Poverty Watch 23

Written By: - Date published: 7:55 am, March 16th, 2013 - 32 comments
Categories: national, poverty - Tags:

Just a brief Poverty Watch today, before we start on the report from the Office of the Children’s Commissioner next week.

It’s very (very!) encouraging to see the number of perceptive, committed, compassionate young people that we have in NZ. The Net and other technology have given them tools to organise, and get their voices heard, that previous generations never had. And they’re making use of the opportunities! One inspiring organisation is Generation Zero, which has an environmental focus. Another is the P3 Foundation, which addresses poverty:

P3 Foundation is a youth-led, New Zealand based charity that inspires and empowers young people to eradicate extreme poverty in the Asia-Pacific.

Our organisation is made up of 130 young, passionate and committed volunteers who are driven by a collective desire to see the end of poverty within this generation. …

Why Are We Doing This?

1.4 billion people throughout the world are currently living in extreme poverty.

This means that they have less than NZD 2.25 per day to cover all essential living costs.

Those who live in these conditions do not have access to the most basic of needs: health care, clean water, food, peace, education – and the opportunity to pursue their dreams. At P3 we believe that this is unacceptable and that as a society, we are morally obligated to take a stand and do something to change this.

We also believe that it is in the best interests of each and every one of us to promote economic and social developments so that together, we can create a better world for everyone who is a part of it. After all, every person deserves the chance the follow their dreams.

P3 are thinking outside NZ, and thinking big! If only we had governments that were up to challenge. Check out the P3 web site for a list of projects, and information about volunteering. Thank you P3.


Here’s the standard footnote. Poverty (and inequality) were falling (albeit too slowly) under the last Labour government.   Now they are on the rise again, in fact a Waikato University professor says that poverty is our biggest growth industry.

Before the last election Labour called for a cross party working group on poverty. Key turned the offer down.  Report after report after report has condemned the rate of poverty in this country, and called on the government to act. Meanwhile 40,000 kids are fed by charities and up to 80,000 are going to school hungry. National has responded with complete denial of the issues, saying that the government is already doing enough to help families feed their kids. Organisations working with the poor say that Key is in poverty ‘la la land’.

The Nats refuse to even measure the problem (though they certainly believe in measurement and goals when it suits them to bash beneficiaries). In a 2012 summary of the government’s targets and goals John Armstrong wrote: “Glaringly absent is a target for reducing child poverty”…

The costs of child poverty are in the range of $6-8 Billion per year, but the Nats refuse to spend the $2 Billion that would be needed to really make a difference. Even in purely economic terms National’s attitude makes no sense.

32 comments on “Poverty Watch 23 ”

  1. rosy 1

    Interesting about the international focus of P3 (albeit a focus on our neighbours). Their focus doesn’t fit with the stereotypical preferences for individual concerns of the atomised young adults of today.

    Research in the UK shows this individual, disconnected outlook is exemplified in a lack of regard for the welfare state (despite high unemployment among this group), the NHS and social cohesion generally.

    Another view was put forward that young people have a “new cosmopolitanism”. A spokesperson for the Adam Smith Organisation argued that the lack of respect for national institutions and social cohesion was an effect of a more cosmopolitan outlook, rather than individualistic behaviour:

    One man who might be said to epitomise Britain’s individualistic new generation is Sam Bowman, the 24-year-old research director of the free-market Adam Smith Institute, who sees the shift as one caused by a new cosmopolitanism, brought on by the internet. “People our age are much more cosmopolitan,” he says. “A 23- or 24-year-old Londoner is more likely to be concerned about Mumbai than Newcastle – we’re much less interested in national boundaries: the internet lets you speak to people who you share interests with, wherever they live. Geographical unity is fine, but I think most people prefer the unity and friendship that comes from shared interests. We get to do that now.”

    Bowman theorises this “cosmopolitan outreach” could serve as a replacement for an emotional connection to the state. Borrowing a phrase from the economist Daniel Klein, he says: “The NHS has been described as ‘the People’s Romance’: virtuous not because it’s the best, but because we’re all involved – it’s unifying. In another generation, that role might have belonged to the army. It makes sense in this modern world that people are becoming less interested in these national institutions.”

    I’ve thought for a long time that there were a lot of intelligent, committed young people out there. It seems P3 might be an example of a trend for a wider outlook than the traditional leftist concerns about poverty and the need and social institutions. At a guess this lack of concern for disadvantaged social groups at home, with whom the educated middle classes have virtually no connection, is transferred to the more exotic poverty and injustices elsewhere. How these concerns can be harnessed in terms of national, as well as international concerns might be more important for the left than hand-wringing about a so-called selfish generation.

    It’s clear that the business and middle classes have more in common with similar groups across borders than with the working classes in their own countries, but maybe this sort of initiative shows that young people are concerned about the problems of inequality. They just might not see it in their own backyard.

    • Rogue Trooper 1.1

      Generation Zero. Yes! represented in our local Environment Center portfolio
      this international focus on poverty by the young? diversion and distraction based in self-interested feel-good idealism. (p*ssing in the wind comes to mind; what real effect does middle-class disadvantage tourism really have on global trends).

      THINK GLOBAL, yet, ACT LOCAL

      • locus 1.1.1

        I think labelling an age group allows us and them thinking. Having said that, if young people in wealthy nations are not sympathetic to the plight of poor at home because they compare with the disadvantages of poor in less developed places, what can we do to get them to realise that judging one lot as more deserving ignores the fundamental cause of poverty everywhere.

    • xtasy 1.2

      rosy – I share your concerns, and I read the same article in the Guardian, about the “self generation”. Yes, it is scary what is happening, and it is happening all over the western, developed world, where the younger generations have fallen for the divide and rule, the individualistic approach, for self fulfilment before collective thinking, rather wanting to live out narcissistic dreams or aspirations than seriously see the bigger picture that they and we all belong to.

      I have observed this for years now, and it is very evident here in NZ, same as in other countries. There is a lack of interest in matters affecting society as a whole, there is too much selective thinking, division, me first thinking and the likes. Indeed, there is a lack of social skills and understanding.

      This I believe is the result of the neo liberal, capitalist approach that so many governments adopted since the mid to late 1980s, the privatisation agenda, the marginalisation of social groups not coping with competitive lifestyles and thinking. It is the divide and rule that has also taken a hold in the media, which under private enterprise took over a large share of the whole media since the late 1980s.

      Most young people know nothing else, they have sucked it up like with their mother’s milk.

      So capitalism has penetrated their brains, rules their world views, and libertarian ideas, ultimately to promote self promotion, self aggrandisement, self fulfilment, before anything else, that is what is now the mindset of the “normal” or majority young generation.

      So this P3 foundation agenda seems a bit out of the ordinary and odd to me. If that is what the supporters do, then it is good of course, but I ask, how many of the young people are behind this? Are they not rather on the margin of society? I would hope not, but I fear they are.

      It smells too much of this exoticism that also some older lefties adhered to, believing it would be easy to change the world by starting overseas, in poor, under developed countries. But to be genuine, one should never forget home for a start, yes perhaps start to learn and apply ideas AT HOME. That though is not happening, and we get heaps of “blame games” instead.

      • rosy 1.2.1

        “Most young people know nothing else, they have sucked it up like with their mother’s milk.”

        Yes xtasy, Thatcher’s/Roger’s children for sure. I think some cannot understand how life can grind people down in a country like Britain or New Zealand – an attitude of ‘the disadvantaged have heaps of help and it’s their fault if they can’t use it.’ It’s partly, I think the very fact that the young and privileged haven’t yet seen what the school of hard knocks can do to a person, especially if that school starts before the disadvantaged kids are even born.

        Maybe with overseas disadvantage they can see the lack of government and charitable intervention in the lives of the poor and disadvantaged so it makes more sense to the privileged young. It’s not that they are unconcerned, it’s that we need to know how that concern can be harnessed for the good of the disadvantaged locally. I think the Greens get a lot of kids because that concern can be harnessed for environmental causes rather than people causes.

        “what real effect does middle-class disadvantage tourism really have on global trends”

        Agree with this too, RT – I have huge problems with mass tourism in the 3rd world where the backpackers want an ‘authentic’ experience of gritty poverty – how colourful – when really they’re just exploiting the poor for the profit of others before going back to their own privileged lives. Of course I realise there are some genuine people out there that go and do their best to improve the lot of others, but they’re a tiny proportion of these tourists, imo.

  2. Draco T Bastard 2

    And now more poor people become homeless due to greed.

    In December, he and business partner Ryan Weir set up the business which advertises properties with a price indication, then invites tenants to make a tender for the rent amount.

    The property goes to the highest bidder who is also considered the best-quality tenant.

    “Especially younger professionals in a flatting situation, they’re quite happy in most cases to pay an extra $50 each a week – it adds up to an extra $200 for a property.”

    Comes back to the government having to build more state houses and residences I suppose. Enough to bring rentals prices back to realistic levels.

    • locus 2.1

      Vienna’s has a long-standing system of state rent control, which still allows private investors to earn a 5% return – not bad considering the bank interest rate is around 2%. In fact 60% of rental properties are privately owned.

      The rental control rules enable more than 80% of Viennese to live in affordable well-mintained well-insulated rental properties. Moreover children are entitled to inherit rental leases from their parents.

      • locus 2.1.1

        Vienna…. not Vienna’s

        why do you spot typos only after posting….

        • Anne 2.1.1.1

          Because once you’ve typed up the comment you want it out of the way so you hit submit forgetting there is currently no edit function. Then you discover the typos, spelling mistakes and think of much better ways to put something but you can’t do a damm thing about it. Life is so hard. 🙁

      • karol 2.1.2

        That sounds like a great policy and outcome.

        • xtasy 2.1.2.1

          This is NORMAL in Austria and Germany by the way!

          I still cannot get it, why there are no caps applied in NZ on rental increases per year. OK, they have the 60 day notice period for rent increases and the 3 month period for not allowing another rent increase after one earlier one, but there is NO cap on how much rents can be increased.

          The same applies to property developments, and we have “land bankers” here, that intentionally sit on sections and will not sell them, until “the market” gives them prime gains to be made, tax free that is.

          How disgusting the situation is in NZ, but does any damned ordinary tenant, resident and voter ever bother to bloody care and change this? We even have Phil Twyford wanting to force another million of residents into the Auckland city area, to justify some policies that Len Brown wants to implement. This is totally insane, and in Europe they would have a REVOLT at hands with such agendas.

      • prism 2.1.3

        locus
        Vienna’s sedate housing system wouldn’t do us impatient aggressive NZs. See prospect and milk it is our slogan. Sell it, make a pile, buy a BMW or a garden shed on wheels. Have ostentatious capital expenditures. Complain at having to pay higher tax on over $100,000. All de rigueur for at least some of us.

        I heard a great little item on the Italian Swiss family that makes violins from old spruce trees in some mountains there. Some trees in the area are 1000 years old. We would be wanting to clearfell them. They grow slowly so the wood is strong and the grain fine.

    • millsy 2.2

      I have always maintained that it is rents we should be up in arms about, not the cost of milk.

      All this tender system is doing is crowding those on low incomes out of the rental market, and into campgrounds and boarding houses. Hardly safe places to be for single people, let alone those with children.

      We are crying out for a state housing building program. Seems to me to be the cleanest way to allievate the housing shortage and make housing affordable.

      Speaking of housing afforablilty, I am waiting for the government to explain how it is going to force land owners to build houses for sale on the bountiful rural land that surrounds our urban areas (or force them to sell to someone who will).

      • Rogue Trooper 2.2.1

        according to Dick Quax on the Auckland Unitary Plan-“going to run out of consented land to build on by May or June and the NIMBYs are gonna resist densification (being dense themselves i ‘spose)

      • locus 2.2.2

        depends how many influential nat voters will make a killing if the rural land is rezoned versus how many people care about the unplanned sprawl of cities. Much wiser but much harder to come up with careful and detailed planning for doubling density within existing city boundaries.

    • AsleepWhileWalking 2.3

      You bet me to it. Just spotted this in the Nerald and found it pretty horrifying.

      Housing is no longer a right (probably hasn’t been since 1994 here in NZ), it’s something to reward the highest bidder.

      What else isn’t a right? Water? Decent food?

      • karol 2.3.1

        It’s pretty appalling. How is it some people are so attached to the “market will decide” dogma, that they fail to see the callous inhumanity of such practices as renting accommodation to the highest bidders – especially at a time of a shortage of affordable accommodation?

        • locus 2.3.1.1

          a short walk down the road to barbarism. Let access to scarce essential resources be contested and the richest or most powerful people will be the winners and the weakest and poorest will be hungry and living in shanties or ghettos. The mythical Market won’t come to the rescue because the poor haven’t the resources to fund housing projects and the rich will actively seek to prevent housing for poor being built at state expense either on selfish ideological grounds or because it might depress profits from their rental properties.

  3. redbaiterbaiter 3

    Here’s a relevant piece of news:

    http://www.otago.ac.nz/wellington/news/otago043362.html

    http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/political/130590/food-cutbacks-to-pay-for-power-appal-greens

    A study by the University of Otago, Wellington just published in the New Zealand Medical Journal finds that households with children that use prepayment meters to pay for electricity experience greater levels of economic hardship.

  4. Mary 4

    “Those who live in these conditions do not have access to the most basic of needs:”

    Access to needs? I thought it was more about meeting needs, not having access to them. Who wants access to needs?

  5. xtasy 5

    Poverty is bad, but it does never mean poverty in spirit, strenght and intelligence and more, so we must wake up and acknowledge that others in other countries are also doing all to improve and succeed, but the competitive idiocy must be contained not to be market driven (only):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3ORkB1eKWE

    Much is happening world wide, and Key went to one of the most exciting and interesting parts on the planet, but he never go the message. Others do. Enjoy just this one clip.

  6. Really happy to see P3 get mentioned on the Standard – I’ve been a regular reader for years, and it’s great to see P3’s name come up. I was a founding member and am now a trustee.

    In reply to some of the comments, I would like to stress that we are very concerned not to fall into poverty tourism or ego stroking. It’s not about us. While we do tell our volunteers’ stories in some marketing, we do our best to ensure that our overseas development partners benefit from our fundraising and/or volunteers’ presence. I learned a huge amount through the youth organisations that I volunteered for in my teens and early 20s, and still learn much through P3 – but that’s only a side benefit. In interviewing potential volunteers, I want to see genuine passion and compassion, not self interest.

    I couldn’t possibly summarise our development policies here, but when we select overseas development partners one of the key factors for us is the level of ownership that the people on the ground have over the project. We aren’t interested in imposing external solutions. In short, we constantly test and revise our development philosophy and policy.

    On international versus New Zealand poverty: When we founded P3, we wanted to explore the linkages between poverty here and poverty overseas. We hoped to show that both were symptoms of underlying economic problems, and help mobilise young New Zealanders to face both. However, we were (in sum) a small group of University of Auckland graduates from privileged upper middle class backgrounds, with very little experience or expertise in New Zealand poverty. We became very concerned that we just didn’t have the knowledge or skills to target poverty here, and were concerned to avoid being privileged upper middle class saviours, sweeping in with naive, arrogant solutions – especially when there are a lot of extremely good organisations with the expertise, experience and standing that we lack.

    We remain, however, keen to explore how we can help to break down the disconnection between poverty here and poverty overseas that many people have.

    We currently have 135 volunteers nationwide. I understand that Generation Zero has similar numbers. The UN Youth has somewhere over 1,000 members, and other groups like JustSpeak, the Global Poverty Project, Enactus and others are also pulling in large numbers of young New Zealanders. I definitely don’t believe the story that young people are ethically or politically disengaged.

    I hope this helps address a few of the concerns some of you have about what we do.

    • lprent 6.1

      Don’t have to convince me. My partner Lyn Collie shot a promo documentary about P3 in India late last year. Looks like an interesting organisation.

      It did rather amuse me seeing Anthony pick up on P3 independently.

    • r0b 6.2

      Thanks for stopping by David. Kudos to you, the founders, and all members. If you ever have anything that you want to “advertise” let us know…

    • rosy 6.3

      Thanks for commenting David. I’m blown away by some of the young talent in NZ… how to harness it in NZ is a problem and your explanation for focusing on absolute poverty overseas is understandable and pretty much what I expected. Seeing the economic deprivation is easy enough and incredibly important – knowing how social exclusion and family deprivation works in countries with so-called relative poverty maybe requires more immersion in the lives of people. Getting alongside the people who are actively working with this stuff could be a possibility for engaging in local poverty issues?

      It probably takes a little longer to come to terms with social exclusion and family deprivation as the things that keep the poor and dispossessed from the services that have been set up to improve health and well-being. It’s not simply a lack of will or ‘choice’ – the narrative of the successful – that keeps people poor in developed countries.

      In the meantime, I reckon P3 is a brilliant initiative. Best of luck with it all.

  7. David 7

    Thanks Rob, Rosy – really appreciate the support!

    Rosy – We are definitely exploring partnerships as you suggest, though realistically probably won’t be able to show anything public until early 2014.

    Thanks again.

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    Ele Ludemann writes –  Winston Peters reckons media outlets were bribed by the $55 million Public Interest Journalism Fund. He is not the first to make such an accusation. Last year, the Platform outlined conditions media signed up to in return for funds from the PJIF: . . . ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    4 days ago
  • Weekly Roundup 1-December-2023
    Wow, it’s December already, and it’s a Friday. So here are few things that caught our attention recently. This Week in Greater Auckland On Monday Matt covered the new government’s coalition agreements and what they mean for transport. On Tuesday Matt looked at AT’s plans for fare increases ...
    Greater AucklandBy Greater Auckland
    4 days ago
  • Shane MacGowan Is Gone.
    Late 1996, The Dogs Bollix, Tamaki Makaurau.I’m at the front of the bar yelling my order to the bartender, jostling with other thirsty punters on a Friday night, keen to piss their wages up against a wall letting loose. The black stuff, long luscious pints of creamy goodness. Back down ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    4 days ago
  • The Hoon around the week to Dec 1
    Nicola Willis, Chris Bishop and other National, ACT and NZ First MPs applaud the signing of the coalition agreements, which included the reversal of anti-smoking measures while accelerating tax cuts for landlords. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: The five things that mattered in Aotearoa’s political economy that we wrote ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    4 days ago
  • 2023 More Reading: November (+ Writing Update)
    Completed reads for November: A Modern Utopia, by H.G. Wells The Vampire (poem), by Heinrich August Ossenfelder The Corpus Hermeticum The Corpus Hermeticum is Mead’s translation. Now, this is indeed a very quiet month for reading. But there is a reason for that… You see, ...
    4 days ago
  • Forward to 2017
    The coalition party agreements are mainly about returning to 2017 when National lost power. They show commonalities but also some serious divergencies.The two coalition agreements – one National and ACT, the other National and New Zealand First – are more than policy documents. They also describe the processes of the ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    5 days ago
  • Questions a nine year old might ask the new Prime Minister
    First QuestionYou’re going to crack down on people ram-raiding dairies, because you say hard-working dairy owners shouldn’t have to worry about getting ram-raided.But once the chemist shops have pseudoephedrine in them again, they're going to get ram-raided all the time. Do chemists not work as hard as dairy owners?Second QuestionYou ...
    More than a fieldingBy David Slack
    5 days ago
  • Questions a nine year old might ask the new Prime Minister
    First QuestionYou’re going to crack down on people ram-raiding dairies, because you say hard-working dairy owners shouldn’t have to worry about getting ram-raided.But once the chemist shops have pseudoephedrine in them again, they're going to get ram-raided all the time. Do chemists not work as hard as dairy owners?Second QuestionYou ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    5 days ago
  • Finally
    Henry Kissinger is finally dead. Good fucking riddance. While Americans loved him, he was a war criminal, responsible for most of the atrocities of the final quarter of the twentieth century. Cambodia. Bangladesh. Chile. East Timor. All Kissinger. Because of these crimes, Americans revere him as a "statesman" (which says ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    5 days ago
  • Government in a hurry – Luxon lists 49 priorities in 100-day plan while Peters pledges to strength...
    Buzz from the Beehive Yes, ministers in the new government are delivering speeches and releasing press statements. But the message on the government’s official website was the same as it has been for the past several days, when Point of Order went looking for news from the Beehive that had ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    5 days ago
  • DAVID FARRAR: Luxon is absolutely right
    David Farrar writes  –  1 News reports: Christopher Luxon says he was told by some Kiwis on the campaign trail they “didn’t know” the difference between Waka Kotahi, Te Pūkenga and Te Whatu Ora. Speaking to Breakfast, the incoming prime minister said having English first on government agencies will “make sure” ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    5 days ago
  • Top 10 at 10 am for Thursday, Nov 30
    There are fears that mooted changes to building consent liability could end up driving the building industry into an uninsured hole. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: Here’s my pick of the top 10 news and analysis links elsewhere as of 10 am on Thursday, November 30, including:The new Government’s ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    5 days ago
  • Gordon Campbell on how climate change threatens cricket‘s future
    Well that didn’t last long, did it? Mere days after taking on what he called the “awesome responsibility” of being Prime Minister, M Christopher Luxon has started blaming everyone else, and complaining that he has inherited “economic vandalism on an unprecedented scale” – which is how most of us are ...
    5 days ago
  • We need to talk about Tory.
    The first I knew of the news about Tory Whanau was when a tweet came up in my feed.The sort of tweet that makes you question humanity, or at least why you bother with Twitter. Which is increasingly a cesspit of vile inhabitants who lurk spreading negativity, hate, and every ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    5 days ago
  • Dangling Transport Solutions
    Cable Cars, Gondolas, Ropeways and Aerial Trams are all names for essentially the same technology and the world’s biggest maker of them are here to sell them as an public transport solution. Stuff reports: Austrian cable car company Doppelmayr has launched its case for adding aerial cable cars to New ...
    5 days ago
  • November AMA
    Hi,It’s been awhile since I’ve done an Ask-Me-Anything on here, so today’s the day. Ask anything you like in the comments section, and I’ll be checking in today and tomorrow to answer.Leave a commentNext week I’ll be giving away a bunch of these Mister Organ blu-rays for readers in New ...
    David FarrierBy David Farrier
    5 days ago
  • National’s early moves adding to cost of living pressure
    The cost of living grind continues, and the economic and inflation honeymoon is over before it began. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: PM Christopher Luxon unveiled his 100 day plan yesterday with an avowed focus of reducing cost-of-living pressures, but his Government’s initial moves and promises are actually elevating ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    5 days ago
  • Backwards to the future
    Prime Minister Christopher Luxon has confirmed that it will be back to the future on planning legislation. This will be just one of a number of moves which will see the new government go backwards as it repeals and cost-cuts its way into power. They will completely repeal one ...
    PolitikBy Richard Harman
    5 days ago
  • New initiatives in science and technology could point the way ahead for Luxon government
    As the new government settles into the Beehive, expectations are high that it can sort out some  of  the  economic issues  confronting  New Zealand. It may take time for some new  ministers to get to grips with the range of their portfolio work and responsibilities before they can launch the  changes that  ...
    Point of OrderBy tutere44
    6 days ago
  • Treaty pledge to secure funding is contentious – but is Peters being pursued by a lynch mob after ...
    TV3 political editor Jenna Lynch was among the corps of political reporters who bridled, when Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters told them what he thinks of them (which is not much). She was unabashed about letting her audience know she had bridled. More usefully, she drew attention to something which ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    6 days ago
  • How long does this last?
    I have a clear memory of every election since 1969 in this plucky little nation of ours. I swear I cannot recall a single one where the question being asked repeatedly in the first week of the new government was: how long do you reckon they’ll last? And that includes all ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    6 days ago
  • National’s giveaway politics
    We already know that national plans to boost smoking rates to collect more tobacco tax so they can give huge tax-cuts to mega-landlords. But this morning that policy got even more obscene - because it turns out that the tax cut is retrospective: Residential landlords will be able to ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    6 days ago
  • CHRIS TROTTER: Who’s driving the right-wing bus?
    Who’s At The Wheel? The electorate’s message, as aggregated in the polling booths on 14 October, turned out to be a conservative political agenda stronger than anything New Zealand has seen in five decades. In 1975, Bill Rowling was run over by just one bus, with Rob Muldoon at the wheel. In 2023, ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    6 days ago
  • GRAHAM ADAMS:  Media knives flashing for Luxon’s government
    The fear and loathing among legacy journalists is astonishing Graham Adams writes – No one is going to die wondering how some of the nation’s most influential journalists personally view the new National-led government. It has become abundantly clear within a few days of the coalition agreements ...
    Point of OrderBy gadams1000
    6 days ago
  • Top 10 news links for Wednesday, Nov 29
    TL;DR: Here’s my pick of top 10 news links elsewhere for Wednesday November 29, including:The early return of interest deductibility for landlords could see rebates paid on previous taxes and the cost increase to $3 billion from National’s initial estimate of $2.1 billion, CTU Economist Craig Renney estimated here last ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    6 days ago
  • Smokefree Fallout and a High Profile Resignation.
    The day after being sworn in the new cabinet met yesterday, to enjoy their honeymoon phase. You remember, that period after a new government takes power where the country, and the media, are optimistic about them, because they haven’t had a chance to stuff anything about yet.Sadly the nuptials complete ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    6 days ago
  • As Cabinet revs up, building plans go on hold
    Wellington Council hoardings proclaim its preparations for population growth, but around the country councils are putting things on hold in the absence of clear funding pathways for infrastructure, and despite exploding migrant numbers. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: Cabinet meets in earnest today to consider the new Government’s 100-day ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    6 days ago
  • National takes over infrastructure
    Though New Zealand First may have had ambitions to run the infrastructure portfolios, National would seem to have ended up firmly in control of them.  POLITIK has obtained a private memo to members of Infrastructure NZ yesterday, which shows that the peak organisation for infrastructure sees  National MPs Chris ...
    PolitikBy Richard Harman
    6 days ago
  • At a glance – Evidence for global warming
    On February 14, 2023 we announced our Rebuttal Update Project. This included an ask for feedback about the added "At a glance" section in the updated basic rebuttal versions. This weekly blog post series highlights this new section of one of the updated basic rebuttal versions and serves as a ...
    7 days ago
  • Who’s Driving The Right-Wing Bus?
    Who’s At The Wheel? The electorate’s message, as aggregated in the polling booths on 14 October, turned out to be a conservative political agenda stronger than anything New Zealand has seen in five decades. In 1975, Bill Rowling was run over by just one bus, with Rob Muldoon at the wheel. In ...
    7 days ago
  • Sanity break
    Cheers to reader Deane for this quote from Breakfast TV today:Chloe Swarbrick to Brook van Velden re the coalition agreement: “... an unhinged grab-bag of hot takes from your drunk uncle at Christmas”Cheers also to actual Prime Minister of a country Christopher Luxon for dorking up his swearing-in vows.But that's enough ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    7 days ago
  • Sanity break
    Cheers to reader Deane for this quote from Breakfast TV today:Chloe Swarbrick to Brook van Velden re the coalition agreement: “... an unhinged grab-bag of hot takes from your drunk uncle at Christmas”Cheers also to actual Prime Minister of a country Christopher Luxon for dorking up his swearing-in vows.But that's enough ...
    More than a fieldingBy David Slack
    7 days ago
  • National’s murderous smoking policy
    One of the big underlying problems in our political system is the prevalence of short-term thinking, most usually seen in the periodic massive infrastructure failures at a local government level caused by them skimping on maintenance to Keep Rates Low. But the new government has given us a new example, ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    7 days ago
  • NZ has a chance to rise again as our new government gets spending under control
    New Zealand has  a chance  to  rise  again. Under the  previous  government, the  number of New Zealanders below the poverty line was increasing  year by year. The Luxon-led government  must reverse that trend – and set about stabilising  the  pillars  of the economy. After the  mismanagement  of the outgoing government created   huge ...
    Point of OrderBy tutere44
    7 days ago
  • KARL DU FRESNE: Media and the new government
    Two articles by Karl du Fresne bring media coverage of the new government into considerations.  He writes –    Tuesday, November 28, 2023 The left-wing media needed a line of attack, and they found one The left-wing media pack wasted no time identifying the new government’s weakest point. Seething over ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    7 days ago
  • PHILIP CRUMP:  Team of rivals – a CEO approach to government leadership
    The work begins Philip Crump wrote this article ahead of the new government being sworn in yesterday – Later today the new National-led coalition government will be sworn in, and the hard work begins. At the core of government will be three men – each a leader ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    7 days ago
  • Black Friday
    As everyone who watches television or is on the mailing list for any of our major stores will confirm, “Black Friday” has become the longest running commercial extravaganza and celebration in our history. Although its origins are obscure (presumably dreamt up by American salesmen a few years ago), it has ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    7 days ago
  • In Defense of the Media.
    Yesterday the Ministers in the next government were sworn in by our Governor General. A day of tradition and ceremony, of decorum and respect. Usually.But yesterday Winston Peters, the incoming Deputy Prime Minister, and Foreign Minister, of our nation used it, as he did with the signing of the coalition ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    7 days ago
  • Top 10 news links at 10 am for Tuesday, Nov 28
    Nicola Willis’ first move was ‘spilling the tea’ on what she called the ‘sobering’ state of the nation’s books, but she had better be able to back that up in the HYEFU. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: Here’s my pick of top 10 news links elsewhere at 10 am ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    7 days ago
  • PT use up but fare increases coming
    Yesterday Auckland Transport were celebrating, as the most recent Sunday was the busiest Sunday they’ve ever had. That’s a great outcome and I’m sure the ...
    1 week ago
  • The very opposite of social investment
    Nicola Willis (in blue) at the signing of the coalition agreement, before being sworn in as both Finance Minister and Social Investment Minister. National’s plan to unwind anti-smoking measures will benefit her in the first role, but how does it stack up from a social investment viewpoint? Photo: Lynn Grieveson ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    1 week ago
  • Giving Tuesday
    For the first time "in history" we decided to jump on the "Giving Tuesday" bandwagon in order to make you aware of the options you have to contribute to our work! Projects supported by Skeptical Science Inc. Skeptical Science Skeptical Science is an all-volunteer organization but ...
    1 week ago
  • Let's open the books with Nicotine Willis
    Let’s say it’s 1984,and there's a dreary little nation at the bottom of the Pacific whose name rhymes with New Zealand,and they've just had an election.Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, will you look at the state of these books we’ve opened,cries the incoming government, will you look at all this mountain ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    1 week ago
  • Climate Change: Stopping oil
    National is promising to bring back offshore oil and gas drilling. Naturally, the Greens have organised a petition campaign to try and stop them. You should sign it - every little bit helps, and as the struggle over mining conservation land showed, even National can be deterred if enough people ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago

  • New Zealand welcomes European Parliament vote on the NZ-EU Free Trade Agreement
    A significant milestone in ratifying the NZ-EU Free Trade Agreement (FTA) was reached last night, with 524 of the 705 member European Parliament voting in favour to approve the agreement. “I’m delighted to hear of the successful vote to approve the NZ-EU FTA in the European Parliament overnight. This is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Further humanitarian support for Gaza, the West Bank and Israel
    The Government is contributing a further $5 million to support the response to urgent humanitarian needs in Gaza, the West Bank and Israel, bringing New Zealand’s total contribution to the humanitarian response so far to $10 million. “New Zealand is deeply saddened by the loss of civilian life and the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago

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