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It’s just too expensive to act on climate change

Written By: - Date published: 1:30 pm, June 15th, 2015 - 187 comments
Categories: climate change, global warming - Tags: , ,

Hope folk are staying away from the Wellington coastline today:

Huge waves smash Wellington rubberneckers amid fears for coastal roads’ survival

… More than 3m swells are forecast to continue to hit the Lyall Bay after large waves washed debris and boulders onto Moa Point Rd yesterday. … The capital’s mayor, Celia Wade-Brown, told Fairfax Media this morning that Wellington’s south coast roads were under increasing threat of large swells because of global warming.

She said while the roads were not at risk of rapid erosion in the next five to 10 years, it could occur if a plan was not implemented to protect the coast.

Meanwhile internationally:

Our rivers are drying up

The Asia-Pacific Greens Federation met in New Zealand for the first time at the weekend, bringing together politicians from 16 countries to discuss the impacts of climate change. Board member Suresh Nautiyal, from India, told the conference in Wellington he came from one of the most fragile parts of the world, the Himalayas, and climate change was having a profound impact. “Our rivers are drying up, our glaciers are melting, and the indigenous mountain people have virtually stopped growing the harvest,” he said.

Read on for accounts from other countries.

National argue that it’s just too expensive to take action on our greenhouse gas emissions. Except that it isn’t:

187 comments on “It’s just too expensive to act on climate change”

  1. weka 1

    And down south, the Mayor of one of NZ’s major cities says that they may have to relocate 10,000 people due to climate change. Dunedin’s been fighting a losing battle against the ocean waves and tide for a while in South Dunedin, but now they’re acknowledging the whole thing: high water table, low lying land, severe weather events that outstrip drainage infrastructure, rising sea levels etc. This will be a bit wake up call for many, and will raise multiple issues around relocation, planning and legislation, insurance, people’s loss of owned homes and how they can afford to move etc. Hopefully this will put the urgent need to address emissions right in people’s faces too.

    A watershed moment for NZ (if you will excuse the pun).

    http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/345701/city-face-end-game-lowlands

    • One Anonymous Bloke 1.1

      No doubt democracy will have to be suspended while the market works out the best solution.

    • dukeofurl 1.2

      Dunedin had a 1 in 100yr rainfall ( 24 hr period), of course its going to overwhelm the drainage which is normally designed for 1 in 20 year rainfall.

      “The area might be one of New Zealand’s oldest suburbs, but it can’t escape its past as a ”reclaimed swamp”, Mr Cull said”

      Says it all really. Swamp – Rain -Flood. This is a lot of places in NZ over winter. Large parts of South Auckland- Takanini- Papakura are former swamps too. They too have a water table just inches below ground level in Winter.

      My topo map gives some streets around Tainui Dunedin at about 2m above SL. The Dutch would give anything be be 2m ABOVE SL.

      • weka 1.2.1

        🙄

      • Colonial Rawshark 1.2.2

        Dunedin had a 1 in 100yr rainfall ( 24 hr period), of course its going to overwhelm the drainage which is normally designed for 1 in 20 year rainfall

        So genius, when is the next 1 in 200yr rainfall due?

        And why do you believe the words of people who have not even lived for a hundred years – how would they know what a “1 in 100yr rainfall” even was?

        • dukeofurl 1.2.2.1

          Sorry if I get too sciency, as thats obvious proof according to you that Im a witch.

          The rainfall records are clear its a 1 in 100 year event. When was Dunedin founded, surely you know it was 1848. Even without 100 years of records its possible to create a reasonable rainfall probability chart. Its called maths!

          But wait its even more sciencey than that, as its not really only ‘once’ every 100 years, its instead that probability in any one year is 1% is that the rainfall will be exceeded that amount. So you could have 1 in 100 years storms 5 years apart.
          Doesnt change anything.

          • Pat 1.2.2.1.1

            hope those analysing those statistics wernt schooled by the same statisticians in ChCh who labelled the flooding there a year or so ago a “1 in !00 year rainfall” event when the the rain gauge figures showed that to be patently false….still, there are lies,damned lies and spokespeople.

          • One Anonymous Bloke 1.2.2.1.2

            Well if you’re going to bring odds into the equation…

            This from NASA:

            Practical effects of increasingly loaded climate dice occur mainly via amplified extremes of Earth’s water cycle.

            Hansen, Sato & Ruedi 2012.

    • Rosie 1.3

      Thats a very sobering article weka. When the local govt is seriously talking about plans to upsticks and all that that will involve it’s a sure sign of our future having arrived.

      • weka 1.3.1

        I think we are here too.

        I was impressed by the ODT writing such a long article and laying out the issues.

  2. weka 2

    “She said while the roads were not at risk of rapid erosion in the next five to 10 years, it could occur if a plan was not implemented to protect the coast.”

    And Dunedin,

    Excelsa raises an interesting point, how Dunedin will “communicate with the rest of New Zealand when it becomes a coastal Island. Dunedin’s only road and rail access is along a coastal corridor at Blueskin Bay and the Taieri Plains which are only a few metres above current sea level”

    Aren’t we lucky we had this flood before the Compass meal delivery service started!

    http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/345701/city-face-end-game-lowlands#comment-72752

  3. Poission 3

    More than 3m swells are forecast to continue to hit the Lyall Bay after large waves washed debris and boulders onto Moa Point Rd yesterday. … The capital’s mayor, Celia Wade-Brown, told Fairfax Media this morning that Wellington’s south coast roads were under increasing threat of large swells because of global warming.

    The event (ie the large swells) have an inverse sign to global warming expectations.

    Southern polar synoptic events are expected to decrease.The event (a polar breakout) of large low pressure systems increased sea level heights to the east with a concomitant flow onto the east coast .

    This tends to occur with a negative excursion of the SAM.

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/daily_ao_index/aao/aao.sprd2.gif

    http://pamola.um.maine.edu/fcst_frames/GFS-025deg/DailySummary/GFS-025deg_NH-SAT5_PMSL.png

    • maui 3.1

      In layman’s terms?

      • dukeofurl 3.1.1

        Wade- Brown is making it up. Large swells from polar low pressure systems are expected to decrease.
        Ms Wade- Brown is confused with the slow sea level rise from AGW.

        Plus with Wellington likely to rise because of tectonic movement ( created the shelfs along coast where roads were built) maybe they will balance out.

        • Colonial Rawshark 3.1.1.1

          ah yes, the hope and pray approach to AGW

          • dukeofurl 3.1.1.1.1

            For people on the exposed southern coast, their position has always been precarious, so they really dont have much choice.

            Better to make improvements in other places and continue to lower greenhouse gases.

            • Colonial Rawshark 3.1.1.1.1.1

              Ah yes, we saw this attitude after the Christchurch earthquakes too: for those Kiwis in the too hard basket, let’s just abandon them and look the other way. What else have you learnt from Tony Blair.

              • dukeofurl

                We can see the SNP has learnt from Tony Blair as they are following his policies, and of course breaking their promises like him too

                • Colonial Rawshark

                  The SNP following Tony Blair’s policies? You’re dreaming mate. Tony Blair would be 100% for Trident and 100% for austerity. Is it tough in Scotland at the moment. You betcha. But that’s what Tory rule and austerity does.

                  • dukeofurl

                    It is tough in Scotland as unemployment is rising while still falling in the rest of UK.

      • Poission 3.1.2

        In layman’s terms?

        AGW =less southerlies.

  4. Clean_power 4

    A very easy way out, but, what natural phenomena cannot be attributed to climate change? Which one?

    These days too much rain orsnow or wind or drought happen because of climate change. What is left: earthquakes?

    • weka 4.1

      Do you think that earthquakes are weather?

    • dukeofurl 4.2

      Too late , the extremists have said it

      ” Professor Bill McGuire of University College London introduced his new book Waking the Giant: How a changing climate triggers earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanoes on the Guardian’s science weekly podcast a few weeks ago, he started with a warning: “It does sound a bit mad, but it isn’t…”

      • Rosie 4.2.1

        And from the RNZ link in Anthony’s post:

        “We’ve had droughts, increased typhon severity and frequency, and the island is very active with lots of dormant volcanoes. The effect of climate change is of course to make the ocean heavier, so that’s causing more earthquakes,” Mr Winkler said.

        -Taiwanese Green Party spokesperson.

        There you go.

        • dukeofurl 4.2.1.1

          Thats a new one , making the ocean heavier. Thats a good laugh.

          Cold water is of course denser.

          • dv 4.2.1.1.1

            Why?

            • dukeofurl 4.2.1.1.1.1

              You do know that cold water is denser ? That the spokesperson for the Taiwan green party is a complete idiot ?

              But back to your question, ever noticed smoke rises up the chimney

              • weka

                At least they believe in the seriousness of AGW and that we should be doing something about it.

              • Draco T Bastard

                Everything I’ve seen so far indicates that you’re the idiot.

              • dv

                ‘Cold water is of course denser.

                SO thus the water is heavier.
                AND more water in the ocean – more weight.

                More weight could trigger fault line movement couldn’t it?

                • dukeofurl

                  Not in the way you are saying . the temperature expands or contracts the waters volume. The weight or mass essentially stays the same.

                  There is a tiny sealevel rise from warming oceans as the seawater expands.

                  The extra water which will increase the total depth of water is too low compared to the average depth of oceans .

                  if this were so , we would see earthquakes triggered by high or low tides ( which are say 1 -3m in a very short time).

                  of course there is no theory that has weight of water affecting earthquakes anyway.

                  • One Anonymous Bloke

                    Hmm, not quite – cf: the Three Gorges Dam and other examples such as Oroville.

                    It would be drawing a long bow to compare them to gradual increase in ocean mass, though.

                    • dukeofurl

                      That is not the new mass of water, its the same process as fracking.

                      The water is forced into the rock through crevasses and acts as a lubricant.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      Reservoir-induced seismicity. Look it up.

              • Colonial Rawshark

                You do know that cold water is denser ? That the spokesperson for the Taiwan green party is a complete idiot ?

                As big an idiot as the head of the ruling party in Australia? It’s really hard to understand what your point is or why you think it is relevant.

          • Draco T Bastard 4.2.1.1.2

            A few years ago some postulated that Greenland losing it’s ice sheet would actually lower the ocean around Britain. The reason why was because of the decreased gravitational effect of the ice upon the water and the decreased weight upon the land would allow it to rise up compared to where it is now.

            Now, if you think that something the size of Greenland rising up a few metres isn’t going to cause earthquakes then I’ve got a bridge to sell you.

            Seal levels rising due to melting ice is going to shift billions, if not trillions, of tonnes of mass around the earth and something is going to give – and it won’t be the water.

            • TheContrarian 4.2.1.1.2.1

              I wonder about the science of that…namely…

              “because of the decreased gravitational effect of the ice upon the water”
              I’m not quite sure what this is supposed to mean but what is the gravitational force of the ice? We’d need to know the mass before speculating on what it’s gravitational effect is

              “the decreased weight upon the land would allow it to rise up compared to where it is now”
              Depends on plate tectonics, is Greenland being pushed up?

              “Now, if you think that something the size of Greenland rising up a few metres isn’t going to cause earthquakes then I’ve got a bridge to sell you.”
              It should already being subject to earthquakes – if it is on a plate boundary it would experience earthquakes with or without ice

              “Seal levels rising due to melting ice is going to shift billions, if not trillions, of tonnes of mass around the earth and something is going to give”
              Would an increase in the mass of the oceans cause increases in earthquakes? If so why?

              Curious about the science of this and if you have further reading I could look at please post em

              • Draco T Bastard

                I’m not quite sure what this is supposed to mean but what is the gravitational force of the ice? We’d need to know the mass before speculating on what it’s gravitational effect is

                Knock yourself out.

                Depends on plate tectonics, is Greenland being pushed up?

                According to the article I read at the time, which I can’t find now, yes. But not necessarily for the reason you think. There’s also some argument on whether Greenland is it’s own plate or just an extension of the North American plate but it does experience earthquakes.

                Would an increase in the mass of the oceans cause increases in earthquakes? If so why?

                Because of plate tectonics and shifting mass around a fluid centre. Has everyone forgotten that the Earth’s Crust is floating on a liquid? Sure, it’s liquid rock and it’s fairly dense and viscous but its still a bloody liquid.

                Curious about the science of this and if you have further reading I could look at please post em

                IIRC, it was something some scientist type had postulated and done some quick sums. He, himself, was surprised by the results but I don’t know if the research has been taken any further but it does, IMO, make some logical sense.

                • TheContrarian

                  “Because of plate tectonics and shifting mass around a fluid centre.”

                  Well yeah, that’s why I asked. Why would the mass of the oceans effect plate tectonics?

                  As to the rest I guess it’ll have to go in the folder labelled “speculative” for now.

                  • One Anonymous Bloke

                    It’s a little more than mere speculation, apparently.

                    These temporal patterns suggest a link to the hydrological cycle and are indicative of a dynamic glacial response to changing climate conditions.

                    • dukeofurl

                      Icequakes are not earthquakes, as the ice is of course constantly moving.
                      The meltwater passes through the ice cracks and can lubricate movement as well as tunnelling through the ice.

                      Glaciers are a complete different story to plate tectonics and geologic faults

                      Glaciers have a well established connection to climate change , its all because they are just water in a different form.

                  • Draco T Bastard

                    Oh, definitely in the speculative basket but I can’t see why you’re missing the “shifting mass around a fluid centre.” Press one end of a floating plate down and a number of things are going to happen:

                    1. That end will go down
                    2. The other end will lift up
                    3. The liquid under it is going to move shifting the other floating plates around it

                    And remember that it’s not plates in a bath but connected floating plates around sphere. Some shift is bound to happen. How much is the question.

                    • dukeofurl

                      See below, Scotland is rising while England is sinking due to geostatic rebound.

                      Doesnt seem to be more earthquakes in England than in Scotland.

                      Earthquakes are very difficult to match to theory. T
                      The fracking connection came about from recording of a big jump in quakes in some areas having extensive fracking

            • dukeofurl 4.2.1.1.2.2

              Gravitation rebound is still occuring in Northern Europe from last ice age. Same as in Canada/US where there were ice sheets a few km thick.

              Its a whole different scale to day as the sea level fell 120m, all though sea level rise when it melted was at most 1m average per century, a figure we are unlikely to reach.

              Scotland had large glaciation so had rebound up to 10cm per century, while southern England , not covered by ice, has been adjusting downwards 5cm per century.

              • Draco T Bastard

                Gravitation rebound is still occuring in Northern Europe from last ice age.

                And you don’t think losing some 3 million cubic kilometres would accelerate that somewhat?

                • dukeofurl

                  Well 3 mill km3 is the total volume of Greenland ice. They havent lost all that yet.

                  Recent research has shown a period when temps were 8C warmer than present didnt have much impact on this ice cap. But that may need more followup.

                  • Colonial Rawshark

                    Recent research has shown a period when temps were 8C warmer than present didnt have much impact on this ice cap. But that may need more followup.

                    Remind me what the human population was, when temps were 8C warmer than now.

                    • dukeofurl

                      The point was the icecap didnt melt completely even in this warmer period.
                      Since we are warming the planet we can work to stop that or even reverse it.

          • Rosie 4.2.1.1.3

            Hey well it’s news to me dukeofurl but it’s something I’d like to learn the basics of, given I’m not a climate scientist.

            • dukeofurl 4.2.1.1.3.1

              It would help if you dont listen to a lot of the Greens, they arent even science based in many other things.
              The interesting thing about climate science is they dont take much notice of the weather either, its the longer trends. More droughts but not really this drought.
              And definitely not this ‘storm du jour’

              • Draco T Bastard

                It would help if you dont listen to a lot of the Greens, they arent even science based in many other things.

                And now you’re just outright fucken lying. The Green parties around the world are the most scientifically based political parties ever.

                • weka

                  +1. Useful for duke to destroy any credibility he has though.

                  The faux reasonable undermining of concern about CC is tiresome.

                • dukeofurl

                  Not in Taiwan.

                  Hows your science based MP Steffan Browning ?

                  • Colonial Rawshark

                    LOL “science based”

                    What we need is a new ethos and a new philosophy for the coming age; and let’s get real here, there are no “science based” political parties because politics is about values and philosophy.

                  • weka

                    Easy slurs duke, but just more troling. Look at NZ GP policy and tell me which bits aren’t science based?

                    • dukeofurl

                      Ceclia Wade Brown has got back on the science bus, as in the TV report she says ‘only’ that the sea storm surge is what it will be like in the future.
                      No sign of her earlier report that todays storm surge was because of climate change is here now.

                  • maui

                    Any sign of science based National Party policies yet?

              • One Anonymous Bloke

                No, in fact, clearly you are ignorant of Peter Trenberth’s response to questions about climate’s effect upon weather.

                Shall I Google it for you?

                • dukeofurl

                  Climate is just weather over a long term. I understand he just said the climate is changing.

                  You are confusing weather with climate, a common mistake.

                  • One Anonymous Bloke

                    No, I’m not, I’m trying to educate you about the reality that Climate affects all weather.

                    For extreme events, the question isn’t, ‘Is it global warming or natural variability? It is always both. The question is just how much each is contributing.

                    Kevin Trenberth.

                    How you think there is going to be some weather that isn’t affected by climate change is beyond me.

                    • weka

                      “How you think there is going to be some weather that isn’t affected by climate change is beyond me.”

                      This.

                    • dukeofurl

                      Not quite all weather . When are we going to have more hurricanes in the US?

                      My question about the weather was the future will show more effects from climate change, but since so far only a small amount of AGW has occurred up to 2010 or so its hard to pin down the naturally occurring events.
                      But its clear future weather is more affected

                    • dukeofurl

                      Heres the technical basis for my opinion that not ALL weather is affected so far by AGW

                      “Globally, there is low confidence in attribution of changes in tropical cyclone activity to human influence. This is due to insufficient observational evidence, lack of physical understanding of the links between anthropogenic drivers of climate and tropical cyclone activity,”

                      http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar5/wg1/WG1AR5_TS_FINAL.pdf . page 73

                    • Colonial Rawshark

                      what’s your policy point, dukeofurl – to sit back and wait for more evidence to accumulate first?

      • One Anonymous Bloke 4.2.2

        Post glacial rebound.

        Accepted as fact since 1890, until you came along.

    • McFlock 4.3

      Fracking causes earthquakes.

      • Bill 4.3.1

        Heat causes expansion. Expansion (if energy is absorbed deep enough) could change the interface between different plates. That could increase earthquake frequency.

