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Key-Fletcher nexus: anti-democratic ‘Intelligence communities’

Written By: - Date published: 11:36 am, May 23rd, 2014 - 47 comments
Categories: accountability, democracy under attack, john key, slippery, Spying, telecommunications, us politics - Tags: ,

The Campbell Live programme this week on John Key’s relationship with the GCSB focused on some very interesting themes, issues and people.  It points to a massive change in direction of government, and the NZ intelligence agencies under John Key’s watch. It focused specifically on NZ-US relations, and Ian Fletcher’s appointment as head of the GCSB, at a time when the surveillance of Kim Dotcom was initiated in NZ. The programme focused on some developments in 2011 and beyond.

campbell-live-gcsb-10-july-2013a

From an earlier Campbell Live programme: bottom right, Eric Holder next to Chris Finlayson at a Sydney meeting.

Massive changes began soon after John Key took office in 2008-9.  At the centre of this change is a shift in focus towards international trade and business that has extended to NZ’s intelligence services. It has involved increasing collaboration with the US, and to a lesser extent the UK governments, and all of the 5 Eyes intelligence partners.

Campbell Live 20 May 2014: “Key’s meeting with GCSB boss revealed

The headline puts Key and Fletcher center stage.  The programme begins with reference to the Kim Dotcom-GCSB saga, with a focus on the appointment to the GCSB of Ian Fletcher. Campbell begins by saying that the GCSB’s illegal surveillance of Kim Dotcom began in December 16th 2011. Campbell then goes on

Neither the Prime Minister nor the incoming GCSB head Ian Fletcher were told about it at the time.  But tonight, for the first time anywhere, we can reveal that Ian Fletcher had taken leave from his job in Queensland to be in Wellington that week.

Following this framing, the programme  shifts towards setting the story within the past and current context of US-NZ government relations.  With this shift, Campbell identifies the significance of the timing of this programme, by saying:

But as we learn the Prime Minister has again been invited to Washington, and as we learn more and more about the GCSB and 5 Eyes, we begin with how the organisation, and our relationship with America, has changed.

On CL, this story begins with John Key’s sudden shift  of Lt General Jerry Mateparae, from head of GCSB to Governor General in May 2011.  This is followed by a chain of events which includes the following: James R Clapper, US Director of National Intelligence (DNI) visiting NZ, and Minister of Foreign Affairs Murray McCully fronting an announcement, by then US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, of stronger ties between the NZ and US.

The CL programme also highlights the way the GCSB, with the appointment of Ian Fletcher, moved away from the primary focus on physical threats to national security, to inorporating a strong focus on “economic threats” and protection for commerce and trade.

Key leads change in NZ “intelligence community”

On checking on Clappers role, I found this description of his brief:

The Honorable James R. Clapper was sworn in as the fourth Director of National Intelligence (DNI) on August 9, 2010. As DNI, Mr. Clapper leads the United States Intelligence Community and serves as the principal intelligence advisor to the President.

full+spectrum dominanceThe term “Intelligence Community” reminded me of Chris Trotter’s post about the shift in the role of NZ intelligence services (April 11, 2013), as indicated by the Kitteridge Report:

The first clue Ms Kitteridge supplies is her reference to something called the New Zealand Intelligence “Community” (NZIC). This new kid on the national security block is the sum arrived at by adding the parts known as The NZ Security Intelligence Service, The GCSB and the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (DPMC).

This, increasingly co-ordinated and integrated, community includes a massive range of people, ultimately answerable to the Prime Minister, who is currently John Key.  This stretches to include the operative national security component of the DPMC, the Officials Committee for Domestic and External Security Co-ordination (ODESC), which includes

the Chief of Defence Force (Lt-General Rhys Jones), the Commissioner of Police (Peter Marshall), and the Secretary of Foreign Affairs and Trade (John Allen). The Directors of GCSB (Ian Fletcher) and NZSIS (Dr Warren Tucker) are not members, but attend most meetings.

Early after he first took office as PM, Key has led a shift to bring the vast array of services included under the “intelligence community” umbrella together under his control.

In an article on 36th Parallel earlier this month, Paul Buchanan explained the importance for democratic governance, of the separations of the powers of the state intelligence apparatus: the opposite of what John Key has been actioning.

The Bigger Picture

Here the whole story gets scarily massive, with too many threads to explain in detail in one post. I have posted before on how Key and Fletcher began meeting after Fletcher moved from the UK to work in Queensland in 2009; of how US Attorney General Eric Holder met with his 5 Eyes counterparts met with Chris Finlayson in Sydney in 15 July 2011 – focused on international and cyber crime.

People at meetings that were reported in this week’s Campbell Live programme, include the John Allen, Head of MFAT (Ministry of Foreign affairs and Trade); Chief of Defense Forces, Lt General Richard Rhys Jones; AND the British High Commissioner Vicki Treadell.

John Allen’s highly paid appointment in 2009, was part of a shift in MFAT away from the democratic principles of governance, towards the PM as CEO of NZ Inc, as spelled out by Fran O’Sullivan at the time.

He will also be a key driver in a huge transformational programme designed to leverage “New Zealand Inc”, so New Zealand’s vital economic and business interests are better projected offshore.

He oversaw a huge restructuring of MFAT, that resulted in large numbers of people losing their jobs.

NZ British High Commissioner since 2010, Vicki Treadell, came from a diplomatic background with a focus on international commerce and trade. (Also part of Fletcher’s UK  roles when working in the UK and Australia).

Ian Fletcher Vicki Treadell

Ian Fletcher Vicki Treadell: Image from The Daily Blog

Lt General Richard Rhys Jones, originally in NZ forces, also is a graduate of

The United States Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC) educates and develops leaders for full spectrum joint, interagency and multinational operations; acts as lead agent for the Army’s leader development program; and advances the art and science of the profession of arms in support of Army operational requirements.

He suffered a career set back in 2000, was resurrected by John Key as Chief of NZ Defense Forces in 2010, then took the fall for safety failures in September 2013.

In summary

The Campbell Live programme pointed to shifts towards NZ Inc, closer ties with the US, and an invasive state surveillance apparatus. At the centre of the shifts  is the relationship between John Key and Ian Fletcher.   The programme features clips showing how Key tried to avoid admitting to the extent of this relationship; especially with regard to Key’s role in appointing Fletcher to the GCSB job. (See my summary of the programme here.)

Brighter future for key and pals

 

47 comments on “Key-Fletcher nexus: anti-democratic ‘Intelligence communities’ ”

  1. ianmac 1

    The CL program covered a lot of ground. The difficulty is coping with that breadth. I like what Grant Robertson is doing in Question Time. He is focussing in on one small part at a time and getting better answers from Key. In spite of the Speaker blocking where he can.
    So well done Karol. A monumental task to sort the chaff.

    • Anne 1.1

      Thank-you karol for your herculean efforts on the subject. I think your readership will be going far beyond the standardista community. There would seem to be few other people publicly subjecting this matter to the intense scrutiny it deserves.

      There is only one MSM outlet -apart from TV3- who has reported any of this story and that was Stuff yesterday. Within hours of the report appearing, Cunliffe’s references to “lies” and “Key being a liar” were expunged.

      I note the following claim now at the bottom of the article:

      This story has been edited to provide background and balance. An earlier version was published before these steps were taken.

      Bullshit and Jellybeans!! Those of us who saw the original will appreciate it is LESS balanced than before. 1/3rd of the story is now devoted to Cunliffe’s speech, and 2/3rds to Key’s responses to the CL programme. The previous was half in half.

      What I take from karol’s post is that Key has been quietly gathering more and more power to himself. And he is using it in the most despicable way. He bullies… he threatens… and almost certainly is using blackmail against those he knows have knowledge of his questionable dealings. His proud boast in the latter months of last year about his top drawer was a direct threat to them.

      He has the MSM exactly where he wants them, and most are too wimpish to stand up to them him. 1984 is here!!

      • Anne 1.1.1

        …. most are too wimpish to stand up to him. (karol maybe you could correct in last line?)

      • Chooky 1.1.2

        +100 Anne …and great post Karol

        I would like to know more about the American Intelligence Community and how it differs from the CIA

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Intelligence_Community

        Are intelligence services being privatised?…If so it very dangerous imo because they will no longer be under the jurisdiction of democratically elected governments…room for fifth columns and all that…and shadowy control from outside/foreign intelligence cabals

    • karol 1.2

      Thanks, ianmac. And yes, Cunliffe and Robertson have focused on the Key’s role in appointing Fletcher.

      That was clearly signalled in the CL programme. Many have seen the CL programme as a fizzer. But, CL needS to tread carefully with the allegations they make. They did put the Key-Fletcher relationship in centre focus, and used those clips of Key clearly evading or being misleading about his meetings with Fletcher.

      The new information in the program emphasized the extent of Fletcher’s involvement with the GCSB, and Key, prior to his appointment – being given leave from his Queensland job, and coming to NZ laregly funded by the NZ government.

      • Sacha 1.2.1

        “Key clearly evading or being misleading about his meetings with Fletcher” – lying, yes.

  2. Wayne 2

    Honestly Karol,

    All your speculation on this is starting to look ridiculous. Yes, New Zealand has a variety of intelligence agencies and co-ordinating committees, but so what. And the people in them regularly meet, including with their international counterparts. What is new here?

    As an example of your devotion to conspiracy theories, it seems to be significant to you that Lt Gen Jones went to CGSC for his senior staff course.

    This is something that New Zealanders have done for many decades (there was bit of a hiatus with the US following 1985). Our senior officers either go to the UK, Australia, Canada or the US for their senior course, since our defence force is too small to run a senior staff college. The course is a year long and is typically undertaken by Army Colonels, Navy Captains, and RNZAF Group Captains.

    Sure the Key government has put in the effort to improve New Zealands relations with the US – I was part of that. But that was intended to be all about normalisation of the relationship.

    As part of your spooky conspiracy theories, you could also add the fact that in 2012 I was a Senior Fellow at the Centre of Strategic and International Studies in Washington DC. They have now published my paper entitled “The New Zealand Paradox; Adjusting to the Change in the Balance of Power in the Asia Pacific over the Next 20 Years.”

    Happy to send you a copy by email.

    • Anne 2.1

      This is something that New Zealanders have done for many decades (there was bit of a hiatus with the US following 1985). Our senior officers either go to the UK, Australia, Canada or the US for their senior course, since our defence force is too small to run a senior staff college. The course is a year long and is typically undertaken by Army Colonels, Navy Captains, and RNZAF Group Captains.

      And what dear chap, has that got to do with the price of fish? OR to spell it out for you – karol’s post? NOTHING. The post is nothing to do with the normal, run-of-the-mill military courses and exchange of personnel. You won’t fool anyone here with that nonsense.

      Are you concerned as to the quality of karol’s investigative skills so you seek to undermine them?

      • the pigman 2.1.1

        It’s a curious mixture of scarcely relevant rambling and self-promotion, isn’t it? Breaking press release from Wayne Mapp: “The U.S. is undertaking a pivot to Asia in its foreign policy, I know this because I am kind of a big deal.”

        Designed to distract. Best treated as white noise.

        • Anne 2.1.1.1

          It’s a curious mixture of scarcely relevant rambling and self-promotion, isn’t it?

          It is indeed.

          Wayne thinks because he gained some fellowship from somewhere or another – and he was once Defence Minister – that he is very important and clever. Well I’ve got news for him. In the course of a past career, I worked with some highly qualified people in the academic sense. I was initially in awe of them until I discovered some of them actually had very poor reasoning skills. They got their quallies by rote learning and were actually a bit dumb. 🙂

          • karol 2.1.1.1.1

            To me, it’s not so much about the smarts, but about people’s underlying values – that’s where there’s a fundamental difference between many of us on the left, and many on the right of politics.

            I think for many that participate within Key and National’s networks in politics and the corporate and financial worlds, they share some underlying values that lead to views that just seem common sense to them. For many, within their world view, the things that are happening probably just seem sensible and accepted by a wide range of people.

            Many of the criticisms we make, just don’t match up with their world view – or the views of those struggling to survive, and whose voices just don’t get heard very clearly in the MSM.

            • Tracey 2.1.1.1.1.1

              do you mean like regarding people who dont agree with them as bags of skin just getting in the way of their business?

              • karol

                Probably more benignly neglectful than that – that they don’t think so much about the people at the bottom of the heap at all – everything must often look good when the focus is on GDP, and business endeavours – the conventions and meetings of people focused on the reports of the CEOs and top diplomats. A world of its own, far removed from the struggle streets of many Kiwis.

                • JAK

                  There is a border between your two worlds. John Key crossed it.

                  • karol

                    Yes, and pulled up the ladder. He also aimed to leave his childhood life behind and aim to hob nob with those with power and money: his aim to be to succeed in the business world and to be PM. He learned early to play golf because he recognised that being a successful business person, meant participating in the “right” kind of social networking.

                    And the struggles of many relatively powerless Kiwis have changed from Key’s childhood days, as the shifts he has been part of have changed the whole context. It’s fairly easy to get out of touch.

                    • JAK

                      “pulled up the ladder”

                      Do you mean that John Key has made it more difficult for children growing up in New Zealand to:

                      -desire to hob nob with those with power and money
                      -succeed in the business world
                      -be PM ?

                    • Will@Welly

                      Aorangi School – part of John Key’s past, gone. Part of the master plan, eradicating his past. Soon all that will remain will be the immediate past – money trader, wealthy, and the present – influential, statesman, Prime Minister.
                      Orwellian.

                    • karol

                      Key lived in a state house when his mother encountered hard times. He was able to go to uni, and get a job in finance trading.

                      His government has been doing way with state houses, and training/education allowances for beneficiaries. Young people have been hard hit by unemployment – few jobs, let alone ones that would lead to high incomes.

                      People can desire whatever they want – achieving it is another matter.

            • Anne 2.1.1.1.1.2

              I agree with you karol but my comments were in relation to their general reasoning not their political leanings. Having said that, I wasn’t suggesting they were inbeciles – just that they weren’t as clever as they thought they were.

          • Wayne 2.1.1.1.2

            Read the paper and make your own assessment of it. But you can hardly do so without reading it.

          • Chooky 2.1.1.1.3

            +100 Anne….lol

    • karol 2.2

      Wayne, you have picked on a minor element in the post – Rhys Jones background, while ignoring more major details. It wasn’t so much that Rhys Jones did a course in the US, but that is was one focused on full spectrum joint, interagency and multinational operations

      Where am I “speculating” on major shifts that have occured under John Key’s oversight?: the amalgamation of the “intelligence community” as a more integrated body under the oversight of the PM – and following the model used in the US for its “Intelligence Community”; the shift of the GCSB (and 5 eyes) from focusing on physical/material security, to a focus on economic and commercial security; and the strongly aligned structural change in MFAT.

      Such things were indicated in the Campbell Live programme, and have been commented on by many others.

      Paul Buchanan’s piece on the need to keep the separation of intelligence powers as a check against anti-democratic intitiatives, is also very significant, as was Trotter’s piece on the shifts under Key’s watch to a more integrated “intelligence community”.

      • Wayne 2.2.1

        Karol,

        So what if that was his area of study, it is pretty important for senior officers. For the last 20 years defence doctrine has been all about multinational joint operations. A recommendation of the Select Committee Report in “Defence Beyond 2000”, was for a Joint Headquarters, in fact a specific suggestion by myself. The Clark govt implemented it around 2001.

        And the same logic has driven a closer integration of intelligence agencies with other parts of govt, including defence.

        It is largely driven by synergies of IT technology – everything can be joined up in a way that was not possible in the past.

        As noted above it has been happening for a while. It is not a secret. Over the last twenty years there have been hundreds of specialist defence books and articles on it.

        Probably the concept had its first big operational deployment in the Gulf War of 1991.

        • Anne 2.2.1.1

          I believe you are deliberately missing the point Wayne. Here is karol’s summary at the end of the
          post:

          The Campbell Live programme pointed to shifts towards NZ Inc, closer ties with the US, and an invasive state surveillance apparatus. At the centre of the shifts is the relationship between John Key and Ian Fletcher. The programme features clips showing how Key tried to avoid admitting to the extent of this relationship; especially with regard to Key’s role in appointing Fletcher to the GCSB job.

          The concern is not so much the changing nature of intelligence gathering apparatus and technological advances associated with it, but rather the profoundly invasive way they are being used. It is unnecessary, immoral and unethical that millions of individuals around the world are having their privacy invaded for no justifiable reason. It is dangerous and will ultimately destroy the democratic governing practices to which all peoples are entitled.

          Yes, you’re right. The concept did have its first operational deployment in the first Gulf War of January/February 1991. No problems with that. The problem lies with the massive upgrading of the surveillance undertaken since then – a surveillance that smells strongly of excess power plays and paranoia.

          That can only lead in one direction – death and destruction.

          • Tracey 2.2.1.1.1

            Wayne cherrypicking? Say it isnt so.

          • Chooky 2.2.1.1.2

            +100 Anne..”The concern is not so much the changing nature of intelligence gathering apparatus and technological advances associated with it, but rather the profoundly invasive way they are being used. It is unnecessary, immoral and unethical …”

            ….and I suspect Dotcom and his so-called “misdemeanors” in New Zealand (there are far bigger cloud storage systems in the USA which Hollywood moguls are not going after) is being used as a scapegoat and a pretext for this intrusive spying and violation of New Zealanders civil liberties…

            ie John Key and mates are arguing that they need to spy on New Zealanders and persecute Dotcom to stop infringement of copyright ( pull the other one!)

            New Zealand is a peaceable country and New Zealanders are a peaceable people…we dont deserve this!…..There is something rotten going on in the State of New Zealand

            • Anne 2.2.1.1.2.1

              +1 Chooky.

              And Key is leading the charge from the NZ end. No prizes for guessing why… he thinks its in his best interest.

        • karol 2.2.1.2

          Yes, I realize there’s a background of shifts in a particular direction. Key has followed it much more enthusiastically than Clark. The likes of Goff are more supportive of it than many others on the left.

          The changes in digital technologies have been incorporated into the mix.

          As part of my research for this post, I looked at this pdf document, published by James Clapper in March 2011.: “Statement for the Record on the Worldwide Threat Assessment of the U.S. Intelligence Community for the Senate Committee on Armed Services ”

          There’s a lot about the threats posed from countrie outsoutsidee 5 Eyes, Western sphere: Iraq, Chine, etc.
          Then there’s this section:

          Intelligence Threats and Threats to US Technological & Economic Leadership Intelligence Threats and Threats to US Technological & Economic Leadership
          […]
          We are also undergoing a phenomenon known as “convergence,” which amplifies the opportunity for disruptive cyber attacks, including against physical infrastructures. This phenomenon means that the same networks and devices are processing a full range of data and support a full range of applications, from banking to social networking, from supply chain management to patient health records. This convergence adds much convenience, but it poses new security challenges across a swath of our government and economy.

          It covers “cyber threats” and later goes on to export controls and economic imbalances.

          And this was at the same time, as now revealed by the Snowden material, the NSA was developing a whole range of powerful and invasive digital capabilities.

          It is of extreme concern to many of us, that very powerul systems of control and devastation, are being incorproated in the intelligence services and related government structures usually more focused on physical threats, , in ways that undermine democracy. And in doing this, wealthy corporates are being empowered and US coproates are being protected and promoted internationally.

        • Robert M 2.2.1.3

          It would be difficult to see any merit in the term as MOD Wayne Mapp or his ridiculous deputy the actor Private Heather Roy. During Wayne Mapp’s term, Defence spending was cut significantly, as was the RNZN fuel allocation, leaving much of the fleet laid up, most of the time. Defence wages for ratings remained far below those of the police, even for far more able and qualified military personel and the inadequate officer pay and fuel allocation mean many mid rank officers deserted the services for Australian industry or its military.
          The excuse was made that the RNZAF Aermacchis could not be returned to service because their engines were no longer servicable. Hower 8/9 of MB339Cs are now being used for military training in the United States and it is unlikely that the cost of refitting 10/12 Aermacchis with new engines and provision for light armament for training with the Navy or Army would have been prohibitive. I would suggest a light armament of a 30mm gun, rocket laucher attachment and ability to carry 2/4- 500/1000lb bombs would have been all that was required of for coastal intervention against say a boatload of gureillas has been heading towards our coast, say if in 1998 Clinton had directed the US and Australia to pressure Indonesia with Economic sanctions and economic pressure through the banking system which seems to be part of the reason we were offered the FFGF-7s and F-16s second hand.
          The current Nationals defence programme remains very light with the proposal for extensive furthur refitting of already 14/16 yr old Anzacs unlikely to be completed until they have been 20 years in the water, an age usually considered unsuitable for modernisation given structual deterioration after significant year at sea. The extra third hand RAN/USN Seasprites seem only suitable for training and training maintenance crews and some spares. The Penquin helicopter anti ship missiles may be useful but the long range British Sea Ceptor anti aircraft missiles seem a bizarre acquisition in this part of world.

    • Tracey 2.3

      Honestly Wayne

      how often as a minister did you get briefed on, and involved in, the appointment of someone to head your ministry, suggest someone, then agree to contact them, contact them, appoint them, and within months forget all about your role in the hiring but wrongly “remember” it was the other guy at your meeting who did what you did?

      misleading the public of nz a or lying to them, may not matter to you, but dont belittle those who do care.

    • Tracey 2.4

      by key govt you mean winston peters under the last coalition labour govt… god, the way you guys twist things is incredible. its like you all have selective amnesia. let me help… condoleza rice and winston made the big thaw.

      • karol 2.4.1

        I think Wayne would agree with you – ie that Key’s government hasn’t been doing anything much that Labour hasn’t been doing, bar in the Rogernomics/Lange period.

        The Clark government did oversee some thawing of US-NZ relations. As Hagar has often pointed out, even under wher watch, when she was putting breaks on getting involved in the Iraq etc., the GCSB happily collaborated with US initiatives.

        The resort to dismissing an overview of the way things have shifted under under Key as “conspiracy theory” is frustrating.

        I’m not talking about a carefully planned and orchestrated conspiracy, but networks of people, with similar views, drawing on various resources within their networks when necessity and/or opportunities arise.

        I have little evidence of the details of how some things happened, or the motivations of various players. I am mapping the changes I can see from the publicly available evidence.

        under Clark, there was a bit of a holding pattern, not getting too far into the “neoliberal” way of doing things, as led by the US.

        Under Key, there have been clear structural shifts in the likes of MFAT and the intelligence services, towards systems and structures that favour international trade and commerce as dominated by big corporates.

        • Tracey 2.4.1.1

          well put.

          greens have caught the pm making stuff up in parliament again…

        • Robert M 2.4.1.2

          We will never know, as the tapes of the Clark conversations with Condi and W43 and his inner Cabinet are never likely to have been released, but it is certainly the case that Clark has been quite a strong acceptor of the GCSB and an expanded role for it , for a long time, ie as early as 30 years ago. I happen to know that shortly after Owen Wilkes on a butterfly collecting mission discovered Tangimoana , that Clark after considering the issue and Muldoons statement on the station, Clark decided it was OK ( I talked to her on the phone several times about this at the time). Also plenty of sources will tell you that Clark was a stong supporter of the establishment of Waihopai and a great enthusiast for the intelligence input and discussions with her Generals.

  3. Tigger 3

    Karol, I want you to know your work on these sorts of things is very appreciated. Great post.

  4. repateet 4

    The use of the Maxwell Smart on here is totally uncalled for! It brings to mind the image of Judith Collins as Agent 99. Calling from somewhere in China too. Hiding under a table ( of the private dinner sort), reporting to the chief.

    • karol 4.1

      I’m not sure how that image got there. I may have omitted to put an image in, and someone else added that one.
      Changed it.

  5. Charlieboy 5

    Karol, great post, and great additional from Anne. I get the feeling,that with this sort of digging down, sooner or later the dam will burst.The Right is certainly worried, as is seen by their ridicule attacks . Anne is right, there is a level of fear out in the media, and you do have to applaud Campbell for his efforts. Where is that really brave deep throat out there in the hinterland, we need you now.

  6. fisiani 6

    Karol Great post. Keep up the great work. This is truly resonating with voters everywhere. Everywhere I go I hear people telling me that they cannot trust John Key after the astonishing Campbell Live revelations of something about spying. The next polls will see National plummet to below 40% and John Keys rating to fall to single figures to match The Cunliffe. Keep up the digging for another 17 weeks.

  7. Charlieboy 7

    Bingo!

  8. Lou 8

    GREAT, thought-provoking post, Karol. My heart sank as I watched CL, as it laid out the worst of my fears. BUGGER, I came to this fair country to get away from this sort of CRAP!!

  9. Tanz 9

    Under Key’s watch, beneficiaries can no longer study full time. He has certianly pulled up the ladder up and he does all he can to eradicate his less than glossy childhood. He worked for the corrupt co of Merryl Lynch, that was the platform to his ill-gained fortune.

    He is a liar and a theif and worst of all, an arrogant show pony. Ego driven. He is startiing to lose a lot of credibility. The MSM are drones though.

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    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Impressive response to DOC scholarship programme
    Some of the country’s most forward-thinking early-career conservationists are among recipients of a new scholarship aimed at supporting a new generation of biodiversity champions, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. The Department of Conservation (DOC) has awarded one-year postgraduate research scholarships of $15,000 to ten Masters students in the natural ...
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    4 days ago
  • Speech to ANZLF Virtual Indigenous Business Trade and Connections Event
    I acknowledge our whānau overseas, joining us from Te Whenua Moemoeā, and I wish to pay respects to their elders past, present, and emerging. Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you all today. I am very pleased to be part of the conversation on Indigenous business, and part ...
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    5 days ago
  • Main benefits to increase in line with wages
    Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni announced today that main benefits will increase by 3.1 percent on 1 April, in line with the rise in the average wage. The Government announced changes to the annual adjustment of main benefits in Budget 2019, indexing main benefit increases to the average ...
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    5 days ago
  • Deed of Settlement signed with Ngāti Maru (Taranaki)
    A Deed of Settlement has been signed between Ngāti Maru and the Crown settling the iwi’s historical Treaty of Waitangi claims, Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little announced today. The Ngāti Maru rohe is centred on the inland Waitara River valley, east to the Whanganui River and its ...
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    7 days ago
  • Support in place for people connected to Auckland COVID-19 cases
    With a suite of Government income support packages available, Minister for Social Development and Employment Carmel Sepuloni is encouraging people, and businesses, connected to the recent Auckland COVID-19 cases to check the Work and Income website if they’ve been impacted by the need to self-isolate. “If you are required to ...
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    7 days ago
  • Statement on passing of former PNG PM Sir Michael Somare
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has expressed her condolences at the passing of long-serving former Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea, Grand Chief Sir Michael Somare. “Our thoughts are with Lady Veronica Somare and family, Prime Minister James Marape and the people of Papua New Guinea during this time of great ...
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    1 week ago
  • Speech to the National Māori Housing Conference 2021
    E te tī, e te tā  Tēnei te mihi maioha ki a koutou  Ki te whenua e takoto nei  Ki te rangi e tū iho nei  Ki a tātou e tau nei  Tēnā tātou.  It’s great to be with you today, along with some of the ministerial housing team; Hon Peeni Henare, the ...
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    1 week ago
  • Drone project to aid protection of Māui dolphin
    The Government is backing a new project to use drone technology to transform our understanding and protection of the Māui dolphin, Aotearoa’s most endangered dolphin.    “The project is just one part of the Government’s plan to save the Māui dolphin. We are committed to protecting this treasure,” Oceans and Fisheries ...
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    1 week ago
  • New water regulator board announced as major Government reform moves forward
    Major water reform has taken a step closer with the appointment of the inaugural board of the Taumata Arowai water services regulator, Hon Nanaia Mahuta says. Former Director General of Health and respected public health specialist Dame Karen Poutasi will chair the inaugural board of Crown agency Taumata Arowai. “Dame ...
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    1 week ago
  • North Auckland gets public transport upgrade
    The newly completed Hibiscus Coast Bus Station will help people make better transport choices to help ease congestion and benefit the environment, Transport Minister Michael Wood and Auckland Mayor Phil Goff said today. Michael Wood and Phil Goff officially opened the Hibiscus Coast Bus Station which sits just off the ...
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    1 week ago
  • Supporting work to protect Northland reserve
    New funding announced by Conservation Minister Kiri Allan today will provide work and help protect the unique values of Northland’s Te Ārai Nature Reserve for future generations. Te Ārai is culturally important to Te Aupōuri as the last resting place of the spirits before they depart to Te Rerenga Wairua. ...
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    1 week ago
  • Critical step to new housing deal for Pacific communities
      Today the Government has taken a key step to support Pacific people to becoming Community Housing providers, says the Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio. “This will be great news for Pacific communities with the decision to provide Pacific Financial Capability Grant funding and a tender process to ...
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    1 week ago
  • Consultation opens on proposed Bay of Islands marine mammal sanctuary
    Conservation Minister Kiri Allan is encouraging New Zealanders to have their say on a proposed marine mammal sanctuary to address the rapid decline of bottlenose dolphins in Te Pēwhairangi, the Bay of Islands. The proposal, developed jointly with Ngā Hapū o te Pēwhairangi, would protect all marine mammals of the ...
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    1 week ago
  • Three District Court Judges appointed
    Attorney-General David Parker today announced the appointment of three new District Court Judges.    Two of the appointees will take up their roles on 1 April, replacing sitting Judges who have reached retirement age.     Kirsten Lummis, lawyer of Auckland has been appointed as a District Court Judge with jury jurisdiction to ...
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    1 week ago
  • Government announces list of life-shortening conditions guaranteeing early KiwiSaver access
    Government announces list of life-shortening conditions guaranteeing early KiwiSaver access The Government changed the KiwiSaver rules in 2019 so people with life-shortening congenital conditions can withdraw their savings early The four conditions guaranteed early access are – down syndrome, cerebral palsy, Huntington’s disease and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder An alternative ...
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    1 week ago
  • Reserve Bank to take account of housing in decision making
    The Reserve Bank is now required to consider the impact on housing when making monetary and financial policy decisions, Grant Robertson announced today. Changes have been made to the Bank’s Monetary Policy Committee’s remit requiring it to take into account government policy relating to more sustainable house prices, while working ...
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    1 week ago
  • Investment to reduce cochlear implant waitlist
    The Labour Government will invest $6 million for 70 additional adult cochlear implants this year to significantly reduce the historical waitlist, Health Minister Andrew Little says. “Cochlear implants are life changing for kiwis who suffer from severe hearing loss. As well as improving an individual’s hearing, they open doors to ...
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    1 week ago
  • Māori wards Bill passes third reading
    The Local Electoral (Māori Wards and Māori Constituencies) Amendment Bill passed its third reading today and will become law, Minister of Local Government Hon Nanaia Mahuta says. “This is a significant step forward for Māori representation in local government. We know how important it is to have diversity around ...
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    1 week ago
  • Government delivers 1,000 more transitional housing places
    The Government has added 1,000 more transitional housing places as promised under the Aotearoa New Zealand Homelessness Action Plan (HAP), launched one year ago. Minister of Housing Megan Woods says the milestone supports the Government’s priority to ensure every New Zealander has warm, dry, secure housing. “Transitional housing provides people ...
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    1 week ago
  • Second batch of Pfizer/BioNTech doses arrives safely – as the first vaccinations take place in the...
    A second batch of Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines arrived safely yesterday at Auckland International Airport, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says. “This shipment contained about 76,000 doses, and follows our first shipment of 60,000 doses that arrived last week. We expect further shipments of vaccine over the coming weeks,” Chris Hipkins said. ...
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    1 week ago
  • $18 million for creative spaces to make arts more accessible
    The Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni has today announced $18 million to support creative spaces. Creative spaces are places in the community where people with mental health needs, disabled people, and those looking for social connection, are welcomed and supported to practice and participate in the arts ...
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    1 week ago
  • Moriori Claims Settlement Bill passes first reading
    Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Minister Andrew Little today welcomed Moriori to Parliament to witness the first reading of the Moriori Claims Settlement Bill. “This bill is the culmination of years of dedication and hard work from all the parties involved. “I am delighted to reach this significant milestone today,” Andrew ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Government action reduces child poverty
    22,400 fewer children experiencing material hardship 45,400 fewer children in low income households on after-housing costs measure After-housing costs target achieved a year ahead of schedule Government action has seen child poverty reduce against all nine official measures compared to the baseline year, Prime Minister and Minister for Child Poverty ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Entries open for the 2021 Prime Minister’s Education Excellence Awards
    It’s time to recognise the outstanding work early learning services, kōhanga reo, schools and kura do to support children and young people to succeed, Minister of Education Chris Hipkins says. The 2021 Prime Minister’s Education Excellence Awards are now open through until April 16. “The past year has reminded us ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Jobs for Nature benefits three projects
    Three new Jobs for Nature projects will help nature thrive in the Bay of Plenty and keep local people in work says Conservation Minister Kiri Allan. “Up to 30 people will be employed in the projects, which are aimed at boosting local conservation efforts, enhancing some of the region’s most ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Improvements to the Holidays Act on the way
    The Government has accepted all of the Holidays Act Taskforce’s recommended changes, which will provide certainty to employers and help employees receive their leave entitlements, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood announced today. Michael Wood said the Government established the Holidays Act Taskforce to help address challenges with the ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • NZ’s credit rating lifted as economy recovers
    The Government’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and faster than expected economic recovery has been acknowledged in today’s credit rating upgrade. Credit ratings agency Standard & Poor’s (S&P) today raised New Zealand’s local currency credit rating to AAA with a stable outlook. This follows Fitch reaffirming its AA+ rating last ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Speech to National Remembrance Service on the 10th anniversary of the Christchurch earthquake
    Tena koutou e nga Maata Waka Ngai Tuahuriri, Ngai Tahu whanui, Tena koutou. Nau mai whakatau mai ki tenei ra maumahara i te Ru Whenua Apiti hono tatai hono, Te hunga mate ki te hunga mate Apiti hono tatai hono, Te hunga ora ki te hunga ora Tena koutou, Tena ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Government reaffirms urgent commitment to ban harmful conversion practices
    The Minister of Justice has reaffirmed the Government’s urgent commitment, as stated in its 2020 Election Manifesto, to ban conversion practices in New Zealand by this time next year. “The Government has work underway to develop policy which will bring legislation to Parliament by the middle of this year and ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • New creative service aims to benefit 1,000 peoples’ careers
    Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage and Social Development Hon Carmel Sepuloni today launched a new Creative Careers Service, which is expected to support up to 1,000 creatives, across three regions over the next two years. The new service builds on the most successful aspects of the former Pathways to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago