web analytics

Is New Zealand really as ‘racist as fuck’?

Written By: - Date published: 1:35 pm, April 12th, 2018 - 85 comments
Categories: Abuse of power, colonialism, discrimination, Propaganda, spin - Tags:

Taika Waititi believes that New Zealand is as “racist as fuck” and after listening to Duncan Garner and Mark Richardson on the subject, I am inclined to believe that there are at least some New Zealanders who are as “racist as fuck”.  A look at the Spinoff’s take on this situation provides numerous examples of how racist New Zealanders really are, all while pretending they’re not.

I think it is interesting that during his spiel, Garner attempts to draw attention to what he views as real racism – i.e. “that’s South Africa under apartheid”. In essence he is trying to negate Taika’s opinion that New Zealand is as “racist as fuck”.  Similar comparisons are made between relative and absolute poverty so that people can deny that poverty exists in our own context. In my opinion Garner is doing just that, he is denying racism exists in New Zealand by making comparisons with countries and circumstances that have more extreme and overt forms of racism than our own brand of racism.

Garner goes on to try to normalise racism when he states “If we’re honest with ourselves, we’re all a little bit racist”. What the fuck does that even mean? Does that mean that if we normalise racism by imbuing everyone with this quality, we can then be more overt with our racism or deny that racism is harmful because we’re all “a little bit racist”?

Both Garner and Richardson, while completely discounting Taika’s view point and experiences, both go on to label him. For example, “he’s too extreme, lighten up and change the record”, implying  that Taika is over reacting, and because he voiced his opinion he’s now ‘too extreme’ – or going on and on. I can’t help but feel this is Garner’s message to all Maori, “we’ve heard it all before, time to stop nagging aye”. A complete whitewash of Maori perspectives and experiences. If they’ve heard it all before, then clearly the message isn’t getting through! Of course, and not surprisingly Mark Richardson is less eloquent, using terms like ‘dickhead…nob…clown’ to describe Taika’s description of our racism. Naturally this type of labelling is designed to chastise the wayward native for his comments.

One doesn’t need to go far to see the impact of the systemic racism that plagues this country.  Can anyone believe that we’re still debating whether the indigenous language of this country should be compulsory in schools?   Or that teaching children about the land wars is up to individual schools?

Is New Zealand as racist as fuck? I believe it is, and I believe evidence of this can be gained by listening to the diatribe of people like Duncan Garner and Mark Richardson, reading comment sections in MSM and the negative statistic that plague Maori and other minority groups in New Zealand.  New Zealand’s racism is evident when Maori are constantly treated like the ‘other’ and Maori culture and language is viewed as an ‘add on’ rather than a normal part of our lives, for example Maori language week when schools, government departments businesses and NGOs, etc all decide to pay homage to tick their Tiriti cultural box.  So yes, I agree with Taika Waititi, New Zealand is as “racist as fuck”!

85 comments on “Is New Zealand really as ‘racist as fuck’?”

  1. David Mac 1

    There is a degree of Richardson like jaw flapping ‘Some of my best mates are Maoris’ racist stylings but I think they’re part of a shrinking group.

    I think we have some insidious deep seated racist paradigms that feed the chooks like Richo.

    The crown is you and me, it is all of us. Our beaches, libraries schools, hospitals and police force. The bits of New Zealand that stay put when we have a government change. Each and every Maori is as much a part of the modern NZ crown as I am.

    Treaty settlements aren’t white people handing money to brown people. It’s us deciding we need to do this for us. Brother to brother.

    I think Kelvin Davis establishing a ministerial role in Crown vs Maori matters is fueling the insidious us vs them paradigms I speak of. I feel there should only be us and just as in any family, each of us has differing needs and dreams.

    • Koreropono 1.1

      So what are you suggesting? That we get on with being ‘one people’?

      • Michelle 1.1.1

        We will never be one people and we never were. And why should we . I find too many NZders to be uneducated and hypocritical in this area they talk a lot about letting more foreigners into our country saying diversity is a good thing we should celebrate it but when it comes to anything Maori for example language and cultural beliefs too many kiwis tramp on it but they are quick to embrace other foreigners culture and language.

    • patricia bremner 1.2

      David Mac that is asking Maori and Kelvin Davis to think as you do …crown and all!!
      Kelvin has kept his culture, done well in ours, and far from creating a divide he is a bridge between the cultures in how they interact.

      How well have you adapted to Maori culture and language? I know Kelvin leaves me in the dust LOL LOL I understand quite a lot of spoken Maori, but speaking? Not so good.

    • koreropono 1.3

      Tena koe David Mac, what is the “insidious us vs them paradigm” that you speak of? And can you please explain how is the ministerial role of Crown/Māori Relations a problem?

      And when you say there should only be ‘us’, which part of ‘us’ do you think we should encourage and keep and which part of ‘us’ should we discard because it’s too contentious?

      • David Mac 1.3.1

        Hi Korero, I see the Crown/Maori relations thing as a problem because I feel they are one and the same. When Queen Victoria was calling the shots from Great Britain, I get it.

        These days Maori are a crucial and systemic component of ‘The Crown.’ We couldn’t do without them. These days the Crown is a Maori nurse, policewoman and teacher.

        I think the minister for Maori/Crown relations should be the Minister for NZ family disputes.

        • koreropono 1.3.1.1

          Interesting thinking, so do you think that the partnership aspect of te Tiriti, should be removed, because according to te Tiriti, the crown and Maori are two distinct entities. Yet, if the partnership guarantee in te Tiriti is breached by the crown, what recourse do Maori have? Maori are not the crown and vice versa, to think otherwise is a bit like promoting assimilation and colonialism in my view. There is not an equal relationship between Maori and the Crown. It is a pity that statistically speaking the Maori nurse, policewoman or teacher you speak of are vastly and disproportionately under represented, so even that analogy is flawed.

          • David Mac 1.3.1.1.1

            The treaty is a deal between Maori and the British Crown.

            We are no longer a British colony and the term ‘The Crown’ has evolved to imply the parts of New Zealand that belong to all of us. It is my personal opinion that this Maori vs The Crown thing is ill founded and divisive. Any taxpayer is a part of what we now refer to as the Crown.

            I’m not suggesting that there shouldn’t be avenues for folk to air their individual or collective concerns, far from it.

            • koreropono 1.3.1.1.1.1

              It is just as well Maori have a document called te Tiriti o Waitangi that shows that Maori are distinct from the crown (or what ever else interpretation you want to put on it) and that document shows that Maori did not cede their sovereignty (like many Tauiwi like to believe they did) to the crown (or any other entity you choose to make up). Te Tiriti has not been honoured and the numerous legislative tools used by the crown to annihilate Maori, on every level, all require redress, we know that the available redress is minuscule in comparison to the harm caused to Maori. That harm is ongoing through systemic racism and has caused inter generational trauma. As colonisation and Tiriti breaches are ongoing, there needs to be a point these issues are rectified to stop the ongoing abuses. It is not a “Maori vs the Crown thing”, that is your assumption, your interpretation. This is really about finding ways to ensure te Tiriti is honoured and that Maori enjoy the Tino rangatiratanga promised them. This is about recovering their economic base and healing from the trauma inflicted. If having a minister for Crown/Maori relationships, is in some small part recognition and steps toward honouring the partnership promised then what is the problem with that? It is only divisive for you because of how you perceive and interpret it, and I suggest that your perception lacks any real understanding of te Tiriti, its history and the historical and current impact of colonisation and institutional racism on the Tangata Whenua.

