web analytics

Labour clarifies position on irrigation and bottled water

Written By: - Date published: 6:30 am, June 26th, 2017 - 50 comments
Categories: election 2017, farming, labour, water - Tags: , ,

labour.org.nz press release

Labour will not resile from royalties

Posted by Andrew Little on June 25, 2017

Labour believes cleaning up our rivers so that they are clean enough to swim in is the most important freshwater issue for this election, but that it is also fair that a royalty should be charged where public water is used in large quantities for private gain, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little.

“It was reported following my speech to Federated Farmers last week that Labour has abandoned its policy of charging a royalty on farming uses of water. We haven’t.

“At the conclusion of my speech I was asked about resource rentals which I thought was a  reference to our NZ Power policy of 2014. I replied that we were not continuing with that policy.  I confirmed we would impose a levy on bottled water.  This was in addition to our focus on water quality, which I had already spoken about.

“The message of my speech was that we will work with farmers on regulatory change and that there is urgency to act on environmental quality and climate change. We remain committed to setting a resource rental for large water take for irrigation at a fair and affordable price.

“I wanted to emphasise that the platform we are campaigning on this election will emphasise water quality and a royalty on water used for bottling.

“The chair of the meeting commented that there was a difference between bottled water and irrigation, which I did not reply to.

“This exchange  was interpreted as Labour abandoning our wider policy, which we have held since the 2011 election, of introducing a wider royalty on commercial uses of water.

“Labour has not resiled from its policy on water royalties.

“This election we will be focusing on water quality and water bottling, as these are important to all New Zealanders,” says Andrew Little.

50 comments on “Labour clarifies position on irrigation and bottled water ”

  1. bwaghorn 1

    what is the irrigation levy to be used for , is it ring fenced for improving all things water , or is it into the great government slush fund?

  2. Charge a lot for irrigation.double the penalties for polluters or those that don’t fulfill their obligations around water – farmers and city folk. Ban water bottling for export.

    • Andre 2.1

      Why ban water bottling for export? It’s the highest dollar value use of the water, and is a near negligible portion of water use in NZ. Just make sure we get a substantial royalty.

      • marty mars 2.1.1

        We need it here. I don’t care about the dollars – that’s a false argument imo.

        • Draco T Bastard 2.1.1.1

          +111

        • Andre 2.1.1.2

          Let’s do a comparison of directly exporting water vs using it to produce milk.

          https://sciblogs.co.nz/waiology/2012/05/24/how-much-water-does-it-take-to-produce-one-litre-of-milk/

          Let’s start by imagining we charge a royalty of $0.01 per litre for bottled water that ends up retailing for over a buck a litre. If that water goes to dairy cows instead, it takes 250 litres of aquifer water to produce a litre of milk in Canterbury, along with another 700 odd litres of other water footprint. That litre of milk is worth maybe $0.70, and creating it also created a shitload of pollutants. The royalty on the 250 litres would instead be $2.50, with no resulting pollution in our waterways.

          I know which deal looks better to me. As long as we’re not trashing environmental treasures by extracting that water.

          • marty mars 2.1.1.2.1

            Just to clarify. My belief is that water is a common. It should be available to all. It should not be commodified for profit. I wouldn’t let farmers do it either.

            • gsays 2.1.1.2.1.1

              I am with you there Marty, some things are sacred, water is one of them.

          • weka 2.1.1.2.2

            Andre why are you comparing a natural resource with something that is produced. As marty says, the water is the commons. It shouldn’t be for sale.

            I’d also argue that the plastics involved in bottling water is a reason on its own not to do it. Massive amounts of pollution. And then there are the carbon emissions.

            We just have to stop all that shit. It’s that thinking (water extraction is better at making money) that has lead us to having most of our rivers polluted (hey, milk powder is a great way to make money). Start with sustainability and then figure out how to make a living within that. Most of what you are talking about isn’t making a living, it’s making a killing, and other things are paying the price.

            “As long as we’re not trashing environmental treasures by extracting that water.”

            Name me some NZ examples where the environment doesn’t get trashed.

            • Andre 2.1.1.2.2.1

              Let’s consider the proposed Ashburton scheme that got a lot of publicity last year.

              http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11672314

              That scheme apparently planned to tap into a resource that’s already heavily drawn on by agriculture, and since Ashburton is closer to the coast than the hills, it would be closer to the end of the line than the source. So I don’t see that there’s an argument that they are unfairly privatising a common resource that should be available to all any more than the farmers drawing on that same resource do. Nor is it trashing an environmental treasure any more than the farmers extracting water are doing, and it would be a very difficult task finding any measurable effects from that extraction from deep underground.