        I’m not saying that’s the case – just applying basic physics to really big scale stuff.

        Besides fracking, building really big fuck-off dams increases the incidence of tremors too.

        • dukeofurl 4.3.1.1

          “Heat causes expansion. Expansion (if energy is absorbed deep enough) could change the interface between different plates. That could increase earthquake frequency.”

          Geothermal gradient is the rate of increasing temperature with respect to increasing depth in the Earth’s interior. Away from tectonic plate boundaries, it is about 25 °C per km of depth.

          There is no evidence that the small temperature change of oceans could effect tectonic movement, which occurs from 5 to 250km. As well the heat flow from the earth is outwards

          I think some are plucking at straws.

          • Bill 4.3.1.1.1

            I’ll match your “I think some are plucking at straws” with the stated “I’m not saying that’s the case – ” and then raise you a “Read the fucking comment you’re offering an opinion on”

            • dukeofurl 4.3.1.1.1.1

              Well I’m writing to the Nobel committee after this to ask they immediately give recognition to your discovery of the reversal of the heat flow of the earths crust.

              Its quite breathtaking, that you have done all this without any empirical research, but no doubt the pure theory of it will dazzle all when you reveal it at your symposium.

              Who could have thought the ‘energy is absorbed deep enough’ it triggers earthquakes too. But if heatflow is reversed ‘anything can happen’-
              I plagiarized that, though from Dancing with the Stars

              But one little thing, give us a hint of the delta you are referring to ?

              • weka

                All your sciency comments just look like anti-AGW troling now (esp after the weird comment about the GP not being science based). It’s hard to take anything you say seriously after that.

                • dukeofurl

                  Whos anti AGW ? Not me.
                  People who say the oceans are heavier because the water is warming are just boofheads, and in this case a Green party member as well.

                  Why dont YOU call them out as being anti science, is it too hard when you are supposedly science friendly yourself .

                  My ‘opinion’ is that it makes it harder for AGW policies to be put in place when mostly green extremists are muddying the message.

                  You are an extreme green, so be it, but save the slut shaming of those who arent so pure as yourself

                  • Colonial Rawshark

                    why don’t you tell us what Tony Blair has to say about AGW.

                  • weka

                    Of course you are an AGW denialist. We know that many of the denialists have moved on from denying existence to denying what needs to be done. Everything I’ve seen you write on this lately has been attempts to undermine people’s genuine concerns about CC and how it is affecting things now and in our near futures. I’ve yet to see you write anything useful in terms of the ‘what do we do now?’ debate.

                    That you tell lies about the only party in NZ that is taking CC seriously tells me everything I need to know about your beliefs. You don’t have to like the GP politically, but what you are saying about them is demonstrably false. You’re part of the problem.

                    It probably doesn’t matter because we’re at a tipping point in terms of where the general public are at, but look how you’ve tied up this conversation today. All that wasted energy, instead of us debating what needs to be done. It’s exactly the same dynamic as the out and out denialists of the past.

                    • dukeofurl

                      Thats amazing , you read your tarot cards and its come curtains for me. Youre an expert at rooting out deniers where ever they are.

                      Must be because I sound all ‘sciency’ and that makes it wrong

                      I dont give the denier views a seconds thought simply because they are wrong. It seems you have studied it , good luck with that.

                    • Colonial Rawshark

                      Mate you don’t sound “sciency” in the least. You do sound like you have an agenda though.

                • Rosie

                  “All your sciency comments just look like anti-AGW troling now”

                  I reckon.

                  Not to mention the quotes without a source or link, eg, 8.1 below

                  • weka

                    I noticed that too. Strange to cut and paste but not link.

                    • dukeofurl

                      Was that some radical science views was it ?

                      Or a statement of the obvious.
                      Im glad you found proof cant let me get a swifty past you.

            • infused 4.3.1.1.1.2

              best reply so far.

      • marty mars 4.3.2

        “Fracking causes earthquakes.”

        Exactly and who’d have thunk that one.

        Anyone got any studies on how they cause earthquakes?

        • McFlock 4.3.2.1

          Most stuff seems to be related to the whats more than the whys or hows. But this article links to a couple of reports.

          Seems that if you apply lots of pressure and add lube along a fault, you can cause fault slippage. oo-er

  5. Sable 5

    Greed in the face of extinction. Utter morons…..

  6. Skinny 6

    Many critics sight the reluctance of the big polluting Nations to buy in as a reason to sit on their hands. Key is already making noise around ‘the poor farmers are taking a hiding without more hoops.’

  7. esoteric pineapples 7

    In the not too distant future, properties too close to the water line won’t be able to get insurance. This will be well before they are finally swallowed up by the sea. Once they can’t get insurance they will be virtually valueless as you need insurance to get a mortgage, and who with cash to buy them would use it on a property with no future value. Before this happens, LIM reports will have a warning on such properties which will deflate their value. Kapiti Coast residents have been fighting having this fact on their LIMs but it will only be a matter of time before councils decide the liability risk of not having them in LIMs outweighs any legal threat from residents.

    • weka 7.1

      I’m guessing it’s already happening (from the ODT link).

      The latest flooding was also likely to have created fresh insurance headaches in parts of South Dunedin, with coverage likely to become more difficult and premiums expected to ”go through the roof”.

  8. Rosie 8

    Those massive sea swells yesterday were bizarre. The sea was calm and the air still. We were driving between Petone and Eastbourne and were just lucky enough to miss waves coming up on to the road. We then went back into the city for a walk around the waterfront. Have never seen the tide so high in the harbour, even the steps/seating at Kumototo were submerged.
    A very strange sight, maybe there’s more of that to come.

    • dukeofurl 8.1

      Sea level is locally affected by air pressure, winds , tides.

      ” A difference from the average of 1 hPa can cause a difference in height of 1 centimetre. A low barometer will allow the sea level to rise and a high barometer will tend to depress it”. At most it could be 30cm.

      A wind blowing into the harbour like Wellington will push seal level up along shore, same applies to lakes.

      All these put together plus a a expected high tide of 1.8m, near the max and you get the result.
      The Tides in Auckland are over 3m while around equator they are only a few cm

      • One Anonymous Bloke 8.1.1

        You forgot melting land-based ice sheets and glaciers. They affect sea level too.

      • Rosie 8.1.2

        Metservice says the expected high tide for today is 1.8 metres at 3.40, which I agree is near it’s maximum:

        http://www.metservice.com/marine-surf/tides/wellington

        but do you know what yesterdays high tide was? I don’t.

        There wasn’t a breath of wind yesterday so that wasn’t pushing the sea level up.

        Having grown up on the Kapiti Coast ( see E.P’s post above) across from the sea, I’ve witnessed some mad high tides but nothing like yesterdays on such a calm day.

        As for Auckland, haven’t they had problem in recent years with part of the north western motorway being flooded by unusually high tides? Seem to recall something about that.

        • dukeofurl 8.1.2.1

          Are you saying its magic or its natural processes.

          • One Anonymous Bloke 8.1.2.1.1

            You forgot to mention the documented anthropogenic factors.

          • Colonial Rawshark 8.1.2.1.2

            Are you saying its magic or its natural processes.

            Try and listen instead of being a know it all. Rosie is trying to communicate to you that the combination of things she perceived seemed subjectively very unusual.

            • Rosie 8.1.2.1.2.1

              Exactly. Thank you CR.

              And as for you dukeofurl, theres no need to be a smart arse.

              You’re simply coming across as someone whose trying to explain away increasingly odd weather as natural and compleeeeetly unrelated to climate change, when that discussion was over years ago.

              • Colonial Rawshark

                we’re going to see more intellectual rationalising away of what we see happening around us, even as things get worse and worse over the next 10-20 years.

                Ask the old farmers and rural folk who have been around the countryside for at least forty or fifty years – if these no-nonsense folk say something is definitely screwy, that’s as good as gospel.

                Forget the clever young city slickers, too many of those people don’t know shit.

              • dukeofurl

                Whos the clever one now ?

                “Partially or wholly due to poor roading engineering possibly?

                Why didnt you tell us you were a roading expert and could peer review these things.

                • Rosie

                  Whose the twat now?

                  Just like I’m not a climate scientist I’m also not a roading engineer (or Inghinair as Nick Smith says) but have spent my life surrounded by engineer types who say engineery things.

                  No it doesn’t qualify me to comment on what issues the NW motorway in Akld is facing but equally you don’t seem to be able to hold up your climate change denying argument. Furthermore, the more you talk about it the more defensive you seem to get.

                  I’m outta here.

                  • dukeofurl

                    Why say its poor engineering with your value judgement.

                    Its been 60 years or so. Settlement will occur that long a period , theres a formula that will predict that. The deeper the mud the more settlement will happen as the decades stretch out.

                    The Osaka airport, even with best engineering predictions will have 17m to 24m by end of century. Even their best estimates at design stage are bit low so far.
                    I could write pages on this, but its not really poor engineering

        • Draco T Bastard 8.1.2.2

          As for Auckland, haven’t they had problem in recent years with part of the north western motorway being flooded by unusually high tides?

          I remember that happening when I was a child 40 years ago. The big problem with that part of the North Western is that it’s on a cause way that’s sinking and so it’s getting worse. It’s now to the point that they’ve decided that they need to do something about it – urgently.

          • dukeofurl 8.1.2.2.1

            The purely tidal effects are fairly normal. Tides can be increased by up to 30 cm by low pressure, wind in a certain direction can push the surface layer, increasing the water level inside an enclosed harbour like Auckland. Tides of course vary with King Tides occurring when Earth and Moon line up.

            Thames in the other direction is prone to sea flooding when the wind is in the other direction.

            Sea level rise so far has been quite small in Auckland area. The significant effect is natural causes and possibly more storms, but I havent seen the longer term climate records.

          • Rosie 8.1.2.2.2

            “The big problem with that part of the North Western is that it’s on a cause way that’s sinking and so it’s getting worse”

            Partially or wholly due to poor roading engineering possibly?

            • Draco T Bastard 8.1.2.2.2.1

              It’s an artificial causeway so wholly due to poor engineering and the fact that it just wasn’t a good place to put a causeway.

              Here’s some pics of its beginnings.

              It’s the Rosebank Road side that’s sinking. The other side is fine (I think).

              • Rosie

                Fascinating to see the evolution of that segment of the NW motorway. (I remember driving that road from my time living in Akld).

                Surely that stretch must have massive remedial works to be undertaken as our environment changes. Wonder who carries the cost for that…

                • Colonial Rawshark

                  Need to go to rail and trains; putting money in roads now is a waste

    • Clean_power 8.2

      Climate change is now the cause of earthquakes and volcanoes (formally geological phenomena). Wellington’s Celia Wade-Brown’s big waves were directly caused by climate change too.

      • One Anonymous Bloke 8.2.1

        🙄

        Look everyone, here’s a Petty George clone.

      • Colonial Rawshark 8.2.2

        It is important to observe the likes of clean power and dukeofurl.

        Even as AGW effects clearly worsen over the next 10 years people like them will deny harder than ever that there is any real problem that society needs to sort out ASAP.

        The age of denial continues.

        • dukeofurl 8.2.2.1

          We have a problem and we need to makes changes.

          You are the one who couldn’t pass a high school climate change course, yet thinks he knows better than the considered opinions of the scientists at IPCC.

          There is too much hot air allready

    • vto 8.3

      Rosie, there was nothing bizarre about the high water and waves in Wellington yesterday and today…..

      it is quite simply the result of an intense giant low deep down south which pushed a very powerful long period swell up the coast. It also had a bit of west in it, just enough to fire on into the harbour, combined with some tidal highs, that is all.

      These swells come and go occasionally. Just now, from the south and the west, NZ is getting a hammering of swells larger than usual. It started about two months ago and I suspect you will see more of the same over the next few more weeks. It is a strong el nino event right now.

      Happens every few years. Was an even bigger one about ten years ago which threw seals and rocks and debris all up and over the road and rail at Kaikoura. People thought it bizarre then too as there was no wind – just big powerful swell generated in far off seas.

      Sea is colder than usual now too in our parts. Intense storms for the winter – make sure the sumps are clear ….

      • Rosie 8.3.1

        Well thank you vto for your rational approach, unlike our friend dukeofurl who seems to be getting increasingly hysterical.

        I had forgotten we were having another el nino, but I don’t know for sure what affect it has on the tides.

        I have to repeat, that was some freaky swell. I’d never seen the likes of it and it’s not like I’m a youg un with nothing to compare it to, or haven’t been around surfies going on about epic swells, or being carried half way out to Kapiti island on giant waves as a kiddie.

        Sorry to hear about the seals.

        • vto 8.3.1.1

          Those occasional giant swells are pretty cool. And if you live Petone Eastbourne area then next time shoot out to the south coast via Wainui, especially if a norwester is blowing too. Spectacular scenes. Deep Cook Strait waters immediately offshore suck it all in and explode it on the shore…. so fine for the soul…

  9. Tracey 9

    In the meantime we are investing $125m in an Asian Bank. Seems there ARE times Key doesn’t mind us being trailblazers… and surprise surprise it involves a bank

    “New Zealand has agreed to become a founding member of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, the Government has announced.

    “Increased infrastructure investment will enhance the Asian region’s growth and that will be good for New Zealand,” Finance Minister Bill English said.

    “New Zealand was the first western developed nation to join negotiations to set up the Bank and our membership will enhance our already strong economic, trade and investment links with the Asian region.”

    New Zealand’s paid in capital will be around NZ$125 million, paid over five years, the statement said.

    The Bank of China led initiative has promoted itself as a means of making up the infrastructure gap between Asia and other parts of the world, however it has led to a diplomatic struggle.

    The United States has reportedly lobbied countries not to join, raising concerns about its governance.

    Privately diplomats have claimed that the bank could be used to expand China’s influence.

    Foreign Minister Murray McCully said Asia was “important to New Zealand’s future” meaning it made sense to invest in the region.

    “Asia is driving global growth and it is full of opportunities for New Zealand. This new Bank will be a welcome addition to existing institutions and it stands to make a significant contribution to infrastructure in the region.”

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/69407785/nz-agrees-to-join-divisive-asian-infrastructure-investment-bank

    more about who has joined
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_Infrastructure_Investment_Bank

    • Tracey 9.1

      “The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) has the mandate to foster economic growth in Asia by investing in infrastructure and other productive areas and promoting regional cooperation and partnership. As a new multilateral development bank (MDB) in the 21st century, AIIB’s approach will be “lean, clean and green”, with a focus on efficiency, sustainability and transparency. The Bank will also work closely with the existing MDBs — complementing, supplementing and enhancing their development efforts.

      • Kiwiri 9.1.1

        Which former National MPs, if any, have been involved in the AIIB or related bodies?

      • Draco T Bastard 9.1.2

        And still not actually needed. Each country has enough resources to develop itself without outside help and, most especially, without outside money.

      • Colonial Rawshark 9.1.3

        The AIIB is a Chinese initiative designed to reduce dependence on US sponsored, western oriented multilateral organisations like the IMF and the World Bank.

  10. ‘We’ face a minim of a 6 meter sea level rise in the foreseeable future, that is the fact when the environment has 400 ppm CO2 in it, well it was last time the planet hit 400 ppm, back in 250 million BC, —– going on past examples, not fuckwit ‘opinions’.
    The rules of nature haven’t changed in the past 250,002,015 years have they? water is still wet, fire still burns, sea levels go UP with higher CO2 levels.
    Or maybe you all are happy listening to the utter bullshit from the wankers? like Cur P Gluckman etal.
    Now some dummy is going to say, we are at 400ppm now, so were is the sea level rise?
    Luckily for us there is still ICE, last time the planet got to 400ppm it did so SLOOOOWLY ie over something like 10,000 years, we have done it in less than 135 years. So BACK THEN there was no ice by the time the planet hit 400ppm
    Last time, over that 10,000 year period there was also about 833 methane lifetimes, ie the methane was ‘born’ lived in the atmosphere for approximately 12 years, then converted to CO2 —- 833 times or there abouts ??? THIS time ‘we’ have done it in maybe 11 methane life times.
    We face the continued rapid melting of the ice, until the planet reaches the enviable ice free status that is 400ppm.
    The ‘rub’ is that there is mega tons of carbon and CH4 stored under the melting ice, be it the tundra, Antarctica or the deep sea clathrates. Don’t take my word for us being utterly fucked, listen to maybe James Hanson “Once the clathrate gun goes off earth will be on a non stop journey to Venus” .. or some such 😉
    FFS what part of this do idiots not understand?
    It will only take something like 5% of what is ‘stored’ under the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) to DOUBLE the CO2 levels in the environment.
    Currently where the methane ‘volcanoes’ were erupting last summer it is up to 16C, good luck stopping the tundra melting at those temperatures.
    Arctic Methane Emergency: Methane released by the Gigaton! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8F9ed5E54s4
    Arctic methane skyrocketing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2ckkxEnWpA
    Is the Methane monster about to roar? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lz_XfjvMpmA
    Arctic Emergency: Scientists Speak https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3XpF1MvC8s
    Natalia Shakhova, PhD. Marine Geology “2 million square Kilometers of 20k deep sediment loaded with CH4” The is the ESAS
    50 GT of CH4 ‘any day’? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kx1Jxk6kjbQ
    Permafrost Methane Time Bomb NBC News https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2w4UQfJHD-A
    Mystery of the Siberian crater deepens: Now two NEW large holes appear in Siberia -Yamal Peninsula – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vm5vn6iE1SI – YAMAL means THE EARTH’S END
    Sea wall? yeah right 😉

  11. infused 11

    NZ’s impact on clime change won’t affect anything that’ you’ve said.

    • Colonial Rawshark 11.1

      It is still right to take the moral stance, to acknowledge and act on the unfolding reality so if nothing else we can look our children and our grandchildren in the eye and say that we did our very best to redeem ourselves.

      • Robert Atack 11.1.1

        CR
        One good thing, if your children aren’t at the age of breeding, you will never have to look their children in the eyes ) … they will not exist.

    • maui 11.2

      We’re one of the highest emitters in the world (per person) and we’re one of the rich countries that has caused the problem. So what we do will have a big impact around the world I would have to say.

      • Robert Atack 11.2.1

        If every Kiwi left the planet tonight, it would make zero impact on Climate Change, in fact if every human left the planet tonight, the planet would still go Venus.
        Not forgetting the 440 Nuke power plants that need up to 60? years to dismantle and make safe, and for most of that time they will need a constant power supply to keep the cooling systems working, no cooling = Fukushima.

        • maui 11.2.1.1

          Since we don’t have an accurate timeline on if or even when the earth will “go venus” I’m still willing to put my faith in humans. That humans are in control of their fate and humans will decide what our future world looks like.

          • Colonial Rawshark 11.2.1.1.1

            They may be healthy conceits, but that is all they are, unfortunately. Even a cursory review of the rise and fall of empires/civilisations over the last 2500 years will tell you that none of those things are true.

            • dukeofurl 11.2.1.1.1.1

              Its fairly clear too, climate change played a role in some of those.

          • Robert Atack 11.2.1.1.2

            “decide what our future world looks like.”
            We have kind of done that Maui,
            It will look devoid of humans )
            The scale of the problem is massive, humans don’t do anything on the scale of what would be needed to reverse what is in motion, the area needed to drag the gigatons of carbon out of the atmosphere would have to be bigger than the tar sands foot print, bigger than all the concrete we have used in the past 100 years, and bigger than all the coal we have mined and burned.
            There are a billion combustion engines currently turning 3 cubic kilometers of oil into CO2 each year, and have been for what the last 30? Well maybe 30 years ago there were only 500 million?
            These are the numbers from 2005 ish?
            Automobiles, globally: 722 million
            Automobiles, USA: 132 million
            Trucks (all types, in USA): 1.5 million
            Buses: (all types, in USA): more than 654,000
            Locomotives: (USA) 26,000
            World aircraft fleet: 11,000 aircraft more than 100 passengers. All 11,000 designed for oil-based fuel.
            World shipping: 85,000 ships in the world.
            Decked fishing boats in the world: 1.2 million
            I can’t remember the #s but coal is worse.?
            We can’t even imagine about how we could reverse the affect this has had on the planet.

        • johnm 11.2.1.2

          Yeh it’s like we’ve provoked the gentle monster relentlessly and the coward’s done nothing, but now aroused he will finish arrogant human scum off. No! they’ll scream it can’t happen to us! We’re the children of Father God! aren’t we! We’re special we’re not like those animals we slaughter in the billions are we? Are we?!

          • Draco T Bastard 11.2.1.2.1

            It’s almost like we’re out to prove the answer to the Fermi Paradox.

            • TheContrarian 11.2.1.2.1.1

              That Fermi Paradox article is awesome. One of the best explanations I have seen yet. Shared around many times in the last few months

        • Bill 11.2.1.3

          Not sure that’s quite right. Fukushima could have been ‘shut down’ fairly fast. Sure, loads of radioactive decay in rods to deal with, and a hot, though ‘shut down’ reactor core, but no need for constant cooling.

          I’m partly basing that on the fact that most (all?) of Japans reactors were shut down (‘hot’ fuel rods removed from the core?) after Fukushima and communities railed against them being brought back on line.

          • Robert Atack 11.2.1.3.1

            All the fuel rods need to be kept cool, that is what they are doing @ Fukushima, they have lost 3 of the cores, and are mainly focused on the old fuel rods., which are stored in 4 above ground tanks and one massive below ground one.
            They need electricity to keep the pumps running.
            They maybe off line, but they still have to keep them cool, that is my point.

            • Colonial Rawshark 11.2.1.3.1.1

              Yep basically; at Fukushima like at many other reactor sites around the world, they found it cheaper to store used fuel rods in the temporary storage pools which were onsite, rather than have them properly casked up and shipped to permanent storage facilities (which more often than not don’t actually exist). They ended up storing more used fuel rods in those cooling pools than they were ever originally designed for.

              Net result, Fukushima’s temporary used fuel storage pools were stacked up to the max with old fuel rods still giving off a massive amount of heat and therefore requiring active cooling. When the water pumps turned off, the coolant pools simply boiled away and the fuel rods melted down/exploded.

              • One Anonymous Bloke

                the coolant pools simply boiled away and the fuel rods melted down/exploded.

                I have not seen anything to suggest this happened: certainly three reactor cores melted down, and spent fuel storage pools were severely compromised.

      • tangled_up 11.2.2

        I agree. It is true that our emissions don’t count for much and what is needed is China and the US to come to the party. Though the movement is about momentum and global pressure also so it is important we play our part.

        • Bill 11.2.2.1

          The science says that zero by 50 is essential to have any chance of avoiding really, really bad shit. NZ can claim that only 20% of NZ emissions are from energy. It doesn’t matter though. That 20% must become 0% by mid century. There ain’t no getting off the hook in a world that requires zero fossil related emissions.

          Might want to posit that against the political call for 50% below 1990 levels by 2050…

          • Draco T Bastard 11.2.2.1.1

            +1

          • Colonial Rawshark 11.2.2.1.2

            I rather suspect that 2050 will be far too late to avoid 4-5 deg C warming.

            • dukeofurl 11.2.2.1.2.1

              Does the IPCC agree with you on that in AR5 , that will have 4-5 C increase in 35 years time ?

              • Colonial Rawshark

                Not now, but they will in a couple of years time.

                • dukeofurl

                  Those tarot cards must be awesome, in that they allow you to predict the future.

                  • Draco T Bastard

                    No tarot cards, just the knowledge that the IPCC has been far too conservative in their estimations and that seems to be due to political interference from climate change deniers in the US administration over the years.

                    • dukeofurl

                      There is some suggestion that the SPM is watered down by politicians when they get together for a talk fest.

                      But the main review of the science. Its quite breathtaking if you say they are wrong because it doesnt suit you.
                      in the IPCC report:
                      Long-term Climate Change: Projections, Commitments
                      and Irreversibility

                      They have a range of of RCP values which is connected to forcings

                      The highest is RCP 8.5 which gives 3.7C +- 0.7 by the end of the century.
                      (plus 0.11 for temperatures measured around 1990)
                      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Representative_Concentration_Pathways

                      http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessmentreport/ar5/wg1/WG1AR5_Chapter12_FINAL.pdf pg 1054

                      These are the best minds and experts in this area but it doesnt surprise me that somehow people with a poor level of science knowledge, as shown in todays discussions, havent the faintest idea and are just making it up.

                      Volcanoes and earthquakes and heavy water, we are dealing with a ship of fools

                    • Colonial Rawshark

                      what’s your point dukeofurl? So you’re a champion of the IPCC reports. Good on you. What are you actually suggesting that we do as a society? Anything? More talking?

                    • Draco T Bastard

                      @dukeofurl

                      Its quite breathtaking if you say they are wrong because it doesnt suit you.

                      I didn’t say that did I? I said that it seems to have been too conservative in its estimations due to political interference and lo and behold:
                      IPCC reports ‘diluted’ under ‘political pressure’ to protect fossil fuel interests

                      Increasing evidence is emerging that the policy summaries on climate impacts and mitigation by the UN Intergovernment Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) were significantly ‘diluted’ under political pressure from some of the world’s biggest greenhouse gas emitters, including Saudi Arabia, China, Brazil and the United States.

                      Several experts familiar with the IPCC government approval process for the ‘Summary for Policymakers’ (SPM) reports – documents summarising the thousands of pages of technical and scientific reports for government officials – have spoken out about their distortion due to political interests.

                      And that’s not the first article I’ve read showing evidence that governments have been putting pressure on the IPCC to water down their conclusions.

                      And even if you don’t accept the possibility of political interference in the IPCC we can have a look at what’s actually happened:

                      In many similar cases, the evidence suggests that changes in climate are occurring faster, and with more intensity, than the IPCC have predicted.

                      You seem to be the one grasping at straws.

                    • dukeofurl

                      I said the SPM is written by politicians , mostly not scientists, thats why I stuck to the core science which is still written by scientists.

                      But no , you have some guy on a blog. Plus something called WS12.
                      It seems they are talking about past temperatures only, and they give a weighting of 5% more in their analysis. Not exactly earth shattering stuff. We see how it goes in next AR WG1 when it comes out.

                      Is there better justification about future temperature increases ?

                    • Draco T Bastard

                      The SPM is still written by the scientists but they’re put under pressure to paint things as being better than they are by the politicians.

                      There’s also the fact that evidence has, so far, shown that the IPCC projections are below what’s actually happening in the real world as I linked to. Hopefully the next AR will correct that but scientists do have a tendency to be conservative in their estimations.

                    • dukeofurl

                      Yes you are right , the SPM for WG1 is written by scientists.

                      I was thinking of the WG I – AR5 Government Review of Final Draft SPM.

                      Its truly byzantine. I dont think its worth even bothering with as we both agree its not ‘improved by the politicians’

              • Bill

                World Bank, Price Waterhouse Cooper, International Energy Agency…and any other report that doesn’t imbed carbon capture and storage or use non – empirical emission rates etc.

                All say 4 by 50 or thereabouts.

                • Colonial Rawshark

                  if dukeofurl is under 35, he’s very likely to live to see the full extent of the disruption we face come 2050-2060.

                  • dukeofurl

                    Ill trust the experts on this one.

                    Im sure the ship of fools has plenty of room for you.

                    • Colonial Rawshark

                      You’ll trust the “experts”! LOL You might as well trust the officers on the Titanic.

                      Explain to me, mate, the cause for your certainty and faith. For starters, how many cases of real life global AGW have your vaunted “experts” actually seen, recorded, lived through and analysed? And I don’t mean simulated on a computer screen, I mean actual.

                      But I already know the answer to that. It rhymes with “hero.”