            • Michelle 1.3.1.1.1.2

              We are no longer a british colony but we fly the union jack we bend over backwards for the English royals and we just got back from the commonwealth games. And I noticed the national government have just said we should and need to stand by our allies.
              I find david macs view to be a typical pakeha view another common view is we didn’t sign the TOW so why should we pay for something that happened 150 odd years ago. Well how do you think the crown got most of the maori peoples land. It was through the pen (legislation) cause they couldn’t defeat our people in war so they passed laws so they could confiscate it. Don’t we still use English common law in our country and if we go back before we go forward we will see what race of people benefitted the most in this country who got the most from the welfare state for example who got the jobs, who got the best houses. And the businesses were also racist I’m talking about the banks that’s why we had to get maori affairs homes the banks wouldn’t lend to many of our people and they couldn’t get money to buy homes for their families.
              The same reason why we still need maori services today because our people were being willfully neglected by mainstream services and they still are.

  2. JohnSelway 2

    In my experience* NZ has kinda felt less racist and more blind to its racial sensitivities.
    In general people might say and do things without thinking about the consequences but will admit “Hey, that could be construed as kind of racist” if they were sat down to think about it.
    I guess what I am saying as instead of being implicitly racist we are just kind of a bit stupid about it at times.

    *Other users experiences may vary. Consult own experiences for further information

    • David Mac 2.1

      I think you’re right John, trying hard to not be misunderstood as racist seems to open my mouth up wide enough for my foot.

      Fortunately it’s where our hearts are at that counts.

      • koreropono 2.1.1

        My heart embraces a truly non racist society and some times I feel the need to kinda educate people who don’t understand the more covert forms of racism that Maori experience everyday, whether they like it or not…racism kinda sucks.

    • koreropono 2.2

      JohnSelway, in my experience NZ has kinda felt more racist, or perhaps my growing education helps me to understand the more insidious forms of racism that Maori experience everyday. It is sad that being “kind of a bit stupid” is used as an excuse for accidental racism. It’s kinda like being accidentally sexist, or accidentally violent, or kinda misogynistic, but not really you know, cause apparently “we’re all a bit racist” and if it is kinda accidental racism then it is kinda okay.

      • JanM 2.2.1

        +100%

      • JohnSelway 2.2.2

        *Other users experiences may vary. Consult own experiences for further information

        • koreropono 2.2.2.1

          JohnSelway that’s kind of a cop out and it is a “kind of bit stupid” to ignore accidental racism and say it is kind of okay cause it was kind of accidental cause we are kind of a bit stupid, but hey that’s my experience thus far.

          • JohnSelway 2.2.2.1.1

            I didn’t say it was OK – I only meant I very really see it as malicious and accidental insensitivey which would be probably make the person who did so embarrassed with themselves if made aware what it was they’d done.

            I didn’t say it was OK and individual results may vary

    • reason 2.3

      The thing with racism, is it does not have “users” John Selway …. it has recipients and perpetrators.

      Those who are the Victims of it ….and those who Benefit from it.

      Nationals recent past behavior has been to try and stoke the racism in NZ …. for cynical political ends …. ie, the iwi / Kiwi electioneering attack on Helen Clarke.

      “I’ll use three striking examples of propaganda from the book. The first, and the whole reason I got going in the first place, was the National Party leader Don Brash’s first major speech, which was the 2004 Orewa Rotary Club speech on so-called ‘race-based privilege’. In Chapter 5 of my book, you can read the strategy discussions that led up to that speech, which had nothing to do with the supposedly urgent issues of race relations and everything to do with trying to score a poll lift for the recently elected leader.” http://www.nickyhager.info/propaganda-then-and-now-notes-of-a-lecture-at-auckland-museum-on-wednesday-2-may-2007/

      The other thing with racism …. is it brings all the other bigotry, discriminations and defects of our mental social psyche along with it….

      eg , prejudice against young people … religious intolerance … contempt for the poor etc.

      New Zealand is racist …. just not as ‘ exceptional’ as some.

  3. Booker 3

    Newshub isn’t exactly my go-to source for news but I thought this commentary by Kanoa Lloyd was on the money: http://www.newshub.co.nz/home/entertainment/2018/04/kanoa-lloyd-taika-waititi-isn-t-sabotaging-new-zealand-he-s-trying-to-help-fix-it.html

    • bwaghorn 3.1

      The problem I had with Kanoas take is she basically said that only whites a racist which is bus.
      Taika s thing about place names is the sort of stuff that turns off people . kiwis of every colour mash words from other races languages.
      Having said that yes there is a shit of racism but each generation seems to be more colour blind . probably because of the Taikas of the world and globalization

      • McFlock 3.1.1

        I took it as that if you haven’t experienced racism in NZ you’re probably white.

        Other peoples might discriminate against each other, but that requires a power imbalance to be able to do. An imbalance that pakeha are statistically much less likely to be on the wrong side of.

        As for the names thing, Waititi was talking about the refusal to pronounce names correctly, not just inadvertant mispronunciation. Like the freaking uproar over Whanganui, or Radio Hauraki taking ages to figure out its name.

        And as he says, most of the time they can pronounce “camembert” properly…

        • Barfly 3.1.1.1

          So when I was sitting overnight in Wellington Central Railway Station waiting for a bus to Auckland (the local trains didn’t start early enough to get it) and a dozen Mongrel Mob members wandered in and said “FUCK OFF HONKY”

          …am I the racist because I’m white?

          I had other shit like this happen in my youth a number of times being threatened and being physically attacked on occasion SO yeah New Zealand is as racist as fuck…IMHO

          • McFlock 3.1.1.1.1

            Well, if you believe you’ve experienced racism and that NZ is racist as fuck, why do you think this subthread refers to you?

            Lloyd simply pointed out that people indignantly saying that NZ has no racism because they haven’t experienced it are most likely able to say that because they’re in the group that’s usually benefitting from the racism.

            • Barfly 3.1.1.1.1.1

              The subthread is about “white” racism or would you like to pretend it’s not?

              Do you think Taika Waititi was referring to Maori racism towards non Maori (yeah right)

              Benefitting? Yeah stuff you I m old I’m poor my health is “Donald Ducked”
              oh btw I’m white – not seeing many bloody benefits here.

              • McFlock

                The subthread, and post, is about who experiences racism. Not about who perpetrates it.

                Here’s what Lloyd opened up her piece with:

                If you don’t think that New Zealand is a racist country, I’m happy for you. I’m happy that you’ve never had to navigate your way through the world wearing a skin that isn’t white.

                That doesn’t say that only white people can be racists. It says that only white people can live in this country and been oblivious to the racism in it. It doesn’t say that all white people are oblivious. It says that all oblivious people are white.

                And yeah, you take a look at the prison, health, and socioeconomic stats and tell me that most racism isn’t with white people in the position of power.

                But in answer to your concerns: #notallwhitepeople 🙄

                • Barfly

                  “wearing a skin that isn’t white.”

                  ” It says that all oblivious people are white.”

                  So the people who threatened me and attacked me weren’t “oblivious” in your world view?