              The planned extraction rate was 1.4 billion litres per year. This sounds like a huge number, but it nets down to 45 litres per second. That’s a tiny trickle of a stream. I’d be surprised if there weren’t farmers extracting a lot more.

              As far as emissions, I’ll guess using the water for bottled water is probably lower than alternative agricultural uses.

              So all up, my argument is that if we are going to allow extraction of that water resource, then using it for bottled water with a royalty is a smarter and less environmentally damaging use than intensifying agriculture. Or if we are going to deny it to bottlers (with a royalty) because it’s privatising a common resource, then we should apply the same reasoning to farmers.

              • Draco T Bastard

                That scheme apparently planned to tap into a resource that’s already heavily drawn on by agriculture, and since Ashburton is closer to the coast than the hills, it would be closer to the end of the line than the source. So I don’t see that there’s an argument that they are unfairly privatising a common resource that should be available to all any more than the farmers drawing on that same resource do. Nor is it trashing an environmental treasure any more than the farmers extracting water are doing, and it would be a very difficult task finding any measurable effects from that extraction from deep underground.

                Non sequitur followed by failed logic.

                Just because it’s close to the coast doesn’t mean that it’s unfairly privatising a common resource.

                Just because it may be better than farming doesn’t mean that it’s not trashing the environment. In fact, we know it is trashing the environment as extracting the water will cause damage to life and the land.

                The planned extraction rate was 1.4 billion litres per year. This sounds like a huge number, but it nets down to 45 litres per second. That’s a tiny trickle of a stream.

                More failed logic.

                It’s not a question of it being a small amount but what the proportion of the amount being added by rainfall. And then how much the environment needs to survive.

                As far as emissions, I’ll guess using the water for bottled water is probably lower than alternative agricultural uses.

                It’s not just about emissions but about other pollutants such as plastic water bottles as well.

                So all up, my argument is that if we are going to allow extraction of that water resource, then using it for bottled water with a royalty is a smarter and less environmentally damaging use than intensifying agriculture.

                Yes it is but it’s still failing to note the actual physical limitations of the environment.

              • greywarshark

                Andre
                Let’s fucking not consider any export of water. It is not a commodity that there is much of, it can’t be processed cheaply enough (say from seawater) at an exportable price, it is a necessity, it is lifeblood to the land, and so with us.

                I’ll say no more. I have said my bit twice now in rage and bewilderment that apparently intelligent and sane people can erect such powerful theoretical arguments that should not even be considered.
                You sound like a neo lib economist who wants to change the world, or exploit to excess parts of it, because he or she worked out an argument calling on faulty theories and authority, that sounds good enough to a packed hall of peers.

              • Ad

                I agree with your reasoning Andre.
                Lowest cost, highest price.

                After all, if we ban exports of water, we ban exports of all fluid exports other than mineral fluids. Although I’ve heard a good glass of Pinot is also “sacred”.

                New Zealand has a comparative advantage in this world for water and grass. That’s still about it.

                The only policy argument is at what level the royalty for water should be set.

                Underneath that is the point Winston raised about whether that royalty should be ringfenced to be spent within the area it was extracted from.

                Also, since it’s a raw ingredient, whether it should be subject to GST or not.

                • Funny a christan like you mocking sacred things. That happened a lot during the early stages of colonisation too when christans showed disdain for the beliefs that they discovered here. Thought we’d moved on from that a bit but…

                • Draco T Bastard

                  New Zealand has a comparative advantage in this world for water and grass. That’s still about it.

                  No we don’t.

                  We have an absolute advantage compared to some nations and an absolute disadvantage compared to some others.

                  The only policy argument is at what level the royalty for water should be set.

                  Under market theology the price of water should be set at the same rate in NZ as the price in the nations with minimal water. NZ would then get a higher profit.

                  Underneath that is the point Winston raised about whether that royalty should be ringfenced to be spent within the area it was extracted from.

                  Most of it should go to the area it was extracted from with some going to the central government.

                  Also, since it’s a raw ingredient, whether it should be subject to GST or not.

                  GST applies to everything sold except financial services.

                  Still, the real question there is if we should have GST at all.

