NZ should follow Norway’s example on oil

Written By: - Date published: 2:00 pm, November 19th, 2009 - 23 comments
Categories: economy, national/act government - Tags:

National has released its petroleum strategy. It appears they plan to further lower our already low royalties to encourage foreign oil companies to come here, dig up our finite our reserves as fast as they can and make off with huge profits. Just about the dumbest attitude you can have to irreplaceable natural resources like oil, gas, coal, and minerals is ‘drill, baby, drill‘. We get these resources once and once only. That means two things:

1) rather than digging up and selling it as soon as possible, we have to get the maximum value for the resource that we can over time. That may mean its wiser to leave the stuff in the ground when prices are low. We should take the approach of countries like Saudi Arabia. When the price is too low, they just reduce how much they sell. They ramp up production when the price is higher. Over time, they maximise their income. We don’t want to follow the US route of a free-for-all with private comapnies digging it up as fast as possible, then having peaking production when prices are low and not being able to sell more when prices are high.

2) This wealth belongs not just to Kiwis living now but to generations to come. If we dig stuff up now we are taking away our children’s chance to dig it up. So, we mustn’t spend the revenue on immediate consumption but rather to build New Zealand’s wealth over the long-term. The UK, for example, has used its North Sea oil and gas revenues for immediate spending. When the resource runs out they’ll be left with nothing but a hole in their budget. Scotland will be in big trouble. Norway, by contrast, has put the bulk of its oil and gas revenues in a national wealth fund (now worth $127,000 per Norwegian) that will keep funding Norway’s standard of living long after the oil and gas are gone (being a responsible country, Norway is also investing a lot of its oil wealth into offsetting carbon emissions and post-oil technology).

The Norwegian model insulates the government finances and the economy from spikes and crashes in resource prices, and prevents a resource rich country becoming a rentier state. In times of international economic crisis the national wealth fund can help protect the national economy. Norway took $2 billion from its $600 billion fund to help push the country through the recession. That money, plus the fact that one in three Norwegians are state employees, protected people from the recession – the unemployment rate is just 3%.

We should adopt the Norwegian model for all our mineral and fossil fuel wealth.

We should set up a publicly-owned company like Statoil to do the drilling, refining, and selling of the product. We don’t need our irreplaceable natural resources to be a profit stream for some foreign owned company. We should give that company a mandate to maximise returns over time, not to exploit the resource as fast as possible.

Like Norway, we need to charge high royalties on extraction of our resources by private companies. It is completely insane that National is cutting royalties to encourage foreign companies to come here and take away our limited natural resources faster. Ideally we should dig up and sell our natural resources ourselves. If we’re going to let private foreign companies do it, we should keep as much of the revenue as we can. It’s our oil, let’s not get ripped off.

The profits and royalties on all mineral and fossil fuel exploitation should go into a national wealth fund to guarantee our economic sovereignty and ensure that the wealth of these one-off resources is not spent and lost forever but continues to enrich New Zealand for generations to come.

23 comments on “NZ should follow Norway’s example on oil”

  1. Sounds like SOCIALISM to me.

    We canna do it, we canna do it.

    Better to give the wealth to overseas corporations rather than retain the wealth for the good of ordinary kiwis.

    [Said with tongue firmly in cheek]

  2. stevo 2

    I have “heard” that Oil has already been found in the southern basin in the 70s, capped off and left until………when ..prices on the rise, the world running out, oh and lets make it even cheaper to dig it up…that would be now.

    Is it true that reserves are already known about? Any exploration workers from those days care to speak up?

    In any case, we should all benefit from any oil found, as there are bound to be downsides. If we become an oil currency, we can forget about exporting anything else, other than milk powder perhaps.

    Will it make petrol cheaper in NZ? Well if we look at how dairy product prices go up when demand is high, then unless Oil production is state controlled, the answer will be NO.

    • gitmo 2.1

      If you take away the govt tax take on oil it is remarkably cheap in NZ – far cheaper than milk.

      If we’ve got oil the likes of the North Sea fields off NZ it would be a very large boon for NZ, perhaps we should go the way of the NPD and work with the major oil companies to exploit the resource.

      Re 1 in 3 a state employee … what’s the ration in NZ ?

      • Bright Red 2.1.1

        about 1 in 10 – 40,000 in the core public service, but add in the teachers, doctors, nurses, SOE employees and it comes to about 250,000.

  3. JD 3

    “This wealth belongs not just to Kiwis living now but to generations to come. If we dig stuff up now we are taking away our children’s chance to dig it up”

    Why not take take the same attitude to the increased debt that would accrue from ramping up govnt spending instead of calling for fiscal restraint. After all its going to be our childrens’s debt to pay back.

    • snoozer 3.1

      eh?

      That was the left’s attitude. That’s why Labour paid down debt and built up assets like the Cullen Fund, rather than cave to the short-sighted calls for deep tax cuts which would have seen us deeper in debt with mammoth deficits.

      You’re not seriously suggesting cutting spending in a recession are you JD? It was only government spending packages that saved the world economy from totally crashing over the last year.

      The world’s government learnt the lessons of the Great Depression – you don’t reduce government demand at the same time at private demand is falling, you increase it to jumpstart the economy.

  4. BLiP 4

    Browncoalie and the rest of the National Ltd® crew are going to need careful monitoring on this latest announcement. Given their predilection for digging up our national parks, I wouldn’t put it past them to use the legislative “tweaks” they are planning for petroleum as a vector for slipping in various and insidious permissions to facilitate further mineral exploitation.

  5. JD 5

    “The world’s government learnt the lessons of the Great Depression you don’t reduce government demand at the same time at private demand is falling, you increase it to jumpstart the economy.”

    They also ramped up govnt spending during an economic boom hence the 44% rise in the numbers of public service.

    Are you totally unaware of the treasary prediction for our debt to ballon in the next 30 years. to 223% of GDP given our current fiscal spending and productivity levels. This doesn’t strike you as worrying?

    “Given their predilection for digging up our national parks”

    So how many national parks have been dug up so far?

    • snoozer 5.1

      jd. if you’re worried about government the only money you’re going to save on a scale that matters without slashing health and education is by raising the superannuation entitlement rate.

      The core public service is too small and too cheap (only $3.6 billon or 5% of govt spending a year) to save significant money while still having the administrative capability that is needed.

      Move the reitrement age to 70, however, and you’re cutting out 32% of current pensioners and you’ll save $2.4 billion a year.

    • I reckon JD may be onto something. If we cut the public service in half we will save a couple of billion. Getting rid of all teachers and nurses ought to just about do it …

      This is the trouble with arguments with the right. You can never get them past the slogan to actually confront the reality.

      Snoozer’s suggested increase in the retirement age is a consideration BUT John Key has ruled out it happening during the time of his government. THis is really typical. They create a problem that will happen but then refuse to implement what may be the only rational response on the grounds of political expediency.

  6. JD 6

    It’s interesting how you describe our bureaucracy as ‘too cheap’. Living in Wellington I am well aware of the numbers of new office grade A blocks which have gone up in Thorndon in the past 4 years. In the end the left may have no choice if it wants to be elected again to limit its cherished public sector. Those thousands of pensioners would rather cut public service numbers than work another 5 years. Really who wouldn’t.

    • JD

      How about answering Snoozer’s response and actually analyse the figures. You could take a machine gun and shoot every public servant on Thorndon Street and you would do bugger all for the Government’s books.

      So what would you do about super?

      Increase contributions to the Cullen fund?
      Put up the age of retirement?

      • Marty G 6.1.1

        The irony, of course, is that if you shot every public servant on The Terrace the price of delivering public services would go up and the service delivery would be worse. It would be left to doctors and teachers etc to try to do their own jobs plus specialist policy development, planning etc etc etc

    • RedLogix 6.2

      mickey,

      I strongly suspect that most righties like JD are functionally innumerate. You give them the numbers but are simply incapable of grasping the elementary consequences of them.

      That’s why they get stuck on ‘sack all the public servants and the books will balance themselves’ magical thinking.

      • Draco T Bastard 6.2.1

        I think it’s more that they’re incapable of accepting reality.

      • fraser 6.2.2

        and at the same time forgetting that the national appointed hatchet men (im sorry “purchase advisors”) could barely find anything that could/should be cut in the first place

    • Marty G 6.3

      If it came to it, I would rather work until 70 (like most people I’m likely to still be healthy and active at that age) than slash healthcare or education.

      So, no, JD, I won’t rather cut public service numbers than work an extra five years.

      As snoozer explained to you, you can’t cut government spending by a meaningful amount by cutting the number of core public service employees. If you cut them by even 10% you’re only talking $340 million, which in the scale of a country of 4 million people is the kind of chump change (0.5% of govt spending) that Treasury finds behind the couch.

      And do you really think that any govt, Labour or National is employing these people for the hell of it? No. They are the ones who organise and plan the actual delivery of public services like health, education, roading. Who do you think decides where and when schools need to be opened or closed? Who do you think monitors and forecasts traffic flows, plans new motorways, gets the consents, hires the contractors?

      You can’t deliver public services without public servants.

      • RedLogix 6.3.1

        If it came to it, I would rather work until 70

        Which of course is not the case for everyone. There are plenty of jobs (drainlaying, shearing, orderlies, truckies and the like) whose jobs is physically demanding. Lots of these men, and it would be mostly men, are plain worn out by the time they are 55, just getting to 60 or so is a struggle for some them. By contrast us shiny arse’s will still be making a doddery nuisance of ourselves at 75 or more. The idea of a universal retirement age may not work anymore.

        There are real policy implications around this.

    • lprent 6.4

      I think you have the same problem with numerical literacy that Nick Smith has. Have you ever read the budgets?

      You’re talking about two completely different orders of magnitude of cost…

      Please start talking after you’ve gained some ability to read a budget…

  7. JD 7

    Interesting range of responses here none of which are either honest (yes of course you want to work until you’re 70) or doesn’t really address the issue of how is NZ going to pay for a gold plated public sector and social service payments when our liabilities may amount to 223% of GDP in the future. Maybe you should examine the consequences of those numbers which posters here have expediently ignored.

    Given that 10% of our population is already in Australia then I’d be worried what will happen then a lot more of us get sick of increasing tax levels. So good luck in ignoring that reality.

  8. Martha 8

    I aggree with the author that NZ should follow Norway’s example on oil as it is beneficial to it.

  9. JD 9

    “I aggree with the author that NZ should follow Norway’s example on oil as it is beneficial to it.”

    The weak link in your plan is that self-restraint is an unknown quality with socialist politicians especially when it concerns other peoples money.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Labour to build replacement for Gorge Road
    Labour will build a new road to replace the Manawatu Gorge Road as quickly as possible, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. ...
    2 hours ago
  • Government suppresses better transport options for Auckland
    A newly-revealed un-redacted report into options for Auckland freight movement shows the Government has been actively trying to suppress more efficient and cost-effective options to construct a third rail line, says Labour’s Transport spokesperson Michael Wood. “While Auckland’s congestion gets ...
    5 hours ago
  • How to vote and keep your info private
    Going to vote or enrolling to vote can be scary. Having your details out there can open a can of worms. I wish we lived in a country where everyone was safe and secure enough to be openly enrolled, but ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    7 hours ago
  • Coleman’s lost control of his Ministry
    Basic blunders and chronic underfunding revealed in Treasury documents obtained by Labour clearly show Health Minister Jonathan Coleman has lost control of his ministry, says Labour’s Health spokesperson David Clark. “Every New Zealander deserves affordable access to quality healthcare but ...
    7 hours ago
  • Household Living Costs hit poorer Kiwis hardest
    Standards of living for the poorest and most vulnerable New Zealanders are being eroded by rising prices for basic living costs, while National has stood idly by, says Labour’s Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Statistics New Zealand data released today is ...
    1 day ago
  • The clock is ticking
      Labour strongly supports the latest report by the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment to have carbon emission targets set in legislation, carbon budgeting and an independent climate commission says Labour’s spokesperson on Climate Change Megan Woods.  “Dr Jan Wright’s ...
    1 day ago
  • Public support keeps Healthy Homes Bill on track
    The strong call from the public for warm, dry, healthy rentals has helped the Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill to pass its second reading, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. ...
    1 day ago
  • More proof National not delivering for New Zealanders
    The Ministry of Social Development’s latest Household Incomes Report is more hard evidence of the growing poverty in New Zealand, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “National claims to be delivering for New Zealanders. This report puts the lie ...
    3 days ago
  • Strong support from medical community for Healthy Homes Bill
    More than a thousand medical professionals, medical students, and other New Zealanders have shown their support for Labour’s Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. ...
    3 days ago
  • Labour will fund Buller Health Centre
    A Labour Government will fully fund the Buller Integrated Family Health Centre in Westport, confirming its commitment to the people of the West Coast and the role of central government to fund essential public services, says Labour’s Health spokesperson David ...
    3 days ago
  • National’s affordable promise for Auckland more smoke and mirrors
    The 26,000 additional houses National plans to build in Auckland on public land over the next decade include fewer than 5,000 affordable homes, while more than 60 per cent will be available for speculators to buy, says Leader of the ...
    3 days ago
  • National out of touch over immigration
    National’s abrupt backflip on their recently-announced changes to immigration shows they never understood the problem and just came up with a confused knee jerk response, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “Regional communities and businesses were quite right to ...
    4 days ago
  • English out of touch on homelessness
    Bill English’s comments that he doesn’t know why people are complaining about the blowout in the number of homeless families the government is putting up in motels just shows how tired and out of touch National is after nine years, ...
    4 days ago
  • All Kiwis to have same standard of cancer care
    Labour is promising that all New Zealanders will have access to the same level of cancer care no matter where they live in the country, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little.   “As someone who has survived cancer I ...
    5 days ago
  • Infrastructure announcement too long coming
    “What took you so long?” is Labour’s response to the Government’s announcement of a new infrastructure investment vehicle. Labour’s Auckland Issues spokesperson Phil Twyford says Labour announced its policy in 2015 to debt-finance infrastructure and service that debt with targeted ...
    5 days ago
  • Time for a breather on immigration
    National has no idea how to house the record number of people entering New Zealand, let alone cope with the pressure on health, education, and transport from this record population growth, says Labour’s Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway. ...
    1 week ago
  • Labour to invest $4 billion in education
    Labour’s Education Manifesto will bring positive change across the education sector and is backed by a massive investment, says Labour’s Education Spokesperson Chris Hipkins.  “Labour’s plan will see an extra $4 billion invested over the next four years. It’s organised ...
    1 week ago
  • National’s shame: worst homelessness in the OECD
    National’s legacy is a housing crisis that has given New Zealand the worst homeless rate in the developed world, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    1 week ago
  • Labour taking action on school donations
    Labour will end so-called voluntary school donations for the majority of parents across the country under its $4 billion plan to revitalise the education sector, says Labour Leader Andrew Little. “Labour has always been committed to a world-class free education ...
    1 week ago
  • Labour to work with Queenstown to build more houses
    Labour will work with Queenstown-Lakes District Council, iwi, and the Community Housing Trust to build the modern, affordable housing Queenstown desperately needs, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. ...
    1 week ago
  • Nats blow the Budget on motels after bowling state houses
    National is spending $140,000 a day putting homeless families in motels, the legacy of nine years of selling off and knocking down state houses, says Labour Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    1 week ago
  • New revelations in Joanne Harrison report
    The State Services Commission’s report into the treatment of whistle-blowers by Joanne Harrison has revealed new accusations against the convicted fraudster, says Labour MP Sue Moroney.  “The report found that four staff inside the Ministry of Transport who had raised ...
    1 week ago
  • Snafu at Princess Margaret
    Jonathan Coleman has to stop the stalling over a new building for mental health services in Christchurch to replace the quake damaged Princess Margaret Hospital, says Labour’s Health spokesperson David Clark. “The Government must accept that Christchurch is still recovering ...
    1 week ago
  • Labour’s fiscal plan to build a fairer New Zealand
    Labour will re-build our housing, health and education while responsibly managing New Zealand’s finances, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little.  “Under Labour’s Fiscal Plan we will deliver big investments in the services we all need and care about, invest ...
    1 week ago
  • Nats show they’re the tax dodgers’ best friends
    The government is taking the knife to IRD at a time when we need a highly skilled department to ensure that multinationals and speculators don’t get away with dodging tax, says Labour’s Revenue spokesperson Michael Wood. ...
    1 week ago
  • Labour secures the future for NZ Super
    A Labour Government will secure the future for New Zealand Superannuation so we can continue to provide superannuation to those retiring at age 65, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “One of the first things a Labour-led Government will ...
    1 week ago
  • Multinationals must pay fair share of tax
    A Labour Government will crack down on multinational companies that are dodging paying their fair share of tax, says Labour Leader Andrew Little. “New Zealanders are missing out by hundreds of millions according to the IRD because multinational companies can ...
    1 week ago
  • ACT’s approach to children backward and ill informed
    Act’s new deputy leader’s claim that Labour’s support for families could “extend the misery of child poverty and even child abuse” is ill informed and offensive, says Labour’s Deputy Leader Jacinda Ardern. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Canterbury hatchet job a disgrace
    The Government’s glib acceptance of advice that the Canterbury District Health Board doesn’t need more money is a hatchet job and a disgrace, says Labour’s Health Spokesperson David Clark. “To claim that the DHB was using tactics to leverage more ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Quality for Kiwi kids at ECE
    After more than a decade of rapid growth in the number of children participating in Early Childhood Education (ECE), it’s time to take stock and map out a clear plan for the future, says Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour to boost ECE quality
    Labour will ensure kids get the best start in life by boosting funding for Early Childhood Centres to employ 100 per cent qualified and registered teachers, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour will stump up a million dollars for Maniototo Hospital
    A Labour led Government will make a million dollars available to rebuild the Maniototo Base hospital in Ranfurly, says the Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little.  “This will be a much needed boost for a long overdue rebuild that has ...
    2 weeks ago
  • No vision for the West Coast
    The West Coast welcomes any Government investment in our region but the lack of any real alternative vision for the West Coast’s economy is disappointing, says Damien O’Connor Labour’s West Coast-Tasman MP.  “The establishment of a Mining Research Unit will ...
    2 weeks ago
  • National’s youth work scheme too little too late
    After nine years, National’s belated attempt to provide work opportunities for unemployed youth should be seen for what it is, a half-hearted, election gimmick from a party that’s ignored the problem till now, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Kiwis won’t fall for Joyce’s spin
    Steven Joyce’s embarrassingly obvious spin on Labour’s Families Package won’t fool anyone, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour prioritises families and public services
    Labour’s Families Package delivers a bigger income boost to more than 70 per cent of families with children than Budget 2017. By not spending $1.5 billion a year on tax cuts, Labour is able to do more for lower and ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Kiwis can’t sleep in your ghost houses, Nick
    The Government’s housing infrastructure announcement is another Nick Smith special – over-promising with no detail on delivery, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour helps older New Zealanders and low income families with winter heating bills
    Labour will further boost its commitment to warm, healthy housing with a Winter Energy Payment for superannuitants and people receiving main benefits, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “Everyone deserves a warm, healthy home to live in. But that’s ...
    3 weeks ago