                  So they were consciously hating on me because I m the wrong skin colour ? Not sure how this is ok is your world.

                  I guess it takes all sorts

                  • McFlock

                    Oh, I’m sure they’d also experienced more than their fair share of racism. Which is probably a significant reason they were in a gang in the first place.

                    And no, it’s not ok. But then neither are your reading comprehension skills, because you’re still responding to shit that nobody actually said or wrote.

                    • Barfly

                      “Is New Zealand really as ‘racist as fuck’? ”

                      That’s the title of the article.

                      “Oh, I’m sure they’d also experienced more than their fair share of racism. Which is probably a significant reason they were in a gang in the first place.”

                      So that makes their racism to me fine and dandy in your view.

                      “And no, it’s not ok. But then neither are your reading comprehension skills, because you’re still responding to shit that nobody actually said or wrote.”

                      So what the title of this article again?

                      It’s pretty obvious (well to me ) that your view is brown = good white = bad. Bit racist isn’t it?

                    • McFlock

                      Indeed the title does ask whether NZ is racist as fuck. You believe it is. So what’s your argument with Waititi and Lloyd again?

                      So that makes their racism to me fine and dandy in your view.

                      Feel free to point out where I wrote that. Somewhere other than your imagination.

                      It’s pretty obvious (well to me ) that your view is brown = good white = bad. Bit racist isn’t it?

                      Am I the one reducing quite a complex and subtle discussion to “brown = good white = bad”?

                      Let’s take it slowly:
                      Racism requires an exercise of power over another person: intimidation, discrimination, denial of service, whatever.

                      Therefore the people most but not exclusively likely to experience racism are those people in groups with the least power. If you have no power to deny service or whatever, you can’t exercise power over others.

                      The flipside being that those who are the least likely to experience racism are the ones most likely to have power in society.

                      None of that precludes people who are slightly higher up the power ladder being racist to people below.

                      Now, if you want to read that as “brown = good white = bad”, go ahead, but I suspect illiteracy would be a bigger problem for you than racism.

                    • Barfly

                      ” But then neither are your reading comprehension skills, ”

                      ” illiteracy would be a bigger problem for you than racism.”

                      You love your insults don’t you?

                      Funnily enough I’ve never been physically assaulted by illiteracy (or literacy for that matter) but I have been threatened and assaulted by racist( I presume- white guy in the wrong place) Maori males

                    • McFlock

                      I like insults more than I like people making up what my “view” is, that’s for darn sure.

                    • mikes

                      “Racism requires an exercise of power over another person”

                      Where does that info come from? You don’t need to be in a majority or in a position of power to be racist

                    • McFlock

                      Really?

                      How can you discriminate against someone if you don’t have the power to discriminate?
                      How can you insult someone if you don’t have the power to speak freely?

                      You show me a case of anyone being racist, anywhere, and I reckon that’s going to be someone in a position of relative power and privilege (at least temporarily). Seriously, I’m having difficulty thinking of any racist act I’ve seen, or heard of, or read of, that doesn’t involve power in some way.

                    • mikes

                      “Really?”

                      Yes really. There’s no modifier that I can find in any definition of racism which requires a power imbalance. Anybody can be racist.

                    • McFlock

                      Should be pretty simple to give an example then.

                  • reason

                    Barfly … the amount of violence in a society reflects the amount of anger.

                    Happy people are not usually violent.

                    Anger, just like gang numbers are a symptom … a symptom of whats happened / happening to people in our society.

                    Whats your emotional response if you think your being treated unfairly or looked down upon … honestly? …

        • bwaghorn 3.1.1.2

          i’ve experienced a bit of it and i’m white and i’ve known one or two maori chaps who say shit things about indian and asian people , i sorry but maori don’t get the high ground on this ,
          i supported the h in whanganui but you do realise in the local maori speech in whanganui the wh is not spoken as a f sound

          • McFlock 3.1.1.2.1

            Literally nobody said Maori have the high ground.

            The only contentious thing people said seems to be that if you haven’t experienced or observed racism in NZ, your skin tone is relatively pale.

            Which is simply another way of saying that pretty much all non-white people in NZ have experienced racism, but some white people think racism doesn’t exist in NZ because they haven’t experienced it themselves.

            • Macdougall 3.1.1.2.1.1

              I totally agree with you McFlock. Kiwis are very uncomfortable with the notion that they are racist. You can’t fix a problem if you don’t acknowledge the problem in the first place. The cartoon above that was published in the mainstream NZ media is a good example. While Australia has its share of rednecks in the suburbs there is no way that cartoon would have been published in Australia. Instituitions and government agencies are 20-30 years ahead of NZ on this issue. Now, I know this must seem incredulous to a lot of Kiwis but it’s true. The Aboriginal flag is flown from public buildings every day. Imagine for a second if it was suggested that the Tino Rangatiratanga flag be flown alongside the NZ flag from all public buildings in NZ. I suspect the reaction would be similar to the suggestion that te Reo be compulsorily taught in all primary schools. Why are Kiwis happy to embrace singing their national anthem in te Reo but don’t want the language taught in schools? Why do Pakeha New Zealanders expect Maori to learn English but they don’t want to learn te Reo? Just sayin.

      • mauī 3.1.2

        Let’s say you were mistakenly called by the name “cwighorn” at least once everyday by someone. If you know that’s not how your name is said, you would probably get pissed off about having to constantly correct people all the time, or you might just resign yourself that noone could get your name right and go along with it. The disappointment would hang around nonetheless. Maybe some Māori feel something similar everyday too?

        • bwaghorn 3.1.2.1

          i’ve met fallas who have definataly given up trying to get us whites to get there name right and either mumble it or shorten it or take a white name , it’s a shame .
          to them i say be proud of your name say it clearly and fukim if they cant be bothered its there problem not yours

    • bwaghorn 3.2

      The problem I had with Kanoas take is she basically said that only whites a racist which is bs.
      Taika s thing about place names is the sort of stuff that turns off people . kiwis of every colour mash words from other races languages.
      Having said that yes there is a shit of racism but each generation seems to be more colour blind . probably because of the Taikas of the world and globalization

      • koreropono 3.2.1

        bwagon I think Taika’s comment is taken too literally, that was just one example that people are clinging to so they can down grade Taika’s point. He also said “[t]here’s still profiling when it comes to Polynesians. It’s not even a colour thing – like, ‘Oh, there’s a black person.’ It’s, ‘If you’re Poly then you’re getting profiled”

        However, given NZ/Aotearoa is founded on a bicultural partnership between Tauiwi and Maori, I would have thought it important that we speak the language properly after 168 years in that partnership but hey who am I to insist that we try to push the issue, especially given all the English language training I got in school, whilst te reo Maori was ignored. I am sorry that ‘sort of stuff…turns people off’, I just don’t understand why or what it turns them off from?

        • bwaghorn 3.2.1.1

          do you insist on maori speaking the queens english ? the maori chaps i’ve worked with in farm and forestry sure don’t , doesn’t bother me one bit .
          the point i’m trying to make is fight the battles that truly matter , like profiling ,
          instead of nit picking about us lip lazy honkies

          • Korero Pono 3.2.1.1.1

            You assume this thread is just about language, it’s not. Racism in all its forms needs addressed, not just profiling or language. Language however is a large component, along with teaching the history of te Tiriti and the subsequent mechanisms used to assimilate Maori and take their land. If those things are taught, there would be less animosity directed at Maori when it comes to settlements and improve Tauiwi understanding of the foundations of systemic racism in Aotearoa. Being a ‘lip lazy’ honky is your descriptor, not mine, and speaks more about your mentality than anything else.