                      That’s why I carefully limit my trust in the “experts” and keep my brain engaged and ready for dissensus.

                • One Anonymous Bloke

                  The World Bank cites the Postdam Institute for Climate Impact Research as predicting 2° by 2050 and 4° by 2100.

                  PwC say 4-6° by 2100.

                  • dukeofurl

                    PwC is just using IPCC which is good.

                    Thanks for that, its good to have science based numbers back.

                    • Bill

                      …its good to have science based numbers back

                      You’re aware that the IPCC bases its numbers on the unscientific assumption that carbon capture and storage will actually work, be developed and then rolled out on a massive scale in a very short time scale?

                      That one assumption bumps their predictions on temperature rises downwards but still doesn’t avoid rises in excess of 2 degrees C while their big Dr Seuss machines get up to speed on sucking carbon out of the air.

                      All very scientific.

                    • Colonial Rawshark

                      Hi dukeofurl, does the IPCC numbers really consider carbon capture and storage as a given in its scenarios?

                      Is that really a “scientific” assumption to make?

          • maui 11.2.2.1.3

            Surely by the time 2030 rolls around we would have increased our targets though, we wouldn’t be that stupid to just continue in the same vein as we are now…

    • Tracey 11.3

      our less than 1% contribution to the new Asian Bank won’t make much of a difference either but your pals in Government still did it.

  12. Sorry me again
    Bill and Tu
    Reducing emissions now to ‘save humanity’ is pointless, like I’ve tried to explain above.
    The environment is @ 400 ppm for the next 1,000 years at the least.
    Once the true affects of 400 ppm are in place, trees will stop growing, the oceans will be toxic emitters of GHGs. I would guess the amount of carbon and methane that is going to come out of the fast thawing tundra, the earth might not see sub 400 for millions of years.
    The planet has NEVER been @ 400 ppm with another god knows??? 6 – 20 times more carbon about to come out of the worlds methane stores?
    Its a bit like an ant and an elephant.
    Watch the links I posted above, surly some free information is worth watching, or as like most humans (and politicians X 10 ) you have a built in ‘flight’ mechanism, that keeps you away, or unable to absorb facts that run contra to your ‘beliefs’ ?
    800 methane life times in the next 10? EXCEPT IT WILL NOT DIE
    ho hum

    • Bill 12.1

      Robert, I know it’s a punt, but since there are poorly understood dynamics in such a complex system or set of systems, it’s just possible that…

      yeah. a punt.

    • dukeofurl 12.2

      When did trees stop being able to grow by CO2 above 400 ppm ?

      Is that with less rainfall the forests thin and replaced by grassland, or is that global rainforest will expand with more rain ?

      • Robert Atack 12.2.1

        Part One: Large Igneous Provinces and their global effects
        Introduction http://www.skepticalscience.com/pollution-part-1.html
        http://www.skepticalscience.com/pollution-part-2.html
        Well first they went extinct, which kind of stunts any species growth 😉
        Somewhere in the above article he mentions the coal cycle being interrupted for 10 million years, I’m guessing that is because there were no trees, this is based on rocks 250 million years old.?

        • dukeofurl 12.2.1.1

          Complete rubbish.

          Concentrations to produce suffocation for people / animals( as mentioned in your link) are 7-10%, that is 70,000-100,000 ppm

          meanwhile plants can 50% faster growth in steady state conditions, with concentrations of 1000ppm.

          Then there is SO2, human emissions peaked at 130 mill tons and are declining, Siberian traps were possibly over 6300 billion tons of SO2. thats right it was 50 million times more than human emissions

          As I thought its all complete rubbish.

          Has nothing absolutely nothing to do with steady CO2 increases that we are facing.

          If you guys were sitting level 6 Science at high school it would be FAIL.

          http://nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/The-New-Zealand-Curriculum/Learning-areas/Science/Achievement-objectives

          • Robert Atack 12.2.1.1.1

            Fine, so what was the CO2 reading at the end of the Permian?
            The time some say 96% of life went extinct?
            Or as this says ?
            With more than 90% of all marine species and 75% of land species wiped out, the end Permian mass extinction was the worst biosphere crisis in the last 600 million years. The extinction was global in reach: almost all animals and plants in almost all environmental settings were affected. An idea of the severity can be visualized by considering that the time afterwards was marked by the beginning of a coal gap lasting for ten million years: coal-forming ecosystems – i.e. forests – simply did not exist for that time.
            400 ppm is just the beginning, the planet could see 500ppm? 1,000 + ?
            The Amazon forest (not the book shop) has emitted more CO2 than the US in one year, 2005 – 10 ish??) not sure how it is going at the moment?

            I’ve been reading for a while how we have pushed the environment further and faster, by up to 10,000 times ??? But to air on the side of caution, and ‘believability’ lets say we have done it 100 times as fast? we are still facing a massive amount of methane and carbon, from the Siberian traps……… coincidentally !!
            Alaska is +10C above monthly average at the moment? ‘The traps’ have been up to something like 25C currently 12 – 20 C
            How much longer can the ice cork hold?
            But why would you listen to me? The links above are maybe more qualified?
            Though some slip into happy chapter mode.

            • dukeofurl 12.2.1.1.1.1

              Interesting stuff, nothing wrong with going off tangent but we talking about AGW levels of CO2.
              800ppm is a whole different scenario than 70,000 ppm

              • Colonial Rawshark

                It amazes me that you continue to calmly talk as if our world is in charted territory. As Atack points out: we very clearly are not. Wake up.

      • Robert Atack 12.2.2

        http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcb.12938/abstract
        Think Progress,
        14 June, 2015

        In contrast to a popular conservative argument, a new study has found that increased atmospheric carbon dioxide isn’t necessarily a boon to plant growth — instead, it causes plants to have a more difficult time absorbing nitrogen, a nutrient critical to plant growth and health.

        And another one for ya
        http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2015/noaa-analysis-journal-science-no-slowdown-in-global-warming-in-recent-years.html

        A major new study from NOAA finds more evidence that we may be witnessing the start of the long-awaited jump in global temperatures. As I reported in April, many recent studies have found that we are about to enter an era of even more rapid global warming.

        Indeed, one March study, “Near-term acceleration in the rate of temperature change,” warns the speed-up is imminent — with Arctic warming rising a stunning 1°F per decade by the 2020s.

        The new study in Science from a team of NOAA scientists, “finds that the rate of global warming during the last 15 years has been as fast as or faster than that seen during the latter half of the 20th Century,” as NOAA explains.

        • dukeofurl 12.2.2.1

          Thats fine but your claim rising CO2 will kill the trees is unsupported. Lets not go there then.

          Regarding the eCO2 atmosphere-
          “experiments in grassland, cropland and forest ecosystems and found that: (i) in all three ecosystem types, this relationship was positive, linear and strong”

          The “ecosystems they studied were N limited”. Its very new research and could show that without access to N some plant growth wont roar away.

          The full article is behind a wall, but would be interesting to read it entirely

  13. Molly 13

    A consideration for the MetService perhaps:
    Cyclone Simon Bridges.

  14. ian 14

    I was driving through breaker bay yesterday enjoying the breeze through the open window in the rental car and got a wave over me and the little corolla. 5 meter swells with the big ones 50 % bigger are pretty awesome. Has happened regularly over recorded history.

  15. Climate scientists raise alarm on melting of carbon-bearing permafrost
    http://www.interaksyon.com/article/112188/climate-scientists-raise-alarm-on-melting-of-carbon-bearing-permafrost

    There may be 1,500 billion tonnes of carbon locked away in permafrost — perennially frozen ground covering about a quarter of exposed land in the Northern Hemisphere,

    “While there is some uncertainty, we know that permafrost carbon losses will be substantial, they will be irreversible,”

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  • Foreign Minister announces two diplomatic appointments
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Foreign Affairs Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters today announced two diplomatic appointments: New Zealand’s High Commissioner to India and Consul-General to Hong Kong. “As New Zealand recovers from COVID-19, our diplomatic and trade networks are more important than ever. That is ...
    1 day ago
  • Week That Was: Recover and rebuild
    We started the week by announcing free apprenticeships to support Kiwis into work and to help get New Zealand moving again - and we ended the week by extending the wage subsidy to 40,000 more businesses, helping to protect businesses and workers alike.  ...
    1 day ago
  • How Budget 2020 is backing businesses
    We’re confident in the ability of Kiwi businesses to succeed in the face of COVID-19, and our Government is committed to doing our bit to enable that success. Kiwi businesses have always been innovative and resilient, and the COVID-19 pandemic has proven this yet again. Many businesses are finding new, creative ...
    1 day ago
  • New Zealand First confirms its first tranche of candidates
    New Zealand First is pleased to release the names of its first tranche of candidates for the 2020 election. The includes all sitting New Zealand First Members of Parliament except Clayton Mitchell MP who earlier today announced he will not be seeking re-election. In alphabetical order they are: MP ...
    1 day ago
  • New Zealand First MP Clayton Mitchell not seeking re-election
    Clayton Mitchell MP, New Zealand First List MP based in Tauranga New Zealand First MP Clayton Mitchell has decided not to seek re-election in this year’s General Election.  “After serious consideration and discussion with my family, I have decided to pursue other passions in my life and spend a lot ...
    1 day ago
  • Five new Lockheed Martin Super Hercules aircraft to replace ageing fleet
    Defence Minister Ron Mark has announced that new Lockheed Martin Super Hercules aircraft would replace the outdated and costly 1960s Hercules fleet. The $1.521b project will include a flight simulator for staff training and other supporting infrastructure. "This fleet will ensure the Defence Force can continue to support New Zealand's ...
    1 day ago
  • Greens urge police to rule out armed police patrols following George Floyd’s death
    The Green Party is urging the New Zealand Police to rule out the use of Armed Response Teams, following their recent trial in communities around Aotearoa. ...
    1 day ago
  • NZ First fought for changes to “poorly-targeted” rent dispute policy
    New Zealand First leader Winston Peters has described Labour's original COVID-19 commercial rent dispute proposal as "poorly targeted". Justice Minister Andrew Little has announced a temporary law change to force commercial landlords and renters to consider COVID-19 in disputes over rent issues, almost two months after the Government first floated the idea.  But ...
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand First ensures commercial rent dispute clause fairly applied
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Leader of New Zealand First New Zealand First acknowledges that some small businesses have been struggling to meet fixed costs due to the loss of revenue by COVID-19. We also know some businesses are at greater risk of insolvency when they cannot come to a reasonable ...
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand First disappointed that Section 70 spouses won’t get relief
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Leader of New Zealand First New Zealand First is disappointed that the removal of the spousal deductions has had to be delayed by the Ministry fo Social Development, due to COVID19 workload pressures. “New Zealand First has always stood for fairness when it comes to superannuation ...
    4 days ago
  • Winston Peters receives petition demanding more protection for nurses
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Leader of New Zealand First On the steps of Parliament today the Leader of New Zealand First, Rt Hon Winston Peters received a petition from registered nurse Anna Maria Coervers, requesting an amendment to the Protection for First Responders Bill which will ensure the legislation also include registered ...
    4 days ago
  • Week That Was: Getting our economy moving
    It's been a busy seven days as we start to rebuild New Zealand together. From delivering extra support for small businesses, to investing in our artists and arts organisations, to cutting red tape on home DIY projects, we're rolling out our plan to get the economy and New Zealand moving ...
    4 days ago
  • Winston Peters: If protests condoned ‘why are we not at level 1?’
    Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters says alert level 2 restrictions have to be discussed during today's Cabinet meeting. Thousands gathered across the country, including at Parliament, yesterday for Black Lives Matter marches where social distancing and mass gathering rules were flouted. Mr Peters said the breaching of Alert Level 2 rules at ...
    4 days ago
  • Northland rail work to help create regional jobs
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of State Owned Enterprises KiwiRail’s Northland rail upgrade steps up another gear today and will help Northland recover from the impacts of COVID-19, State Owned Enterprises Minister Winston Peters says. The Government is investing $204.5 million through the Provincial Growth Fund to ...
    5 days ago
  • Green Party statement on the death of George Floyd
    “Today and every day we stand in solidarity with George Floyd’s family, friends and community who feel pain and fear about his untimely death at the hands of Minneapolis police”, said Green Party Co-leader and Māori Development spokesperson Marama Davidson. ...
    5 days ago
  • Lake Brunner’s Mount Te Kinga to go Predator Free
    Fletcher Tabuteau, Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Hon Eugenie Sage, Minister of Conservation The West Coast forests of Mount Te Kinga at Kotuku Whakaoho/Lake Brunner are the latest predator free project to receive Government funding, announced Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage and Under Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher ...
    1 week ago
  • Green Party welcomes crucial financial support for creatives
    The Green Party says new government support for creatives and artists is a vital lifeline for a sector struggling to survive the COVID crisis. ...
    1 week ago
  • Strongest ever water reforms mean swimmable rivers within a generation
    The Green Party says major freshwater reforms announced today provide the strongest ever protections of our waterways, to help ensure the next generation can swim in the rivers of Aotearoa. ...
    1 week ago
  • Greens work to secure inquiry into Wild West student accommodation sector
    The Green Party has begun the process for a Select Committee inquiry into student accommodation, which has been exposed during COVID-19 as an under-regulated sector that straddles students with unfair debt. ...
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand joins global search for COVID-19 vaccine
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Foreign Affairs Hon Megan Woods, Minister of Research, Science and Innovation Hon Dr David Clark, Minister of Health Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters, Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods,  and Health Minister David Clark today announced a COVID-19 vaccine strategy, ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Budget 2020: Five things to know
    Budget 2020 is about rebuilding together, supporting jobs, getting business moving and the books back into the black. It’s an integral part of our COVID-19 economic response, and our plan to grow our economy and get New Zealand moving again. Here’s a quick look at the five top things you ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Green Party unveils its candidate list for the 2020 election
    The Green Party is pleased to reveal its candidate list for the upcoming election. With a mix of familiar faces and fresh new talent, this exceptional group of candidates are ready to lead the Greens back into Government. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Coalition Government approves essential upgrades on Ōhakea Air Base
    The Coalition Government has approved $206 million in essential upgrades at Ōhakea Air Base.  Defence Minister Ron Mark said the money would be spent on improving old infrastructure. He said safety issues would be addressed, as well as upgrades to taxiways, accommodation and fresh, storm and waste water systems. "This ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Attributable to the Rt Hon Winston Peters
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Leader of New Zealand First “I am not persisting with this case just for myself, but for all people who have had their privacy breached. Privacy of information is a cornerstone of our country’s democracy. Without it our society truly faces a bleak future. We now ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Major boost in support for caregivers and children
    Hon Tracey Martin, Minister for Children A major increase in funding and availability of support will improve the incomes and reduce the pressure on 14,000 caregivers looking after more than 22,000 children. Children’s Minister Tracey Martin says that caregivers – all those looking after someone else’s children both in and ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Forestry Minister Shane Jones moves to protect sawmills
    Forestry Minister Shane Jones has introduced a Bill to Parliament that he says will "force more transparency, integrity and respect" for the domestic wood-processing sector through the registration of log traders and practice standards. The Forests (Regulation of Log Traders and Forestry Advisers) Amendment Bill had its first reading in ...
    3 weeks ago

  • Great Walks bookings open next week
    This summer presents a great opportunity for New Zealanders to get out into nature with bookings on Great Walks for 2020/21 set to open next week, says Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage.  Bookings for the Great Walks will open between 9 and 11 June, excluding Milford and Routeburn tracks which ...
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    11 hours ago
  • Ministerial Diary April 2020
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    1 day ago
  • Govt extends support schemes for businesses
    Extra 40,000 businesses to be eligible for wage subsidy extension Small business cashflow support application period extended The Government is today announcing further support for businesses that continue to be affected by the global COVID-19 pandemic, as the broader economy becomes one of the most open in the world following ...
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    1 day ago
  • Five new Super Hercules to join Air Force fleet
    The Coalition Government has confirmed five Lockheed Martin C-130J-30 Super Hercules transport aircraft will be purchased to replace the existing fleet, Defence Minister Ron Mark announced today.  “Last year, Cabinet selected these aircraft as the preferred option to replace the current Hercules fleet. Procurement of the Super Hercules has been ...
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    1 day ago
  • Wairarapa Moana seeks international recognition as vital wetland
    The Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage is celebrating World Environment Day with an announcement of a major step towards Wairarapa Moana being recognised as an internationally significant wetland. “Wairarapa Moana is an ecosystem of 10,000 hectares of wetland and open water that provides a home for indigenous fish, birds and ...
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    1 day ago
  • New public housing sets standard for future
    New public housing that will save tenants money in energy bills, and provide warmer, healthier and more comfortable homes, is setting the standard for the Government’s future public housing programme, Housing Minister Megan Woods said. Dr Woods opened the new Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities complex, which has a ...
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    1 day ago
  • First Police wing to complete training post lockdown
    A new-look Police graduation ceremony to take account of COVID19 health rules has marked the completion of training for 57 new constables. Police Minister Stuart Nash attended this afternoon's ceremony, where officers of Recruit Wing 337 were formally sworn in at the Royal New Zealand Police College without the normal support of ...
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    2 days ago
  • Government makes further inroads on predatory lenders
    Mobile traders and truck shops must adhere to responsible lending requirements Interest rate cap on high-cost loans Lenders prohibited from offering further credit to an applicant who has taken two high-cost loans in the past 90 days The Minister of Commerce and Consumer Affairs, Kris Faafoi, has signalled an end ...
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    2 days ago
  • New survey shows wage subsidy a “lifeline” for businesses, saved jobs
    94% of firms say wage subsidy had positive impact on cashflow 62% of firms say support helped to manage non-wage costs like rent A survey of business that have received the Government’s wage subsidy show it has played a significant role in saving jobs, and freed up cash flow to ...
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    2 days ago
  • Tax changes support economic recovery
    New legislation introduced to Parliament today will support growth and assist businesses on the road to economic recovery, said Revenue Minister Stuart Nash. “The Taxation (Annual Rates for 2020-21, Feasibility Expenditure, and Remedial Matters) Bill proposes that businesses can get tax deductions for ‘feasibility expenditure’ on new investments,” said Mr ...
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    2 days ago
  • $4.6 million financial relief for professional sports
    Sport and Recreation Minister Grant Robertson has welcomed the first release of funds from the $265 million Sport Recovery Package announced as part of Budget 2020. Sport NZ has announced that $4.6 million in funding will go to the Wellington Phoenix, NZ Warriors, Super Rugby teams and the ANZ Premiership ...
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    2 days ago
  • Critical support for strategic tourism assets
    An iconic New Zealand tourism attraction and the country’s 31 Regional Tourism Organisations are the first recipients of support from the $400 million Tourism Sector Recovery Plan, to help position the sector for recovery from COVID-19, Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis announced today. The plan includes a Strategic Tourism Assets Protection ...
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    2 days ago
  • Supporting Kiwi businesses to resolve commercial rent disputes
    The Government will legislate to ensure businesses that suffered as a result of the COVID-19 response will get help to resolve disputes over commercial rent issues, Justice Minister Andrew Little announced today. A temporary amendment to the Property Law Act will insert a clause in commercial leases requiring a fair ...
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    2 days ago
  • Prompt payments to SMEs even more urgent
    The Minister for Small Business says new data from Xero highlights the urgency of prompt payment practices to small and medium enterprises as we move into economic recovery. Last month Government ministers wrote to significant private enterprises and the banking industry to request they join efforts by government agencies to ...
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    2 days ago
  • Free period products in schools to combat poverty
    Young people in Waikato will be the first to have free access to period products in schools in another step to support children and young people in poverty,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said.  During term 3, the Ministry of Education will begin providing free period products to schools following the ...
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    3 days ago
  • Response to charges in New Plymouth
    The Minister of Police Stuart Nash has issued the following statement in response to charges filed against three Police officers this morning in the New Plymouth District Court. “Any incident involving a loss of life in Police custody is taken very seriously. The charges today reflect the gravity of the ...
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    3 days ago
  • Govt boosts innovation, R&D for economic rebuild
    $196 million for Crown Research Institutes $150 million for R&D loan scheme $33 million for Māori research and development opportunities $12 million for the Nationally Significant Collections and Databases $10 million to help maintain in-house capability at Callaghan Innovation New Zealand’s entrepreneurs, innovators and crown researchers will benefit from a ...
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    3 days ago
  • Temporary changes to NCEA and University Entrance this year
    Further temporary changes to NCEA and University Entrance (UE) will support senior secondary school students whose teaching and learning have been disrupted by COVID-19. “The wellbeing of students and teachers is a priority. As we are all aware, COVID-19 has created massive disruption to the school system, and the Government ...
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    3 days ago
  • Extended terms for the directors of the Racing Industry Transition Agency
    Minister for Racing Winston Peters today announced that the terms for the directors of the Racing Industry Transition Agency (RITA) have been extended to 30 June 2021. Due to the COVID-19 crisis the transition period has been extended to ensure that the Racing Industry Bill can complete its progress through ...
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    3 days ago
  • Healthy Homes Standards statement of compliance deadline extended
    The deadline for landlords to include detailed information in their tenancy agreements about how their property meets the Healthy Homes Standards, so tenants can see the home they are renting is compliant, has been extended from 1 July 2020 to 1 December 2020.  The Healthy Homes Standards became law on 1 July 2019. The Standards are ...
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    4 days ago
  • Criminal Cases Review Commission board appointments announced
    Justice Minister Andrew Little today announced details of further appointments to the Criminal Cases Review Commission. “I am pleased to announce Paula Rose QSO OStJ as Deputy Chief Commissioner for a term of five years commencing on 15 June 2020,” said Andrew Little. “I am also pleased to announce the ...
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    4 days ago
  • Release of initial list of supported training to aid COVID-19 recovery
    The Targeted Training and Apprenticeships Fund (TTAF) will pay costs of learners of all ages to undertake vocational education and training The fund will target support for areas of study and training that will give learners better employment prospects as New Zealand recovers from COVID-19 Apprentices working in all industries ...
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    4 days ago
  • Emission trading reforms another step to meeting climate targets
    The Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) will finally start to cut New Zealand’s greenhouse gas pollution as it was originally intended to, because of changes announced today by the Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw. The changes include a limit on the total emissions allowed within the ETS, rules to ensure ...
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    4 days ago
  • Queen’s Birthday Honours highlights Pacific leadership capability in Aotearoa
    Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio says the Queen’s Birthday 2020 Honours List provides an abundance of examples that Pacific people’s leadership capability is unquestionable in Aotearoa. “The work and the individuals we acknowledge this year highlights the kind of visionary examples and dedicated community leadership that we need ...
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    5 days ago
  • Govt backing horticulture to succeed
    The Government is backing a new $27 million project aimed at boosting sustainable horticulture production and New Zealand’s COVID-19 recovery efforts, says Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. “Our horticulture sector has long been one of New Zealand’s export star performers, contributing around $6 billion a year to our economy. During and ...
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    5 days ago
  • Applications open for forestry scholarships
    Applications have opened for 2021 Ngā Karahipi Uru Rākau – Forestry Scholarships, which will support more Māori and women to pursue careers in forestry science, says Forestry Minister Shane Jones. “I’m delighted Te Uru Rākau is offering Ngā Karahipi Uru Rākau – Forestry Scholarships for the third year running. These ...
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    5 days ago
  • Excellent service to nature recognised
    The Queen’s Birthday 2020 Honours List once again highlights the dedication by many to looking after our native plants and wildlife, including incredible work to restore the populations of critically endangered birds says Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage. Anne Richardson of Hororata has been made an Officer of the New ...
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    5 days ago
  • Wetlands and waterways gain from 1BT funding
    The Government will invest $10 million from the One Billion Trees Fund for large-scale planting to provide jobs in communities and improve the environment, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor and Forestry Minister Shane Jones have announced. New, more flexible funding criteria for applications will help up to 10 catchment groups plant ...
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    6 days ago
  • New fund for women now open
    Organisations that support women are invited to apply to a new $1,000,000 fund as part of the Government’s COVID-19 response. “We know women, and organisations that support women, have been affected by COVID-19. This new money will ensure funding for groups that support women and women’s rights,” said Minister for ...
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    6 days ago
  • Govt supports King Country farmers to lift freshwater quality
    Healthier waterways are front and centre in a new project involving more than 300 King Country sheep, beef and dairy farmers. The Government is investing $844,000 in King Country River Care, a group that helps farmers to lift freshwater quality and farming practice, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. “Yesterday ...
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    1 week ago
  • Libraries to help with jobs and community recovery
    A major funding package for libraries will allow them to play a far greater role in supporting their communities and people seeking jobs as part of the economic recovery from COVID-19. “Budget 2020 contains over $60 million of funding to protect library services and to protect jobs,” says Internal Affairs ...
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    1 week ago
  • Support for arts and music sector recovery
    A jobseekers programme for the creative sector and four new funds have been set up by the Government to help our arts and music industry recover from the blow of COVID-19. Thousands of jobs will be supported through today’s $175 million package in a crucial economic boost to support the ...
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    1 week ago
  • Legislative changes to support the wellbeing of veterans and their families
    Minister for Veterans Ron Mark has welcomed the First Reading of a Bill that will make legislative changes to further improve the veterans’ support system.  The Veterans’ Support Amendment Bill No 2, which will amend the Veterans’ Support Act 2014, passed First Reading today. The bill addresses a number of ...
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    1 week ago
  • Christ Church Cathedral – Order in Council
    Views sought on Order in Council to help fast track the reinstatement of the Christ Church Cathedral  The Associate Minister for Greater Christchurch Regeneration, Hon Poto Williams, will be seeking public written comment, following Cabinet approving the drafting of an Order in Council aimed at fast-tracking the reinstatement of the ...
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    1 week ago
  • New Zealanders’ human rights better protected in new Bill
    The law setting out New Zealanders’ basic civil and human rights is today one step towards being strengthened following the first reading of a Bill that requires Parliament to take action if a court says a statute undermines those rights. At present, a senior court can issue a ‘declaration of ...
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    1 week ago
  • Deep concern at Hong Kong national security legislation
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters today reiterated the deep concern of the New Zealand Government following confirmation by China’s National People’s Congress of national security legislation relating to Hong Kong. “New Zealand shares the international community’s significant and long-standing stake in Hong Kong’s prosperity and stability,” Mr Peters said. “New Zealand ...
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    1 week ago
  • Government invests in New Zealand’s cultural recovery
    Thousands of artists and creatives at hundreds of cultural and heritage organisations have been given much-needed support to recover from the impact of COVID-19, Prime Minister and Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Jacinda Ardern announced today. “The cultural sector was amongst the worst hit by the global pandemic,” Jacinda ...
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    1 week ago
  • Better protection for New Zealand assets during COVID-19 crisis
    Key New Zealand assets will be better protected from being sold to overseas owners in a way contrary to the national interest, with the passage of the Overseas Investment (Urgent Measures) Bill. The Bill, which passed its third reading in Parliament today, also cuts unnecessary red tape to help attract ...
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    1 week ago
  • Cleaning up our rivers and lakes
    Setting higher health standards at swimming spots Requiring urban waterways to be cleaned up and new protections for urban streams Putting controls on higher-risk farm practices such as winter grazing and feed lots Setting stricter controls on nitrogen pollution and new bottom lines on other measures of waterway health Ensuring ...
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    1 week ago
  • Record year for diversity on Govt boards
    The Government is on the verge of reaching its target of state sector boards and committees made up of at least 50 percent women, says Minister for Women Julie Anne Genter and Minister for Ethnic Communities Jenny Salesa. For the first time, the Government stocktake measures the number of Māori, ...
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    1 week ago