very robust, proven, and incredibly forgiving as they’ve been engineered to be that way for decades as some pieces are kept many years beyond useful life.

      It’s the overhead of layers of parties, profit, beauracracy, regulation and the legal/audit costs they tow behind them that makes our power bills so large.

      We have less than 5 mill, declining industry and 75% renewable generation, bring back the NZED !

      • Colonial Viper 6.2.1

        NZED 😎

        • insider 6.2.1.1

          Ah yes the NZED, the days of rolling blackouts…

        • joe90 6.2.1.2

          Ah yes the NZED, the days of rolling blackouts…

          Really, when?.

          • insider 6.2.1.2.1

            The last systemic rolling blackouts in NZ were in the 1970s. These were regular and driven by long term supply insecurity rather than short term response to climate or network failures. It was a centrally planned and operated system then.

            • lprent 6.2.1.2.1.1

              I can’t remember them in Auckland (which would have been the first place hit) and I’d have been quite aware of them from at least 1974. I was delivering the Star and would read the copy either then or when I got home every day.

              • insider

                I can remember them. Television broadcast hours were cut. Power was cut in the evenings and on weekends. Aucland may have been managed differently

                • mike e

                  Outsider when did Auckland have its major black out it was after privatisation.
                  We had oil fired power stations then oil shortages and you can Guarantee it was a National govt in power then.
                  Next in the early seventies our economy was expanding.
                  Now our enegy use is declining

                  • insider

                    Which one Mike? The central city one which went on for weeks was due to the failure of a community owned monopoly company’s poor management of its assets. Basically no checking and no accountability. The 06? one was due to poor maintenance management by the state owned monopoly

                    • mike e

                      the 06 outage was only for a few hours not months

                    • mike e

                      The state owned enterprise had under invested since its break up into parts from NZED.

                    • Colonial Viper

                      Right wing bullshit meme of privatisation vs public ownership.

                      The real difference is leadership and investment. That’s when the advantages of public ownership can come shining through as the assets are run for the benefit of the country.

                    • insider

                      Don’t forget to storm the barricades on your way out cv.

                      It’s you and Draco that are pushing a simplistic ‘state is great’ line – its just faith based polemic.

                      I say the evidence in nz and overseas shows things are much more mixed. You have private dominated systems that work well and some that don’t, and the same with state dominated.

                    • Socialist Paddy

                      Insider I hear there were also blackouts during the 1930s. Is this the fault of the first Labour Government?

                    • Colonial Viper

                      It’s you and Draco that are pushing a simplistic ‘state is great’ line – its just faith based polemic.

                      Yeah sorry dickhead, that’s not my position at all. Please just speak for yourself in future.

                    • insider

                      But the Assets owned and operated by ‘we the people’ in he form of a council organisation. The kind of model being championed by a few here.

                    • Socialist Paddy

                      But the problem is these democratic institutions are set up but then a bunch of penny pinching tories get elected and make a name for themselves by cutting costs and saving on maintenance.

                      And then shyte like this happens.

                      Blame the right people insider.

                      And then explain how Enron, the pinnacle of free market enterprise, screwed things up so badly. 

                    • Colonial Viper

                      And then explain how Enron, the pinnacle of free market enterprise

                      Well, up to that date, Enron was the pinnacle of free market fraud.

                    • Herodotus

                      No CV Enron was also a failure of regulation e.g. Auditors, disclosure and the regulators. Also with the 401k employees pension fund
                      http://www.policyarchive.org/handle/10207/1329
                      sad thing is I see history repeating itself. There will be more Enrons, and with the crap regulation with Kiwisaver and other pension funds many retirees and pension fund investors to incur more pain. We need more regulation and regulators with real muscle.
                      http://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=10831491

                    • Colonial Viper

                      No CV Enron was also a failure of regulation

                      Sure. But only if you consider deliberate fraud, outright lying to shareholders and investors, destruction of data, and neck deep collusion between Enron’s executive management and their auditors, as ‘a failure of regulation’.

                      Me, I just call it financial fraud. Or more specifically, a control fraud.

            • joe90 6.2.1.2.1.2

              Best you start trawling the yearbooks for any references to your assertion because I reckon you’re making shit up.

              • insider

                Take it with the electricty regulator. I’m sure they’ll be fascinated by your insight and throw all their research out of the window.

            • Draco T Bastard 6.2.1.2.1.3

              And you know what happened in the 1970s, yes?

          • joe90 6.2.1.2.2

            You’ll have to be a little more specific because in the seven years, 1971 – 1978, I worked for the NZED I was never aware of the rolling blackouts you describe.

              • Te Reo Putake

                Be more specific. Have you any evidence of blackouts in the seventies or not? I’m picking not.

                • Colonial Viper

                  insider’s ridicuolous penchant for assigning power failures down to private vs public ownership just shows the shallowness of right wing thinking.

                • insider

                  Have you read the paper with the big chart listing the various cuts shown in the 70s? I think not

                  • Te Reo Putake

                    Yep, that’s right, I’m not wading through the document. Better things to do. Be more specific, fool.

                  • Draco T Bastard

                    They weren’t cuts but public conservation measures. There’s a big difference. I certainly recall having to do the same thing since the implementation of faux competition and the profit drive.

                    • insider

                      That has got to be the biggest piece of newspeak today. There were cuts. Regular ones.

                    • Draco T Bastard

                      If you’ve got a limited supply then you don’t get to do everything that you want to do. Basic economics. The limited supply wasn’t due to the functioning of the state power system but basic physical limitations. Those limitations were recognised and conservation measures put in place. Same thing happens today when we get dry years.

                      If power had been in private we would have been far worse off.

                    • insider

                      You don;t get regular cuts and restrictions over three or four consecutive years in a centrally planned system just due to weather. This was a systemic failure, and that can only have been because in this case central planning did not work.

                      To sayit would have been worse if privately operated is not only slightly childish but ignores the complete lack of blackouts in similar if not worse weather circumstances in the following 40 years.

                    • Colonial Viper

                      yeah dude because the weather never goes into 3 or 4 year wet cycles or dry cycles 🙄

                      All you’re railing against is the fact that Nature Rules OK.

                    • insider

                      Unfortunately once again the hydro inflow data just doesn’t back you up. The seventies cycles were no better or worse than the following 30 or so years.

                    • Colonial Viper

                      And I’m afraid your spouting of gobbledegook doesn’t count for much.

                    • insider

                      and your continual avoidance of inconvenient facts (or ‘gobbledegook’ as you delightfully like to call them) regularly shows you up as a blowhard. Do you stick your fingers in your ear and go ‘wah wah wah I’m not listening’ at the same time?

                  • RedLogix

                    And on page 56 Table 3 of this document it states:

                    This was a period of relatively tight supply with conservation measures required in 1973, 1974, 1975 and 1976. This situation appeared to develop as a result of higher than anticipated demand growth over that period.

                    This clearly implies that the economy was growing more rapidly than normal … umm … which party was in government during this period in question?

                    • Carol

                      Hot water was also rationed in the 50s and, I think early 60s in Auckland. The water heating was switched off at the supply for a certain amount of time each day. In my family in my childhood, we could only get enough hot water for a couple of baths a day. People tended to not have showers installed in those days.

                      I think the unrestricted access to electricity is pretty recent….. and we may go back to rationing before too long, given peak everything.

                    • lprent []

                      The ripple control on hot water is still there. Used to get really irritated at one place in the mid 90s with a crap relay or something. Would make a loud distinct click..

                    • mike e

                      the kirk govt expanded the economy at breakneck speed something that hasn’t happened since nor likely to ever again.

                    • lprent

                      That was also about when the marsden B was meant to commission to run on oil for peak loads. Bad choice of fuel. Don’t think they could afford to run it.

                  • Colonial Viper

                    Sure, because if power had been privately owned, the dams would have filled up faster.

                    • Carol

                      Actually, if you look at the history of electricity in NZ, you can see it’s development really only became “sufficient” in the late 70s.

                      Also, I know when I was growing up we just didn’t have all the electricity-guzzling equipment people now take for granted:

                      in my (middleclass) house:
                      no fridge until somewhere in the mid to late 1950s;
                      no washing machine until mid to late 1960s;
                      only one radio til some time in the 60s – no record players
                      no TV til late 60s, but then only one b/w set
                      no sure when we got heaters, but mostly we just had an open fire in the living room

                      And this history shows that development of electricity supply was limited during WWII:

                      http://www.contactenergy.co.nz/web/aboutus/nzelectricityindustry

                      But World War II slowed down progress and, as a result of the huge increase in demand after the war, a 30-year hydro building programme was established. Dams were built at Tongariro, Lake Manapouri, the Mackenzie Basin and on the Clutha and Waikato rivers.

                      More power stations were built in the years between 1958 and 1978, including: Meremere (coal); Wairakei (geothermal); Marsden A (oil); New Plymouth (gas, with oil as a backup); Huntly (dual gas/oil); Otahuhu A (gas turbine) and Whirinaki (gas turbine). By 1965, the North and South Islands were linked by huge submarine electricity cables across Cook Strait.

                • lprent

                  The main blackouts I remember were in 1997. Someone let the lights go out in Auckland..

              • Draco T Bastard

                Ah, supply restrictions resulting in the populace having to save power but not actual power outages.

                If all those projects assessed as highly likely to proceed did in fact proceed,
                dry-year margins would likely rise to levels not seen since the late 1980s.
                Figure 43: Estimated dry-year energy supply margins (1971 to 2015)

                So, things haven’t been as good in the supply of power since the 1980s. Hmmm, broken up and commercialised in the early 1990s…

    • mike e 6.3

      Outsider Where’s the cheap in Australia get your facts upto date.
      Carbon taxes have put an end to cheap power because over 80% of Australia power is generated using coal.

  7. BernyD 7

    The politicians have always tried to divide NZ using Maori rights.

    The fact is Maori are another group of civilians in NZ who voice their beliefs.
    They have historical and documented precedents on their side when they do it.
    Their voice and opinion has just as much merit as any other group in NZ.
    It’s not about numbers it’s about civilised debate, a good idea is always worthy.

    The fact that they have a Historical precedent to help them get their beliefs heard is beneffiting everyone.

    From what I know they have never tried to claim money for the use of water.

    It’s about maintaining the water ways of NZ, which we can’t do if they are “Owned” by some third party (All the shareholders would be a third party).

    They always “Listen” to the politician but the reverse is rarely true.

    So I Bless them as Good Civilised People and hope they can help find a solution for all NZers.

  8. joe90 8

    Wow, insider was right, for two years there were outages which were so serious that twenty years later the electricity industry needed reforming.

    /

    Figure 8: Retail demand conservation measures during dry periods

    1973 – July-Sept – Supply authorities ordered to cut
    consumption by 5%. Water heating restrictions. TV broadcast
    hours reduced. Power cuts in some areas in evening peak
    periods & weekends

    1974 – Feb-July Public conservation campaign. Water
    heating restrictions. Public lighting restrictions. TV
    broadcast hours reduced. Rolling blackouts

    • Carol 8.1

      1973-4 was the time of the “oil crisis”. There was a lot of concern about long term energy shortages. I went to the UK for the first time early 73 on a ship. The ship had to go slower than usual to conserve fuel. When I got to London, the friends I stayed with were talking about just having lived through the a year or two of some 3 day work weeks. This was partly due to a miners strike but also due to the “oil crisis” of 1973:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-Day_Week

  9. Colonial Viper 9

    despite insider’s rampant misdirection DTB is right. Private profit is a dead loss on the community. Add to the fact that core infrastructure like energy has to be run strategically for the benefit of the nation: our power generation needs to be 100% NZ owned and managed.

    • Poission 9.1

      Core infrastructure with natural oligarchical properties need to be managed differently.This was an argument that Gareth Morgan postulated.