            • bwaghorn 3.2.1.1.1.1

              i agree there is animosity around the treaty but you must realise that if most kiwis on some level didn’t understand that the settlements have been both right and needed then they would not have happened in a democratic country.

              also keep in mind i didn’t sign a treaty some long dead fallas did , but i’m willing to let it be even though it was deeply flawed because it had two versions.

  4. SPC 4

    I’ll reference a Behavioural Science Unit of the FBI worldwide study back in the 1980’s – where they noted a connection between (higher levels of) crime and ethnic identity where this was of an underclass. And add that where ethnic identity is associated with being of an underclass there will be a “race” profiling issue (whether amongst individuals or institutions).

    This speaks to identity and group association and impacts on the community (separation by class/property value in location) and party politics of the nation.

  5. JanM 5

    Yes (in answer to Booker) – Kanoa’s contribution is great, isn’t it- thank goodness we do have the odd intelligent journalist/presenter in our country.
    And as for the rot spouted by the likes of Garner and Richardson – that’s what you get when you give semi-educated twerps jobs like they have in the belief that they will appeal to ‘the average bloke’. On that basis, we most certainly are not only racist but ignorant as well!

    • tc 5.1

      Sad thing is they do appeal to many kiwis because of that casual blokey racism.

      On the few occasions I catch Richardson on TGGW he’s doing an A grade job at low brow rants pitched at his target audience with whoever co-hosts providing faux concern.

      It’s all about ratings not respect in an evironment with SFA standards being enforced.

      • JanM 5.1.1

        The worst of it is that this reinforces ignorant prejudices – I can’t quite come to grips somehow that we actually pay people vast sums to talk ill-informed tripe which is the knowledge equivalent of Coca Cola and MacDonalds – it actually does harm.

  6. Stunned Mullet 6

    Define ‘fuck’

  7. trey 7

    Ae, I tautoko Taika and your good self

  8. jimekus 8

    One man’s history is another man’s lie

  9. Stuart Munro 9

    These things are relative. As cultures go NZ is relatively permeable. I imagine a few folk think that if mispronunciation of place names is Taika’s go to example it’s not that big an issue.

    I’m more concerned by differences in mortality or incarceration rates that demonstrate significant systemic unfairness – as recently as 1980 male Maori life expectancy was 50, and although that has improved it’s still nothing to boast of.

    That said, broad brush accusations of racism may generate more heat than light – specifics on the other hand can be addressed. Racism will always be with us – the harm that springs from it can be minimized however.

    Stove makes a lot of sense on it https://archive.org/details/RacialAndOtherAntagonisms

  10. Ed 10

    I really try to ignore Garner and Richardson.
    Vile people whose job it is to foster hatred and division.

  11. timeforacupoftea 11

    I have only heard racism in Dunedin against Pom’s.
    Pretty good for 65 years.
    My kids ( I Must ask them now 30y+) have never said anything to me that they have heard racists comments.
    Maybe if comments on race were said it went in one ear and out the other.

    I had one Chinese and one Maori kid in my class through 1950’s 1960’s and I never thought they were any different to me, who is parts of many races.

    Is this mainly a North Island problem ?
    Whats with people who race profile ?
    Are racists just very bad people or are they sex pests as well.
    We know the prisons have a high percentage of mental problems, I can only imagine that the prison population would lash out on most of these unhealthy problems.

    However I have seen heaps of bulling.

    • JanM 11.1

      It is definitely more of an issue in the north. When I was a student in the 60s I was standing on a cab rank in K Rd one evening. The taxi driver (Maori) insisted I come with the ride he was picking up because he didn’t feel comfortable leaving me on my own at night. After he had dropped off his fare he told me he was swapping over to his own taxi – did I mind – no – so we went to his place, I helped do the paper work and off we went to where I was staying. As he drove he expressed the opinion that I couldn’t possibly be a North Islander because I wouldn’t have trusted him as a Maori. I was seriously shocked – and he was right – I came from Dunedin!

  12. Chuck 12

    “I just don’t understand why or what it turns them off from?”

    koreropono of course, te reo is important to you and many others, however like most things in life whats important to someone may not be to another.

    Over time as generations come and go, we may have the majority of NZ’ers speaking te reo.

    As an example in my extended family about half identify as Maori. None can speak fluent to reo, nor do they have a desire to do so.

    • koreropono 12.1

      Kia ora chuck, yes te reo is important to me and many others, and I agree like most things in life what’s important to someone may not be to another…you know like English, which is compulsory in schools, clearly some people view English as more important than te reo. Despite a Tiriti partnership, it is clear that some things are deemed more important than others, Maori is the ‘add on’ the extra, whilst English is the compulsory.

      As an example, in my extended family about half identify as pakeha or tauiwi, none speak fluent English, nor do they have a desire to do so. Yet they are forced to!

      • Chuck 12.1.1

        “As an example, in my extended family about half identify as pakeha or tauiwi, none speak fluent English, nor do they have a desire to do so. Yet they are forced to!”

        Good point koreropono! about being forced to speak English.

        When I was at school I never took the opportunity to learn other languages, and yes te reo was one of the languages offered when I was in school (early 1980’s). I regret not taking the opportunity.

      • red-blooded 12.1.2

        Actually, koreropono, English isn’t compulsory in school – either English or Māori is compulsory until the end of Y11. That’s been the situation for some 20+ years, brought about by the kura kaupapa movement and other strides in Māori medium education.

        I agree that NZ is a racist society. We’re just starting to get over the idea that Māoritangi is “other” and that ordinary people are white, everyone else is a bit different, not quite like “us”. Explicit racism, like racial insults, is less and less acceptable, but that’s the easy stuff. It’s still true that Māori and Pasifica people die younger, are more likely to go to prison and are less likely to do well in our education system. There’s lots of work going on to try and address each of these issues, but we can’t deny that they are issues and simply labelling them as class issues ignores the fact that having certain racial groups over-represented amongst the disadvantaged is a sure sign of ingrained racism.

        Besides, I think pakeha people lecturing Māori people about what racism is and telling them they’re wrong to think that their lives have been affected by it is like the various men who at different times in my life have tried to explain to me what real feminism is and point out that there’s no real patriarchy operating in NZ.

        How about we do a bit of listening? Maybe a bit of self-examination rather than self-justification?

        • koreropono 12.1.2.1

          Red-blooded, thanks for your information. However, when you say “Either English or Māori is compulsory until the end of Y11” I assume you mean Māori is compulsory in full immersion kura kaupapa schools?

          I am not sure which of your comments are aimed at me specifically or generally aimed at others on this thread. Perhaps you could clarify so I do not jump to conclusions and I can answer to comments that are aimed specifically at me.

    • timeforacupoftea 12.2

      In our family we have a tiny bit of Maori and none of us speak Maori.
      None of our family long for our past but prefer the future.

      Speaking for myself most Maori and English words I make a hash of.
      I was useless at English not great at spelling and just say what I see in a word.
      Yep ! I get heaps but really its ( their there ) problem not mine.

      Everyone for themselves though, what ever floats your boat.

  13. SPC 13

    The example of New Zealand Pakeha not pronouncing Maori names accurately has to be, in part, a joke about our inability to pronounce any word with vowels in it properly.

    • Obtrectator 13.1

      ” …. our inability to pronounce any word with vowels in it properly”

      Or consonants either (‘t’ for instance being too often slurred to ‘d’, even by our current and previous Prime Ministers).

      • Anne 13.1.1

        Talking of poor speaking habits by PMs… it’s time somebody told our current PM it is “anything” not “anythink”. I cringe every time I hear her say it.

  14. Gabby 14

    It’s just possible that Taika got asked about glue inhalation because he was a weird little bugger.

  15. R.P McMurphy 15

    In New Zealand Maori are the “other” and perceived to be upholders of subsistence labour norms and therefore an obstruction to the white trash who would prefer to occupy that niche solely by themselves.

  16. mikes 16

    I think NZ, like any country has it’s share of racism. But I reckon we are a lot less racist in our views than many other countries I’ve visited. I posted the stats map linked to below on daily review a few days ago, but that daily review was already a coupla days old so it may have been missed. I think it shows a few interesting things, one of the main ones being that it seems countries who have immigrants from all over the world appear to hold less racist views than those with little immigration, which makes sense really.

    Obviously it’s just one map with a small data set, etc, but interesting nonetheless.

    It shows that NZ, along with Australia, most of the Western democracies and South American countries, are the least racist countries. The most racist are in the middle East, parts of Africa, India, the rest of Asia and Russia

    http://viralscape.com/world-maps/greatest-and-lowest-racial-tolerance-by-country/

  17. Gosman 17

    Nobody has actually defined what “Racist as fuck” means yet.

    Racism exists everywhere but because it does it does not mean everywhere is “racist as fuck”

  18. cleangreen 18

    If you got involved with Maori culture as I did as a white man you would embrace far more sensitivities and goodness in the culture.

    We are very gifted to have Maori as a partner in our lives and should welcome this collective culture as our environment and future is safer just having the strong Maori link to the earth and water being kept far purer than would have been left otherwise without having Maori involvement.

    Regarding Duncan Garner;

    Duncan Garner was this morning on the AM show’ viciously attacking labour’s newly released Energy Policy, while at the same time was seeming to be supporting National’s abysmal past policy again, and not following up with labour’s Phil Twyford asking Judith Collins when will national begin to plan to turn off the oil tap, then when Garner had the chance to drill Collins he failed repeatedly without asking national Judith Collins “when will National stop oil drilling in NZ” – a sorry sight there.

  19. Al 19

    Yeah I also think NZ is a really racist country. The level of racism varies but is omnipresent here. I think racism (much of it covert and ‘swept under the carpet’) has been a major instrument of attempting to maintain Pakeha hegemony and marginalising any divergent cultural perspectives since Pakeha first came to Aotearoa. This is most evident with the Don Brash “we are all one” mantra which suggests that we are all human and just need to get on with it. This, of course, overlooks the massive violence and trauma imposed on indigenous and other cultural minority groups in this country since Pakeha first arrived. The same racism that Maori have endured has also been piled on Pasifika people and more recently Asian people who have settled here. Don’t get me started about the intergenerational trauma that Maori carry today from past abuse which is partially (at least) responsible for many of the negative statistics applied to Maori today. Sure, Dr Brash might suggest we are all one, but is was not Pakeha that had their economic base stolen from under them, then were expected to “just get on with it”!

  20. Xanjo 20

    See if you can finish the children’s rhyme we all learned as kids….
    Eeny, meeny, miney, mo……..

  21. Cold Hard Truth 21

    Take racism and replace it with imperialism and you are probably closer to the bones of what made NZ what it is. Same for Australia, UK, France and others. Just look at whats going on in Syria and the attitude towards nations like China and Russia.

  22. Cinny 22

    Yes it is racist.

    I didn’t realise it was as bad until I lived in the North Island, one of my besties is Samoan, when we would go out clubbing was when I would notice racism or if we were pulled over by the police and she was driving. Or if she came down to the South Island on holiday with me.

    But she taught me a valuable lesson about how it feels.

    One night she suggested that we go clubbing in South Auckland, I must note that I always felt safe with her, we would look after each other, so the thought of going out in South Auckland was not scary knowing my awesome friend would be there. But it’s not until you are the only white girl at the club that you notice how it must feel to be the only brown girl at the club. People stare. It makes one feel super uncomfortable.

    What I have taught my girls is not to describe someone by their skin colour, rather by their hair, eyes, clothes they are wearing, their behaviour etc.

    Love our diverse country, it’s up to us to remove racism, how we teach and show the next generations on how to behave and how not to pigeonhole is paramount.
    For example when referring to the RSE workers in our region, we describe them as happy, smiley etc, because they are (make eye contact with them and they always give you a huge grin), worries what colour they are, it’s their smiles and laughter we see and remember.

    It’s not just racism here, it’s pure ignorance. One time was out with a friend in Blenheim who had recently shaved off her glorious locks, we are walking down the street at night and a car went past, some guys were hollering out the window…. ew you dirty lesbians etc. I guess if you are a chick with short hair in Blenheim you are gay, far out the ignorance is primitive dark ages.

    Time for NZ to grow the fuck up.
    And time for some people (garner, richardson and others) to shut the fuck up.

  23. R.P McMurphy 23

    racism is an objectional norm that is sustained by the fallacy of division. i.e if one person in a race is this then all others of this race are like this.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Week That Was: Another week of major progress
    This week we moved into the second half of 2020 - and our Government delivered another week of big changes and major progress for New Zealanders. Read below for a wrap of the key things moments from the week - from extending paid parental leave, to making major investments in ...
    19 hours ago
  • Green Party opposes RMA fast-track bill that cut corners on environmental safeguards and public cons...
    The Green Party has opposed the COVID-19 Recovery Fast-track Consenting Bill which shortcuts normal consenting processes under the Resource Management Act (RMA), reduces public participation and narrows environmental considerations. ...
    2 days ago
  • Site of new freight hub revealed
    Hon Shane Jones, Minister of Regional Economic Development A regional freight hub for the lower North Island will be built just northeast of Palmerston North, Regional Development Minister Shane Jones has announced. The Government is investing $40 million through the Provincial Growth Fund to designate and buy land and design ...
    2 days ago
  • Greens call for Guaranteed Minimum Income to alleviate skyrocketing debt with MSD
    Green Party Co-leader Marama Davidson is calling for the introduction of a Guaranteed Minimum Income to lift hundreds of thousands of people out of poverty and prevent more families entering into further debt with the Ministry of Social Development.  ...
    2 days ago
  • Winston Peters: Facts matter when taxpayer money is on the line
    There has been renewed focus on New Zealand First acting as a handbrake on the Government after our decision to not support Auckland light rail. We are a handbrake for bad ideas, that is true, but our track record since 2017 has seen New Zealand First constructively also serve as an ...
    2 days ago
  • Bill raising minimum residency requirement for NZ Super passes first reading
    Mark Patterson MP, New Zealand First List MP New Zealand First’s Fair Residency for Superannuation Bill passed its First Reading in Parliament today. The Bill makes a significant change to NZ Super by raising the minimum residency requirement from 10 to 20 years, after age 20. “Currently, a migrant of ...
    2 days ago
  • Harsher penalties for assaults on first responders one step closer
    Darroch Ball MP, Spokesperson for Law and Order A New Zealand First member’s bill in the name of Darroch Ball introducing a six-month minimum prison sentence for assaults on first responders has passed its second reading in Parliament. The new offence of "injuring a first responder or corrections officer with ...
    3 days ago
  • Criminal Cases Review Commission delivers Coalition promise
    Fletcher Tabuteau MP, Deputy Leader of New Zealand First New Zealand First welcomes the launch of the new Criminal Cases Review Commission, gifted with the name from Waikato-Tainui - Te Kāhui Tātari Ture, announced in Hamilton today by Justice Minister Andrew Little. “New Zealand First has long believed in and ...
    3 days ago
  • Greens welcome huge new investment in sustainable projects
    The Green Party is celebrating over $800m in new funding for green projects, which will get people into jobs while solving New Zealand’s long-term challenges. ...
    3 days ago
  • New Zealand First demands answers from Meridian Energy
    Mark Patterson MP, Spokesperson for Primary Industries New Zealand First is appalled that Meridian seems to have been unnecessarily spilling water from its dams to drive up its profits."While New Zealanders have been coming together in some of our darkest hours, we don’t expect power gentailers to waste water and ...
    4 days ago
  • Getting New Zealand moving again: June 2020
    We wrapped up the first half of 2020 with a busy month, taking additional steps to support New Zealanders as we continue with our economic recovery. We rolled out targeted packages to support key industries like tourism and construction, helped create jobs in the environmental and agriculture sectors, and set ...
    4 days ago
  • Māori union leader appointed to Infrastructure Commission board
    Hon Shane Jones, Minister for Infrastructure Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones has welcomed the appointment of Maurice Davis and his deep infrastructure and construction experience to the board of the Infrastructure Commission. Mr Davis (Ngāti Maniapoto), is the seventh and final appointment to the board led by former Reserve Bank Governor ...
    4 days ago
  • Click-bait journalism at its worst
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Leader of New Zealand First New Zealand’s click bait journalism is taking a turn for the worse, with yet another example of sensationalist, wilful-misrepresentation of the facts. “New Zealand First has worked constructively with its Coalition partner on hundreds of pieces of legislation and policy, and ...
    4 days ago
  • Green Party proposes transformational Poverty Action Plan
    The Green Party is today unveiling its Poverty Action Plan, which includes a Guaranteed Minimum Income to ensure people have enough to live with dignity.     ...
    6 days ago
  • PGF accelerates Rotorua projects
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister Fletcher Tabuteau MP, Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development The Rotorua Museum redevelopment and Whakarewarewa and Tokorangi Forest projects will be accelerated thanks to a $2.09 million Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) boost, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher ...
    1 week ago
  • Week That Was: Getting people into jobs
    This week, we rolled out the next steps of our recovery plan, with new infrastructure investment, extra support for tourism operators, and a new programme to get Kiwis into agriculture careers. The global economic consequences of COVID-19 will continue to be a challenge, but we have a detailed plan to ...
    1 week ago
  • Coalition commitment establishing Mental Health Commission delivered
    Jenny Marcroft MP, Spokesperson for Health New Zealand First welcomes the passage of the Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission Bill through its final reading in Parliament today fulfilling a coalition agreement commitment. “This is an important step in saving the lives of New Zealanders and delivers a key coalition commitment ...
    1 week ago
  • Whakatāne gets a $2.5m ‘turbo boost’
    Whakatāne has been given a $2.5 million boost to speed up previously funded projects and create more than 450 jobs in the next decade. Of those, the equivalent of 160 full-time jobs could be delivered in the next six weeks. Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters is in town to make ...
    1 week ago
  • $2.5m PGF funding to speed up economic recovery in Whakatāne
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister Fletcher Tabuteau MP, Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) is investing $2.5 million to accelerate three infrastructure projects in Whakatāne, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. “This package is about ...
    1 week ago
  • Shane Jones calls out those holding drought-stricken Auckland ‘to ransom’ over water
    Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones is throwing his weight behind a bid by the Auckland Council to fast-track the more than doubling of the city's water allowance from the Waikato River. And he's coming out strongly against anyone who plans on getting in the way of this campaign. "It is my ...
    1 week ago
  • Another Green win as climate change considerations inserted into the RMA
    The Green Party is thrilled to see changes to the Resource Management Act (RMA) that mean consents for large projects can be declined if they will have significant climate change implications that are inconsistent with the Zero Carbon Act and Aotearoa New Zealand’s Paris Agreement obligations.  ...
    1 week ago
  • New Navy vessel Aotearoa to arrive in New Zealand
    Hon Ron Mark, Minister of Defence The Royal New Zealand Navy’s new ship, Aotearoa, set sail for New Zealand on 10 June from the Republic of Korea, and is due to arrive in Auckland tomorrow, announced Minister of Defence Ron Mark. “Aotearoa is the Royal New Zealand Navy’s new fleet ...
    1 week ago
  • Racing Industry Bill passes third reading
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister for Racing Racing Minister Winston Peters has today welcomed the Racing Industry Bill passing its third reading, creating the legislative framework for revitalising the racing industry while limiting the need for future government intervention. “For too long our domestic racing industry has ...
    1 week ago
  • Green Party seek amendment to ensure all prisoners can vote
    The Green Party has today put forward an amendment to the Electoral (Registration of Sentenced Prisoners) Amendment Bill to ensure all people in prisons can vote in general elections. ...
    1 week ago
  • Green Party welcomes new approach to delivering light rail
    The Green Party welcomes the decision to not proceed with Public Public Investment (PPI) delivery of Auckland’s light rail project and to instead run the process through the public service. ...
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand First welcomes PGF investment in Wairarapa Water
    Hon Ron Mark, New Zealand First List MP based in the Wairarapa New Zealand First List MP Hon Ron Mark welcomes the announcement of Provincial Growth Funding investment of $1.4 million to help secure the Wairarapa’s water supply. The funding boost will allow the Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC), and ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand First MP Mark Patterson selected as candidate for Taieri
    New Zealand First list MP Mark Patterson has been selected to represent the party in the newly formed Taieri electorate at the upcoming election. Mr Patterson, his wife Jude and two daughters farm sheep and beef at Lawrence and Waitahuna. He previously stood in the Clutha-Southland electorate however boundary changes ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Ground-breaking on NZ Post depot
    Hon Shane Jones, Associate Minister for State Owned Enterprises A new ‘super depot’ to be built for NZ Post in Wellington will create around 350 jobs during construction, Associate Minister for State Owned Enterprises Shane Jones says. Shane Jones today attended a ground-breaking and blessing ceremony for the parcel-processing depot ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Week That Was: Putting our economic plan into action
    Our strong economic management prior to COVID-19 - with surpluses, low debt and near-record-low unemployment - put us in a good position to weather the impact of the virus and start to rebuild our economy much earlier than many other countries. Now we're putting our plan to recover and rebuild ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Fleeing drivers hit new record-high yet again
    Darroch Ball MP, New Zealand First Spokesperson for Law and Order Recently released Police fleeing driver statistics have shown yet another increase in incidents with another record-high in the latest quarter. “This new quarterly record-high is the latest in a string of record-high numbers since 2014.  The data shows incidents ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Fletcher Tabuteau selected as candidate for Rotorua
    New Zealand First MP Fletcher Tabuteau is pleased to be confirmed today as the party’s candidate for the Rotorua electorate. Speaking at the Rotorua AGM for New Zealand First, Mr Tabuteau said this is an election that is incredibly important for the people of Rotorua. “The founding principles of New ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Greens call for Government office to address Rainbow issues following Human Rights Commission report
    The Human Rights Commission’s PRISM report on the issues impacting people based on their sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) provides an excellent programme of work for future governments to follow, say the Greens. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Winston Peters continues push for trans-Tasman travel as military take control of operations
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters said the trans-Tasman bubble had not been jeopardised after a border botch-up resulted in New Zealand having two active cases of COVID-19. On Friday, Mr Peters told RNZ's Morning Report he had heard from Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison that borders for trans-Tasman travel would open by ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Winston Peters on the Government’s Covid-19 border blunder
    Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters said today he was pleased the army was now running the quarantine and isolation process - up until now it has been the Ministry of Health. Peters told Newstalk ZB's Mike Hosking that the army knew how to introduce and follow protocols and instil discipline. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand First’s Ron Mark confirms bid for the Wairarapa seat
    Hon Ron Mark, New Zealand First List MP based in the Wairarapa New Zealand First MP and Minister for Defence and Veteran’s Affairs Ron Mark has confirmed his bid for the Wairarapa seat.“The Coalition Government has done a lot of good work throughout the Wairarapa, but many constituents have told ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand First welcomes second tranche of candidates
    New Zealand First is pleased to release the names of its next tranche of candidates for the 2020 election. We’re proud to announce these hardworking New Zealanders that have put their hand up to fight for a commonsense and resilient future.Jamie Arbuckle – Kaikoura Mark Arneil – Christchurch Central Jackie ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Joint effort under way to repatriate stranded Vanuatu nationals
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Foreign Affairs Hon Ron Mark, Minister of Defence A massive joint effort between New Zealand Government agencies, employers, and the Vanuatu Government is underway to repatriate over 1000 Vanuatu nationals stranded in New Zealand, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters and Defence Minister Ron ...
    2 weeks ago
  • $40m for regional apprenticeships
    Hon Shane Jones, Minister of Regional Economic Development Reprioritised funding of $40 million from the Provincial Growth Fund will support up to 1000 regional apprenticeships, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones said today. The Regional Apprenticeship Initiative is part of the wider Apprenticeship Boost announced by Education Minister Chris Hipkins ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Greens welcome new ACC zero carbon plans, call for ruling out any future fossil fuel investment
    The Green Party welcomes the ACC’s announcement to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050 but emphasises the need to go further, and faster to truly meet the climate change challenge. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Farmers pleased with NZ First amendments to firearms bill
    Farmers are rejoicing after Labour agreed to an amendment pushed by New Zealand First in the firearms bill that will allow the use of restricted guns for pest control.  Concessions on gun control mean farmers will be able to apply for a licence to use restricted firearms for pest control. ...
    2 weeks ago

  • Building a more sustainable construction sector
    A new programme, which sets a firm course for the Building and Construction sector to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, has been announced by the Minister for Building and Construction Jenny Salesa. “A significant amount of New Zealand’s carbon emissions come from the building and construction sector.  If we’re serious ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • PGF funds tourism boost in Northland
    The Provincial Growth Fund is investing more than $7.5 million in Northland ventures to combat the economic impact of the COVID-19 virus, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones have announced. The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) investment is going to the Northern Adventure Experience and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Four new projects announced as part of the biggest ever national school rebuild programme
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Education Minister Chris Hipkins today announced significant funding for Auckland’s Northcote College as part of the first wave of a new nationwide school redevelopment programme to upgrade schools over the next 10 years. The $48.5 million project brings the total investment in Northcote College to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • COVID-19: Support to improve student attendance and wellbeing
    The Government has opened an urgent response fund to support schools and early learning services to get children and young people back on track after the Covid-19 lockdown. “While we are seeing improvements in attendance under Alert Level 1 Ministry of Education data shows that attendance rates in our schools ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Fast-track consenting law boosts jobs and economic recovery
    The law to boost the economic recovery from the impact of COVID-19 by speeding up resource consenting on selected projects has passed its second and third readings in the House today. “Accelerating nationwide projects and activities by government, iwi and the private sector will help deliver faster economic recovery and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Whanganui Port gets PGF boost
    Five port-related projects in Whanganui will receive a $26.75 million Provincial Growth Fund investment to support local economic recovery and create new opportunities for growth, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. “This is a significant investment that will support the redevelopment of the Whanganui Port, a project governed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • More support for Sarjeant Gallery
    Whanganui’s Sarjeant Gallery will receive an investment of up to $12 million administered by the Provincial Growth Fund to support its redevelopment, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. The project is included in a $3 billion infrastructure pipeline announced by Finance Minister Grant Robertson and Shane Jones yesterday. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Funding for training and upskilling
    The Provincial Growth Fund is investing nearly $2.5 million into three Te Ara Mahi programmes to support Manawatū-Whanganui jobseekers and employees to quickly train and upskill, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. “Up to 154 local people will be supported into employment within the first year by these ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Statement from the Minister of Health Dr David Clark
      This morning I have formally tendered my resignation as Minister of Health, which was accepted by the Prime Minister. Serving as Minister of Health has been an absolute privilege – particularly through these extraordinary last few months. It’s no secret that Health is a challenging portfolio. I have given ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Scholarship placements for agricultural emissions scientists doubles
    Scholarships for 57 early-career agricultural emissions scientists from 20 developing countries is another example of New Zealand’s international leadership in primary sector sustainability, says Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. Mr O’Connor, announcing the scholarships today, says hundreds of applications were received for this fourth round of the CLIFF-GRADS programme (Climate, Food ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Funding for Foxton regeneration
    A project to help rejuvenate the Horowhenua town of Foxton will receive a Provincial Growth Fund investment of $3.86 million, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. “This funding for the Foxton Regeneration project will be used to make the well-known holiday town even more attractive for visitors and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Plan to improve protection of moa bones
    Moa bones and other sub-fossil remains of extinct species are set to have improved protection with proposals to prevent the trade in extinct species announced the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage today. “We have lost too many of our native species, but these lost species, such as moa, remain an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Free lunches served up to thousands of school children in the South Island
    The Government’s free and healthy school lunches programme moves south for the first time creating jobs for around 30 people in Otago and Southland. “Eighteen schools with 3000 students are joining the programme – 11 have already begun serving lunches, and seven are preparing to start during Term 3. This is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Screen Sector recovery package protects jobs, boosts investment
    Thousands of Kiwi jobs and investment in New Zealand productions will be protected through a screen sector support package announced today by Associate Minister for Arts Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni, Minister for Economic Development Phil Twyford and Minister for Broadcasting Kris Faafoi. The package also includes investment in broadcasting ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New fund to help save local events and jobs
    The Government has established a new $10 million fund for the domestic events sector to help save jobs and protect incomes as it recovers from the impacts of COVID-19, Minister of Economic Development Phil Twyford announced today. This funding from Budget 2020 follows talks with the event sector designed to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Bill to improve fuel market competition
    The Government has taken another step in its commitment to making sure New Zealanders get a fairer deal at the petrol pump with the introduction of legislation to improve competition in the retail fuel market, says Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods. “The fuel market study that this Government ordered ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Zealand joins global facility for pre-purchase of COVID-19 Vaccine
    New Zealand has joined a global initiative that aims to enable all countries to access a safe and effective Covid-19 vaccine, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters announced today. The COVAX Facility was recently launched by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. The Alliance includes the World Health Organization, UNICEF, the World Bank ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Right to legal representation in Family Court restored today
    From today new legislation takes effect to both restore the right to legal representation at the start of a Care of Children (CoCA) dispute in the Family Court, and allow parties to those proceedings to access legal aid where eligible. During a visit to the Family Court in Auckland today, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Transitioning to a fully-qualified home-based ECE workforce
    Home-based early childhood education (ECE) subsidised by the government will transition to a fully qualified workforce by 2025 to ensure better and more consistent quality, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. “Quality early learning helps provide children with a strong foundation for their future,” Chris Hipkins said. From 1 January ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Criminal Cases Review Commission gets to work
    The new Criminal Cases Review Commission | Te Kāhui Tātari Ture (CCRC) has started work and can now independently investigate claimed miscarriages of justice. “Even though we have appeal rights and safeguards against unsafe convictions, from time to time our justice system does get things wrong. The design of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Speech by the Minister of Defence to the New Zealand Institute of International Affairs
    E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā karangatanga maha, tēnā koutou Ki a koutou Te Āti Awa, Taranaki Whānui, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, ngā mana whenua o te rohe nei, tēnā koutou Ko Te Whare Wānanga o Aotearoa ki ngā take o te Ao (NZIIA), Ko te Rōpū Tohu Tono ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Six months with baby and $20 more a week for new parents
    The Government’s increase to paid parental leave kicks in today with another 4 weeks taking New Zealand up to a full 6 months (26 weeks, up from 22 weeks) leave for new parents, and the maximum weekly payment will increase by $20pw, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Iain Lees-Galloway says. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Infrastructure investment to create jobs, kick-start COVID rebuild
    A new package of infrastructure investments will help kick-start the post-COVID rebuild by creating more than 20,000 jobs and unlocking more than $5 billion of projects up and down New Zealand. Finance Minister Grant Robertson and Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones today outlined how the $3 billion infrastructure fund in the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Statement on passage of national security law for Hong Kong
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters today expressed the New Zealand Government’s deep disappointment at the passage by China’s National People’s Congress Standing Committee of a national security law for Hong Kong. “New Zealand has consistently emphasised its serious concern about the imposition of this legislation on Hong Kong without inclusive ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • July 1 marks progress for workers, families
    More jobs and more family time with newborns are the centrepiece of a suite of Government initiatives coming into effect today. July 1 is a milestone day for the Government as a host of key policies take effect, demonstrating the critical areas where progress has been made. “The Coalition Government ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Auckland water consent referred to Board of Inquiry
    Environment Minister David Parker has today “called in” Auckland’s application to the Waikato Regional Council to take an extra 200 million litres of water a day from the lower reaches of the Waikato River for Auckland drinking water and other municipal uses.  The call-in means the application has been referred ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New Zealand to host virtual APEC in 2021
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters and Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker announced today that New Zealand’s hosting of APEC in 2021 will go ahead using virtual digital platforms. Mr Peters said the global disruption caused by COVID-19, including resultant border restrictions, had been the major factor in the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Matakana Link Road construction kicks off and drives jobs
    The start of construction on a new link road between Matakana Road and State Highway 1 will create jobs and support the significant population growth expected in the Warkworth area, Transport Minister Phil Twyford and Mayor Phil Goff announced today. Transport Minister Phil Twyford said construction of the Matakana Link ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • PPE supplies secured as COVID-19 response focuses on border
    The Government is prioritising its latest investment in PPE for frontline health workers, including staff at managed isolation and quarantine facilities, Health Minister David Clark says. “With no community transmission of COVID-19 our response now has a firm focus on keeping our border safe and secure. “We must ensure that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • PGF funding for Parihaka settlement
    The Parihaka Papakāinga Trust in Taranaki will receive up to $14 million for a new visitor centre and other improvements at the historic settlement that will boost the local economy and provide much-needed jobs, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones and Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little have ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Protections for workers in triangular employment
    Protections for workers who are employees of one employer but working under the direction of another business or organisation have come into force, closing a gap in legislation that  made the personal grievance process inaccessible for some workers, says Workplace Relations Minister Iain Lees-Galloway. “This Government is working hard to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government strengthens managed isolation system
    A range of improvements are already underway to address issues identified in the rapid review of the Managed Isolation and Quarantine system released today, Housing Minister Megan Woods said. The review was commissioned just over a week ago to identify and understand current and emerging risks to ensure the end-to-end ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Whakatāne to go predator free with Government backing Ngāti Awa led efforts
    The important brown kiwi habitat around Whakatāne will receive added protection through an Iwi-led predator free project announced by Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage and Under Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau. “The Government is investing nearly $5 million into Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Awa’s environmental projects with $2.5 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Growing Goodwood: Expanding wood waste recycling plant in Bay of Plenty, Waikato
    An extra 4,000 tonnes of offcuts and scraps of untreated wood per year will soon be able to be recycled into useful products such as horticultural and garden mulch, playground safety surfacing and animal bedding as a result of a $660,000 investment from the Waste Minimisation Fund, Associate Environment Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Scott Watson’s convictions to be referred to Court of Appeal
    The Governor-General has referred Scott Watson’s convictions for murder back to the Court of Appeal, Justice Minister Andrew Little announced today. Mr Watson was convicted in 1999 of the murders of Ben Smart and Olivia Hope. His appeal to the Court of Appeal in 2000 was unsuccessful, as was his ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Protecting Kiwis with stronger financial supervision
    A new five-year funding agreement for the Reserve Bank will mean it can boost its work to protect New Zealanders’ finances, Finance Minister Grant Robertson says. “New Zealand has a strong and stable financial system. Financial stability is an area that we are not prepared to cut corners for, particularly ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Forgotten funds and missing money
    A law change has been introduced to make it easier for forgotten funds in institutional accounts to be returned more easily to their rightful owners. Revenue Minister Stuart Nash has introduced an amendment to the Unclaimed Money Act 1971. It will update the rules controlling forgotten sums of money held ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government delivers on mental health commitment
    The Government is delivering on election commitments and a key recommendation of He Ara Oranga: Report of the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction with the establishment of a permanent independent Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission, Health Minister Dr David Clark says. Legislation enabling the establishment of the fully ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand privacy law modernised
    A Bill to replace New Zealand’s Privacy Act passed its third reading in Parliament today, Justice Minister Andrew Little has announced. “The protections in the Privacy Bill are vitally important. The key purpose of the reforms is to promote and protect people’s privacy and give them confidence that their personal ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Tourism operators provided extra support
    Extra support is being provided to tourism businesses operating on public conservation land announced Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis and Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage today.  The Government is providing $25m worth of support to tourism operators impacted by COVID-19, with a decision to waive most Department of Conservation tourism related concession ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago