web analytics

Police Liaison = Police Trap

Written By: - Date published: 3:16 pm, June 8th, 2012 - 45 comments
Categories: activism, police - Tags:

Last week I wrote about how the mass arrest of protesters last week was planned by police from the beginning. A couple of days later I was told that 10 minutes before the march a Police Liaison Officer spoke to protest organisers and stated that police were only there to facilitate the march. I have now managed to track down the video of this conversation:

At the beginning of the video, if you listen carefully you’ll hear the Police Liaison say: “We are here to facilitate that…”

The conversation then goes on:

Police Liaison: Ideally, depending on numbers, we would prefer you to stay on the footpath.

Protest Organiser: Yeah that’s not going to happen.

Police Liaison: What about one lane?

Protest Organiser: No one lane’s not going to happen either. That would kind of defy the point of the blockade protest. The idea is, we want to be engaging with these people so we feel like if we aren’t asking them to engage directly then we’re not really being heard, and that can be illustrated by the Minister of Finance kind of inciting this situation himself directly. That’s kind of our position on it – we would like to stand on both sides of the street and we feel there probably will be enough of us.

Police Liaison: Have you got any indication of numbers?

Protest Organiser: We’ll just keep counting, like you.

Police Liaison: Very good. And have you got a time?

Protest Organiser: 3pm

Police Liaison: For here? Is that when you’re going to march? Are you going to have a little rally first?

Protest Organiser: There’ll be a bit of a rally here, when we announce the plan to everyone. Much the same as last week. And then we’ll march from here so there’ll be a few chants and then we’ll walk up the street.

Police Liaison: Will you tell me your direction?

Protest Organiser: It’s going to be in the same direction as last time.

Police Liaison: Very good. Thank you very much.

As it turned out the protesters decided they didn’t reasonably have the numbers to take over the whole street, so they were only marching up two out of the four lanes.

The Police Liaison Officer in this conversation could have warned the protesters that everyone would be arrested if they marched up the road (though that would itself have been unlawful). Instead she clearly gave the impression that police had no issue with the protest plan. The video was taken right on 3pm, just before the beginning of the protest. Less than 10 minutes later, police began the mass arrests.

45 comments on “Police Liaison = Police Trap ”

  1. Draco T Bastard 1

    And the police wonder why people hold them in contempt.

    • Te Reo Putake 1.1

      The Police officer seemed pretty reasonable to me, Draco. Nothing contemptible about liaising with the organisers of the march, nothing on the tape to suggest she was in on a set up or indeed, that there was a ‘trap’ at all. They’re cops; if you piss them off, they arrest you. Something I’ve experienced myself, in many similar circ’s (and, on occasion, without the kid glove treatment I saw in the vids of the arrests).
       
      The tactic of arrest, hold and release has been used for years now. It’s an effective way of taking the steam out of a protest, without the drama of court appearances, convictions etc. Or a ‘fry up’ as I believe our coppers call the use of the Tazer.

      • Draco T Bastard 1.1.1

        Nothing contemptible about liaising with the organisers of the march,

        There was no liaising, just information gathering.

        It’s an effective way of taking the steam out of a protest,

        Well, if that’s its purpose then it needs to be illegal. The police are supposed to be there to help protect democracy, not help the authoritarian governments destroy it.

        • Te Reo Putake 1.1.1.1

          No, that was liaising; the sharing of information. All this video proves is that one police officer thought that the march was no big deal. I must say your idea that the police are here to help protect democracy is touchingly naive! They are here to enforce the law, something they have in common with police forces in every country, democratic or not.

          • shreddakj 1.1.1.1.1

            The Bill of Rights is law yes?

            • Te Reo Putake 1.1.1.1.1.1

              What’s your point?

              • Colonial Viper

                Reminds me of Occupy protests in the US where the police would quietly escort a peaceful protest march…straight into a dead end police cordon which would close shut around the protesters. Mass arrests would follow.

                TRP: why do you think the “liaison” didn’t issue any warning to the protestors that they faced imminent arrest?

                • Te Reo Putake

                  Because the Liaison Officer clearly wasn’t in on the conspiracy, CV. Need to know, plausible deniability and all that.
                   
                  Nah, just kidding. Watch the video, she just isn’t that bothered, nor is the student leader. Why it changed from a pretty low key event to numerous arrests, I do not know. But, so what? It’s just not that big a deal that a few middle class kiddies* got locked up for a few hours. Try being brown, poor and out at night in a South Auckland shopping centre for the real thing. Especially tonight with the cops looking for the guy who tried to shoot one of their own.
                   
                  *Copyright V32!

                  • weka

                    Whether she knew or not it’s pretty obvious from the time frames that the person in charge knew. That counts as a set up.

                    • Te Reo Putake

                      Maybe so, weka, but there isn’t any evidence to back up that assertion AFAIK. The cops were certainly helped by the organisers’ failure to get a permit for the march*. That gave them the ability to use the pretty loose breach of the peace provisions to start nicking people any time they felt like it.
                       
                      *I stand to be corrected, but I think that was confirmed in the posts last Friday. I’ve got a dose of the flu, so I’m not up to trawling through the comments to check.

                    • weka

                      not really getting your point TRP. I thought Rocky’s post made it pretty clear. Unless you are saying she is lying or mistaken?
                       
                      The police knew there was a protest. They planned a blockade. or are you saying it was coincidence they were on the same street at the same time?
                       
                      Yes, there was no permit. But as Rocky spelled out in the last post, there was no need for one – historically in Auckland protests have sometimes been held without them, and that’s not been a problem.

                    • Te Reo Putake

                      Mistaken, not lying. If they’d got the permit, then it would have been less of a green light for the cops to start arresting people. Without it, all the marchers were technically breaching the peace the moment they left the pavement, which gave the cops the ability to do what they did. Why they did it, I don’t know. I’m guessing whoever was in charge thought things were getting out of hand and took the catch and release option. Which is a pretty common response in these situations.
                       
                      Just so there’s no confusion, I fully support the aims of the march and I think the game of Frogger the marchers played with the cops after the arrests was probably the cleverest bit of protest action in years.
                       
                      But I just don’t see a conspiracy, Weka, nor have I seen any evidence of police brutality.

                    • KJT

                      Can’t anyone see what is wrong with these statements?

                      YOU NEED A PERMIT TO PROTEST.

                      POLICE HAVE A RIGHT TO DETAIN PROTESTERS WHO ARE NOT BREAKING ANY LAWS.

                      We have have statements like this from several commenters on this site.

                      Where are the advocates of individual freedom?

                      I forgot. They are instructing the police to arrest legal protesters.

                      The police do not have the right to detain;
                      Legal protesters.
                      A demonstration using a public thoroughfare.
                      Citizens going about their lawful business. (Whether it pisses the cops off or not).

                      THE POLICE DID NOT HAVE A RIGHT TO DETAIN NON VIOLENT MARCHERS. Shown by the lack of charges.

                      What happened to the right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure.

                      The police involved should have been charged with illegally preventing citizens right to dissent. Or are we just going to quietly give in to the erosion of our rights and the increase in police powers.

                    • Colonial Viper

                      Nah, just kidding. Watch the video, she just isn’t that bothered, nor is the student leader. Why it changed from a pretty low key event to numerous arrests, I do not know. But, so what? It’s just not that big a deal that a few middle class kiddies* got locked up for a few hours.

                      The liaison was part of a police process to end a democratic protest using force. Force which was used despite the fact that no actual arrests could be justified.

                      Surprised you’re so blasé about it, actually.

                      All this video proves is that one police officer thought that the march was no big deal

                      Why did her superiors choose not to warn the marchers that arrests were imminent if they continued?

                    • Te Reo Putake

                      Yes, KJT, shouting helps.
                       
                      So does getting the appropriate permits so that you are not immediately breaking the law the moment your protest starts, thus allowing the cops to start nicking people any time they felt like it.
                       
                      So all your shouty bits are complete bollocks, I’m afraid. The naivety of the organisers allowed the cops the freedom to arrest any time they wanted to. Which they took full advantage of, apparently. Hopefully, the next one this group organises will be a bit less helpful to PC Plod, but if your comment is indicative of the strategic planning, maybe not.
                       
                      CV, I suspect there was no plan to arrest anyone at all, but at some point, whoever was in charge made the call to start doing so because of the events on the march itself. In other words, something changed. Not an unusual happening in a relatively volatile event.
                       
                       

                    • KJT

                      Te Reo.

                      I do not think you understand.

                      I am shouting because I am pissed off. At people do not understand how serious it is that our rights are slowly, but surely, being removed..

                      IN A “FREE” COUNTRY YOU SHOULD NOT NEED A PERMIT TO PROTEST.

                      AND THE POLICE SHOULD NOT HAVE ANY RIGHT TO STOP YOU, SIMPLY PROTESTING.

                      Marching down a public road is not breaking the law.

                      Forcibly detaining and seizing people during a protest is breaking the law. And a crime against human rights.

                      I do not think you get what is wrong with the picture.

                      It is not right when they do it to brown people out of sight, teenagers because they think they will get away with it and students in plain sight.

                      It is never right!

                  • rocky

                    Try being brown, poor and out at night in a South Auckland shopping centre for the real thing.

                    Exactly. If they’ll do this to white middle class students while the cameras are rolling, imagine being poor and brown in South Auckland!

                    • rocky

                      CV, I suspect there was no plan to arrest anyone at all, but at some point, whoever was in charge made the call to start doing so because of the events on the march itself. In other words, something changed. Not an unusual happening in a relatively volatile event.

                      If there was no plan to arrest, why were there 100 police and a bunch of paddywagons deployed right from the start?

                    • Te Reo Putake

                      Cheers, Rocky and more power to you! The events around class sizes clearly show that this Government are scared shitless when the middle class get militant. We need more protests and more people out on the street to stop asset sales and to bring this wretched excuse for a leadership to its knees. But that needs more understanding of the real power in this country. It ain’t the cops! It’s us.

                      Edit: re: the paddy wagons, that’s SOP. Hell, they had the army 3 kms from Whanganui city on the last day of the Pakaitore occupation. But that was uppity maori, not the sons and daughters of National voters.

          • Nandor 1.1.1.1.2

            Naive maybe but police instructions do explicitly state that one of their functions in policing demonstrations is to protect the right of democratic protest. That was a result of a recommendation of the Justice and Electoral Committee after it held an inquiry into the policing of the Free Tibet protests during APEC in 1999, during which police used “catch and release” and also pulled flags out of protestors hands so the Chinese Premier couldn’t see them. Parliament was highly critical of such actions.

  2. Sweetd 2

    Really?!?!?!, which people?

    • McFlock 2.1

      I suspect a number of people who were arrested, detained and then released without charge.

  3. Sweetd 3

    Well, then, don’t sit in the middle of a busy road at rush hour.

    • Rocky 3.1

      The sitting started after the arrests started.

      • McFlock 3.1.1

        letting facts get in the way of idiot assumptions again? Unfair!

      • Sweetd 3.1.2

        evidence?

        On the raw video from tvnz arrests were made when they were sitting.

        • McFlock 3.1.2.1

          That doesn’t mean the first arrests happened when everyone was sitting.

        • BJ 3.1.2.2

          If you are genuinely interested, here’s footage of the moment when we go from standing to sitting, as well as of a cop throwing a punch and numerous cops using legalized police brutality techniques. We were marching before we were standing still, but when the police stop you from moving forward it’s kinda hard to keep going.

          • weka 3.1.2.2.1

            I’m really shocked by that. I haven’t watched any other footage. The police surrounding the protestors like that, how can that be anything other than intimidating? And what can be the point of that except if you are intending to arrest the protestors? I can’t see how that manoeuvre can have been anything other than planned.

          • sweetd 3.1.2.2.2

            The video shows police arresting people after they had sat down.

            • Colonial Viper 3.1.2.2.2.1

              Yes it does. But it doesn’t conclusively show no arrests before that point either.

            • McFlock 3.1.2.2.2.2

              It shows police hemming the students in on at least three sides before the decision to sit was made. So even though that particular video doesn’t show arrests before sitting (not that it shows all the protest, by any means), I think it demonstrates that the decision to arrest was pretty obviously made before the decision to sit down. 
                      
              So your comment “Well, then, don’t sit in the middle of a busy road at rush hour” is still pretty stupid – if anything the decision to sit seemed to be a reaction to the cops’ clear intention to surround, contain and arrest. Same playbook as Berkeley in the 60s, by the way.
               

              • sweetd

                It was the middle of a main road approaching rush hour. Hem them in, and keep them out of the traffic as best they could. Sitting down was a provocation. Removing them was the correct course of action for that location. FFS they could of had a god ole sit down in aotea squarre and nobody would give a rats ass. The location and the action they took at that location was the reason they got arrested.

                • McFlock

                  You can see the cops deploy around the protest and close right in before the decision to sit was made.
                       
                  If anything, hemming the students in was a provocative act that they simply responded to by sitting down.
                         
                  “Keep them out of the traffic”? What traffic? Although that footage does show an almost empty lane that could have been used for limited traffic had it not been filled with police officers preparing to arrest students then release them without charge.

                • felix

                  Hi sweetd.

                  Lets save a bit of time with the back and forth and you looking up non-existent statutes that you think supersede the BoRA, and just come out and say that you think the police should be able to arrest anyone they like, anytime they like.

          • David H 3.1.2.2.3

            And if you look at that footage when the punch was thrown there is one thing missing, NO I.D badges can be seen. go through it frame by frame from 3.40. and you will also see a couple of police walk out, start from about 50 secs. Then another line moves in from the back, and the thuggery starts.

  4. Tiger Mountain 4

    The coppers will rarely put themselves out to enforce peoples democratic rights, over decades liaison officers have been there to gather info not smooth the way for a great demo. It is worse these days with the multiplicity of ‘spook squads’ who treat virtually any expression of protest as a real world opportunity to use their twisted training.

    Call a cop because you have been treated unfairly at work, I don’t think so. Put on a legal picket outside a boss’s premises and the bluebellies are there in ten minutes supporting the employer. They are part of the state forces fer crissakes, don’t expect anything else.

    • KJT 4.1

      Yep. You will be down to the cop shop in jig time if you embezzle a hundred dollars off your employer, even if it was a mistake..

      If they forget to pay you $100 dollars a month then refuse to back pay it. Try and get the cops interested.

  5. Tezza 5

    I entered Symonds street at 2.30 pm it was blocked off to traffic (by police) after the Wellesley st turnoff so all traffic was diverted down Wellesley street. I parked on Princes Street which was not blocked off and went to the university.
    The protest started from the University Library at 3.00pm. The march entered Symonds street and marched on one side of the road only (the side entering the city) and had not gone far before being stopped and pushed around by the police. Symonds street was still blocked off at this point – by the police.
    Police had wagons cars and vans parked on the other side of the road.
    My question is: How can protesters marching down one side of an already blocked thoroughfare be accused of blocking that thoroughfare?
    This seemed to be a premeditated action on the part of the police.

  6. Tim 6

    So is a permit now required to march and protest? I ‘spose that’s something like giving so many days notice of an intention to strike?

    Shit – when did that happen?

    I’ve been in hybernation for a while (from memory since about 1984) – has someone redefined the meaning of facism in my absence?

    Oh, and when did the police become so namby pamby that their belts are so full of various weaponry that they waddle when they walk. I’m assuming it was around the time they put their own worst enemy in charge of representing their interests in the form of a Greg – thick-shit – O’Connor : Chief Apologist and former Captain Wunder-Cover, Hypocrite-at-large.
    The sooner the police collective lose him as a means of representing their best interests, the sooner they’ll regain some cred. But then they don’t really need credibility do they – or respect. Demanding both seems to be their Divine right over and above those they supposedly “serve”.

    Can someone tell me where I apply for permission so half a dozen mates and I can walk down Lambton Quay chanting how much we’re in love with dimocrissy, peace, love and the Merikin way?
    Is it the City Council office or Stasi HQ?

    • Carol 6.1

      I though it always was the case that permission was needed for protests. It certainly was for street protests in the UK when I was there in the late 70s. The police always wanted to authorise a route, and to prepare their troups. There was some conflict with feminist groups, for instance, wanting to take a route through specific streets in the centre of London, which the police wouldn’t allow.

  7. Te Reo Putake 7

    Just for future reference, here is the relevant section of the Ak council website. Other local councils will probably have similar user friendly pages.

  8. Rosie 8

    Hey Rocky. Thanks for posting last Sunday’s article and yesterday article outlining the progress of the Ak protests and subsequent police action. It was interesting that you made it clear about the direction of the police in regard to this particular protest, that there was a pre determined agenda on their behlaf. This approach was a topic of discussion on Radio Active’s Thursday interview they do with Alistair from Scoop. co .nz. The point was made that the police here in Wgtn would be unlikely to behave in the way that the Ak police were directed to and how this comes down to an individual and very personal directive from the cop in charge. I do recall when I saw the cops monitoring the occupy camp in civic square last year I felt a familiar anxiety at the sight of them as I’d had a very negative experience on the picket line some years back however in this particular instance they were really chilled – and apparently this was a consistant theme for the duration of the camp. This is just what I heard as I wasn’t at the camp that much and certianly not at the end. It’s sad that the Ak protesters had to face such provocative action. I want to acknowledge your stance and let you know just as one person, that watching the TV footage I felt proud to call myself an NZer which doesn’t happen often enough these days. All power to you and to everyone involved for standing up and standing strong. Kia Kaha.

  9. tony 9

    Here’s a video showing the police immediately arresting the person at the front of the march, before it has even really begun:

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Language provides hope for Tuvalu
    Climate change continues to present a major risk for the island nation of Tuvalu, which means sustaining te gana Tuvalu, both on home soil and in New Zealand Aotearoa, has never been more important, Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio said. The Tuvalu Auckland Community Trust and wider Tuvalu ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    8 hours ago
  • Minister Sio to attend Asian Development Bank meeting in Manila
    Associate Foreign Affairs Minister Aupito William Sio travels to the Philippines this weekend to represent Aotearoa New Zealand at the 55th Annual Meeting of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) Board of Governors in Manila. “The ADB Annual Meeting provides an opportunity to engage with other ADB member countries, including those ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • United Nations General Assembly National Statement
    E ngā Mana, e ngā Reo, Rau Rangatira mā kua huihui mai nei i tēnei Whare Nui o te Ao Ngā mihi maioha ki a koutou katoa, mai i tōku Whenua o Aotearoa Tuia ki runga, Tuia ki raro, ka Rongo to pō ka rongo te ao Nō reira, tēnā ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New strategy unifies all-of-Government approach to help Pacific languages thrive
    A united approach across all-of-Government underpins the new Pacific Language Strategy, announced by the Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio at Parliament today. “The cornerstone of our Pacific cultures, identities and place in Aotearoa, New Zealand are our Pacific languages. They are at the heart of our wellbeing,” Aupito ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Upgrades for sporting facilities ahead of FIFA Women’s World Cup
    Communities across the country will benefit from newly upgraded sporting facilities as a result of New Zealand co-hosting the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023. The Government is investing around $19 million to support upgrades at 30 of the 32 potential sporting facilities earmarked for the tournament, including pitch, lighting and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Partnership supports climate action in Latin America and Caribbean
    Aotearoa New Zealand is extending the reach of its support for climate action to a new agriculture initiative with partners in Latin America and the Caribbean. Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced a NZ$10 million contribution to build resilience, enhance food security and address the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Landmark agreement for Māori fisheries celebrates 30th year
    The 30th anniversary of the Fisheries Deed of Settlement is a time to celebrate a truly historic partnership that has helped transform communities, says Parliamentary Under-Secretary to the Minister for Oceans and Fisheries Rino Tirikatene. “The agreement between the Crown and Māori righted past wrongs, delivered on the Crown’s treaty ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government backs initiatives to cut environmental impact of plastic waste
    The Government has today announced funding for projects that will cut plastic waste and reduce its impact on the environment. “Today I am announcing the first four investments to be made from the $50 million Plastics Innovation Fund, which was set last year and implemented a 2020 election promise,” Environment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Call for expressions of interest in appointment to the High Court Bench
    Attorney-General David Parker today called for nominations and expressions of interest in appointment to the High Court Bench.  This is a process conducted at least every three years and ensures the Attorney-General has up to date information from which to make High Court appointments.  “It is important that when appointments ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Depositor compensation scheme protects Kiwis’ money
    New Zealanders will have up to $100,000 of their deposits in any eligible institution guaranteed in the event that institution fails, under legislation introduced in Parliament today. The Deposit Takers Bill is the third piece of legislation in a comprehensive review of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand Act and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New fund to help more Pacific aiga into their own homes
    The Government has launched a new housing fund that will help more Pacific aiga achieve the dream of home ownership. “The Pacific Building Affordable Homes Fund will help organisations, private developers, Māori/iwi, and NGOs build affordable housing for Pacific families and establish better pathways to home ownership within Pacific communities. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • More than 100,000 new Kiwis as halfway point reached
    Over 100,000 new Kiwis can now call New Zealand ‘home’ after the 2021 Resident Visa reached the halfway point of approvals, Minister of Immigration Michael Wood announced today. “This is another important milestone, highlighting the positive impact our responsive and streamlined immigration system is having by providing comfort to migrant ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Maniapoto Claims Settlement Bill passes third reading – He mea pāhi te Maniapoto Claims Settl...
    Nā te Minita mō ngā Take Tiriti o Waitangi, nā Andrew Little,  te iwi o Maniapoto i rāhiri i tēnei rā ki te mātakitaki i te pānuitanga tuatoru o te Maniapoto Claims Settlement Bill - te pikinga whakamutunga o tā rātou whakataunga Tiriti o Waitangi o mua. "Me mihi ka ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • 50,000 more kids to benefit from equity-based programmes next year
    Another 47,000 students will be able to access additional support through the school donations scheme, and a further 3,000 kids will be able to get free and healthy school lunches as a result of the Equity Index.  That’s on top of nearly 90% of schools that will also see a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Healthy Active Learning now in 40 percent of schools across New Zealand
    A total of 800 schools and kura nationwide are now benefitting from a physical activity and nutrition initiative aimed at improving the wellbeing of children and young people. Healthy Active Learning was funded for the first time in the inaugural Wellbeing Budget and was launched in 2020. It gets regional ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Speech at 10th meeting of the Friends of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty
    Kia Ora. It is a pleasure to join you here today at this 10th meeting of the Friends of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty. This gathering provides an important opportunity to reiterate our unwavering commitment to achieving a world without nuclear weapons, for which the entry into force of this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Speech for Earthshot Prize Innovation Summit 2022
    Kia ora koutou katoa Thank you for the invitation to join you. It’s a real pleasure to be here, and to be in such fine company.  I want to begin today by acknowledging His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales and Sir David Attenborough in creating what is becoming akin ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New accreditation builds capacity for Emergency Management Volunteers
    Emergency Management Minister Kieran McAnulty has recognised the first team to complete a newly launched National Accreditation Process for New Zealand Response Team (NZ-RT) volunteers. “NZ-RT volunteers play a crucial role in our emergency response system, supporting response and recovery efforts on the ground. This new accreditation makes sure our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Govt strengthens trans-Tasman emergency management cooperation
    Aotearoa New Zealand continues to strengthen global emergency management capability with a new agreement between New Zealand and Australia, says Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty. “The Government is committed to improving our global and national emergency management system, and the Memorandum of Cooperation signed is another positive step towards ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Christchurch Call Initiative on Algorithmic Outcomes
    Today New Zealand, the USA, Twitter, and Microsoft, announced investment in a technology innovation initiative under the banner of the Christchurch Call.  This initiative will support the creation of new technology to understand the impacts of algorithms on people’s online experiences.  Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms play a growing role in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • JOINT PR: Trans-Tasman Cooperation on disaster management
    Hon Kieran McAnulty, New Zealand Minister for Emergency Management Senator The Hon Murray Watt, Federal Minister for Emergency Management Strengthening Trans-Tasman cooperation on disaster management issues was a key area of focus when Australia and New Zealand’s disaster management ministers met this week on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Ministerial Conference on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • More transparency, less red-tape for modernised charities sector
    The Charities Amendment Bill has been introduced today which will modernise the charities sector by increasing transparency, improving access to justice services and reducing the red-tape that smaller charities face, Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector Priyanca Radhakrishnan said. “These changes will make a meaningful difference to over 28,000 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Pacific visas reopened to help boost workforce
    Work continues on delivering on a responsive and streamlined immigration system to help relieve workforce shortages, with the reopening of longstanding visa categories, Immigration Minister Michael Wood has announced.  From 3 October 2022, registrations for the Samoan Quota will reopen, and from 5 October registrations for the Pacific Access Category ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Queen Elizabeth II Memorial Day Bill passes into law
    The Bill establishing Queen Elizabeth II Memorial Day has passed its third reading. “As Queen of Aotearoa New Zealand, Her Majesty was loved for her grace, calmness, dedication, and public service. Her affection for New Zealand and its people was clear, and it was a fondness that was shared,” Michael ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New investor migrant visa opens
    The new Active Investor Plus visa category created to attract high-value investors, has officially opened marking a key milestone in the Government’s Immigration Rebalance strategy, Economic Development Minister Stuart Nash and Immigration Minister Michael Wood have announced. “The new Active Investor Plus visa replaces the previous investor visa categories, which ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New wharekura continues commitment to Māori education
    A new Year 1-13 designated character wharekura will be established in Feilding, Associate Minister of Education Kelvin Davis announced today. To be known as Te Kura o Kauwhata, the wharekura will cater for the expected growth in Feilding for years to come. “The Government has a goal of strengthening Māori ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • National minute of silence for Queen Elizabeth II
    A national minute of silence will be observed at the start of New Zealand’s State Memorial Service for Queen Elizabeth II, at 2pm on Monday 26 September. The one-hour service will be held at the Wellington Cathedral of St Paul, during a one-off public holiday to mark the Queen’s death. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech to the Climate Change and Business Conference
    Tēnā koutou i tēnei ata. Good morning. Recently I had cause to say to my friends in the media that I consider that my job is only half done. So I’m going to take the opportunity of this year’s Climate and Business Conference to offer you a mid-point review. A ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government enhances protection for our most-productive land  
    Enhanced protection for Aotearoa New Zealand’s most productive land   Councils required to identify, map, and manage highly productive land  Helping ensure Kiwis’ access to leafy greens and other healthy foods Subdivision for housing on highly-productive land could still be possible in limited circumstances  The Government has today released a National ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Kieran McAnulty to attend Asia-Pacific Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction
    Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty will travel to Brisbane this week to represent Aotearoa New Zealand at the 2022 Asia-Pacific Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. “This conference is one of the most important meetings in the Asia-Pacific region to progress disaster risk reduction efforts and increase cooperation between ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Trade and Agriculture Minister to travel to India and Indonesia
    Minister of Trade and Export Growth and Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor will travel tomorrow to India and Indonesia for trade and agricultural meetings to further accelerate the Government’s growing trade agenda.  “Exploring ways we can connect globally and build on our trading relationships is a priority for the Government, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Poroporoaki: Cletus Maanu Paul (ONZM)
    E te rangatira Maanu, takoto mai ra, i tō marae i Wairaka, te marae o te wahine nāna I inoi kia Whakatānea ia kia tae ae ia ki te hopu i te waka Mātaatua kia kore ai i riro i te moana. Ko koe anō tēnā he pukumahi koe mō ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pacific Wellbeing Strategy sets clear path to improve outcomes for Pacific Aotearoa
    Strengthening partnerships with Pacific communities is at the heart of the Government’s new Pacific Wellbeing Strategy, Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio announced today. “Working alongside communities to ensure more of our aiga and families have access to the staples of life like, housing, education, training and job opportunities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Jobs on the horizon for more than 1,000 rangatahi
    Following on from last week’s Better Pathways Package announcement and Apprenticeship Boost 50,000th apprentice milestone, the Government is continuing momentum, supporting over 1,000 more rangatahi into employment, through new funding for He Poutama Rangatahi. “Our Government remains laser focused on supporting young people to become work ready and tackle the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NZ/AU partnership to bring world-class satellite positioning services
    Land Information Minister Damien O’Connor today announced a joint Trans-Tasman partnership which will provide Australasia with world-leading satellite positioning services that are up to 50 times more accurate, boosting future economic productivity, sustainability and safety.  New Zealand and Australia have partnered to deliver the Southern Positioning Augmentation Network (SouthPAN), with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Govt helps small businesses get paid on time
    The Government is adding to the support it has offered New Zealand’s small businesses by introducing new measures to help ensure they get paid on time. A Business Payment Practices disclosure regime is being established to improve information and transparency around business-to-business payment practices across the economy, Small Business Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Economy grows as tourism and exports rebound
    The economy has rebounded strongly in the June quarter as the easing of restrictions and reopening of the border boosted economic activity, meaning New Zealand is well placed to meet the next set of challenges confronting the global economy. GDP rose 1.7 percent in the June quarter following a decline ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Ambassador to China announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Grahame Morton as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to China. “Aotearoa New Zealand and China share a long and important relationship,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “As we mark 50 years of diplomatic relations between our nations, we are connected by people-to-people links, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • 1.4 million hectares of wilding pine control work in two years
    1.4 million hectares of native and productive land have been protected from wilding conifers in the past two years and hundreds of jobs created in the united efforts to stamp out the highly invasive weeds, Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor said. Speaking today at the 2022 Wilding Pine Conference in Blenheim, Damien ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • HomeGround – “a place to come together, a place to come home to”
    After 10 years’ hard mahi, HomeGround - Auckland City Mission's new home – is now officially open. “It’s extremely satisfying to see our commitment to providing a safety net for people who need housing and additional support services come together in a place like HomeGround, to create a better future ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago