Questions for DS and DC

Written By: - Date published: 12:55 pm, December 4th, 2011 - 82 comments
Categories: david cunliffe, labour - Tags: , ,

The two main contenders for the leadership of the Labour Party are attending meetings with members in various parts of the country. On current schedule they’ll be in my neck of the woods late in the week.

So – if you could be in the audience – what questions would you ask David Cunliffe, and why? What questions would you ask David Shearer, and why?

82 comments on “Questions for DS and DC”

  1. My first question would be what role do you have for your opponent if you win and what will you do to reconcile the Caucus?

  2. Blue 2

    My question for both would be the same:

    “What are the top three things you want the next Labour government to achieve?”

    I want to know more about what each of them stand for, what their vision is, what their priorities are. And I don’t want some vague waffle from Shearer, I want some concrete answers.

  3. Hilary 3

    What is your attitude to the Green Party, and those who vote for them?
    (Personally, I think the future for the left is a some sort of collaboration between Labour and Greens, and possibly also Mana, so I would like to see conciliatory approaches from the top).

  4. wyndham 4

    Hilary – – – – right on the nail.

  5. Uturn 5

    What is your motivation to seek the Labour Party Leadership? Are you happy with Labour’s intentions as they stand or do you support a move in a new direction?

  6. If Winston Peters is the answer. What is the question ?

    • RedLogix 6.1

      Winston represents a real constituency. More socially conservative than Labour, but with not dissimilar economic policy. That and a distinctive nationalistic streak, peculiarly absent most NZ politics.

  7. Nick K 7

    What do the both of you possibly think you can offer the “working class” when one is Harvard educated and the other has worked for the World’s largest NGO earning tax free US dollars?

    • Colonial Viper 7.1

      I’d like to ask a particular New York investment banker and currency speculator the same question.

      • Pete 7.1.1

        One suspects you are referring to John Key? That would be funny if he did put his name forward for the job of labour representative!

    • Jackal 7.2

      You would be saying “he’s just a working class hick” if they didn’t have qualifications Nick K. Since when was a qualification a hindrance in politics?

  8. Ms X 8

    In view of the article in the Herald about Labour needing to be further right than it is, do you see Labour as Left or Centre Left? and why?

  9. just saying 9

    Without any meaningless waffle:

    Describe the top five (concrete) policies, that are not currently Labour policy, that you want to fight for, and explain why.

    Explain your views on neoliberalism, and the future of capitalism.

    What are your views on “identity politics”? (god I hate that term but anyhow…).

    What are the five biggest issues facing New Zealand, and how do you believe we should deal with them?

    Do you see yourself as to the right or to the left of the current caucus? elaborate?

  10. Jackal 10

    What do you plan to do about the low voter turnout? This is important because many of those who did not vote have the most to lose under brand key.

  11. daveo 11

    If you’re made leader your staffing will be crucial. Have you decided who your chief of staff would be and can you tell us who it is and why you have chosen them?

  12. Afewknowthetruth 12

    Question:

    In view of the fact that global extraction of oil peaked over 2005 to 2008, and is on the way down, and that no combination of so-called alternatives can possibly support current economic arrangements, and in view of the fact that excessive carbon dioxide emissions due to the burning of fossil fuels pose the greatest threat continued habitability of the Earth by humans, do you intend to start talking honestly about the crucical issues of our times or do you intend to continue ignoring them until it is far too late to do anything?

  13. When it comes to solving the economic problems facing New Zealand, to what extent can government measures be the solution?

    (That should flush out some latent or not so latent ideology. Variants include ‘social problems’, ‘environmental problems’ …)

    What need, if any, do you believe there is for more and better forms of participatory democracy at local and national levels and in the workplace?” 

    If you could change one thing, overnight, about New Zealand (and I don’t mean ‘attitudes’, ‘values’, etc.) what would that be?” 

  14. Anthony 14

    What do you see as the required steps for New Zealand to raise its levels of productivity.

    • Afewknowthetruth 14.1

      Anthony.

      Are you a factory owner?

      Lower pay rates, longer hours for the same pay, faster production lines, working people harder, replacing people with machines?

      • Anthony 14.1.1

        No but I’ve worked in one, where because of the low pay rates it was cheaper to have us carry and stack boxes than buy or hire a fork lift.

        I want to see how they answer these questions and the slants that become apparent from their answers.

  15. mikesh 15

    What are your views on re-establishing public broadcasting TV in NZ?

  16. neoleftie 16

    From an old marxist how do you intend to reconnect the disjointed labour party to the majority of voters who would identify themselves as social democrates ( even if they arent aware they could be defined as social democrates ) in a continuous growth pattern.

  17. Anthony 17

    What are your views on the current gap between work and welfare?

  18. AnnaLiviaPlurabella 18

    What the hell can you do for Trevor Mallard?

  19. Salsy 19

    What are your views on the TPPA ?

  20. red blooded 20

    How do you think Labour can attract more young activists and voters? (and please don’t just refer us to the upcoming structural review…)

  21. ianmac 21

    What immediate steps should be taken to deal with the thousands of kids who are living in poverty?

    • Pete 21.1

      That may be impossible to fix, but the aim should be to reduce the number of children born into poverty.

    • seeker 21.2

      Same Ianmac @ 5.45pm. To me, after seeing the documentary on the state of so many of our poor children this is the big question. Especially now that we have National for the next 3 years and they are certainly not going to do anything for the poor little mites and the tragedy wiill only become worse.
      Unbearable.

  22. chris73 22

    To D Cunliffe: You’ve stated you’ll buy back any assetts sold under National, will you extend that to all assetts sold under Labour as well?

    To D Shearer: Would you buy back all assetts sold under National and buy back any assetts sold under National?

    Also what can be done to sort out the top order of the NZ cricket team?

    • felix 22.1

      “You’ve stated you’ll buy back any assetts sold under National,…”

      Got a link or a quote for that?

      • Colonial Viper 22.1.1

        Cunliffe said on The Nation that re-nationalisation would be considered.

        • Carol 22.1.1.1

          QA today:

          http://tvnz.co.nz/q-and-a-news/david-shearer-cunliffe-interview-4588692

          DAVID CUNLIFFE
          Yeah, SOE partial privatisation, no. I dont stand for a paler shade of blue, and I wanna look down the barrel and say this – if the government is going to sell off precious state assets, then we would not rule out renationalising some of them. People need to be aware of that regulatory risk.

          • felix 22.1.1.1.1

            That’s what I thought I heard. A fair way from what chris alleged.

            • chris73 22.1.1.1.1.1

              OK so change it to considering then

              • McFlock

                no reason not to consider renationalising any asset, whether it was sold by labour or national.
                 
                Which is a bit different from committing to repurchase every asset sold in the last 30 years.

        • mikesh 22.1.1.2

          He also said it on Q&A.

          • felix 22.1.1.2.1

            Cunliffe said he could consider buying back some sold assets.

            Which is very different to what chris said, which was he will buy back any assets sold by National.

            Got to watch these fantasies and lies, they have a habit of coming back 3 years later as established memes. Best to stop them before they get started.

  23. Pete 23

    Will you ban cricket?

    • Trowlie 23.1

      If not a total ban, at least ban fiddling at full deliveries outside the off stump while the ball is new.

      • chris73 23.1.1

        I could support this

      • mac1 23.1.2

        Fiddling at full deliveries outside off stump in test matches is a bit like partial asset sales- there’s not a high rate of return, you risk losing your assets to a foreign owner, there’s not much risk to the new bidder/owner and generally you get a low price for your asset. There’s also not much the selectors can do until the next rematch.

        Who said cricket’s got nothing to do with life?

  24. randal 24

    my question is when are you going to spank hooton and kweewee!

  25. Jackal 25

    What is your plan to combat National’s propaganda machine and media bias?

  26. Carol 26

    What role are women going to play in your caucus? Is it going to be as male dominated as National’s government, with most of the dominant positions going to men?

    • Craig Glen Eden 26.1

      +1 I would also ask how is your caucus leadership going to reflect a modern Bicultural NZ.

  27. Campbell Larsen 27

    What chance do you think there is of the MSM supporting the ‘leadership play’ all the way through to endorsement of the chosen candidate and favourable press post appointment?
    What hope is there for the rejected candidate in terms of future leadership possibilities? Is it: not now but later, or will it be: they weren’t right then, they can’t be the right person for the job….

    Why was there not sufficient dialoge within the party, and indeed between you two to enable the appropriate successor to be chosen? After all this was not unexpected, and neither of you are fools; can a public popularity constest umpired by the notoriously biased MSM really deliver a better result?

    A succession strategy is a necessary part of any organization. Ideally multiple candidates are nurtured and then the best individual is put forward for the circumstances at the time. This is not a race but an evaluation of each persons strengths.

    While popularity with the public is one of those strengths I sincerely hope it has not become the most important and I certainly hope that those that are unsuccessful are forever cast as the runner up. Such an outcome rewards the media for two dimensional portrayals of personalities and issues
    and deprives us of future talent merely to assuage the medias never ending hunger for titillation.

    • Campbell Larsen 27.1

      Oops meant ‘i hope that those that are unsuccessful are NOT forever cast as the runner up’

  28. newsense 28

    Why did you enter parliament?

    What is the philosophy of a social democratic party?

    What is the role you see for centre-left parties as the financial crisis deepens?

    Will you sign the TPP?

  29. belladonna 29

    Are you going to, shock horror, support beneficiares instead of bashing those most vulnerable people in society as has been the pattern for both Labour and National.

  30. newsense 30

    What policy planks of the last election will you say are non-negotiable for you?

    How will you be highlighting the abuse of democracy through use of urgency and will you be voting to give any minister power such as McCully had and Brownlee has?

  31. Jackal 31

    How do you plan to service the government’s $50 billion debt hole National has got us into?

    • burt 31.1

      Jackal

      That should be easy for Labour given the number will be a lot lower than Labour must have secretly been planning to manage if they won the election.

      • Jackal 31.1.1

        What? Labour provided the most in-depth fiscal policy of any opposition party ever… which showed them paying off the debt faster in the long term while also retaining our assets.

        This post isn’t about you making shit up burt.

        • burt 31.1.1.1

          This post isn’t about you making shit up burt.

          Correct, it seems to be about Labour making shit up and you believing it !

          • Jackal 31.1.1.1.1

            Labour didn’t come up with that figure, it’s from the OECD’s Statistical Annex (PDF). New Zealand’s General government gross financial liabilities as a percentage of GDP is set to grow from 28.9% in 2008 to 50% in 2013.

            Here’s Brian Gaynor crunching the numbers: Smooth ride over for Key as deficits demand action

            As a result gross Government debt has blown out from $43.5 billion to a forecast $79.8 billion in June 2012 under the Key Administration, whereas it increased from $36.6 billion to $43.5 billion in nine years under Prime Minister Helen Clark.

            Selling assets isn’t going to work.

  32. What is the role of the State in society and in the economy?

     

    • burt 32.1

      Good question. Lets hope the self serving answer isn’t given… remember it… Whatever govt decide it to be.

    • A very good – and very basic – question. (Though I’d ask ‘What should be the role of the state in society and in the economy?’ – but I think that’s what you were aiming at.)

      Anyone who has thought much about modern politics and government should have a clear opinion in relation to that question.

      Covering both the social and economic spheres in the question is also very useful.

    • Campbell Larsen 32.3

      +1

  33. newsense 33

    How will you tackle the dominance of Sky TV and SkyCity in areas of our culture?

  34. Do you support unqualified free trade or do you believe NZ industry should be protected and promoted?

  35. Do you agree with the ongoing flattening of NZ’s tax system and if not, will you reintroduce a more progressive taxation regime?

  36. Will you privatize the NZ military and its peace-keeping operations?

  37. r0b 37

    Some great suggestions here – thanks folks!

  38. If_you_see_Kay 38

    How do you intend to supplement the collection of time-servers on the Labour list with people who have actually succeeded beforehand in some social and/or business endeavour, as you both have?

  39. If_you_see_Kay 39

    You have both talked about the regeneration of the Labour party, but do either of you have any actual specific plans to involve anyone other than the usual suspects in that regeneration?

  40. AAMC 40

    How to you propose to create a new unified Left?
    Would you consider a shared leadership like the Greens and a consensual rather than hierarchical structure within the party?
    Are you prepared to publicly denounce Neo-Liberalism and front a robust debate around new economic thinking? How do you intend to do so?
    How can you distance yourself from the propaganda around Communism, The Cold War and Unionism, fear of which has been played brilliantly – if sadistically – by the right, and form a new narrative around these values to reignite the desire to vote?
    Are you prepared to take us forward? Or souls all on the left jump ship to the Greens?

  41. AAMC 41

    Do you intend to react to defeat by a rachet to the Right in an attempt to claim National’s territory, or do you intend to reinvigorate those who have lost faith in democracy and move us into the future?

  42. CentreOfLeft 42

    The preliminary results of the election show that Labour handsomely won the party vote in all seven Maori Electorates.
    Bearing that in mind, what will you be doing to specifically target the needs of Maori?

    Also, how’s your te reo going?
    (I’m not asking for an exhaustive whaikorero at the drop of a hat, I just want to be able to hear a pakeha politician pronounce Maori names without cringing, is that so much to ask?)

  43. her 43

    What would you do to make NZ a better place for everyone?

  44. js 44

    What is your commitment to reduce socio-economic disparaties and improve parliamentary representation for the 20% of New Zealanders who identify as disabled?

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