                  • Ad

                    A marked “theology” is not what is proposed. Labour is precisely proposing to regulate its price.

                    GST is proposed under NZFirst to remove GST on raw ingredients.

                    No political party in parliament I am aware of is proposing to get rid of GST entirely.

                    • Draco T Bastard

                      A market theology is what we have. Adding water pricing is more of that market theology.

                      GST is massively regressive and needs to be gotten rid of.

                    • Draco T Bastard

                      I think the government Treasury’s accounts are now addicted to it, now that they’ve sold off most of the power companies.

                      Now that they’ve cut taxes on the rich actually.

                      Dropping GST will mean having to put the taxes back up on the highest earners.

                      Maybe a really adventurous state would simply nationalise fresh water, form its own company, and really make some tax.

                      That’s pretty much what needs to happen.

              • weka

                If you think that drawing water from aquifers doesn’t affect the environment I suggest doing some research on the US rivers that no longer reach the sea.

                Of course individual takes don’t make a difference. It’s when the take is more than the aquifer and catchment can sustain that’s the problem. We already know that NZ currently is in overshoot on so many levels, and we don’t yet know what will happen to the Canterbury aquifers from climate change (less rain and snow? More wind? melting glaciers etc). Ground water is far too important to fuck around with.

                The difference between bottled water and ag is that ag will eventually be about keeping humans alive instead of making money. Bottled water is not about that at all. It’s about supporting the extravagant lifestyles of developed places who have fucked their own water supply. I’m all for bottling water for humanitarian reasons, even with the plastics involved, but I think we have a moral imperative to not send our water to places that won’t look after their own.

                Agriculture for food needs far less water than it uses now. Regen ag specialises in low water farming. There’s no reason that kind of farming can’t take water as needed, but that’s entirely different than what we are seeing now. So sure, let’s ban commercial bottling of water, and put a moratorium on big ag irrigation so it can transition to regenag.

                • Jenny Kirk

                  Totally agree with you, Weka. Sensible, commonsense comments – so realistic …… its no wonder all those neo-libs don’t understand – they only understand their own fantasies.

                • Timeforacup of tea

                  Hello.
                  I am in the USA right now and can buy spring water for .1666666 cents per litre, yes that is right point 1666666 cents per litre. 24 – 500 mil bottles for US$1.99.
                  New Zealand is a rip of country when it comes to bottled water and I have never ever purchased a plastic bottle of water in NZ but do here in the US. Beats coke hands down.
                  Gas was US$1.99 a gallon today which ruffly translates to 25 cents US per litre. Eggs huge large buggers 47 cents US a dozen. And a US gallon of milk rich creamy milk not like our watered down stuff US$1.95 or ruffly 50 cents a litre.
                  Have a nice day.

            • Draco T Bastard 2.1.1.2.2.2

              +111

          • Draco T Bastard 2.1.1.2.3

            As long as we’re not trashing environmental treasures by extracting that water.

            Trashing the environment is exactly what we will be doing by extracting the water and exporting it. Never mind reducing the amount of water for each and everyone of us here in NZ.

            Why do people think that the water we have is unlimited?

            • Ad 2.1.1.2.3.1

              Depends where you live.
              Too much in some places, not enough – seasonally – in others.

              • Draco T Bastard

                Still not unlimited.

                • Ad

                  It’s surplus.

                  Those who have an oversupply should be able to use that oversupply – unless of course you cut through Conservation lands to get at it. No need to be selfish with something we have in oversupply that the world needs.

          • Ad 2.1.1.2.4

            There are plenty of brewery companies who have asked the same question as that: why not just export water, when we get all the grief about whether beer is “craft” or not, what scale of alcohol tax it attracts, the massive plant and machinery required to produce at scale, the operational costs, the marketing costs, the depreciation, etc etc.

            Which is a very good driver for those like Coca Cola whose core products need massive extra ingredients, marketing, copyright protection.

            And we have too much of it most of the time in many places.

            I’m amazed that Watercare hasn’t started retailing bottled water itself.

      • greywarshark 2.1.2

        Andre
        Water is a scarce but necessary commodity. You want to keep exporting this??
        And think that we won’t be rorted by any business that sets up this moving gold mine??

        Wake up brother. Once the pipes are in place it can be siphoned off and who will be able to keep accurate measurements of how much? There could be observers in place and they would get captured by the business selling the water. It would be ripe for moral hazard. For bribes, for tax avoidance, for payment evasion with businesses constantly going broke owing $millions.

