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Open Mike 27/04/2018

Written By: - Date published: 6:00 am, April 27th, 2018 - 69 comments
Categories: open mike - Tags:

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Step up to the mike …

69 comments on “Open Mike 27/04/2018”

  1. Ad 1

    Good to see Bill Cosby finally convicted of sexual assault.

    • Morrissey 1.1

      Not everybody will be happy. Cosby has some fervent fans in this country….

      “Bill Cosby. GO-O-O-O-OOD, eh?”

      —Mike “Contra” Hosking, NewstalkZB, 2013, after playing one of Cosby’s stand-up routines ranting about the misbehaviour of black youth.

      • Ad 1.1.1

        Let’s see how those favourite lines work in jail.

        • Morrissey 1.1.1.1

          I doubt many of the other prisoners would ever have appreciated his Uncle Tom monologues.

      • james 1.1.2

        People can be unhappy that people they liked turn out disappointments and horrible people.

        I doubt anyone feels much if any sympathy for him now that the truth has come out.

        Dont confuse the two.

        • Morrissey 1.1.2.1

          Hosking supported Cosby because in his dreary and unfunny monologues, Cosby loudly, relentlessly, blamed black people for their plight. The fact that he was a sexual predator of Trumpian proportions was unknown at the time, and the revelation of his crimes means that the likes of Hosking have not been so loud in their praise of him recently.

          • millsy 1.1.2.1.1

            Cosby represents (or represented) a strain of black reactionary conservatism which is centred around evangelical Christianity (think those gospel choirs). Similar people are Ben Carson (Trump’s housing secretary), David Clark (sheriff of Milwakee) and Clarence Thomas.

            • Morrissey 1.1.2.1.1.1

              And that arch-nitwit, Thomas Sowell. He’s the favorite author of Leighton Smith and other non-readers.

      • reason 1.1.3

        Bill Cosby 2 minute mark

        • Morrissey 1.1.3.1

          Brilliant! Especially just after the 8:00 mark….

          “You know who never had someone protest at their gigs because of their material? Bill Cosby. You gotta give it to Bill. What a dignified man. He never said the swear words, he never lowered himself to my level. What a class act he is.”

    • Carolyn_Nth 1.2

      These high profile cases, exposed by the media, and subsequently partly tried via media, have done a job the justice system previously failed to do.

      The failings in the system have been exposed: failings that allow many men, especially those in positions of (varying degrees of) power in diverse social contexts, to get away with sexual assault and rape.

      Now is the time to change the system, so it works to arrest and convict those guilty of such crimes, and also to change the culture so that such crimes happen far less often.

    • tracey 1.3

      He is on bail. A further sign society has a wee way to go determining that drugging abd sexually assaulting women is a bad thing. He has had sufficient time to get his affairs in order and say his goodbyes. But no, home he goes.

  2. patricia bremner 2

    I see on Scoop Sepioloni is doing a limited trial of a system for the disabled.
    Report in a year!!

    • millsy 2.3

      No one seems be able to come up with a detailed explanation of how this will work beyond corporate state buzz words.

      • Rosemary McDonald 2.3.1

        Ask, and ye shall receive millsy.

        Here is the Cabinet Paper that lays out the Plan…https://www.odi.govt.nz/assets/New-Zealand-Disability-Strategy-files/Disability-Support-System-Transformation-Overall-Approach.pdf

        If there is a newer version, one tweaked by the new government it has not revealed itself to your truly.

        A cursory peruse will reveal this is a Plan that will not achieve full nationwide rollout until 2027. Whew! I’ll be ashes or dust by then.

        That cursory peruse will reveal the bane of my frigging life…fucking redacted sections….a line here, a couple of lines there….then whole big bleeding swags of blankety bloody blank.

        And no point in dropping another line to Clare “Open Government” Curran as according to the letter from her in reply to my last letter to her regarding redacted sections this wee gem…https://www.health.govt.nz/system/files/documents/pages/ris-government-response-family-carers-case.pdf she can’t instruct Ministries to release information they consider we are not entitled to see.

        And talking about entitlement. Ministry of Health DSS clients have none.

        ACC foobarred do, enshrined in Legislation, but MOH DSS disabled do not.

        And the above Cabinet Paper does make passing note that some disabled people just might get it into their heads that they are entitled…this must be nipped in the bud.

        Now, back to the Grand Announcement from the PSA.

        They do not like disabled people having control over who does their personal cares, when, how etc….Individualised Funding gives clients this control…..including the right to dismiss staff should they not work out.

        Now…put on hold your workers’ rights outrage and think for a minute…that person you hired to do your personal cares presented well at the interview and performed well during the trial period. The honeymoon is over however and it turns out they like to get sloshed on a Thursday night and arrive to do your manual bowel cares and shower in a less than sober state at six am on Friday. They also think you enjoy listening to endless ribald tales of their sex life. You have spoken to them but to no avail…they have rights and you need their help and you can’t fire them….

        OK. So this is an extreme scenario…though not at all unheard of…but you surely get the drift, right???

        The usual ‘rules’ protecting workers from ‘unfair’ dismissal are not appropriate in this case. At. All.

        And besides, as I pointed out to the nice young woman from the PSA at the meeting in Balmoral a few years ago, any carer worth their salt can pick up another client if things don’t gel with this one….plenty of work there for the right people.

        So this is a massive turnaround from the PSA.

        The NZDSN…the organisation protecting the profit making capabilities of the Contracted Care (sic) Providers also have issues with IF, Personal Budgets, call them what you will….

        See, IF is funded at a lower hourly rate that what the CP have negotiated with the MOH. Built into the hourly rate for the CPs is a margin to provide for their overheads. Economies of scale as CP companies have amalgamated has ensured that profits are good….

        The more disabled folk taking up IF will have the inevitable effect of reducing the profit making capacity of the Contracted Providers.

        The NZDSN have seen this coming for quite some time, and have positioned themselves to still remain in business in this new market…https://www.demos.co.uk/files/At_your_service_-_web.pdf?1256725103

        Whew! That’s me done for now.

        Simply lovely having access to a real device…with keys, and broadband and a mouse so one can link to documents etc. 😉

    • Rosemary McDonald 2.4

      Well, what a coincidence.

      I fired off an email just the other night to the PIC of the DSS System Transformation. I pointed out, amongst other things, that the NZDSN and the PSA were not going to be exactly ecstatic that the new happy crappy plan for the poor disabled hinges largely on folk using IF.

      Really disappointed with the System Transformation from what I’ve read.

      Perhaps there is an updated Cabinet Paper? The one that tipped me into despair was signed by the previous incumbent, Wagner.

      Very possibly SSDD.

    • Rosemary McDonald 2.5

      patricia bremner

      This is NOT an initiative from the current incumbents.

      However, it was borne out of this… https://www.parliament.nz/resource/en-nz/48DBSCH_SCR4194_1/cb220d2e3ba25dc33dec0b28b29b30578d110dd5

      “Inquiry into the quality of care and service provision for people with disabilities” Report of the Social Services Committee 2008.

      Background to the inquiry
      In 2005 and 2006 concerns about support services for people with disabilities were raised by the media and discussed in Parliament. In particular, two major service providers were accused of inappropriate treatment of people with disabilities in their care, and one was found to have received funding to which it was not entitled. Publicity about abuse and irregular financial dealings appeared to be indicative of wider issues in the disability sector, and organisations representing the disabled community publicly expressed dissatisfaction with current service provision.
      Concerns about the quality, training, and availability of staff looking after people with disabilities with complex needs were raised, deaths in care facilities were examined in the media, and the Government’s management and funding of the disability sector was questioned.
      . A series of investigations and audits produced evidence of strengths in the
      system, but there was also evidence of unacceptable conditions and abuse, making an inquiry necessary.”

      Read it and weep….many of us did.

      So…Labour Government, and shitty care for disabled Kiwis after not quite a decade of application of neo liberal policies around disability supports.

      Who would have ever thought that handing over big chunks of money to profits and ‘non-profits’ to provide disability care to people with high needs, using a largely untrained and unregulated workforce would end in exploitation and abuse and neglect?

      Yet, when family carers who did not risk the lives of their loved ones at the hands of these abusers and exploiters went to Court to be paid for the work they did….some in the ‘sector’ threw the ‘abuse, neglect and exploitation’ narrative right back at us.

      The Person In Charge of this System Transformation told me a couple of months ago that the issue of family care (as opposed to care through providers) is NOT part of the System Transformation strategy/discussion/initiative or whatever happy clappy name they choose to use.

      How can this be?

      The single biggest Court Case, causing ripples all the way to the UN, involving the care of disabled Kiwis and it is NOT a part of the single biggest System Transformation since Kimberly et al were closed?

      Since the ST began under National we’ll blame them for this serious and quite frankly damned insulting omission.

      So, sorry pb, no cause for celebration.

      Not for a decade.

      Labour has a shameful record on this issue.

  3. Ed 3

    Does RNZ pimp for the reading lobby?

  4. The Chairman 4

    Climate Change Minister James Shaw says he’s looking at putting a tax on imported petrol vehicles and using that money to subsidise electric cars.

    https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport/audio/2018642421/levy-on-petrol-car-imports-considered-by-govt

    Effectively, those that can’t afford a new electric car will be subsidising those that can. Therefore, while this may be a win for the Green’s environment cause it goes against their social justice stance. Which won’t go down too well with many of their supporters.

    With the Greens leading this drive and with consumers being warned to expect substantial jumps in fuel and energy prices from any shift to a low carbon economy, the Greens better ensure there are sufficient safeguards to protect low income households if they want to avoid consumer, thus voter blow-back.

    • Barfly 4.1

      I can’t fault your logic there.

      • mac1 4.1.1

        This policy needs much more detail to see how well it will work. How much will an EV need to drop in price in order to make it attractive to the masses? What mechanism will they use to prevent a EV dealer tweaking the price to get a larger subsidy, like some landlords do with the accommodation supplement?

        I am already a EV owner. It may be a Green issue but none of my Green drinking mates own one. They give me a bit of good-natured cheek about my Labour credentials, so a month ago, after some more ‘holier-than-thou’ ribbing, I dropped my EV keys onto the table and asked “How Green are you?’

        None had an electric car. Shaw needs to preach to his converted………. 162,000 Green voters in NZ in 2017. Only 6000 EVs owned in NZ.

        What other factors apart from price hinder a greater uptake of EV in NZ?

        • The Chairman 4.1.1.1

          Considering the masses buy secondhand imports, one would expect the price of an electric car would have to be substantially slashed for the masses to afford one.

          Another problem in us all changing to electric vehicles is our electricity supply is still reliant on fossil fuels.

          • mac1 4.1.1.1.1

            https://www.stuff.co.nz/motoring/news/97198599/electric-vehicles-can-we-become-the-norway-of-the-southern-hemisphere

            “New Zealand can feel rather proud that it is second-best in the world in the way we generate electricity. Hydro, wind and geothermal energy combine to produce 85 per cent of our power, with the remainder generated using gas and coal.”

            One of the least reliant on fossil fuels in the world.

            “Our performance is not that far behind the top country, Norway, which generates 97.9 per cent of its power using renewables. Other countries that are performing well include Colombia at 82 per cent and Brazil at 81.2 per cent.”

            Norway and New Zealand, though close in renewable energy generation have this disparate statistic also.

            “It’s estimated that the 4500 EVs now in use in New Zealand (September 2017 figures) represent less than 1 per cent of our total car “park”. Compare that to Norway (which is not much bigger than us, both in terms of land area and population), which boasts more than 150,000 EVs and plug-in hybrids. Not only that, but last year 40 per cent of all new vehicles registered in that country were EVs.”

            • The Chairman 4.1.1.1.1.1

              One of the least reliant on fossil fuels in the world but reliant nonetheless. And that is at current demand. If we all shifted to electric vehicles, our electricity supply would have to increase. So unlike Norway, we’re nowhere close to 100%, thus are unprepared for a massive surge in electric vehicle uptake.

              Interestingly, I see Government subsidises and being friendlier to electric vehicles is what is largely driving their uptake in Norway.

              Therefore, it indicates subsidises work. However, the problem for the Greens is expecting those that can’t afford a new electric car to help fund those who can won’t go down too well with many of their supporters. Hence, they really need to look for a more progressive means of funding.

              • AB

                ” the problem for the Greens is expecting those that can’t afford a new electric car to help fund those who can won’t go down too well with many of their supporters”
                Yes – government subsidies would be far better directed at making electrified public transport free at the point of use, rather than helping high income earners buy a $40k Leaf instead of a $35K petrol vehicle.

            • Gabby 4.1.1.1.1.2

              Did the Norwegians have a Max Bradford to ensure their access to cheap electricity?

              • Macro

                Ooooh! Gabby that was a low blow!
                Good ol Max – what a clusterfuck that was.
                🙂

          • tracey 4.1.1.1.2

            The second hand hybrid or electric market is growing. Toyota priys was first made in 2003??

          • Mikes 4.1.1.1.3

            No it isn’t. Our power generation is over 80% renewable

          • Gabby 4.1.1.1.4

            James, man of the people that he is, pointed out that a 2nd hand crap Leaf would set you back a mere 15 g. Chump change to the right sort of people.

            • Macro 4.1.1.1.4.1

              Actually one with a battery that is not too far gone will set one back about $11,000.
              There is a guy in Auck who specialises in repairing such batteries cell by cell so its not such a massive outlay as a new one. For local driving the EV is the ideal vehicle. Having to travel around 200 Km and return on a reasonably regular basis (with no rapid charging readily available) I find a hybrid is the answer. I have cut my carbon emissions by half. Locally – down a steep hill and back – a distance of around 5km I use the car as an EV.

              • Molly

                We also have a hybrid, but I agree with opinions that it has two systems that can go wrong. We have a maintenance contract with “that guy in Auckland”, so we can get a replacement battery etc. when we need it. Will probably try and upgrade before then. We purchased it second-hand, and it provided us with the seven-seater we needed. It is 2004, so not as efficient as the later models, but still pretty good.

                My partner drives a fully electric for work, and it is great. Takes a bit of getting used to with the charging, and driving it is a bit different. But the next lot of nissans, etc should have a range of around 300-400kms. More than enough for most uses – if, there are enough charging stations around.

                I read about the number of petrol stations dropping from around 4,000 in 1976 to around 1,200 now. I guess part of that would have been the petrol companies getting rid of their private owners, but that would have hit the regions and smaller towns the hardest.

                The cost of a rapid charger is around $50,000 (Bridges warning);.

                Wouldn’t it be great if some of that regional funding, merged with infrastructure funding and those regional self-owned businesses in small towns could access a scheme that installed for free a rapid-charger if their business plan was up to a certain level of viability and/or social contribution? That’s twenty minutes for that business and others to provide goods and services to a customer.

                The returns on the investment of $114,000,000 to all NZers would be considerable:
                1. An electric charger infrastructure that reduces range anxiety,
                2. A direct investment into locally owned small to medium businesses in the regions,
                3. A concrete commitment to transitioning transport.

                I’m sure that the America’s Cup has some type of cost/benefit analysis, but all event like this can manage to rustle something up. Doesn’t mean they are truly beneficial.

        • greywarshark 4.1.1.2

          The Greens in the middle class are good at talkng the talk but not walking the walk, unless it happens to be one of their particular
          concerns. My opinion. Many are still stuck on recycling or getting us all on bikes or banning everything that isn’t kosher.
          Meanwhile others have to get by trying to fulfil their obligations to family, taxation system, landlord or bank etc.

          Agreed with an acquaintance today that a number of small minibus taxis, at contract rates driven by local people, and which could be EVs,
          be available to collect children on a route to go to school and be brought home again, for a virtual koha. Less traffic on the road, and more safety than bicycling, and in the end perhaps less need of a second car.

          Let’s get serious about coping with our problems and paying a lot of money into the political system that seems constipated or delivers piles of ordure to us. Friendly, capable helpful pollies who want to do the best to enable a happy thriving community adopting good practices with the future in mind.

          Keep that vision before you, recall it at night before you go to sleep, and give yourself 5 minutes to invigorate yourself with it into a positive frame of mind as you leap out to start your day.
          Think kia ora and ata marie.

  5. veutoviper 5

    A very interesting interview on Morning Report this morning was with Tracey Martin, Minister for Children, who is currently in the UK investigating how they deal with vulnerable children there, ahead of the review of Oranga Tamariki.

    The first 4 mins of the 5.57 min interview by Suzie Ferguson was on the changes being implemented by certain jurisdictions in the UK (including Scotland) which have achieved improvements, for example by a change in focus from ‘doing services’ to concentrating on ‘building relationships with our children’.

    The discussion also covered the role of social workers. Martin considered that we have excellent social workers here in NZ and there was no problem with our social workers themselves. Rather, she believed that the environment they are working in is very important, with social workers needing to be well supported to be able to do their job. While she did not say so directly, she seemed to imply indirectly that she did not think that they were necessarily well supported currently.

    IMHO although brief, these remarks were particularly interesting in relationship to the Social Services & Community Select Committee Report back on the Social Workers Registration Legislation Bill that has been the subject of discussion here on TS in several posts over the last week starting with the guest post by Keiran O’Donoghue titled “Professional identity – Why it matters or Why we are being screwed by the Government”.

    So I hope that Smellpir, Amy and others directly involved in social work and who have guest posted and/or commented on TS on the concerns raised by the Select Committee report back take a few minutes to listen to Martin.

    http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport/audio/2018642426/tracey-martin-learns-from-uk-before-oranga-tamariki-review

    Note: Unfortunately in the last two minutes of the interview, Ferguson diverted onto the subject of Martin’s views on smacking and her parenting practices some years ago. This led to an exchange between the two as to the reason Martin was being interviewed with Martin seeing this as her role now as Minister for Children – not what she or NZF had thought or had policies on some years ago. Martin held her ground well with a hint of steel against this diversion. I just wish they had continued to discuss the issues covered in the earlier part of the interview.

    • solkta 5.1

      not what she or NZF had thought or had policies on some years ago.

      The election was only six months ago. NZF campaigned on repealing the ‘smacking bill’ and Martin endorsed this policy. She said that she smacked her kids and thought it was fine.

      • veutoviper 5.1.1

        I agree I was a little unclear in my wording on that, solkta.

        My main focus in respect of this morning’s interview was on what Martin had to say about social workers. Research I have done and posted under the O’Donoghue guest post and discussed there with Smellpir for example, indicates that NZF appear to be more aligned with the registration regime and definitions (including the controversial scope of practice) sought by the social worker profession itself for many years than any other political party.

        Re the “anti-smacking law”, as you say, NZF did campaign in both the 2014 and 2017 elections – not to repeal the smacking law per se, but to hold a referendum on whether or not it should be repealed.

        This – and her own smacking of her kids years ago – were discussed on 30 October 2017 in an interview between Martin and John Campbell on RNZ Checkpoint where she also clarified that the referendum had not survived the coalition negotiations, and she and her party had moved on from this.

        ”The Minister for Children, New Zealand First’s Tracey Martin, says her party’s policy to hold a referendum on repealing the child smacking law did not make it through coalition talks.

        The law was passed in 2007, removing the defence of reasonable force in cases of child abuse.

        New Zealand First campaigned in 2014 on holding a referendum to repeal the law, saying it was passed in 2007 despite overwhelming public opposition.

        Ms Martin told Checkpoint with John Campbell that the law had had a chilling effect on parents, including herself.

        She said she used to smack her children sometimes if they simply refused to listen.

        Tracey Martin said once the law was changed, her children were older anyway.

        But she said the world had moved on, and her party had moved on.

        “If I can find a way without coalition partners, to improve that legislation to make it clearer in law, then we will do that.

        “With regard to the referendum on section 59, that did not survive negotiations.”

        https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/checkpoint/audio/2018619768/minister-for-children-wanted-to-repeal-anti-smacking-legislation

  6. The Chairman 6

    How should we pay for our transport upgrade?

    Through regressive user pays charges and taxes or by way of progressive taxes?

    Labour look set on using regressive user pays charges and taxes. Therefore, if we don’t support that, now is the time to be vocal.

    • Ed1 6.1

      I would be interested in the rationale for private funding of some parts of the plan – all that seems to do is remove control from government to deliver profits to banks and private shareholders – and they walk away from losses.
      Toll roads should be for roads that cannot be otherwise justified in priority terms, or where restrictions on volume are desirable (such as central city tolls). I think road user charges should cover the cost of both the development and maintenance of roads, and also the “cost” of emissions – I would expect individual vehicles to therefore pay based on weight and emissions test results – that alone may be an incentive for electric or at least hybrid cara. How that flows through to petrol vehicles is problematic, but I suspect fair charges would make very heavy road vehicles less attractive.
      There should be considerable scope for raising money from a fairer tax system – the glaring market distortion of tax free capital gains needs to be addressed.

      • The Chairman 6.1.1

        The rationale for private funding is to reduce the Government’s outlay, keeping debt off their balance sheet.

        But I agree, it comes with a potential moral hazard of privatising gains while socialising losses all in while adding to the cost of borrowing.

        Tolls should only be used to pay for the project, ceasing once it has been paid for. Which means no privatisation with tolls going to provide private profit.

        Nevertheless, tolls are regressive, thus are a larger burden on low income households. So is using charges to restrict traffic volumes, thus unless there are measures to counter the negative impact on low income households, I can’t support them.

        As for the cost of emissions, expecting individual vehicles to pay based on weight and their emissions test results is also regressive. We can’t expect low income household to disproportionally pay for our transport upgrade, hence I’d like to see more progressive ways to secure funding being put forward.

        Increasing the bright-line test will help capture capital gains.

  7. cleangreen 7

    So much for our the Labour Government revoking our rights and democratic right to speak with our own submission before this kangaroo court committee over the TTP11.

    Where was that promise to give us our voice and that they will hear us over our issues?

    Surely hearing our voice over TPP11 should have been our explicit right?

    What a sad day for our loss of democracy we see now.

    This came back today to our ‘pre-submission’ from the committee reviewing all the submissions placed with them before last week deadline.

    A public march must be made when they finally execute the TPP11 as they are hellbound to punish us into this 35 yr enslavery called a ‘free trade’ agreement.’ is not a free trade agreement at all and it seems to be already made by them to exclude our rights to present a verbal submission as they dismiss any voices against the ugly agreement made behind all our backs with no fair discussion with us all before hand.

    start;

    27/4/18.
    Dear Submitter

    Thank you for your submission on the International treaty examination of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership. A copy will be distributed to members of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade committee.
    We note that you had requested to make an oral submission to the committee. However the committee has decided it won’t be hearing oral submissions from submitters whose written submission comprised of text from the “It’s Our Future” campaign, available on their website.
    What happens next?
    – After the committee has considered all public submissions and official advice, they’ll share their findings and recommendations with Parliament in a report.
    – The committee’s report, along with all of the submissions and advice, will be publicly released and will be published to the Parliament website http://www.parliament.nz. If you have any concerns about this please contact committee staff.
    – After the committee has presented its report, the item will progress to the next stage and will be considered by Parliament.

    If you would like more information or have any questions then please let us know and we will be happy to help you.

    Yours sincerely,
    Committee Secretariat.
    end;

  8. Monty 8

    Hey

    Still no Weka. @mickeysavage, @Bill, @lprent can anyone advise if she is ok.

    Her articles and comments are missed.

  9. Philip Ferguson 9

    Otago Socialist Society event on Marx’s ‘Wage Labour and Capital’:
    https://rdln.wordpress.com/2018/04/24/wage-labour-and-capital-otago-socialist-society-event-5-30pm-monday-april-30/

  10. greywarshark 10

    Did you hear this Radionz piece from Charles Finney on WTO and USA and storm clouds ahead?
    http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/on-the-inside/355959/nz-must-heed-us-moves-to-disable-world-trade-organisation

    New Zealand’s size and reliance on trade makes having global trade rules, backed by a dispute settlement system, particularly important for us. For years in the past, the lack of such a system meant our exporters faced potentially huge tariffs on all goods.

    The 1947 General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade helped with that, and in 1995 the World Trade Organisation (WTO) applied those rules to the key industry of agriculture and boosted the dispute resolution system, a huge win for New Zealand.

    However, the WTO – in particular the dispute resolution system which gives it heft – has recently come under threat from the US.

    The system consists of two levels. If a complaint cannot be resolved by consultation between parties, a panel of experts will make recommendations on how to resolve it. But these decisions can be appealed and, if appealed, they can’t be adopted.

    As at least one party is usually unhappy with a panel report, the matter is usually resolved by appeal to the WTO’s seven-member Appellate Body. Their decisions are binding: you either implement the decision, or pay the other parties compensation.

    Three members must sit on every appeal, with members from the countries involved in a dispute excluded. This is a great system as it stops members vetoing decisions.

    For some time however, the US has been vetoing all replacements to the panel of seven members. Members are appointed for a fixed four-year term. These terms can be extended, but the US is vetoing extensions too…….

    (How long are we going to put up with this debacle of a supposed developed educated country full of supposedly responsible intelligent worldly-wise people, and which holds itself out as a paragon amongst nations, serving up this mean-minded stuff as appropriate behaviour for our world of modern societies and economies?)

    • tracey 10.1

      How long? As long as enough believe the myth that the economy is number 1 rather than the economy serving the people first, then environment. Servant not master.

      Too many think that only the wealthy have a valid or credible view of what needs to be done and that making lots of money = successful = to be listened to.

  11. greywarshark 11

    Have all Trump followers caught up with Bad Lip Reading where the politicians’ hearing with Mark Zuckerburg is turned into the fakest of news.

    https://boingboing.net/2018/04/26/a-bad-lip-reading-of-mark-zuck.html

  12. eco maori 12

    There is a awesome program on Al Jazeera
    At the minute it comfirms all that I have said about the dubble edged sword of the Internet Ka kite ano

  13. eco maori 13

    Ka pai Julia Whaipooti I have just picked up here story she was at the United nations presentating the plite of Maori culture tangata from the justice system in Atoearoa New Zealand. I won’t quote my situation but its farcical here is the link below

    https://www.google.co.nz/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/2018642011/young-maori-go-to-un-to-oppose-mega-prison&ved=2ahUKEwj4lr6p2dvaAhUDvbwKHYmbCpoQFjACegQIBxAB&usg=AOvVaw2wfaKtzRUdoZDniaPgYWuG
    What got me was that there is no word of this Mana Wahine story in MSM??????????
    KA KITE ANO

    • eco maori 13.1

      Newshub good evening going through the old ship log books of the ship that have been to Antarctic is a excellent way to get more clues to climate change we can learn a lot more from OUR history and use this information to make our society better. The THUNDER had a good Game Kia kaha guys The Rugby was good this weekend Ka pai Ka kite ano

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  • First Police wing to complete training post lockdown
    A new-look Police graduation ceremony to take account of COVID19 health rules has marked the completion of training for 57 new constables. Police Minister Stuart Nash attended this afternoon's ceremony, where officers of Recruit Wing 337 were formally sworn in at the Royal New Zealand Police College without the normal support of ...
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    2 hours ago
  • Government makes further inroads on predatory lenders
    Mobile traders and truck shops must adhere to responsible lending requirements Interest rate cap on high-cost loans Lenders prohibited from offering further credit to an applicant who has taken two high-cost loans in the past 90 days The Minister of Commerce and Consumer Affairs, Kris Faafoi, has signalled an end ...
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    4 hours ago
  • New survey shows wage subsidy a “lifeline” for businesses, saved jobs
    94% of firms say wage subsidy had positive impact on cashflow 62% of firms say support helped to manage non-wage costs like rent A survey of business that have received the Government’s wage subsidy show it has played a significant role in saving jobs, and freed up cash flow to ...
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    5 hours ago
  • Tax changes support economic recovery
    New legislation introduced to Parliament today will support growth and assist businesses on the road to economic recovery, said Revenue Minister Stuart Nash. “The Taxation (Annual Rates for 2020-21, Feasibility Expenditure, and Remedial Matters) Bill proposes that businesses can get tax deductions for ‘feasibility expenditure’ on new investments,” said Mr ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 hours ago
  • $4.6 million financial relief for professional sports
    Sport and Recreation Minister Grant Robertson has welcomed the first release of funds from the $265 million Sport Recovery Package announced as part of Budget 2020. Sport NZ has announced that $4.6 million in funding will go to the Wellington Phoenix, NZ Warriors, Super Rugby teams and the ANZ Premiership ...
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    9 hours ago
  • Critical support for strategic tourism assets
    An iconic New Zealand tourism attraction and the country’s 31 Regional Tourism Organisations are the first recipients of support from the $400 million Tourism Sector Recovery Plan, to help position the sector for recovery from COVID-19, Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis announced today. The plan includes a Strategic Tourism Assets Protection ...
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    10 hours ago
  • Supporting Kiwi businesses to resolve commercial rent disputes
    The Government will legislate to ensure businesses that suffered as a result of the COVID-19 response will get help to resolve disputes over commercial rent issues, Justice Minister Andrew Little announced today. A temporary amendment to the Property Law Act will insert a clause in commercial leases requiring a fair ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    12 hours ago
  • Prompt payments to SMEs even more urgent
    The Minister for Small Business says new data from Xero highlights the urgency of prompt payment practices to small and medium enterprises as we move into economic recovery. Last month Government ministers wrote to significant private enterprises and the banking industry to request they join efforts by government agencies to ...
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    15 hours ago
  • Free period products in schools to combat poverty
    Young people in Waikato will be the first to have free access to period products in schools in another step to support children and young people in poverty,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said.  During term 3, the Ministry of Education will begin providing free period products to schools following the ...
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    1 day ago
  • Response to charges in New Plymouth
    The Minister of Police Stuart Nash has issued the following statement in response to charges filed against three Police officers this morning in the New Plymouth District Court. “Any incident involving a loss of life in Police custody is taken very seriously. The charges today reflect the gravity of the ...
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    1 day ago
  • Govt boosts innovation, R&D for economic rebuild
    $196 million for Crown Research Institutes $150 million for R&D loan scheme $33 million for Māori research and development opportunities $12 million for the Nationally Significant Collections and Databases $10 million to help maintain in-house capability at Callaghan Innovation New Zealand’s entrepreneurs, innovators and crown researchers will benefit from a ...
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    1 day ago
  • Temporary changes to NCEA and University Entrance this year
    Further temporary changes to NCEA and University Entrance (UE) will support senior secondary school students whose teaching and learning have been disrupted by COVID-19. “The wellbeing of students and teachers is a priority. As we are all aware, COVID-19 has created massive disruption to the school system, and the Government ...
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    1 day ago
  • Extended terms for the directors of the Racing Industry Transition Agency
    Minister for Racing Winston Peters today announced that the terms for the directors of the Racing Industry Transition Agency (RITA) have been extended to 30 June 2021. Due to the COVID-19 crisis the transition period has been extended to ensure that the Racing Industry Bill can complete its progress through ...
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    1 day ago
  • Healthy Homes Standards statement of compliance deadline extended
    The deadline for landlords to include detailed information in their tenancy agreements about how their property meets the Healthy Homes Standards, so tenants can see the home they are renting is compliant, has been extended from 1 July 2020 to 1 December 2020.  The Healthy Homes Standards became law on 1 July 2019. The Standards are ...
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    2 days ago
  • Criminal Cases Review Commission board appointments announced
    Justice Minister Andrew Little today announced details of further appointments to the Criminal Cases Review Commission. “I am pleased to announce Paula Rose QSO OStJ as Deputy Chief Commissioner for a term of five years commencing on 15 June 2020,” said Andrew Little. “I am also pleased to announce the ...
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    2 days ago
  • Release of initial list of supported training to aid COVID-19 recovery
    The Targeted Training and Apprenticeships Fund (TTAF) will pay costs of learners of all ages to undertake vocational education and training The fund will target support for areas of study and training that will give learners better employment prospects as New Zealand recovers from COVID-19 Apprentices working in all industries ...
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    2 days ago
  • Emission trading reforms another step to meeting climate targets
    The Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) will finally start to cut New Zealand’s greenhouse gas pollution as it was originally intended to, because of changes announced today by the Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw. The changes include a limit on the total emissions allowed within the ETS, rules to ensure ...
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    2 days ago
  • Queen’s Birthday Honours highlights Pacific leadership capability in Aotearoa
    Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio says the Queen’s Birthday 2020 Honours List provides an abundance of examples that Pacific people’s leadership capability is unquestionable in Aotearoa. “The work and the individuals we acknowledge this year highlights the kind of visionary examples and dedicated community leadership that we need ...
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    3 days ago
  • Govt backing horticulture to succeed
    The Government is backing a new $27 million project aimed at boosting sustainable horticulture production and New Zealand’s COVID-19 recovery efforts, says Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. “Our horticulture sector has long been one of New Zealand’s export star performers, contributing around $6 billion a year to our economy. During and ...
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    3 days ago
  • Applications open for forestry scholarships
    Applications have opened for 2021 Ngā Karahipi Uru Rākau – Forestry Scholarships, which will support more Māori and women to pursue careers in forestry science, says Forestry Minister Shane Jones. “I’m delighted Te Uru Rākau is offering Ngā Karahipi Uru Rākau – Forestry Scholarships for the third year running. These ...
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    3 days ago
  • Excellent service to nature recognised
    The Queen’s Birthday 2020 Honours List once again highlights the dedication by many to looking after our native plants and wildlife, including incredible work to restore the populations of critically endangered birds says Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage. Anne Richardson of Hororata has been made an Officer of the New ...
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    4 days ago
  • Wetlands and waterways gain from 1BT funding
    The Government will invest $10 million from the One Billion Trees Fund for large-scale planting to provide jobs in communities and improve the environment, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor and Forestry Minister Shane Jones have announced. New, more flexible funding criteria for applications will help up to 10 catchment groups plant ...
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    4 days ago
  • New fund for women now open
    Organisations that support women are invited to apply to a new $1,000,000 fund as part of the Government’s COVID-19 response. “We know women, and organisations that support women, have been affected by COVID-19. This new money will ensure funding for groups that support women and women’s rights,” said Minister for ...
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    4 days ago
  • Govt supports King Country farmers to lift freshwater quality
    Healthier waterways are front and centre in a new project involving more than 300 King Country sheep, beef and dairy farmers. The Government is investing $844,000 in King Country River Care, a group that helps farmers to lift freshwater quality and farming practice, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. “Yesterday ...
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    6 days ago
  • Libraries to help with jobs and community recovery
    A major funding package for libraries will allow them to play a far greater role in supporting their communities and people seeking jobs as part of the economic recovery from COVID-19. “Budget 2020 contains over $60 million of funding to protect library services and to protect jobs,” says Internal Affairs ...
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    6 days ago
  • Support for arts and music sector recovery
    A jobseekers programme for the creative sector and four new funds have been set up by the Government to help our arts and music industry recover from the blow of COVID-19. Thousands of jobs will be supported through today’s $175 million package in a crucial economic boost to support the ...
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    6 days ago
  • Legislative changes to support the wellbeing of veterans and their families
    Minister for Veterans Ron Mark has welcomed the First Reading of a Bill that will make legislative changes to further improve the veterans’ support system.  The Veterans’ Support Amendment Bill No 2, which will amend the Veterans’ Support Act 2014, passed First Reading today. The bill addresses a number of ...
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    6 days ago
  • Christ Church Cathedral – Order in Council
    Views sought on Order in Council to help fast track the reinstatement of the Christ Church Cathedral  The Associate Minister for Greater Christchurch Regeneration, Hon Poto Williams, will be seeking public written comment, following Cabinet approving the drafting of an Order in Council aimed at fast-tracking the reinstatement of the ...
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    6 days ago
  • New Zealanders’ human rights better protected in new Bill
    The law setting out New Zealanders’ basic civil and human rights is today one step towards being strengthened following the first reading of a Bill that requires Parliament to take action if a court says a statute undermines those rights. At present, a senior court can issue a ‘declaration of ...
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    7 days ago
  • Deep concern at Hong Kong national security legislation
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters today reiterated the deep concern of the New Zealand Government following confirmation by China’s National People’s Congress of national security legislation relating to Hong Kong. “New Zealand shares the international community’s significant and long-standing stake in Hong Kong’s prosperity and stability,” Mr Peters said. “New Zealand ...
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    1 week ago
  • Government invests in New Zealand’s cultural recovery
    Thousands of artists and creatives at hundreds of cultural and heritage organisations have been given much-needed support to recover from the impact of COVID-19, Prime Minister and Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Jacinda Ardern announced today. “The cultural sector was amongst the worst hit by the global pandemic,” Jacinda ...
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    1 week ago
  • Better protection for New Zealand assets during COVID-19 crisis
    Key New Zealand assets will be better protected from being sold to overseas owners in a way contrary to the national interest, with the passage of the Overseas Investment (Urgent Measures) Bill. The Bill, which passed its third reading in Parliament today, also cuts unnecessary red tape to help attract ...
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    1 week ago
  • Cleaning up our rivers and lakes
    Setting higher health standards at swimming spots Requiring urban waterways to be cleaned up and new protections for urban streams Putting controls on higher-risk farm practices such as winter grazing and feed lots Setting stricter controls on nitrogen pollution and new bottom lines on other measures of waterway health Ensuring ...
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    1 week ago
  • Record year for diversity on Govt boards
    The Government is on the verge of reaching its target of state sector boards and committees made up of at least 50 percent women, says Minister for Women Julie Anne Genter and Minister for Ethnic Communities Jenny Salesa. For the first time, the Government stocktake measures the number of Māori, ...
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    1 week ago
  • New appointments to the Commerce Commission
    The Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister and Broadcasting, Communications and Digital Media Minister, Kris Faafoi, has today announced the appointment of Tristan Gilbertson as the new Telecommunications Commissioner and member of the Commerce Commission. “Mr Gilbertson has considerable experience in the telecommunications industry and a strong reputation amongst his peers,” ...
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    1 week ago
  • Historic pay equity settlement imminent for teacher aides
    The Ministry of Education and NZEI Te Riu Roa have agreed to settle the pay equity claim for teacher aides, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. This will see more than 22,000 teacher aides, mostly women, being valued and paid fairly for the work they do. “Teacher aides are frontline ...
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    1 week ago
  • Govt delivers security for construction subcontractors
    Subcontractors will have greater certainty, more cashflow support and job security with new changes to retention payments under the Construction Contracts Act says Minister for Building and Construction, Jenny Salesa. A recent review of the retentions money regime showed that most of the building and construction sector is complying with ...
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    1 week ago
  • New Zealand and Singapore reaffirm ties
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong have marked the first anniversary of the New Zealand-Singapore Enhanced Partnership with a virtual Leaders’ Meeting today. The Enhanced Partnership, signed on 17 May 2019, provides the framework for cooperation across the four main areas of trade, defence and ...
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    1 week ago
  • JOINT STATEMENT BY THE PRIME MINISTERS OF NEW ZEALAND AND THE REPUBLIC OF SINGAPORE ON THE FIRST AN...
    On 17 May 2019, New Zealand and Singapore established an Enhanced Partnership to elevate our relations. The Enhanced Partnership – based on the four pillars of trade and economics, security and defence, science, technology and innovation, and people-to-people links – has seen the long-standing relationship between our countries strengthen over the ...
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    1 week ago
  • Government investment supports the acquisition of new Interislander ferries
    State-Owned Enterprises Minister Winston Peters has welcomed KiwiRail’s announcement that it is seeking a preferred shipyard to build two new rail-enabled ferries for the Cook Strait crossing. “This Government is committed to restoring rail to its rightful place in New Zealand. Bigger, better ships, with new technology are yet another ...
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    1 week ago