      The assets and revenue (cost increases) are based on revalued asset cost (so called fair value) and not on their historical cost.This is in effect a windfall profits stream and is widely used eg airport companies.

      Morgan suggested that if the accounting change generated a capital gain constraint, that there would be two significant responses.First the assets would return across the ledger very quickly, and price increases would reduce to the cpi creating market stability for both large and small users.

      This would broaden the tax base ,and stabilize inflation from internal forcing.

      As an interesting aside Rusal the Russian alu producer,has agreed to invest in modernization of one of its plants (efficiency) following large scale protests after threats to reduce production (and jobs) due to the high cost of energy.

      The government energy supplier agreed to reduce the existing energy increases.

      Unemployment in the RF has reduced to 5.1% which is the level at the start of the GFC.

      • Colonial Viper 9.1.1

        Just by coincidence Russia also happens to have one of the largest foreign currency reserves in the world, as well as one of the largest gold reserves in the world.

        And they can still send men into space. The US can’t.

        • Populuxe1 9.1.1.1

          And yet they never put a man on the moon, or successfully landed a probe on Mars, or sent probes to the outer planets, and so forth and so on if you must insist on spouting irrelevancies.
          They certainly manage to beat the US in the area of millions slaughtered in the 20th century and appalling civil rights today – not that any of this is relevant of course…. Shall we sing the Third International now?

          • Draco T Bastard 9.1.1.1.1

            You’ll note that Pop1 is being rather picky about what the Russian Space Program achieved.

            • Populuxe1 9.1.1.1.1.1

              Not especially – I’m just questioning its relevance to the topic. After all, a lot of the rocket technology on both sides was due to the work of Nazi scientists and Hitler made Germany into one of the most industrially advanced and wealthy countries in Europe – that’s if you’re actually trying to make some sort of connection between technological capacity and ideology.

              • Draco T Bastard

                …that’s if you’re actually trying to make some sort of connection between technological capacity and ideology.

                If I was going to make that connection then I’d point out that a supported populace does better technologically than one that isn’t even if that support is of the authoritarian type. To put it another way, a government active in R&D and manufacture produces better results than the free-market.

          • Colonial Viper 9.1.1.1.2

            Pop said:

            And yet they never put a man on the moon,

            After 40 years, the US won’t again. If that makes you feel better.

        • Poission 9.1.1.2

          Just by coincidence Russia also happens to have the lowest govt debt gdp ration in the G8.

          http://www.tradingeconomics.com/charts/russia-government-debt-to-gdp.png?s=rusdebt2gdp&d1=20000101&d2=20120906

          Surprising is that the decrease occurred after suspension of the sale of strategic energy assets

          • Colonial Viper 9.1.1.2.1

            Yep. Putin gave those energy oligarchs some very clear guidelines to follow…”or else”.

            • Poission 9.1.1.2.1.1

              Indeed the role of the Oligarchs is ubiquitous.There is a nice paper on the GFC and Oligarchs ie unbridled power.

              https://mitsloan.mit.edu/MSTIR/world-economy/Crisis-2008-2009/Documents/09-093%20The%20Financial%20Crisis%20of%202008.Rev.pdf

              Another ingredient that helped create the mix that nearly brought the U.S. financial industry to its knees was the cozy relationship that had built up over the years between Wall Street and Washington. As Johnson noted, “Oversize institutions disproportionately influence public policy; the major banks we have today draw much of their power from being too big to fail. [Wall Street] benefited from the fact that Washington insiders already believed that large financial institutions and free-flowing capital markets were crucial to America’s position in the world.” By the time of the crisis, 90% of all the money deposited in the United States was in 20 banks.

              It was no secret that Wall Street firms were big political contributors. The securities and investment industry—which included Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, Merrill Lynch, Lehman, and Bear Stearns—gave $97.7 million to federal political candidates during the 2004 election and $70.5 million for the 2006 congressional election.

              • mike e

                poi the same people that caused the GFC(18 current or former directors of the federal reserve) are profiting because the govt has handed them 4 trillion in interest free loans

  10. Feargal 10

    Strangely enough, or maybe it’s not strange, Nationals’ Sell the Assets campaign appears to take no notice of the reason why many of our assets are/were Government owned.
    It was /is the very same reason that most responsible Companies won’t be interested now.
    If NZ was a vibrant large country filled with many consumers Private Business would have built the Dams and there Reticulation systems many many years ago. They would have also built Large Ports, Railways and alternate Transport Systems. Maintained and improved them over
    the years.
    But it wasn’t that attractive then and it isn’t now.
    It is however attractive to ” Thrash the Donkey Merchants” & “Profit few at the expense of the many Merchants” and get a quick buck
    and get out fast.
    Let’s be honest here Fat Cats. None of you then, or now, would as mentioned, build a new Port, Dam, Railway or Road off your own bat.
    Not now, just as you wouldn,t back in the latter part of the 19th Century. New Zealand wasn’t large enough in user uptake to make these things profitable enough. These Government assets weren’t Govt owned because of some ideological love of Government ownership. It was done for practical reasons. The infrastructure was considered necessary for a small group of Pacific Islands to become more in tune with the developing world economy and to encourage more settlement in NZ.
    This situation still exists. Globalist economic fairy tales re the better running of these assets. And “Why should Governments own
    Power stations”, rhetoric doesn’t stack up!
    What does stack up is the Greedy Rhetoricians lust to make a fast buck at the expense of generations of poor isolated peoples desire and bloody hard work to have more comfortable and decent Lifestyle at a reasonable cost. These reasons are just as valid today. It buggers
    belief that we should forsake these very same reasons and pay some greedy ass more, for what we have had for years.
    Not to give these assets to a bloated few money hungry Corporations. Whose interests lie far beyond a decent and equitable lifestyle
    for the peoples of these far flung Islands’.

    But that’s alright we can buy them back.Oh wait a mo, we already have. Isn’t this having to pay the thieves to get your stolen
    property back!!

    • insider 10.1

      Of course the first electric power scheme built in NZ was funded by private entrepreneurs through a public share issue

      • felix 10.1.1

        And what? How did it pan out for them?

      • lprent 10.1.2

        And from memory wound up being subsidized by the city to prevent bankruptcy. Or are you thinking of the one that was put in for the mine?

        Of course we could check ourselves if you’d put in a link, I could find out which fairy story you are peddling.

        Partial stories with unstated moralities are ok for children. But realities seldom contain nice beautiful princesses – they usually have bad PMT and neat making obsessions

      • Draco T Bastard 10.1.3

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_sector_in_New_Zealand#History

        While industrial use quickly took off, it was only government programmes in the first two thirds of the 20th century that caused private demand to climb strongly as well. Especially the rural areas were beneficiaries of subsidies for electrical grid systems, where supply literally was provided to create demand, with an intention to modernise the countryside. The results were notable – in the 1920s, electricity use increased at a rate of 22% per year. In fact, the ‘load building’ programmes were so successful that shortages started to occur from 1936 on, though a large number of new power stations built in the 1950s enabled supply to catch up again.[8]

        So, we have electricity in the country pretty much solely due to government action.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • APEC 2021 Women and the Economy Forum prioritises women’s economic empowerment
    Minister for Women Jan Tinetti today chaired the virtual APEC 2021 Women and the Economy Forum, which is working to address outstanding issues for women and girls across the region as it recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic. The forum brought together Ministers and representatives from 21 economies to discuss gender ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    27 mins ago
  • Upper Hauraki to move to Alert Level 2
    Upper Hauraki will move to Alert Level 2 from 11:59pm tomorrow, 25 September, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins confirmed today. After positive cases were detected in the Upper Hauraki area on Sunday, extra Alert Level restrictions were put in place to immediately prevent any wider transmission of the virus.  “We’ve ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Report into Aotearoa New Zealand’s export controls system released
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today welcomed the findings of an independent review into Aotearoa New Zealand’s export controls system, which regulates the export of goods to foreign militaries, police forces or paramilitaries. Produced by David Smol, a former Chief Executive of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    20 hours ago
  • New District Court Judge appointed
    Attorney-General David Parker has announced the appointment of Brett Crowley of Wellington as a District Court Judge.  He is currently the Wellington Public Defender and started his career as a staff solicitor working in a range of litigation including criminal defence work. He went to the bar in 1999 specialising ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    21 hours ago
  • Mental health stocktake shows strong progress
    The first report of the Government’s Implementation Unit has found strong progress has been made since the Mental Health and Addictions Package was announced in 2019. “The report notes most initiatives funded in the Budget 2019 package are on track to deliver what is expected by 2023/24,” Grant Robertson said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    21 hours ago
  • Working together to grow the West Coast
    A project that has been crucial in allowing businesses to continue during the tourism downturn is among a number of initiatives to receive a boost from the Government’s Jobs For Nature programme, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. Sustaining South Westland is an extension of an initiative set up last year ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    22 hours ago
  • Next steps to improve safety in wake of Whakaari White Island tragedy
    The Government is moving to improve safety in light of the Whakaari White Island tragedy and has released proposals to reinforce safety standards in registered adventure activities. The package of proposals includes: Strengthening requirements for how operators, landowners and the regulator manage natural hazard risks Improving how risks are monitored, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    24 hours ago
  • New Zealand donates more COVID-19 vaccines to COVAX and the Pacific
    Foreign Affairs Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta and Associate Health Minister Aupito William Sio announced today that New Zealand is donating additional Pfizer vaccines to the Pacific and AstraZeneca vaccines to the COVAX Facility, to support equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines. “New Zealand is donating 708,000 doses of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Speech to the Property Council of New Zealand
    Kia ora koutou katoa   Is it a pleasure to be able to speak with you today, and to be able to answer some questions you may have. I would like to acknowledge the organisers of this event, the Property Council. The theme of this year’s conference is City Shapers. Together ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Additional MIQ for Christchurch
    An additional hotel will be added to our network of managed isolation and quarantine facilities, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “I have approved and Cabinet is in the final stages of signing off The Quality Hotel Elms in Christchurch as a new managed isolation facility,” Chris Hipkins said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • NZ COVID-19 response earns another major digital investment
    Minister for the Digital Economy and Communications Dr David Clark welcomes Amazon’s Web Services’ (AWS) decision to establish a Cloud Region on New Zealand shores, further boosting New Zealand’s growing digital sector, and providing a vote of confidence in the direction of New Zealand’s economic recovery. “Amazon is the second ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand invests in cutting edge cancer R&D
    Scaling up the manufacture of CAR T-cell cancer therapy for clinical trials Advancing New Zealand’s biomedical manufacturing capability Supporting future international scientific collaborations Transforming cancer care with targeted, affordable solutions Research, Science and Innovation Minister Hon Dr Megan Woods has announced that the fight against COVID-19 will not stop the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Expert group appointed to lead New Zealand’s future health system
    An outstanding group of people with extensive and wide-ranging governance and health experience have been appointed to lead the Māori Health Authority and Health New Zealand, Health Minister Andrew Little says. “This Government is building a truly national health system to provide consistent, high-quality health services right across the country. This ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Funding to help clean up contaminated sites
    The Government is supporting the clean-up of contaminated sites in Northland, Dunedin and Southland to reduce risk to people’s health and protect the environment. Environment Minister David Parker said the funding announced today, through the Contaminated Sites Remediation Fund, will help us turn previously hazardous sites into safe, usable public ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Predator Free apprenticeships open up new job opportunities
    The expansion of a predator free apprenticeship programme is an opportunity for more people to kick-start a conservation career, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “The Predator Free Apprenticeship Programme is focused on increasing the number of skilled predator control operators in New Zealand through a two-year training programme. “The Trust ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Further NCEA support confirmed for Auckland students
    The number of Learning Recognition Credits for senior secondary school students will be increased for Auckland students, Education Minister Chris Hipkins confirmed today. This recognises the extended time these students will spend in Alert Levels 3 and 4. “It means students in Auckland will have a fair opportunity to attain ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Long-term pathway next step to better mental wellbeing for New Zealanders
    The Government is taking a new approach to support people who experience mental distress, Health Minister Andrew Little says. “Kia Manawanui Aotearoa – Long-term pathway to mental wellbeing (Kia Manawanui) is the first 10-year plan of its kind that targets the cause of mental distress and also sets out how ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Keeping our Police safe to keep our communities safe
    The Government is committed to keeping our frontline police officers safe, so they in turn can keep New Zealanders safe – with one of the largest investments in frontline safety announced by Police Minister Poto Williams at the Police College today.   The $45 million investment includes $15.496 million in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Clean Vehicles Bill passes first checkpoint
    The Land Transport (Clean Vehicles) Amendment Bill will help New Zealand drive down transport emissions by cleaning up the light vehicle fleet, Transport Minister Michael Wood says. The Bill passed its first reading today and will establish the legislative framework for key parts of the Government’s Clean Car Package, including ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Funding boost supports ongoing Māori COVID-19 response
    The Government is responding to the need by whānau Māori and Māori Health providers to support their ongoing work responding to COVID-19 and to continue increasing rates of Māori vaccination, Associate Minister for Health (Māori Health), Peeni Henare and Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson announced today.   This increased ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Significant increase to COVID-19 penalties
    Penalties for breaches of COVID-19 orders are set to significantly increase from early November 2021 to better reflect the seriousness of any behaviour that threatens New Zealand’s response to the virus, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “Throughout this Delta outbreak we’ve seen the overwhelming majority of people doing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Counter-Terrorism Legislation Bill returns to Parliament
    The Counter-Terrorism Legislation Bill has returned to Parliament for its second reading in an important step towards giving enforcement agencies greater power to protect New Zealanders from terrorist activity. “The Bill addresses longstanding gaps in our counter terrorism legislation that seek to protect New Zealanders and make us safer,” Justice ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Joint Statement: New Zealand and Australian Trade Ministers
    Hon Damien O'Connor MP, New Zealand Minister for Trade and Export Growth, and Hon Dan Tehan MP, Australian Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment, met virtually on Monday 20 September to advance trans-Tasman cooperation under the Australia-New Zealand Closer Economic Relations Trade Agreement (CER). CER is one of the most ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Prime Minister’s Post Cabinet Press Conference/COVID-19 Update opening statement
    ***Please check against delivery***   E te tī, e te tā, nau mai rā [To all, I bid you welcome]   As you will have seen earlier, today there are 22 new community cases to report; three of which are in Whakatiwai in the Hauraki area, and the remainder in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Major milestones for Māori COVID-19 vaccine rollout as new campaign launches
    Whānau Ora and Associate Health (Māori Health) Minister Peeni Henare acknowledges two major milestones in the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccination programme for Māori. “I am very pleased to announce more than 50 percent of eligible Māori have received their first dose and 25 per cent are now fully vaccinated,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government funding to fight infectious diseases
    $36 million for research into Covid-19 and other infectious diseases The investment will improve our readiness for future pandemics Research will focus on prevention, control, and management of infectious diseases The Government’s investing in a new Infectious Diseases Research Platform to boost Aotearoa New Zealand’s Covid-19 response and preparedness for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Quarantine-free travel with Australia to remain suspended for a further 8 weeks
    Suspension to be reviewed again mid to late November Decision brought forward to enable access from Australia to first tranche of around 3000 rooms in MIQ Air New Zealand working at pace to put on more flights from Australia from October    The suspension of quarantine-free travel (QFT) with Australia has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Extra support for Ethnic Communities to share vaccination information
    Extra support is being made available to Ethnic Communities to help them share COVID-19 vaccination information within their communities, Minister for Diversity, Inclusion and Ethnic Communities Priyanca Radhakrishnan said. “We know we need to get every eligible person in New Zealand vaccinated. A fund being launched today will allow for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • School holidays remain unchanged for Auckland region
    School holidays in Auckland will continue to be held at the same time as the rest of the country, starting from Saturday, 2 October, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “I’ve carefully considered advice on the implications of shifting the dates and concluded that on balance, maintaining the status quo ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government continues crackdown on gangs and organised crime
    Operation Tauwhiro extended until March 2022 Since it was launched in February, Operation Tauwhiro has resulted in:   987 firearms seized $4.99 million in cash seized 865 people charged with a firearms-related offence Gangs and organised crime groups will continue to be relentlessly targeted with the extension of Police’s successful ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to Body Positive 'HIV Treatments Update Seminar 2021'
    E ngā mana E ngā reo E ngā iwi Tēnā koutou katoa Ka huri ki ngā mana whenua o te rohe nei. Tēnā koutou. He mihi hoki ki a tatou kua tau mai nei I raro I te kaupapa o te rā. Nō reira tēnā koutou katoa Acknowledgements It’s a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Power bill changes bring fairness to charges
    A key recommendation of an independent panel to make electricity charges fairer across all households will be put in place, the Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods has announced. “Phasing out the regulations on ‘low-use’ electricity plans will create a fairer playing field for all New Zealanders and encourage a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NZ economy’s strong momentum will support rebound from Delta outbreak; COVID fund replenished
    The economy showed strong momentum in the period leading up to the recent Delta COVID-19 outbreak, which bodes well for a solid economic rebound, Grant Robertson said. GDP rose 2.8 percent in the June quarter, following on from a 1.4 percent increase in the previous March quarter. This was a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Projects create benefits into the future
    Making a well-known lake swimmable and helping to halt the decline of the endangered hoiho/yellow-eyed penguins are among a suite of new projects being supported by the Government’s Jobs for Nature programme across the southern South Island, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “It’s no secret that many of our most ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Opening statement for Whāriki Indigenous Small Business Roundtable
      Kei ngā tōpito e wha o te āo e rere ana te mihi maioha ki a koutou nō tawhiti, nō tata mai e tāpiri ana ki tēnei taumata kōrero mo te ao hokohoko arā mā ngā pākihi mo ngā iwi taketake Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa – Pai Mārire.  ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New members appointed to Kāpuia
    The Government is adding four additional members to Kāpuia, the Ministerial Advisory Group on the Government’s Response to the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the terrorist attack on Christchurch mosques. “I’m looking forward to having Pamela MacNeill, Huia Bramley, Melani Anae and Katherine Dedo  join Kāpuia and contribute to this group’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Timeline confirmed for Emissions Reductions Plan
    Cabinet has agreed to begin consulting on the Emissions Reduction Plan in early October and require that the final plan be released by the end of May next year in line with the 2022 Budget, the Minister of Climate Change, James Shaw confirmed today. “Cabinet’s decision allows organisations and communities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pay parity pathway for early learning teachers confirmed
    Pay parity conditions and higher funding rates for education and care services will come into force on 1 January, 2022, Minister of Education Chris Hipkins confirmed today. The Government signalled this work in Budget 2021. “From 1 January, 2022, centres opting into the scheme will receive government funding and be ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to the New Zealand Nurses Organisation Conference 2021
    Kia Ora tatau katoa.   Ka tuku mihi ki nga nēhi, He pou Hauora o Aotearoa, E ora ai tatou.   Whakatau mai  I runga i te kaupapa o te ra Te NZNO conference.   Tena koutou tena koutou Tena tatou katoa   Good morning, and thank you inviting me ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government investment in farmer-led catchment groups sweeps past 150 mark
    171 catchment groups have now been invested in by the Government 31 catchment groups in the Lower North Island are receiving new support More than 5,000 farmers are focussed on restoring freshwater within a generation through involvement in catchment groups  Government investment in on-the-ground efforts by farmers to improve land ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago