Nonsense

Written By: - Date published: 12:31 pm, November 13th, 2012 - 69 comments
Categories: accountability, blogs, david shearer, disaster, labour, leadership, The Standard, you couldn't make this shit up - Tags:

NZ Herald: ‘David Shearer is brushing off a crescendo of calls for him to step down by left-leaning bloggers and commentators, saying it is “nonsense” and should be ignored.’

69 comments on “Nonsense”

  1. Tom Gould 1

    When will David Shearer wake up to the fact that he has had 11 months to close the gap with Key as preferred PM. How long does he need? Heck, his predecessor had 3 years. And the one before him took 6 years to gain the country’s confidence. So 11 months is plenty long enough, surely.

    • gobsmacked 1.1

      Actually Tom, if you look at the preferred PM ratings, you will see that Shearer has gone backwards:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opinion_polling_for_the_next_New_Zealand_general_election

      Of course Key is losing support. After a year of miserable failure, how could he not? If the Labour leader had spent the last year in a coma, Key would have lost support. The Labour leader might have gained.

      • Tom Gould 1.1.2

        And the guy before the woman before had 3 years. However, the guy before that only had 13 months. So there is precedent. Besides, it’s the Labour way. Sit on your backside and moan, and when someone else doesn’t get it done, sack them and find someone else who can. Saves getting up off your backside, I guess?

        • Rhinocrates 1.1.2.1

          That was then, this is now. Times change, media changes… and it’s not Shearer that’s the problem; that buffoon’s only a symptom. It is Labour that’s sick and it’s been four solid years of stagnation now, not eleven months. I can imagine them electing a sack of potatoes and saying, “Give it enough time…” followed by a sack of turnips, and saying “It’s been three terms now, but it’s just about to come into its own, any year now”, followed by a sock (give it a chance, at least it’s warm and fuzzy), then a washing machine (Ha! Look, it dealt to the sock and let National make as many suds!), then… ah, who cares…

          Sorry, history is bunk (attr. Henry Ford). New century, new mores, new media, new timescales.

          That’s the nature of the media environment now. I can’t say that I like it either, but I want a party of triumphant heroes, not martyrs.

  2. gobsmacked 2

    Again Tom, all noise, no sense.

    “The Labour way”? False.

    Who was the last Labour leader who was not given the chance to fight at least one election? Palmer. Over 20 years ago.

    It would be a very rare exception. But Shearer is an exceptionally poor leader.

    (NB this was a reply to Tom Gould’s second comment, which has now disappeared)

  3. Bill 3

    Hmm, the poll on that page which has apparently had between 2500 and 2550 votes as of now runs at 70% or respondents saying it would be a good idea to explore other options or emphatically saying it’s time for him to go.

    Absolute nonsense, of coourse 😉

  4. Descendant Of Smith 4

    From my observation there seems to be four schools of thought
    Yep for shearer
    Nah for shearer which also may or may not be for cunliffe
    Do not care who it is policies we want to know about
    Does not matter cause it is all screwed anyway

    None of those viewpoints should be dismissed as nonsense

    Dismissing them reflects the same arrogance national show to voters. You can acknowledge points of view without agreeing with them.

    I feel monthy python arguement clinic despair.

  5. Colonial Viper 5

    Whoever is guiding Shearer’s media strategy has no idea whatsoever.

    • Rhinocrates 5.1

      They have an idea, one idea: Blairism.

      “The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing”

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hedgehog_and_the_Fox

      Or in other terms, as was said of the Blimpish* “Bomber” Harris, they confuse “advice with interference, evidence with propaganda and criticism with sabotage” (an attitude that seems to be the basis for the Jackal’s thought).

      They think that acknowledging any other idea is losing. It’s a tragedy that the hedgehog’s one big thing is a fog.

      *Apologies to the cinematic Major General Sir Clive Wynne-Candy, who learned better.

      • Jackal 5.1.1

        Not at all Rhinocrates… What I actually said was that criticism can be damaging and commentators should be aware that they could have a detrimental affect on the broader aspects of what they believe in. This is true of both right and left political commentary.

        Advice is usually not made public btw, and whether it’s merely interference in order to sabotage is entirely dependent on the amount of propaganda being expressed. I thought most of the articles on David Shearer were reasonably balanced, the comments however not so much.

        You might have noticed that I have acknowledge lots of other ideas, some of which I agree with and some that I don’t. You might not be aware that both jackals and foxes are animals that come from the Canidae family; they are therefore inherently not Hedghogs.

        Please don’t try to draw me into such a silly debate again Rhinocrates… I find your pontificating rather boring.

      • Rogue Trooper 5.1.2

        yet, sometimes i really enjoy and value Rhinocrates commentary

  6. ak 6

    At last eh? A good clear decisive sound-bite, no hint of umming and erring – along with the Pagani purge, great progress. (told you he reads the ole Stan’ 😉 )

  7. Dr Terry 7

    Please refer my comment (pertaining to the Herald report) under another Heading: “At Conference, vote for a member’s democracy”.

  8. Tim 8

    OK David (Shearer)…….anything you say. After all yu da boss and we jiss gonna lay down and take another round. Ooooooooh yea Kimu savee! We knows you the sage…the experinsed UN man. Why yea…. me umm gonna vote for yo ma man! Strum us a tune will ya – why yea – we be with ya!

    (Yea right!)

    • King Kong 8.1

      I may be getting the wrong end of the stick, but even I find mimicking the language of a deferential negro slave quite racist.

      • Murray Olsen 8.1.1

        I thought he was mimicking Key having a bro chat with King’s College First XV.

        • David H 8.1.1.1

          🙂

        • Bob 8.1.1.2

          More like David Cunliffe rallying for votes http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvenqcfX1j8
          Imagine how often this would be played if he became the new Labour leader!

          The comments that have been left don’t paint a happy picture of him either.

          • fatty 8.1.1.2.1

            oh dear…Bob, you got sucked in. All those comments are from right wingers who are scared of him. The video was talked about on radio live, whaleoil and kiwiblog. Labour voters have made it quite clear what they think of Cunliffe, and they don’t reflect most of those comments.
            Its becoming painfully obvious that the torries are shitting themselves at the thought of Cunliffe running Labour…Better luck next time Bob.

            • Bob 8.1.1.2.1.1

              Haha, you crack me up fatty, great satire “All those comments are from right wingers who are scared of him”, brilliant. Couldn’t be that the sight of a condescending ‘rich prick’ trying to talk down another ‘rich prick’ while, as King Kong would put it “mimicking the language of a deferential negro slave” is not really becoming from the potential future leader of a major NZ political party. Nah, that can’t be right, must be a right wing conspiracy cos they’re scared aye bro.

              “Labour voters have made it quite clear what they think of Cunliffe”, quite right, Labour went from having a 60 vote Party majority in the New Lynn electorate in 2008, to a 749 vote majority to National in 2011.

              • Colonial Viper

                Cunliffe increased by over one quarter his personal majority from 4025 to 5190. In a year that the party vote tide went out against Labour in a very big way.

                • Bob

                  Or you could say he regained some of the 4,000 vote majority he lost (8000, down to 4000) from 2005-2008.
                  Lies, damn lies and statistics.

                  • Colonial Viper

                    And Cunliffe successfully did so in a year that the tide went out on Labour in almost every other general electorate contest.

              • felix

                WTF are you talking about, Bob?

                Weird how right wingers get so upset over a white man pronouncing a few maori words correctly.

                And no, nobody said anything about a conspiracy. You guys are all quite capable of being idiots off your own bats.

              • fatty

                -Couldn’t be that the sight of a condescending ‘rich prick’ trying to talk down another ‘rich prick’-

                Why do you assume that the left considers all rich people to be ‘rich pricks’? You are wrong. A rich prick is a person who is rich and doesn’t care for those that suffer from the same system they benefit from. Its simplistic thinking, and stems from the assumption that our economic system is natural, and that the left are jealous. Or, to be more precise, your thinking probably stems from kiwiblog and whaleoil.
                I’m guessing that Noam Chomsky is fuckin loaded…do you consider him a rich prick too? There are a few rich prick in the Labour Party, no doubt about that, but in most people’s eyes, Cunliffe is not one of them.

  9. Craig Glen Eden 9

    Ive thought about this for a while, they tried to paint Shearer as a a nice moderate caring type but to think you could lead the Party after being a MP for less than a term he must have one huge ego or be seriously deluded!

    • Blue 9.1

      I’m going with arrogant and deluded. I’m beginning to think that the ABC club have created more of a monster than they know.

      Shearer seems to be putting it over quite clearly that he has no intention of stepping down and will have to be dragged out kicking and screaming.

      It seems one of the many political instincts he lacks is knowing when it’s time to go. That doesn’t bode well for the future. If the worst happens and he’s entrenched as Labour leader going into the election and Labour loses, he might very well ignore the convention of falling on his sword after a defeat and actually try to lead the party even after that.

      That would give the ABC club a bit of a shock…

    • leftriteleft 9.2

      CGE: You might need to read this:

      http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/people/john-key

      As you can see, it’s about the wanker who is f**king this country, as we argue who’s got the mettle to be Leader of Labour.

      • karol 9.2.1

        With a photo of “Kiwi of the Week” Fred Evans along side Key. Could the contrast be more stark?

      • Luke 9.2.2

        Well said, that ‘wanker’ is becoming smarmier by the day. His sarcasm and arrogance in parliament is intolerable. HE is really becoming quite obnoxious. What is more concerning is he is getting away with it, but I am not sure if it is the ineffectual leader we have, or all this bickering… Whatever happens, we need to take an affirmative decision after the conference and stick with it, or we will be self destructing into oblivion.

  10. karol 10

    Bryce Edwards has done a round-up  of the calls for and against Shearer.  But first this comment by Edwards….?
     

    The Standard blog – which is normally slavishly pro-Labour and its leadership – is suddenly publishing incredibly frank and fierce calls for Shearer to go.

    Edwards sums up, thus:

    Labour’s problems relate to its confused identity and ideology. Shearer perhaps epitomises this, but he is hardly alone. The rest of the Labour caucus also have problems projecting a vision of how a Labour government would differ significantly from a National one. So, if Shearer was replaced by Cunliffe or Robertson, would Labour really be seen as a credible alternative to the current government? While there is a fair perception that David Shearer is unable to manage his caucus and that he has failed to look like a prime minister, could Robertson or Cunliffe really come up with or promote any compelling policies or sell Labour as something different to National?
     

    A similar point is made by Lynn Prentice on The Standard in his post, Shuffle the caucus deck

    As Edwards reports, it seems Richard Long has come out in favour of Shearer.  With endorsements like that….? 

    • Rhinocrates 10.1

      As Edwards reports, it seems Richard Long has come out in favour of Shearer. With endorsements like that….?

      He long has, and he’s advised Shearer against restructuring his front bench. Likewise Hooters claims that he’s the best Labour leader and goes bugfuck over Cunliffe. Indeed, with endorsements like that…

      (It always amuses me that Hooters tries to market himself as an independent shaper of opinion to his Nat clients on left-wing blogs by writing such transparently disingenuous crap).

    • hrrumph 10.2

      Also Fran O’Sullivan, DPF, and and…

      Also their was a massive profile on a ‘leading Labour’ figure in today’s Herald…um, no it wasn’t a Steve Maharey add, it was famous for…I don’t actually know…Josie Pagani! The Labour who gets more coverage in the Listener and Herald than Richard Prebble (only slightly) and whose ideas seem to be somewhat to the right of his.

      Why on earth does she get any publicity? How is she a commentator? Why don’t they ask any of the other myriad of falled Labour MPs….?

  11. Sam 12

    Seriously? This post is one sentence long and is a link to and a quote from a Herald article?

    At least Farrar has the ability to write something in between his swathes of copy-pastas from internet news sites. No wonder nobody reads this blog anymore.

  12. Funny, I think the bloggers feel the same way about Shearer. 😉

  13. millsy 14

    Remember: David Cunliffe said in 2008 that he had private health insurance, and before the 2011 he said that he would continue with public service layoffs.

    Suggest you think about that before fantasising about a cloth capped Cunliffe in the PoA picket lines rousing up the workers.

  14. I was surprised at Andrew Little’s reply to a reporter today about blogs, “The blogs dont get to vote in the labour party,so we dont pay much consideration to it ”
    Clayton Cosgrove also said “Blogs,who cares about blogs”
    The attitude is shocking, are us, as voters, surplus to their requirements because they have the
    ability to work without the ‘people’ factor being involved or having an opinion about policy
    or personalities that we vote for,it’s as if we, the voter,the supporter,the long time champion
    the labour party should have no say or opinion ,in their eyes.
    Instead of welcoming the internet age,the blog sites,modern media,the current
    labour stalwarts cast aside the opportunity to connect to the average person and answer
    their queries about what bothers them,with inclusion in mind,this is the disconnect that
    many are feeling.
    I for one will pay the next ‘shearer says’ blog with the attention it deserves.

    • Colonial Viper 15.1

      I was surprised at Andrew Little’s reply to a reporter today about blogs, “The blogs dont get to vote in the labour party,so we dont pay much consideration to it ”

      Revealing, considering that the only people who get votes which count in Labour at the moment is caucus.

    • karol 15.2

      Andrew Little’s reply to a reporter today about blogs, “The blogs dont get to vote in the labour party,so we dont pay much consideration to it ”Clayton Cosgrove also said “Blogs,who cares about blogs”

      Yes.  Unbelievably dismissive!  So I’m not a Labour Party member, but my party vote is up for the getting if a party shows they are democratic and working for the people, inclusive, etc.  I am still not seeing anything to encourage me back to voting for the Labour Party.

      Those two have definitely gone way down in my estimation.  Guys, get a clue!  Everything you say via the media has an impact, one way or another. 

      • anthony bull 15.2.1

        they are correct – the few hundred people who read political blogs are already hardcore left or right leaning and what they read on the blog only serves to reinforce their voting lean – what is discussed or published on the blog has no impact on voting numbers whatsoever.

        MSM sites have several orders of magnitude more influence on voting.

    • Blue 15.3

      Are you really surprised that the people who elected David Shearer as their leader are arrogant, stupid and really enjoy shooting themselves in the foot?

      Let’s say for a moment that you are high up in a political party, and there’s this blog where many of your party members and activists, the people who form your LECs, put up your hoardings, doorknock, make phone calls, get the vote out on election day, tell everyone they know about said political party and what it is doing etc. hang out, and where thousands of politically aware people come to find out about your party and what it’s doing (especially when the MSM ignores you).

      Do you:

      (a) Treat this as a valuable resource to keep in touch with the grassroots of the party and politically informed voters; or
      (b) Ignore, denigrate and offend these people, tell them their opinions are worthless and you don’t give a shit about them.

      Blogs don’t vote, Andrew Little, but both the bloggers and the people reading them do. And guess what? Many of those people will get a vote if the party’s rules are reformed and the membership gets a say in who you sad sacks elect as leader.

  15. Saarbo 16

    This just shows how f$#@#n dumb Shearer is, he is possibly the dumbest politician since Bob Clarkson. Saying this just before the Conference…he has no political sense at all. The ABC brigade better be ready this weekend, because members are unhappy that they have selected the dumbest arsehole as leader and have basically handed National the election in 2014…good work! Fu$#@n dick heads.

  16. Labour needs to take electorates from National (especially in Christchurch) and the Greens are great for the party vote; the only problem is that Labour isn’t telling us what it will do once it returns to power. I don’t think I would be wrong to say that most New Zealanders don’t know what Labour even represents any more, beyond a different name and workers rights. That will pose a problem in upper middle class households and above, which might vote Green but might not trust Shearer having a union background.

  17. Luke 18

    I am one of the people who have been on the ‘get rid of Shearer’s bandwagon, but you know what? Just like his mate and former leader, Mr Goff. David Shearer is a hell of a nice guy, and I think his flaw, if anything is that he is too nice and too trusting. Simply put, I think Mr. Shearer’s people are doing a shit job promoting him, advising him etc. Let us look at Ms. Clark, she was elected leader in 1993, and didn’t beomce prime minister until 1999. Hard work and perseverance paid off. I think Mr Shearer needs a couple of full time advisers that can master him in the art of media, and public speaking. A little coaching can go a long way. I would love to see David give Bryan Edwards a call, or someone just as media savvy. I like Mr Shearer, and I think he can engage people who are not into politics, we just have to give him a chance, and I am talking 2-3 years not a meagre 12 months. I am happy to eat my words and stand by my leader, if and only if he gets some better people behind him!

    • Saarbo 18.1

      No way, he is too Dumb. Simple as that. He must go if Labour is to have any future.

    • Colonial Viper 18.2

      I think Mr Shearer needs a couple of full time advisers that can master him in the art of media, and public speaking. A little coaching can go a long way. I would love to see David give Bryan Edwards a call

      Ummmmm. Perhaps you should read the following mate.

      fellow media trainer Bill Ralston joked about Shearer, ‘He should have had some media training.’ But it was a joke. Media training would have made not an iota of difference to Shearer’s fortunes. He would have proved untrainable.

      That sounds harsh, but it is not intended to be. Shearer is simply miscast as the leader of a political party in opposition. To change his image, he would have to change his personality and that, in human terms, could only be a change for the worse. Shearer is genetically challenged as a Leader of the Opposition. The killer instinct and the showbiz gene are both missing. He can be reasonable but he can’t project.

      http://brianedwardsmedia.co.nz/2012/04/on-david-shearer-and-wisdom-before-and-after-the-event/

    • gobsmacked 18.3

      Luke

      I think your points are valid, but – too late. Remember: David Shearer became leader after a high-profile media contest, in which he showed that he was nowhere near ready.

      Fortunately, it didn’t matter much, because it was December, and politics shut down for a couple of months in summer.

      So Shearer did … nothing. There was an obvious problem, and he waited half a year (!) before going to Ian Fraser for media training. That simply beggars belief. It indicates a lack of self-awareness and poor judgement. Or picking the wrong advisers – which is the same thing.

      He had a chance to hit the ground running, and he wasted it. I have no idea why.

  18. Luke 19

    I wonder if this time next week anything will happen. The caucus are cowardly and will not take any action because they know they will implode. Shearer, as you all put is not the man for the job, then who the hell is? Because if you remember Cunliffe’s lack of loyalty during the Goff debate with Key.. Remember the numbers. Who needs enemies when you have Cunliffe in your corner… And you think he will be a better leader. Well it clearly indicates that he has Key’s and perhaps Clark’s traits, slippery as a fish. Then there is Grant Robertson, another one of those people that when the leader turns their back, Robertson is either getting ready to stick the knife in or heading for the hills. I truly believe that if Shearer is to go, we will have this same discussion in a year. It is funny, because I cannot see any credible alternative, well I can but she does not want the job!

    • Colonial Viper 19.1

      Because if you remember Cunliffe’s lack of loyalty during the Goff debate with Key..

      Oh FUCK OFF. How do you figure blaming Cunliffe for Goff not remembering the numbers under intense debate pressure???

      • Luke 19.1.1

        Hmmm, from what I recall the numbers came out later, but his finance team were vague on the details… Oh and by the way, don’t swear at me or other people, You have no respect for anyone, you shouldn’t abuse people who have different points of view from you, not cool, you are a bully!

        • Colonial Viper 19.1.1.1

          I’m sorry, I meant to say that, IMO, it is quite unreasonable to blame Cunliffe for Goff being unable to recall numbers associated with the PREFU, while Goff was under the extreme stress of a live debate situation.

          Can you please explain why you would choose to blame Cunliffe for this incident.

        • starlight 19.1.1.2

          When you think about it if Goff went into such a crucial debate,then he should have been schooled up on everything himself, it’s called responsibility,he was doing ok too,i thought,
          he did hold his ground,it’s a shame ‘show us the money’ is not used now against key and co.

    • fatty 19.2

      “Because if you remember Cunliffe’s lack of loyalty during the Goff debate with Key.. Remember the numbers. Who needs enemies when you have Cunliffe in your corner”

      What do you mean?…it was a debate live on TV and Goff messed up – How the hell is that Cunliffe’s fault?
      All Goff had to do was shoot down Key by saying he would reverse the tax cuts to the rich that weren’t working, then reverse the conversation into an argument about Key trickle up policies. You can’t blame Cunliffe for that. Jeeze. You must be having a laugh

    • Saarbo 19.3

      No you are wrong Luke, any Leader worth his/her salt should have the high level numbers sussed before he/she goes into a major debate. If Goff went into this debate without the numbers then he was not up to the job. Cunliffe has been made a scape goat for Goff’s ineptness. 

  19. Luke 20

    He was the fiance person, right…  It was apparent that he did not inform Goff or brief him on the numbers, before or after the debate.  Remember they asked Goff to provide numbers?, and he eventually got back to the media, but it took a while and it gave the impression that therte was no conhesion in the party.  Moreover, it was asked on the Radio New Zealand Politics Weekly podcast ealier this year, much of what Cunliffe denied.  I have spoken to a couple of people who all thought the same thing.  It is well known that he is not trusted in ABC’s circles, he is percieved as a man on the outer, all for himself.  These are not my words, this is what is percieved by many people.  Anyway… I heard what you had to say and I am still going to stick by Shearer, and if they do replace him, I hope they do it quick and effectively. 

    • fatty 20.1

      “Remember they asked Goff to provide numbers?, and he eventually got back to the media, but it took a while and it gave the impression that therte was no conhesion in the party?”

      Nah, it was not about cohesion in the party…it was about Goff floundering around in front of the cameras like a dying fish. My last post says how I think the situation could have been handled. Numbers then were irrelevant, Goff could have, and should have shot that down with ease. By the way, that ‘show me the money’ moment will happen again in 2014 if Shearer debating Key live before the election…except this time it will be way, way worse. On the other hand, Key would be shitting himself if he had to step up against Cunliffe, especially since the economy ain’t going nowhere in the next 2 years…Cunlife would own him, and Key’s preppy school-boy quips would be useless.

      “It is well known that he is not trusted in ABC’s circles”

      Cunliffe not trusted in ABC’s circles? For real?

    • Benghazi 20.2

      Luke you don’t know what you are talking about. If Goff wanted a briefing from Cunliffe all he had to do was ask. He made a habit over three years of not asking Cunliffe. Cunliffe was kept on the outer. This was a pure power play by the right faction in caucus, headed by Annette King. Goff had had the numbers for a long time – he had the relevant economic briefing paper. The numbers were not new. Stop spinning the ABC nonsense.

  20. Luke 21

    Look at this transcipt, read and it clearly indicates that there were murmurs of Cunliffe not playing with a straight bat.  Seriously surprised that you did not hear this, or want to I guess…
    http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1112/S00025/cunliffe-on-the-nation.htm

    • Colonial Viper 21.1

      Oh Luke. You’re still blaming Cunliffe for Goff not being able to recall the precise numbers under the pressure of a live debate? AND you’re blaming Cunliffe for Goff not being able to improvise a rebutt to Key to push back on the PM?

    • fatty 21.2

      I’ve got no idea what part I’m supposed to be reading, or if I should be reading between the lines, or what…
      You’ll have to be more specific in pointing out how Cunliffe is responsible for messing up a debate that he didn’t take part in.
      Is this the part you are referring to?

      “David: Well he did have the numbers, the numbers that he was specifically asked there were around the Capital Gains Tax taxflows, they were public from the middle of July. I’m not criticising Phil in any way for the bounce of the ball in that debate….He had the same team briefing him that were briefing me and working with me, I had my phone on and computer on all that day, I didn’t get any request for anything extra from his team.

      Sean: Okay so you’re essentially saying Phil Goff mucked that one up all on his own.

      David: I’m not criticising but I would very flatly reject any suggestion that I let Phil down or worse, that I was in any way disloyal, that is just not true, and you can imagine that it’s somewhat hurtful.”

    • lprent 22.1

      Bomber: I don’t know why you bother. It is going to turn up on the feed on the right of the screen on whatever cycle that is running on. But don’t spam it across posts or I will start trashing it.

  21. lurgee 23

    I’m willing to bet all the money in the world that if Cunliffe had won the Labour leadership, the party would be in exactly the same position and – apart from swapping names around – the same squabbles and arguments, backbitings and underminings would be taking place here. And National would still be looking forwards to a third term as the left eviscerates itself.

    Wasn’t it just a couple of months back that an upwards blip in the Roy Morgan numbers sent The Standard into paroxysms of delight at the prospect of a Red-Green coalition? And already, the baked meats of Shearer’s political wedding banquet are to furnish forth his political funeral table! Frailty, thy name is something or other!

    • Colonial Viper 23.1

      I’m willing to bet all the money in the world that if Cunliffe had won the Labour leadership, the party would be in exactly the same position

      Perhaps, but with the slight difference that 5,000 hard core activists up and down the country would already be setting the ground work for burying Key under a 2014 landslide.

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    Last week I hosted Free West Papua leader Benny Wenda at Parliament and travelled with him to a number of important events. Benny is spokesperson for the United Liberation Movement for West Papua and lives in exile in England. 14 ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    4 days ago
  • Nats unprepared for record immigration
    National’s under-investment in housing, public services, and infrastructure means New Zealand is literally running out of beds for the record number of new migrants, says Labour’s Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway. ...
    5 days ago
  • Labour opposes Ports of Auckland sale
    Labour would strongly oppose the sell-off of the Ports of Auckland to fix a short term cash crisis caused by the Government blocking the city’s requests for new ways to fund infrastructure, says Labour’s Auckland Issues spokesperson Phil Twyford. “National ...
    7 days ago
  • Workers pay the price of Silver Fern’s Fairton closure
    The threatened closure of Silver Fern Farms’ Fairton Plant in Ashburton raises serious questions about the Government’s support of the sale of half of the company to a foreign company, when it appears this outcome may have been inevitable, says ...
    1 week ago
  • National’s answer to the housing crisis: One new affordable house per 100 new Aucklanders
    National’s fudge of a housing plan will make Auckland even more of a speculators’ paradise, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. ...
    1 week ago
  • Government can’t be trusted with private data
    The independent review of the Ministry of Social Development’s data breach in April has shown, once again, that the Ministry cannot be trusted with private client information, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni. “The investigation by former Deloitte chairman ...
    1 week ago
  • Another crisis, another half-baked National plan
    The National Party may have finally woken up to the teacher supply crisis facing our schools but their latest half-baked, rushed announcement falls well short of the mark in terms of what’s required, says Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins. ...
    1 week ago
  • Nats: Don’t bite the hand that feeds you
    Alfred Ngaro’s recent comments have exposed the Government’s ‘don’t bite the hand that feeds you’ approach, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni. ...
    1 week ago
  • Breaking news – National admits there’s a housing crisis
    National finally admits there’s a housing crisis, but today’s belated announcement is simply not a credible response to the problem it’s been in denial about for so long, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “National can’t now credibly claim ...
    1 week ago
  • Nats lay the ground for housing bust
    Goldman Sachs’ warning that New Zealand has the developed world’s most over-priced housing market, with a 40 per cent chance of a bust within two years, shows the consequences of National’s nine years of housing neglect, says Labour Housing spokesperson ...
    1 week ago
  • Well they would say that, wouldn’t they?
    Property investors’ lobby groups have been up in arms this week about Labour and Green parties’ plans to close tax loopholes and fix the housing market. That’s probably a good thing. Like an investor in any other sector, they expect ...
    GreensBy James Shaw
    1 week ago
  • Alfred Ngaro reflects National’s culture of silencing debate
    Image from Getty Images Community groups must be free to advocate for the people they serve. It’s these people who see first-hand if ideas dreamt up in Wellington actually work on the ground. It’s essential that they can speak freely ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    1 week ago
  • Bill English must reassure community organisations
    The Prime Minister must do more to reassure community organisations after Cabinet Minister Alfred Ngaro's apparent threats to their funding if they criticise government policy which has left a born-to-rule perception amongst many, says Labour Leader Andrew Little. “Alfred Ngaro ...
    1 week ago
  • Extremism and its discontents
    Another scar on global democracy appeared recently, this time in Germany.It seems that the number of soldiers on duty with extremist political leanings has become a concern to the military leadership in that country. Soldiers were found openly possessing ...
    GreensBy Kennedy Graham
    1 week ago
  • Government’s suicide approach disappoints
    Mike King’s sudden departure from the Government’s suicide prevention panel, amid claims the Government’s approach is ‘deeply flawed’, is further evidence National is failing on mental health, says Labour’s Deputy Leader Jacinda Ardern. “Mental health is reaching crisis point in ...
    1 week ago
  • National backs speculators, fails first home buyers
    National is showing its true colours and backing speculators who are driving first home buyers out of the market, says Labour Leader Andrew Little. “By defending a $150m a year hand-out to property speculators, Bill English is turning his back ...
    1 week ago
  • More oversight by Children’s Commissioner needed
    More funding and more independence is required for the Children’s Commissioner to function more effectively in the best interests of Kiwi kids in State care, says Labour’s spokesperson for children Jacinda Ardern. ...
    1 week ago
  • Labour to end tax breaks for speculators; invest in warm, healthy homes
    Labour will shut down tax breaks for speculators and use the savings to help make 600,000 homes warmer and healthier over the next ten years, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “It’s time for fresh thinking to tackle the ...
    1 week ago
  • Health of young people a priority for Labour
    Labour will ensure all young people have access to a range of health care services on-site at their local secondary school, says Labour’s deputy leader Jacinda Ardern. “Our policy will see School Based Health Services extended to all public secondary ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Ratifying the TPPA makes no sense
    The recent high-fiving between the government and agricultural exporters over ratification of the TPPA (Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement) is empty gesture politics in an election year. Ratification by New Zealand means nothing. New Zealand law changes are not implemented unless the ...
    GreensBy Barry Coates
    2 weeks ago
  • NIWA report proves National’s trickery re swimmable rivers
    National have a slacker standard for swimmable rivers than was the case prior to their recent so-called Clean Water amendment to the National Policy Statement (NPS), says Labour’s Water spokesperson David Parker. “The table 11 on page 25 of the ...
    2 weeks ago
  • MPS shows new approach needed on housing
    The Reserve Bank’s latest Monetary Policy Statement provides further evidence that only a change in government will start to fix the housing crisis, says Labour Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “It is more evident than ever that only a Labour-led government ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Fresh approach on mental health
    Labour will introduce a pilot scheme of specialist mental health teams across the country in government to ensure swifter and more effective treatment for those who need urgent help, says Labour’s Leader Andrew Little. “Mental health is in crisis. It ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Sallies back Labour’s plan for affordable homes
    The country’s most respected social agency has endorsed Labour’s KiwiBuild plan to build homes that families can afford to buy, and delivered a withering assessment of the National Government’s housing record, says Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Education is for everyone, not just the elite
    Proposals by the National Party to ration access to higher education will once again make it a privilege only available to the elite, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. “Speaking at the Education Select Committee, Maurice Williamson let the National ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Cancer support changes far too little, certainly late
    Anne Tolley’s belated backtrack to finally allow Jobseeker clients suffering from cancer to submit only one medical certificate to prove their illness fails to adequately provide temporary support for people too sick to work, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Kids must come first in enrolment debate
    The best interests of children should be the major driver of any change to policies around initial school enrolments, not cost cutting or administrative simplicity, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.   “The introduction of school cohort entry is ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Feed the Kids
    While in Whangarei last week, I had the pleasure of meeting Buddhi Manta from the Hare Krishna movement whose cafe is making lunch for some schools in Whangarei. His group have been feeding up to 1,000 primary school kids at local ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    2 weeks ago
  • DHBs’ big budget blowout
    New Zealand’s District Health Boards are now facing a budget deficit of nearly $90 million dollars, a significant blowout on what was forecast, says Labour’s Health spokesperson David Clark.   Labour believes health funding must grow to avoid further cuts ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Govt plays catch up on drug funding
    The Government's backdown on Pharmac is welcomed because previous rhetoric around the agency being adequately funded was just nonsense, says Labour's Health spokesperson David Clark. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour to build affordable homes in Hamilton
    Labour will build 200 affordable KiwiBuild houses and state houses on unused government-owned land as the first steps in our plan to fix Hamilton’s housing crisis, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “We will build new houses to replace ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Mental Health waiting times a growing concern
    There is new evidence that the Mental Health system is under increasing strain with waiting times for young people to be seen by mental health and addiction services lengthening says Labour’s Health spokesperson David Clark.   “Following yesterday’s seat of ...
    3 weeks ago
  • More beneficiaries heading to jail, fewer to study
    The latest quarterly benefit figures show a rising number of beneficiaries have left the benefit because they have gone to prison, while fewer are going into study, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni. “According to recent figures, in the ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Analyst charts failure of National’s housing policy
    Respected analyst Rodney Dickens has published a devastating critique of National’s housing policy, and says Labour’s policies give more hope, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “Mr Dickens shows since the signing of the Auckland Housing Accord in 2013 the ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Cost of Living increases hit those with least the hardest
    Beneficiaries, superannuitants and people on the lowest incomes continue to bear the brunt of higher inflation, according to the latest data from Statistics NZ, says Labour Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Since National came to office (December 2008) inflation for those ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Pike River Mine families deserve more
    The Government must be more open and honest about the Pike River Mine says Dunedin South’s  Labour MP Clare Curran.   “It’s just wrong that the Commerce Select Committee has refused a Labour Party request to re-open its investigation ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Government goalposts taken off the field
    The Government’s decision to dump the Better Public Service (BPS) Target to Reduce Reoffending by 25 per cent by 2017 shows when it comes to measuring their progress the National Government hasn’t just shifted the goalposts, but has taken the ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Last call of the kea?
    Last weekend, I attended the first ever Kea Konvention jointly organised by the Kea Conservation Trust and Federated Mountain Clubs of New Zealand. It was a power-packed weekend full of presentations by scientists, volunteers and NGOS working to raise awareness of this ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers
    3 weeks ago