        Just leave our water alone, or it will be bloody water, the rose red bubble of a pricked thumb, I can feel it in my thumbs, I can feel it in my water. There is an inevitable human skewedness waiting to happen here, it’s just normal human business and greed behaviour to follow that route which will lead to multiple tragedies.

        • Ad 2.1.2.1

          We have an economy that runs on water already.
          Much of it is accurately measured, commodified, and given extra value before being sold, consumed and exported. You’re soaking in it.

      • Stuart Munro 2.1.3

        It’s not just about money – the whole water bottling game is environmentally negative. Councils should concentrate on clean water for people living in the area – not risk that for a dodgy dollar.

  3. patricia bremner 3

    Was this another case of a “misunderstanding/non story” which causes distraction through headlines for the growing ranks of Labour/Greens? (not counting inflated polls ofcourse).

    • Jenny Kirk 3.1

      Yes – I think so. A “misunderstanding” on the part of the media who reported it.
      I noted another one (I’m not going to say what it was) yesterday, and someone will be waiting for the opportunity to bring it up to “disrespect” Andrew Little. Just don’t believe them, and try not to be distracted.

      • weka 3.1.1

        +1 I was puzzled myself by the original article (it was in the rural pages of Stuff). But seeing left wing politicos assuming that the article was true was pretty interesting. The article itself wasn’t very well written, but some lefties just want to assume the worst about Labour and that’s where they will go first rather than checking things out.

        • Bill 3.1.1.1

          I’m still puzzled 😉

          The original article refers to the 2014 policy of “resource rental”, but resource rental has been around since 2011 (‘Water’ is currently under review alongside other policies from 2014 and hasn’t been released as policy yet) . Andrew Little says he thought the question was about the 2014 policy of having a single buyer for generated electricity (The NZ Power Policy). That was dropped back in Nov 2015, and I have to say, that barring actually hearing how the question was phrased, I’m buggered if I can see how confusion between those two things could arise.

          Anyway, ‘checking stuff out’ then, it seems isn’t always that straight forward, aye?

          People generlly reported in good faith off the back of that stuff report. NRT has already put out a correction, and I’d hardly characterise the NZ Federation of Freshwater Anglers as lefties (who) just want to assume the worst about Labour…

          • weka 3.1.1.1.1

            Just as well I wasn’t talking about the anglers then and instead was talking about actual lefties who should know better but let their antipathy towards Labour cloud their judgement (mostly on twitter but also Rhinocrates on the weekend). The article was clearly not clear and in the political scene I’m not really going to go with ‘we should take Stuff at face value’.

            I don’t understand the whole resource rental vs whatever, so will wait for the actual policy release before condemning Labour.

            “and I have to say, that barring actually hearing how the question was phrased, I’m buggered if I can see how confusion between those two things could arise.”

            Whereas I think that people miscommunicate all the time and so I’m not going to try and parse a conversation I wasn’t party to on the basis of an article that was clearly inaccurate. Who knows what happened or why, shit happens. What bothers me is the political climate that relentless seeks to find the weakness and stomp on it. It’s brutal and punishing and I’m fucking sick of it. Sorry, not wanting to have a go at you, but I still think this shit might lose the left a close election.

            • Bill 3.1.1.1.1.1

              Not any kind of fan for “taking things at face value”. And I don’t think the likes of who-ever NRT is either. What I was pointing to was that they reported in good faith. I’m not sure how they could have checked things out when there isn’t any policy released yet. But whatever…

              • weka

                Yeah, nah. Media have good access to Labour, not least because it’s their job. They could have clarified directly with Labour comms. I have no idea if the report was in good faith, or had a pro-farming bias, or whatever but I see no reason to suppose that it was an accurate report.

                I read it and thought what? It didn’t make sense. Stuff could have figured that out too. Which doesn’t excuse Labour from their comms issues, just that my original point was that it’s the lefties who are inclined to bash Labour that went there so fast.

                • Bill

                  I’m talking about NRT’s blog post that was done in good faith off the back of the msm reportage.

                  • weka

                    yes, and I think IS was one of the people too quick to jump to bashing Labour. I read the article and thought something was wrong. IS is more politically savvy than me, so what gives.

  4. Michael 4

    Then how come Little’s comments to Federated Farmers were reported so differently from those above? I realise the Feds aren’t exactly core Labour supporters (which begs the question of WTF he was even speaking to them in the frst place, instead of trying to get some support from people who might vote for him – if he spoke clearly and without any bullshit) and might not make the most reliable messengers, but the media scrum who reported his comments (in an open meeting) couldn’t have got it that wrong? Could they?

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Environment Court Judge appointed
    Prudence Steven QC, barrister of Christchurch has been appointed as an Environment Judge and District Court Judge to serve in Christchurch, Attorney-General David Parker announced today. Ms Steven has been a barrister sole since 2008, practising in resource management and local government / public law.    She was appointed a Queen’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    40 mins ago
  • Government moves on climate promises
    The Government is delivering on its first tranche of election promises to take action on climate change with a raft of measures that will help meet New Zealand’s 2050 carbon neutral target, create new jobs and boost innovation. “This will be an ongoing area of action but we are moving ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Jump starting research careers
    The Government is investing up to $10 million to support 30 of the country’s top early-career researchers to develop their research skills. “The pandemic has had widespread impacts across the science system, including the research workforce. After completing their PhD, researchers often travel overseas to gain experience but in the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • Project protects jobs and nature
    A Waitomo-based Jobs for Nature project will keep up to ten people employed in the village as the tourism sector recovers post Covid-19 Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “This $500,000 project will save ten local jobs by deploying workers from Discover Waitomo into nature-based jobs. They will be undertaking local ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    24 hours ago
  • Minister Shaw speaks with U.S. Presidential Envoy John Kerry
    Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw spoke yesterday with President Biden’s Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry. “I was delighted to have the opportunity to speak with Mr. Kerry this morning about the urgency with which our governments must confront the climate emergency. I am grateful to him and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs makes three diplomatic appointments
    Foreign Affairs Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta today announced three diplomatic appointments: Alana Hudson as Ambassador to Poland John Riley as Consul-General to Hong Kong Stephen Wong as Consul-General to Shanghai   Poland “New Zealand’s relationship with Poland is built on enduring personal, economic and historical connections. Poland is also an important ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Major redevelopment of Wainuiomata High School underway
    Work begins today at Wainuiomata High School to ensure buildings and teaching spaces are fit for purpose, Education Minister Chris Hipkins says. The Minister joined principal Janette Melrose and board chair Lynda Koia to kick off demolition for the project, which is worth close to $40 million, as the site ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • New expert group appointed to advise Government on Oranga Tamariki
    A skilled and experienced group of people have been named as the newly established Oranga Tamariki Ministerial Advisory Board by Children’s Minister Kelvin Davis today. The Board will provide independent advice and assurance to the Minister for Children across three key areas of Oranga Tamariki: relationships with families, whānau, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • COVID-19 vaccine slated for possible approval next week
    The green light for New Zealand’s first COVID-19 vaccine could be granted in just over a week, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said today. “We’re making swift progress towards vaccinating New Zealanders against the virus, but we’re also absolutely committed to ensuring the vaccines are safe and effective,” Jacinda Ardern said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New ACC Board members announced.
    The Minister for ACC is pleased to announce the appointment of three new members to join the Board of ACC on 1 February 2021. “All three bring diverse skills and experience to provide strong governance oversight to lead the direction of ACC” said Hon Carmel Sepuloni. Bella Takiari-Brame from Hamilton ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Economic boost for Southland marae
    The Government is investing $9 million to upgrade a significant community facility in Invercargill, creating economic stimulus and jobs, Infrastructure Minister Grant Robertson and Te Tai Tonga MP Rino Tirikatene have announced.  The grant for Waihōpai Rūnaka Inc to make improvements to Murihiku Marae comes from the $3 billion set ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Celebrating the Entry Into Force of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons
    [Opening comments, welcome and thank you to Auckland University etc] It is a great pleasure to be here this afternoon to celebrate such an historic occasion - the entry into force of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. This is a moment many feared would never come, but ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Supporting disabled people to stay connected
    The Government is providing $3 million in one-off seed funding to help disabled people around New Zealand stay connected and access support in their communities, Minister for Disability Issues, Carmel Sepuloni announced today. The funding will allow disability service providers to develop digital and community-based solutions over the next two ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Voluntary saliva testing offered to quarantine workers from Monday
    Border workers in quarantine facilities will be offered voluntary daily COVID-19 saliva tests in addition to their regular weekly testing, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. This additional option will be rolled out at the Jet Park Quarantine facility in Auckland starting on Monday 25 January, and then to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Next steps in firearms buy-back
    The next steps in the Government’s ambitious firearms reform programme to include a three-month buy-back have been announced by Police Minister Poto Williams today.  “The last buy-back and amnesty was unprecedented for New Zealand and was successful in collecting 60,297 firearms, modifying a further 5,630 firearms, and collecting 299,837 prohibited ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Jobs for Nature projects target iconic ecosystems
    Upscaling work already underway to restore two iconic ecosystems will deliver jobs and a lasting legacy, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says.  “The Jobs for Nature programme provides $1.25 billion over four years to offer employment opportunities for people whose livelihoods have been impacted by the COVID-19 recession. “Two new projects ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Public Housing Plan announced
    The Government has released its Public Housing Plan 2021-2024 which outlines the intention of where 8,000 additional public and transitional housing places announced in Budget 2020, will go. “The Government is committed to continuing its public house build programme at pace and scale. The extra 8,000 homes – 6000 public ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Prime Minister congratulates President Joe Biden on his inauguration
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has congratulated President Joe Biden on his inauguration as the 46th President of the United States of America. “I look forward to building a close relationship with President Biden and working with him on issues that matter to both our countries,” Jacinda Ardern said. “New Zealand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Jobs for Nature funding will create training and employment opportunities
    A major investment to tackle wilding pines in Mt Richmond will create jobs and help protect the area’s unique ecosystems, Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor says. The Mt Richmond Forest Park has unique ecosystems developed on mineral-rich geology, including taonga plant species found nowhere else in the country. “These special plant ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pre-departure testing extended to all passengers to New Zealand
    To further protect New Zealand from COVID-19, the Government is extending pre-departure testing to all passengers to New Zealand except from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “The change will come into force for all flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (NZT) on Monday ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Bay Cadets learn skills to protect environment
    Bay Conservation Cadets launched with first intake Supported with $3.5 million grant Part of $1.245b Jobs for Nature programme to accelerate recover from Covid Cadets will learn skills to protect and enhance environment Environment Minister David Parker today welcomed the first intake of cadets at the launch of the Bay ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Cook Islanders to resume travel to New Zealand
    The Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern and the Prime Minister of the Cook Islands Mark Brown have announced passengers from the Cook Islands can resume quarantine-free travel into New Zealand from 21 January, enabling access to essential services such as health. “Following confirmation of the Cook Islands’ COVID ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Supporting communities and landowners to grow employment opportunities
    Jobs for Nature funding is being made available to conservation groups and landowners to employ staff and contractors in a move aimed at boosting local biodiversity-focused projects, Conservation Minister Kiritapu Allan has announced. It is estimated some 400-plus jobs will be created with employment opportunities in ecology, restoration, trapping, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Border exception for some returning international tertiary students
    The Government has approved an exception class for 1000 international tertiary students, degree level and above, who began their study in New Zealand but were caught offshore when border restrictions began. The exception will allow students to return to New Zealand in stages from April 2021. “Our top priority continues ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Tiwai deal gives time for managed transition
    Today’s deal between Meridian and Rio Tinto for the Tiwai smelter to remain open another four years provides time for a managed transition for Southland. “The deal provides welcome certainty to the Southland community by protecting jobs and incomes as the region plans for the future. The Government is committed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New member for APEC Business Advisory Council
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has appointed Anna Curzon to the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC). The leader of each APEC economy appoints three private sector representatives to ABAC. ABAC provides advice to leaders annually on business priorities. “ABAC helps ensure that APEC’s work programme is informed by business community perspectives ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Govt’s careful economic management recognised
    The Government’s prudent fiscal management and strong policy programme in the face of the COVID-19 global pandemic have been acknowledged by the credit rating agency Fitch. Fitch has today affirmed New Zealand’s local currency rating at AA+ with a stable outlook and foreign currency rating at AA with a positive ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Additional actions to keep COVID-19 out of NZ
    The Government is putting in place a suite of additional actions to protect New Zealand from COVID-19, including new emerging variants, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “Given the high rates of infection in many countries and evidence of the global spread of more transmissible variants, it’s clear that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • 19 projects will clean up and protect waterways
    $36 million of Government funding alongside councils and others for 19 projects Investment will clean up and protect waterways and create local jobs Boots on the ground expected in Q2 of 2021 Funding part of the Jobs for Nature policy package A package of 19 projects will help clean up ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago