web analytics

Is Matthew Hooton becoming a socialist?

Written By: - Date published: 8:38 am, July 20th, 2018 - 41 comments
Categories: business, capitalism, class war, Deep stuff, economy, Economy, employment, Free Trade, jacinda ardern, john key, Politics, quality of life, tax, Unions, wages, workers' rights - Tags:

Occasionally previously staunch defenders of the free market see the light and turn to the left after they realise that the power of the state is necessary to counter the evil caused by unregulated greed.

One of them is Bernard Hickey, one of the most astute local commentators on economic issues.  In 2010 he wrote:

I feel like a priest who has been wrestling with his belief in god and has now decided god does not exist.

It’s time for me to recant and to say what I’ve been thinking for months: the economic god of completely free markets and capital flows is not worth believing in anymore and we must look for other things to believe in and do.

I think New Zealand needs to have a debate about capital controls, about foreign ownership of assets, about measures to control our currency and about being openly nationalistic rather than internationalistic about our economic policy.

I think the Global Financial Crisis and the preceding decade of debt-driven instability in global capital markets and trade flows have demonstrated the failure of the economic model most New Zealand policymakers have adhered to for nearly 3 decades.

I think we need to rethink the way we run monetary policy, the way we allow foreign ownership of assets, the way we encourage savings, the way our financial institutions are regulated and change the things we are aiming for.

We should debate more specific controls on who owns what assets, whether monetary policy should still use the Official Cash Rate to focus on inflation alone, and whether banks should still be free to lend however much they want to whomever they want.

Another right winger may right now be having his very own road to Damascus moment.  Although judgment on this should be reserved until further information is in.

I am referring to occasional Standard reader Matthew Hooton.

His latest Herald article is headed Communism by Stealth is here, recycling John Key’s oft quoted description of the Government’s Working for Families policy.

He talks about how the Nurses wage claim was perfectly justified, which it was.  He says that this may ignite wage inflation, which it might, and this would mean that Jacinda Ardern would be a one term Prime Minister, which it won’t and which she wouldn’t.

He then says this:

In fact in 2004, the left-wing critique of Working for Families was stronger than Key’s, that it would operate as a subsidy of low-paying employers.

That is, using Key’s original numbers, if there was a job to do worth $60,000 a year, an employer could hire someone with two kids, pay them just $38,000 a year, and they’d end up with almost the same pay in the hand.

Union bosses rightly feared it would be difficult to get workers with children to sign up for a pay campaign if it made little difference whether they earned $38,000 or $60,0000 a year.

Worse, if Government subsidises something, there will be more of it, in this case low-paid jobs. To an employer, Working for Families screams out: “Don’t buy more plant and machinery or invest in on-job training, just hire a few more low-skilled labour units and get the government to pick up a big hunk of the tab.”

On this point many left wingers would agree.  Wages should be higher and the state should not have to subsidise wages and salaries just so that families can cope.  I disagree with the language however.  I have always thought of working for families as advantageous tax treatment of deserving taxpayers, not as a cost.

Hooton then seeks to divide workers between those with children and those without.

When trying to buy a house, childless people also have to compete with those with children, whose after-tax incomes have been artificially inflated by the state.

Working for Families then creates a vicious economic and political cycle. As it holds back productivity and keeps wages low, the best electoral response is to expand it further, as Ardern and Robertson did in December.

And what better way to stop nurses, teachers, doctors, and police officers from striking than to ensure the ones with children will get nothing out of doing so?

He thinks the policy causes division.  Speaking as a taxpayer who has never received working for families can I express my consent and support to those with young children on modest wages receiving extra assistance.

Hooton blows it with his last paragraphs.

And don’t expect National to be able to do anything about it. With the financial status of so many working families now as locked in to welfare as any other beneficiary, abolishing Working for Families is becoming ever-more politically impossible.

It has transferred the primary economic relationship that determines family income from being that with the employer to that with the state. It is indeed communism by stealth. Clark and Cullen knew exactly what they doing when they set it up.

The policy was not a permanent power grab by the fifth Labour Government.  It was an attempt to address increasing poverty caused by rampant greed and Globalisation.

But what are the solutions?  What does Comrade Hooton think should happen to make sure that working families receive an adequate wage?

He is unfortunately very quiet on this.  Maybe he needs to go further on his trip to Damascus before he can say what needs to be done.

Through an unfortunate juxtaposition his column had an EMA advertisement opposing the Government’s attempt to improve Union access to work sites.  The evidence is undeniable, increased Union power increases wages.  Clearly the EMA realises this.

I look forward to the next column from Comrade Hooton where he takes on the EMA and explains to them that the best way to avoid “Communism by Stealth” is to properly reward workers and to respect and engage with the Union movement.

41 comments on “Is Matthew Hooton becoming a socialist? ”

  1. Puckish Rogue 1

    Aren’t we all a little bit socialist 🙂

  2. R.P Mcmurphy 2

    Business in New Zealand hides behind a grandiose set of axioms that are the stuff of economic theory for giant corporations with large payrolls. Business can always afford higher wages but in new zealand where most businesses are relatively small and owner operated the payoff is psychological for the owners and not merely financial but the ruggid individyoualls love being able to enforce economic obedience and obeisance from the workers.

    • soddenleaf 2.1

      Poorly thought theories, like neolib free market ideals, support big corps, why?How have they persisted though wrong? Simple cheaper energy means growth has nothing to do with politicians or economic theories. Those who vote Tory really never had a clue, or else brought into the idea that cheaper energy meant govt needed to regulated lessand so let the market be freed up. The problem is govt keeps your competitors honest, chlorine meat, heat treated vegies, PR running to shop floor where manager get bonus for cutting wages, etc becuase some bright thing in or has convinced the board that lower quality means more sales.

      Good businesses recognize the need to keep efficiency high not just inside the business gates, when a company cheats customers, employees, the competition must meet those lower standards or goto the wall. So good boards,ceos, are out in front pushing good standards on tgeir industry. I.e not like the civil engineers who let the cctv building inspectors walk… etc.

      Efficient economy efficient govt.

  3. Pat 3

    It may not apply to Hickey whos revelation was sometime ago, but I suspect most recent ‘road to Damascus’ events are driven largely by fear….and a likely justifiable fear at that.
    Resetting wealth distribution is not so simple as higher wages for the low(er) paid as was alluded to by Mr Hickey when he mentions capital controls for it is the free movement of capital that is the very basis of the neoliberal experiment….and are enough prepared to accept the trade offs that come with that control?…especially when many have known nothing else.

    And then theres climate change.

  4. aj 4

    “The policy was not a permanent power grab by the fifth Labour Government. It was an attempt to address increasing poverty caused by rampant greed and Globalisation”

    And if I recall correctly WFF was put in place after a long period when the Right (and the media) were constantly drawing attention to the difficulties families were facing with living costs.

    • Pat 4.1

      WFF was largely an increased version of the Family Support paxkage introduced by the 4th Labour Gov….if I recall correctly the Australian gov introduced a much more generous version around the same time and later the Clark gov increased payments and renamed it WFF.

  5. Lucy 5

    I have always believed that WFF was a subsidy for employers that artificially depressed wages. Having said that there was a desire to ensure that lower paid workers with children were able to keep out of the poverty. The difference between the minimum wage and a family wage for a person with one child is $185 in tax credit and in work tax credit. So the difference between what the employer pays ($630) and what a statistician has calculated costs to raise a child is $185. Labour costs have been suppressed by ensuring a flow of cheap labour – with youth rates and migration (probably not as big a factor as categorized) and clamping down on the ability to organize as a collective. The cost of labour should reflect the cost to the labourer, as no firm would produce a part that cost more to make than was sold for! If we look at humans as resources, as employers tell us they do then the real cost of living is an essential part of the calculation of wages. which would logically mean that working in Auckland you would be paid more by your employer for housing component and in South Island you are paid more to compensate for oil prices.

    • Adrian Thornton 5.1

      @ Lucy +1
      I would also add that if the WFF is also a subsidy to landlords that helps artificially floats New Zealanders obscene fetish in using housing as a tradable commodity, the ‘housing market’ would collapse tomorrow without it.

    • millsy 5.2

      The same could be said about what people like to call ‘youth rates’. Bascially expecting parents to subsidise employers (the argument being that most 17 and 18 year olds live with their parents and don’t need as much money as older workers do.

  6. tc 6

    ” Is Matthew Hooton becoming a socialist? ” yeah nah just another day at the office for matty. Chuck out an old slogan that seemed to work last time dog whilsting with communism eh, must be a slow day.

    What intrigues me is how much in the DP delivery seat is the paid columnist as opposed to how much at the DP strategy table he is. Be interesting to see who sits at that table.

  7. Morrissey 7

    Hooton? That cynic above all cynics has meddled with gullible “liberals” in the past.

    https://morrisseybreen.blogspot.com/2018/01/hooton-talks-mike-williams-agrees-with.html

    And no bunch of liberal patsies is more gullible than the poor folk over at Russell Brown’s love fest. Remember the havoc Hooton stirred up when he pretended to be a Nelson Mandela fan…

    Open mike 30/12/2013

  8. patricia bremner 8

    Last time I heard Hooten on the radio with Kathryn Ryan he was hysterical at the idea of Jacinda forming a government with the Greens and NZ First. He was so petulant and cross at the idea of change he was child like.

    He was so in a screaming frenzy Kathryn told him ‘That is enough Mathew’ Mind this hostess has had the right on regularily and can harrange the left when it suits.

    So the idea that Mathew could seriously accept anything other than right wing dogma would be a complete surprise. ‘A Damascas moment? Possibly, but not too likely.

    Some of these now fringe players are finding astute journalists asking questions they can’t answer, and to get cut through they are using ‘communism’ ‘unions’ ‘payrates’ ‘Inept government’ in a muddled effort to explain what clearly hasn’t worked. ‘Poor Mathew’. He and Hosking have the same ‘flu, only Hoskings blames the Government.

    Have they seen ‘the light?’ Don’t think so. Will they change? It isn’t likely all things considered, as they think those from the left lesser beings with fewer rights.

  9. Currently reading Other People’s Money, by economist John Kay and he pretty much says all of this. That the financial institutions we have created have only served to syphon off wealth to the 1%. It seems that a lot of other people have come round to this viewpoint. Hooton knows this instinctively – and he does note ruefully the strong early criticism of Working For Families on the left.

  10. Julia Schiller 10

    Perhaps you need to look past your own cohort to find resentment toward families receiving WFF? At least you and I were comfortable enough to be able to have children in the first place. But the Millennial generation is delaying having children, maybe forever, thanks to student debt, crappy housing options, and precarious work.

    I am starting to appreciate the argument that Labour’s efforts to mitigate the evils of unregulated greed don’t equate to much more than handouts/bandaids that go straight back into the pockets of these greedy private interests. Increase the student allowance? Private landlords raise rents commensurately. Similar with the winter heating subsidy.

    In the case of power, the left should be talking about completely renationalising that industry to lower everyone’s power bill and make the switch to sustainable energy easier. There’s some communism for you, Hooton!

    • Rosemary McDonald 10.1

      “In the case of power, the left should be talking about completely renationalising that industry to lower everyone’s power bill and make the switch to sustainable energy easier.”

      Seriously scary suggestion, and it’d be wise to check the horses are well contained with their blinkers and earmuffs in place before putting it out there. 😉 😉

      This is what a true Left and progressive gummint would do if it was truly committed to positive change for the 99%…but we don’t have one of those yet. 🙁 🙁

      Maybe next time?

  11. UncookedSelachimorpha 11

    He’ll become a communist I expect. It’s exactly the same thing as socialism.

  12. Kat 12

    Long after the sun went down Hosking and Hooton sat quietly in the car, the contents of the glove box had been emptied on the floor and there was no map. Hosking looked out the window into the darkness and began to shiver, he needed some relief. Hooton spun the dial on the radio, faint voices could be heard behind the static. Then the unmistakable voice of John Campbell burst through the ether “absolutely marvelous”………. Hosking looked down at the rear left wheel, not only was it wet it was flat.

    • patricia bremner 12.1

      Wonderful visuals, Thank you Kat.

      • cleangreen 12.1.1

        Shit Kat;

        Please write a book; – as you have a way with words I’m captured again.

        I am astonished. You are gifted.

  13. SPC 13

    More likely he is setting the scene for the right to once more move on WFF when back in government.

    As last time, they would reduce the real value of WFF, and again hold down nurses wages and use the saved money to finance a reprise of the 2017 election tax cuts package – this is why the great majority of the oldies vote National (every tax cut bumps up the value of their super, which just makes it more unaffordable).

  14. SPC 14

    And as for the ridiculous argument that without WFF employers would pay workers more. Total nonsense. National held down the real value of WFF while in office and there was no surge in wages, ask nurses.

  15. The sky will fall in on our heads if we have a strong Union presence like they do in Australia where wages are significantly higher…

    Say what ????? !!

    Socialism ,…my great fanny fat aunt… and Australia has a far more ‘ Americanized’ economy than us by far.We just are not ‘ doing it right’.

    Too many who want to keep it just like it is.

    And that’s the real problem.

    • Draco T Bastard 15.1

      Too many who want to keep it just like it is.

      And that’s the real problem.

      QFT

  16. Brutus Iscariot 16

    He’s right in that WFF is an appalling mess – discriminatory against non-breeders, and abysmally inefficient. Tear up the lot and start again, perhaps by going down the route of a UBI.

    • RedLogix 16.1

      I’ve strongly argued for a UBI as a component of a rational, efficient tax reform package. The open question remains, is it sufficient by itself? The clean logical arithmetic appeals a lot, but what might be the unintended outcomes?

      It’s something we should think through.

    • phil 16.2

      Agreed, although I’d prefer the UI to be rather more than basic. Why not reorganise the economy to maximise the quality of life of the many rather than the wealth of the very few?

  17. RedLogix 17

    A thoughtful post Mickey. While I agree that empathy is not a cardinal feature of right wing politicos, it’s wrong to think they are entirely unaware of inequality as a problem.

    It’s worth reading Hooten to understand how deep and complex a problem it really is. While it’s true that the chief symptom of inequality is a lack of money, it’s not obvious that throwing money at it is the best solution.

  18. patricia bremner 18

    When did these poor wages become entrenched?? When Muldoon started his wage and price freeze.
    Then the Bill Birch contracts act allowed firms to close, change their name and offer cut rate rehiring wages. Locking union reps out and bringing in individual contracts compounded thingsThen to avoid holiday pay uniforms insurance and Kiwi saver, employers moved to contracting..
    We are more like America than Aus. Aussies still have Unions and on-site reps, they also have the “Fair work” rules and $18.98 an hour is the bare minimum.
    Workers here in NZ had no rights, but this new Government has made numerous employers pay correctly, which has given people backpay up to 13/14 thousand.
    More work place inspectors has uncovered mean and cruel practices. Aussies can’t believe the low wages some Kiwis get.
    The Australian Government pays Employers $10 000 to take on a new worker full time. So the employers are subsidised here and in Australia.
    The Neo Liberal system is like gruyere, full of holes.

    • … ‘ Aussies can’t believe the low wages some Kiwis get ‘ …

      And in an article I read many years ago about young Australian managers sent here from Australia to do their ‘apprenticeships’… one statement by one of them was :

      … ” Australian CEO’s cant believe the garbage NZ workers will put up with , – in Australia there’s just no way workers would put up with any of this shit ”…

      So they’ve known about it for several decades and taken full steps to exploit the situation for all its worth. Foreigners coming here , exploiting New Zealand workers, siphoning off huge profits and then laughing at us.

      Make you feel good ?

      But the question remains ; WHO enabled them to be able to do that ?

      I think you know and I know EXACTLY who.

      ——————————–

      New Right Fight – Who are the New Right?
      http://www.newrightfight.co.nz/pageA.html

      ——————————–

      • Graeme 18.1.1

        I went over to WA in the mid 80’s after a while on the Clyde Dam and other sites around NZ.

        I thought NZ had a strong Union culture but the Aussies had REAL UNIONS. I couldn’t believe the efficiency and reach of the Australian Unions, coverage went well above the trade level and they didn’t fuck about. Any shit and it was all on.

        • WILD KATIPO 18.1.1.1

          Good on you , Graeme.

          Been busy… just casually recapped. Was good to see .

        • Wensleydale 18.1.1.2

          Yeah, NZ unions don’t seem to have the stomach for a fight to be honest. It’s more a case of “Let’s just sit down, have a wee chat and a nice cup of tea, and see if we can’t come to an arrangement.” And while you’re sitting there enjoying your cup of Bell and plate of gingernuts, employers are knifing you in the kidneys, lying to the media and laughing all the way to the bank. The notion of ‘good faith’ seems to be a sick, sad joke much of the time.

  19. greywarshark 19

    Thanks Micky
    Interesting post. A double rainbow, how can it be? Bernard AND Matthew?
    It is a bright moment in a day to read about possible changes that might enable some good stuff to get done.
    A little songwas made to go with the double rainbow viral thing.
    Let’s celebrate, and mark this point in time.
    (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX0D4oZwCsA

  20. Tricledrown 20

    Hooton is a politikle chameleon he changes his colour according to how the political winds blow.
    But underneath he is yellow notice the little twerk when he speaks.
    He’s Trumpish but with a nagging whine.
    Since he been off the waggon he has been doing a lot more slaggin.
    When the National Party is up in the poles he is fine.

  21. Pat 21

    Before unwinding WFF it may pay to develop a workable alternative …especially in light of the fact that the minimum wage is $16.50 p/h (34k pa) and the living wage is considered $20.55 (or 43k)

    https://www.workingforfamilies.govt.nz/tax-credits/payment-table.html

    • greywarshark 21.1

      People would like to see WFF dismantled. It only subsidises employers and that is wrong. It enables them to pay less than they should so that we are increasingly seeing poor working people living below the breadline.

      Abolish this practice they thunder. It is incompatible with a fair society. Yes but. First replace it with something else will you boofheads. There are real people here trying to live on relatively little, so don’t take the little away and only leave them with ‘relatively’.

      Something like this is happening already to beneficiaries who get money to boost their meagre benefit from their relatives (or friendly loan company), but then the state tries to cancel their benefit and want back all the living expenses already used for sustenance, back to some distant time when they became needy.

      Can lefties with such high principles about how things should be done actually CARE that people have sufficient remuneration from elsewhere and are paid adequately first! This BEFORE wiping WFF and insisting on tidy, appropriate business systems that bring decent standards to “”everything”” they do?! Let’s face it – a majority of businesses in NZ would have to close down in that case, at least temporarily.

      • greywarshark 21.1.1

        And further to my above comment I look further in the column and see Red Logix at 16.1 making a short but absolutely vivid true point about the need to think through changes and alternatives from a practical point of view of how it will affect the lowest paid, and structurally unemployed and partially employed.

        Also what effect it will have on the money flow so that NZ businesses can continue trading profitably and employing at decent wage levels. Wages should start cranking up every two years to keep up with low inflation, remembering that over those two years people have been paying the current prices from yesterday’s wage rates. That lag should be remembered when there is talk about wage rises being inflationary. Look elsewhere for that fuel I think.

  22. Jum 22

    Hooton a socialist? How ridiculous. He’s a weasily, snake whisperer from radio 10 years back. The only reason he ever attacks National is because they’re not the alt right/conservative right/greedy right act.

    He has clients that want to own New Zealand and New Zealand workers and he wants to help them get there.

    Handle with care; bacteria alert.

  23. georgecom 23

    WFF does have an element of subsidising low wages. However, if WFF had not existed wages would be little higher than they are today. So whilst Hooten might be correct in a sense, the real world reality is that I doubt employers would not have suddenly and magically hiked wages had WFF never come around. So maybe theoretically correct only M Hooten.

    WFF is a funny amalgam of approaches. Yes, it is a poverty reduction package that ensures families are lifted above a poverty line. It is also a form workfare, not the highly punitive form we can see the likes of Judith Collins rolling out were she in power, more an incentive for people to be “available and work ready for the labour market”. It financially drives people toward being available to the market. Another way that it subsidises employers.

    If H Hooten is indeed genuine about his comments, he will strongly advocate foe the one thing which is shown to lift wages, unionism. He will advocate for strong democratic industry unions and the policy settings which allow industry based agreements.

    Balls in his court now to back up what he says with an actual plan to lift wages.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Prime Minister congratulates victorious Black Caps
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has congratulated Kane Williamson and the Black Caps for their victory over India in the final of the inaugural Cricket World Test Championship. “The Black Caps have made New Zealand proud. This was a masterful performance from a team at the top of their game and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 hours ago
  • Further action to tackle cervical cancer
    Parliament has taken another step to help reduce the number of women who develop cervical cancer, with the Health (National Cervical Screening Programme) Amendment Bill passing its third reading. “I am very pleased by the robust consideration this Bill has received. It will ensure technology allows healthcare providers to directly ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 hours ago
  • $500 million seized from gangs and criminals
    A significant Government milestone has been reached with $500 million in cash and assets seized from gangs and criminals by Police over the past four years, Police Minister Poto Williams announced today. “During our last term in office, this target was set for 2021 with Police as part of our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • Congratulations to the Black Caps – World Champions
    Minister of Sport and Recreation Grant Robertson has congratulated the Black Caps as the deserved winners of the inaugural World Test Cricket Championship. “The Black Caps have pulled off a remarkable and deserved win in the World Test Championship final against India.  The final is the culmination of two years ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Alert Level 2 in Wellington, Wairarapa and Kāpiti Coast
    Alert Level 2 measures are now in place for Wellington, Wairarapa and Kāpiti Coast to the north of Ōtaki, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says. These measures are precautionary, following the potential exposure of New Zealanders to a COVID-19 case from Sydney. The person visited a range of locations in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    19 hours ago
  • Speech to the India New Zealand Business Council Summit
    5pm, Wednesday 23 June 2021 [CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY] Tuia te Rangi e tū nei Tuia te Papa e takoto nei Tuia te here tangata Ka rongo te pō, ka rongo te Ao Tihei Mauri Ora   Introduction Namaskar, tēnā koe and good evening. Thank you for your kind invitation to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    19 hours ago
  • Financial support for caregivers widened
    Children’s Minister Kelvin Davis has welcomed changes that will make it easier for caregivers looking after children outside of the state care system to access much-needed financial assistance. The Social Security (Financial Assistance for Caregivers) Amendment Bill will also allow these caregivers to access further benefits previously unavailable to them. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    21 hours ago
  • Agencies to have powers to secure maritime domain
    A Bill introduced to Parliament today aims to prevent serious criminal offending at sea, including transnational offending and organised crime, Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta announced. “Aotearoa New Zealand will be better placed to keep our maritime environment secure against threats like drugs trafficking, wildlife trafficking and human trafficking with the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    22 hours ago
  • Critical support for New Zealand’s budding researchers
    Fellowships to attract and retain talented researchers in the early stages of their career, have been awarded to 30 New Zealanders, Associate Research, Science and Innovation Minister Dr Ayesha Verrall announced today. “I am pleased to congratulate these researchers, who will be receiving funding through the MBIE Science Whitinga Fellowship. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Bill to stop taxpayers having to fund oil field decommissions
    The Government is preventing taxpayers picking up the bill for the decommissioning of oil fields, says Energy and Resource Minister Dr Megan Woods.  “After the Crown had to take responsibility for decommissioning the Tui oil field, it became clear to me that the current requirements around decommissioning are inadequate and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Quarantine Free Travel from New South Wales to New Zealand to pause
    New Zealand’s Quarantine Free Travel from New South Wales to New Zealand will be paused while the source of infection of new cases announced in Sydney is investigated, says COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins. There are 10 new community cases of COVID-19 today in New South Wales, taking the Australian ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Milestone reached for Iwi Affiliation Population Counts
    Iwi affiliation data released today provides updated population counts for all iwi and addresses gaps in Māori data originating from the 2018 Census, says Associate Minister of Statistics Meka Whaitiri. “The release of the 2018 Iwi Affiliation Estimated Counts is a really important step, and I acknowledge the hard work ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Ngāti Rangitihi Claims Settlement Bill passes first reading
    Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Minister Andrew Little welcomed Ngāti Rangitihi to Parliament today to witness the first reading of The Ngāti Rangitihi Claims Settlement Bill. “I know it took a lot of hard work, time and patience by all parties involved to reach this significant milestone. I am honoured to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Speech to the Sustainable Healthcare and Climate Health Conference Aotearoa
    Mihi Tēnā tātou katoa Kei ngā pou o te whare hauora ki Aotearoa, kei te mihi. Tēnā koutou i tā koutou pōwhiri mai i ahau. E mihi ana ki ngā taura tangata e hono ana i a tātou katoa, ko te kaupapa o te rā tērā. Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Infrastructure Acceleration Fund opening for business
    Criteria to access at least $1 billion of the $3.8 billion Housing Acceleration Fund (HAF), announced in March, is now available, and an invitation for expressions of interest will be released on 30 June, Housing Minister Megan Woods has announced.  “This is a key milestone in our plan to accelerate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Bringing back the health of Hauraki Gulf
    New marine protection areas and restrictions on fishing are among a raft of changes being put in place to protect the Hauraki Gulf for future generations. The new strategy, Revitalising the Gulf – Government action on the Sea Change Plan, released today, draws on input from mana whenua, local communities, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Speech to AI Forum – Autonomous Weapons Systems
    AI Forum New Zealand, Auckland Good evening and thank you so much for joining me this evening. I’d like to start with a thank you to the AI Forum Executive for getting this event off the ground and for all their work and support to date. The prospect of autonomous ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Zealand boosts support to Fiji for COVID-19 impact
    Aotearoa New Zealand is providing additional support to Fiji to mitigate the effects of the current COVID-19 outbreak on vulnerable households, Foreign Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta announced today. “Recognising the increasingly challenging situation in Fiji, Aotearoa will provide an additional package of assistance to support the Government of Fiji and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Round 2 of successful energy education fund now open
    $1.65 million available in Support for Energy Education in Communities funding round two Insights from SEEC to inform future energy hardship programmes Community organisations that can deliver energy education to households in need are being invited to apply for the second funding round of the Support for Energy Education in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Ngarimu scholarships to target vocational training
    Associate Education Minister Kelvin Davis today announced three new scholarships for students in vocational education and training (VET) are to be added to the suite of prestigious Ngarimu scholarships. “VET learners have less access to study support than university students and this is a way to tautoko their learning dreams ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Recognising the volunteers who support our health system
    Nominations have opened today for the 2021 Minister of Health Volunteer Awards, as part of National Volunteer Week. “We know that New Zealanders donate at least 159 million hours of volunteer labour every year,” Minister of Health Andrew Little said in launching this year’s awards in Wellington. “These people play ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Drug Free Sport supported to deal with new doping challenges
    Drug Free Sport New Zealand will receive a funding boost to respond to some of the emerging doping challenges across international sport. The additional $4.3 million over three years comes from the Sport Recovery Fund announced last year. It will help DFSNZ improve athletes’ understanding of the risks of doping, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government support for South Auckland community hit by tornado
    The Government is contributing $100,000 to a Mayoral Relief Fund to support Auckland communities impacted by the Papatoetoe tornado, Acting Minister for Emergency Management Kris Faafoi says. “My heart goes out to the family and friends who have lost a loved one, and to those who have been injured. I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Celebrating World Refugee Day
    World Refugee Day today is an opportunity to celebrate the proud record New Zealanders have supporting and protecting refugees and acknowledge the contribution these new New Zealanders make to our country, the Minister of Immigration Kris Faafoi said. “World Refugee Day is also a chance to think about the journey ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Face to face meeting delivers significant progress on NZ-UK FTA
    New Zealand and the UK have committed to accelerating their free trade agreement negotiations with the aim of reaching an agreement in principle this August, Trade Minister Damien O’Connor announced. “We’ve held constructive and productive discussions towards the conclusion of a high-quality and comprehensive FTA that will support sustainable and inclusive trade, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government taking action to protect albatross
    New population figures for the critically endangered Antipodean albatross showing a 5 percent decline per year highlights the importance of reducing all threats to these very special birds, Acting Minister of Conservation Dr Ayesha Verrall says. The latest population modelling, carried out by Dragonfly Data Science, shows the Antipodean albatross ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Adoption laws under review
    New Zealand’s 66-year-old adoption laws are being reviewed, with public engagement beginning today.  Justice Minister Kris Faafoi said the Government is seeking views on options for change to our adoption laws and system. “The Adoption Act has remained largely the same since 1955. We need our adoption laws to reflect ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Wider roll-out of cameras on boats to support sustainability and protect marine life
    Up to 300 inshore commercial fishing vessels will be fitted with on-board cameras by 2024 as part of the Government’s commitment to protect the natural marine environment for future generations.  Minister for Oceans and Fisheries David Parker today announced the funding is now in place for the wider roll out ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Plan for vaccine rollout for general population announced
    New Zealanders over 60 will be offered a vaccination from July 28 and those over 55 from August 11, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. The rollout of the vaccine to the general population will be done in age groups as is the approach commonly used overseas, with those over ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New Zealand introduces Belarus travel bans
    New Zealand has imposed travel bans on selected individuals associated with the Lukashenko regime, following ongoing concerns about election fraud and human rights abuses after the 2020 Belarus elections, Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta has announced. The ban covers more than fifty individuals, including the President and key members of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • NZ economy grows driven by households, construction and business investment
    The Government’s efforts to secure the recovery have been reflected in the robust rebound of GDP figures released today which show the economy remains resilient despite the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, Grant Robertson said. GDP increased 1.6 percent in the first three months of 2021. The Treasury had ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Milestone 250th tower continues to improve rural connectivity
    The Government has welcomed the completion of the 250th 4G mobile tower, as part of its push for better rural connectivity. Waikato’s Wiltsdown, which is roughly 80 kilometres south of Hamilton, is home to the new tower, deployed by the Rural Connectivity Group to enable improved service to 70 homes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Quarantine Free Travel pause with Victoria to lift on Tuesday
    Following a further public health assessment of the COVID-19 outbreak in greater Melbourne, New Zealand’s Quarantine Free Travel pause with Victoria has been extended to 11.59pm on Tuesday 22 June, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says. It has been determined that the risk to public health in New Zealand continues ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Prime Minister mourns passing of Dr Sir Ian Hassall
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is mourning the passing of Dr Sir Ian Hassall, New Zealand’s first Children’s Commissioner and lifelong champion for children and children’s health. As a paediatrician Sir Ian contributed to a major world-first cot death study that has been directly credited with reducing cot deaths in New ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • APEC structural reform meeting a success
    APEC ministers have agreed working together will be crucial to ensure economies recover from the impact of COVID-19. Minister of Commerce and Consumer Affairs David Clark, chaired the virtual APEC Structural Reform Ministerial Meeting today which revolved around the overarching theme of promoting balanced, inclusive, sustainable, innovative and secure growth ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Digital hub to boost investment in forestry
    A new website has been launched at Fieldays to support the forestry sector find the information it needs to plant, grow and manage trees, and to encourage investment across the wider industry. Forestry Minister Stuart Nash says the new Canopy website is tailored for farmers, iwi and other forestry interests, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government continues support for rangatahi to get into employment, education and training
    Over 230 rangatahi are set to benefit from further funding through four new He Poutama Rangatahi programmes, Minister for Social Development and Employment Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “We’re continuing to secure our economic recovery from COVID by investing in opportunities for rangatahi to get into meaningful employment, education or training ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NCEA subjects up for consultation
    The education sector, students, their parents, whānau and communities are invited to share their thoughts on a list of proposed NCEA subjects released today, Education Minister Chris Hipkins says. This is a significant part of the Government’s NCEA Change Programme that commenced in 2020 and will be largely implemented by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Major investment in plantain forage programme aims to improve freshwater quality
    The Government is backing a major programme investigating plantain’s potential to help farmers protect waterways and improve freshwater quality, Acting Agriculture Minister Meka Whaitiri announced at Fieldays today. The Sustainable Food and Fibre Futures (SFFF) fund is contributing $8.98 million to the $22.23 million seven-year programme, which aims to deliver ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • America’s Cup decision
    The Minister responsible for the America’s Cup has confirmed the joint Crown-Auckland Council offer to host the next regatta has been declined by the Board of Team New Zealand. “The exclusive period of negotiation between the Crown, Auckland Council, and Team New Zealand ends tomorrow, 17 June,” said Stuart Nash. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago