web analytics

Stand up for the rule of law

Written By: - Date published: 10:55 am, September 21st, 2011 - 44 comments
Categories: democracy under attack, law and "order" - Tags:

The Police have known for years that the kind of surveillance they carried out in the Ureweras was illegal.

They went ahead and did it anyway. They were betting that the Courts would permit illegally gained evidence to be used in prosecuting serious offences (no ‘fruit of a poison tree‘ rule here like in the US). They got a surprise with the strength of the Supreme Court’s decision to disallow the evidence against most of the Urewera 18, even though the illegally obtained evidence will still be allowed against four who suffer more serious charges. But the important point is this: your Police knowingly acted illegally to spy on your fellow citizens.

No-one’s saying those being surveilled are angels. It’s not about them. It’s about whether the agents of the State, who are ultimately meant to be your agents, should be allowed to act illegally. Should the ends justify the means or do we believe in the rule of law as the only way to constrain those with power from abusing it?

Should the law be changed for the future? I’m no expert. It seems the experts do want the law changed. That’s why a law change has been in the Search and Surveillance Bill for two years to make this surveillance legal. But the government didn’t get around to passing it. Too busy organising the World Cup, I guess…. oh, wait.

But should the law be changed retrospectively? That’s a whole other kettle of fish. It tells the Police that they can do whatever they want and later claim that their actions have to be legalised post hoc as long as they cry ‘if you don’t you’ll be letting crims free!’

There needs to be some kind of consequence to the Police officers and their bosses who knowingly broke the law. They’re criminals, after all. So far, there’s been no suggestion that these law breakers should be punished from the government.

Regardless of whether the law should be retrospectively changed, the way that National is planning to ‘fix’ the situation is completely unacceptable. According to reports, the law they want to rush through under Urgency doesn’t change the law it just suspends the effect of the Supreme Court decision for a year. So, the surveillance – past, present, and future – will remain illegal, just everyone will pretend the Supreme Court decision making that clear hasn’t happened year. It’s ludicrous and it’s a breach of the rule of law and separation of powers.

If the Executive doesn’t like the law as it stands, it should ak Parliament to change it, after which the Judiciary will interpret the new law. That’s how our system of government works. What the Executive shouldn’t do is interfere in our independent Judiciary by using Parliament to pick out a single court decision it doesn’t like, in which everyone agrees the Judiciary has done its job in correctly interpreting the law passed by Parliament, and put it on ice. It is not for the Executive or for Parliament to do the job of the Judiciary or prevent the Judiciary doing its job. If Bainimarama tried this, our government would be howling.

So where to from here? The Greens, Maori Party and, probably, ACT will oppose this law. That leaves Labour to give National a majority. Labour’s in a tough place. If they make a principled stand they risk the media calling them soft on crime 10 weeks from an election, with the going already tough. On the other hand, if the media decide that rights, restraint of State power, and the rule of law matter – and, incredibly, that’s not something we would normally expect from the media (witness that fuckwit John Armstrong’s uncritical backing of National and attack on Labour today – http://nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.php?c_id=1&objectid=10753198) – then Labour can safely stand up for principle, maybe even score a political win. Unfortunately, being a political party, especially a major political party, often means voting for things that you oppose but that is is politically untenable to vote against (even the Greens voted for CERRA, the Canterbury Enabling  Act 1).

I’m hoping that Labour will vote against this Bill. It certainly seems they are drifting that way.

But they will need the support of the media, who need to take responsibility for their constitutional role, rather than acting like sports commentators for once. The journos need to look at the government’s record of anti-democratic actions – Supercity, Ecan, CERA, CERRA, abuse of Urgency, RWC Enabling Act, abuse of question time, refusing to do media on policies like asset sales – and decide that, when the government is seeking it infringe on the independence of the Judiciary to protect the illegal actions of the Police,  it is time to draw a line in the sand.

44 comments on “Stand up for the rule of law ”

  1. freedom 1

    Law is the only barrier to State-sanctioned oppression.
    If it is not respected in a democracy, there is no democracy to respect.

    • bbfloyd 1.1

      democracy? you surely don’t believe we live in a democracy still? the national party has NEVER actually espoused democratic governance…. it’s one of the central pillars of their political philosophy…

      the only difference between national and the likes of augusto pinoche is that the pinoche regime had the balls to shoot their dissidents…. here, it takes ministers using the full weight of the news media to publicly destroy any dissent…. when it seems obvious they would rather just round up troublemakers and ship them off to one of the shiny new prisons to help them break from their antisocial attitudes…

      • King Kong 1.1.1

        Jeez floyd, are you sure we live in the same country?

        National wanting to round up and shoot dissidents?

        When you state things like that it becomes very difficult to take anything else you say seriously.

  2. All this is about the concentration of executive power to make and impose rapid decisions to deal with the global capitalist crisis as it impacts on NZ. Its not about the ‘rule of law’ which is always subordinated to executive power and in times of crisis the law is changed to reflect the direct interests of capital. Nor is it about the police who are mere agents of ruling class interests.

    The bosses rule by means of their own law which is the law of private property and civil rights to defend and facilitate capital accumulation. Cabinet rule is the Board of NZ Inc, Key is the CEO who ‘chairs’ NZ ‘above classes’ and apparently in the ‘national interest’.

    When some element of government (even the ‘executive’ in the US in the form of Obama) threatens even minimally ruling class interests then the dominant finance sector mobilises outside government to accuse it of ‘class war’!

    In NZ such is the dominance of the ruling class executive that there is almost no disagreement among that class as to how to rule. Labour’s traditional constituency – the fraction of NZ manufacturing capital is now mostly foreign owned so its only claim to manage capitalism better than the NACTs is to push R&D to increase labour productivity. But that too has been increasingly ‘internationalised’ by free trade agreements which means that MNCs are sovereign not the NACT board. Thus NACTs are riding high as this ‘national interest’ is the RWC mask for the interests of international capital – mainly, US, Chinese, Australian and some EU MNCs.

    There is no national road out of this serfdom only working class internationalism joining forces with workers right around the world to take on the ‘new rulers of the world’ the imperialist MNCs. In each country that begins with the great refusal to follow the dictates of global capitalism and oppose it without fear as part of the global uprising that is taking place around the world.

  3. The Herald editorial today was remarkably good and I agreed with every word of it.  Armstrong becomes more irrelevant and more obviously biased by the day.

    • toad 3.1

      I agree with the general thrust of the Herald editorial, but not with this bit:

      Equally, the police can continue to use covert surveillance if the offending under investigation is serious. 

      They should not be suspending the use of video surveillance in major operations.

      The continued use of video surveillance in defiance of the Supreme Court’s determination that it is unlawful would almost certainly result in Court findings that the Police had acted in bad faith in obtaining the evidence.  That would raise the s 30 Evidence Act bar even higher than in the Urewera case, possible to the extent that such evidence would not be admissible however serious the alleged offence.

      So I think there is a case for some reasonably urgent measures to prospectively permit Police video surveillance under warrant.  But there is absolutely no case to retroactively validate past unlawful Police collection of video evidence – that is simply repugnant to the rule of law.

      • alex 3.1.1

        Good on you Toad, at least we know one party will oppose these frightening and dangerous government actions.

      • mickysavage 3.1.2

        Perhaps I was a bit too fulsome in my praise of the editorial and should have said “I agree with every word of it except for the suggestion the Police should continue covert surveillance in the meantime” …
         
        Of course the Police can continue to do so and argue under section 30 of the Evidence Act that the evidence should still be admitted although I suspect that since the publication of the Supreme Court decision the chances of the evidence being admitted have worsened considerably.

        • Herodotus 3.1.2.1

          How is Joe Average suppose to understand teh law? So it is not right for taping regarding the majority of those that were originally charged, BUT it is admissable for the other 5?

          • grumpy 3.1.2.1.1

            Simply, Joe average can’t. Nor can a High Court Judge, nor can 3 Appeal Court Judges and neither could 2 Supreme Court Judges.

      • KJT 3.1.3

        There should only be one answer to this. The police involved should be before the courts for breaking the law.

        There is no justification for this sort of breach of privacy when there is not enough evidence for a warrant.

  4. Scott 4

    I believe in the rule of law as the only way to constrain those with power from abusing it.

    Just look at the US in post 911, 4th Reich Mode.

    Toddlers fondled by TSA at airports because they’re a security risk?
    People in the desert forced off of their property because of complaints from non-existent neighbors?
    These are only two examples on a long list of what Americans are willing to put up with.
    Their own Ben Franklin said something like “people who would exchange their freedoms for security, deserve neither.”

    The “terrorist” raid in the Ureweras was a test to see how Kiwis would respond to the “Guilty until proven innocent” mode of anti-terrorist laws, and see how Kiwis would respond to the atrocities perpetrated on people outside of the usual circle of friends.

    We don’t want to go down this slippery slope.

    • Scott 4.1

      Here’s a link about the people in the desert: http://sovereignty.net/p/sd/LA-A21.htm

    • Do you live in America post 9/11???

      Have you even actually visited America, I have family members that have been there since 1994, I visited there eight times, and people in the USA are going by their daily lifes, eg: working, taking their kids to soccer practice, as normal.

      I fail to see all this oppression you are talking about.

      • Colonial Viper 4.2.1

        Didn’t get your balls scanned at the airport then?

        I suppose you don’t wear a turban or a long full beard or are black so didn’t get interrogated by cops on a frequent basis?

        And the US has reintroduced state sponsored slave labour by firing public sector workers and using free labour from prisoners to clean parks and dig up roads.

        Also look for the 46M on food stamps, with no prospects of getting off them, and another 11M whose unemployment benefits have expired, while the elite talk about slashing health and social security spending.

        I fail to see all this oppression you are talking about.

        Look harder upper class white boy.

        • Brett Dale 4.2.1.1

          Colonial Viper:

          First Im far from being an upper class white boy, (what is that anyway)

          On my last trip, yes I had to put my hands at the back of my head and go through the
          full body scanner, like other white boys/girls, black boy/black girls/short/tall/fat/skinny/turban wearing/non turban wearing people going through an airport.

          The tsa workers, were professional and polite. On a pervious trip i had a routine bag search, where everything got taken out of my bag and I got question.

          Again they were professional and polite.

          The average amercian like the average kiwi/aussie goes about their normal day, normally.

          Not sure what states are using this prison labour that you speak of, but this is untrue in the places that I have visited.

          Like I said The area that i visited was multi cultural, Americans just getting on with their daily lifes.

          • Colonial Viper 4.2.1.1.1

            They were polite and courteous invading your personal privacy and scanning/patting down your privates? Good-oh.

            How about the retina scans and bio-ID photos they took of you then? Are you reassured to know that in four or five years the US military is going to have military drones using those biomarkers to designate and destroy targets automatically without human intervention?

            First Im far from being an upper class white boy, (what is that anyway)

            You’ve had 8 return trips to the USA in 17 years, no doubt trips to Oz and Asia as well in that time, yeah mate you’re an upper class white boy.

            Not sure what states are using this prison labour that you speak of, but this is untrue in the places that I have visited.

            Now I know you are making this shit up, because I doubt you checked out the penal code in each state you passed through as a routine part of visiting family.

            FYI the state I am referring to is WI, under Walker.

            • Brett Dale 4.2.1.1.1.1

              Colinial Viper:

              I grew up in a poor part in Christchurch,, my highest paid job has been $17 an hour, I go overseas to the states to visit family (I dont stay in hotels, so I save on accommodation), never been to Asia, been to aussie twice around 20 years ago.

              Im in my 40’s, I have never had a mortgage, never married, I have always rented. I dont have kids, I dont drink or smoke so I save that way, I eat like a freakin bird.

              I have been lucky enough to find work thru my adult years.

              I am white, but Im not rich or upper class, i live in a wee place in an average area.

              I had no problem with walking thru full body x ray machines, or having bag searches, the people who have done this have always been respectful, and im sure they anit doing full body xrays for some perverted pleasure.

              In terms of who is doing the road work/clean up, well the road work is beginning done by road workers, and clean up is being done by students, the area that I go to is a student town.

              Dont be so judgmental on what you think I am.

  5. KJT 5

    Where are the prosecutions for the police that broke the law?

    Surely a policeman knowingly breaking the laws, they are supposed to enforce, is grounds for dismissal.

    • Blighty 5.1

      considering that cop got a $250 fine for doing a u-turn on a blind corner and killing a motorcyclist, don’t hold your breath on this one

  6. alex 6

    Personally I’m most concerned about the overuse of urgency. Its an absolute disgrace that they are allowed to use it to enact a law like this, really makes a mockery of our system of checks and balances.

  7. vto 7

    I’m getting reluctant to post here anymore… I can smell them watching and quite frankly I aint exposing myself and those around me to such risk (got plenty other battles to fight). Even though the wider issue comprises a far greater risk.

    I mean, how anonymous are we on here? Not very I strongly suspect.

    Seems we are well down the slippery slope already.

    • terryg 7.1

      VTO,

      you are not anonymous, nor can you ever be – not any more, at any rate. Modern data mining techniques are extremely sophisticated, and the data sets get richer and more interconnected by the minute. Big brother has been here for some time now. Not via nonsensical drivel like flouride being used to track you, but through technology.

      cellphone = portable tracking device – gps enabled or not.

      We dont have ANPR cameras here yet (Automatic NumberPlate Recognition), but its only a matter of time.

      image analysis is good enough now to recognise and track individuals – with or without disguises.

      any form of electronic transaction provides identifying and locating information.

      facebook (AKA the greatest surveillance tool ever developed)

      I think for now we here in NZ are somewhat free of the worst of this – but our days are numbered. and the filth routinely trace digital footprints and use them as evidence.

      On behalf of my profession, I apologise to all humanity for what we have enabled. oops.

      • insider 7.1.1

        We do have anpr cameras. There are a couple of them mounted in vans in Auckland which featured on the news recently, and there are the ones on the northern toll road.

    • Campbell Larsen 7.2

      You owe it to the companies that assess domestic terror threats on behalf of the government to keep up your ‘terrorist activities’ – the economy is very fragile right now and unless the perceived threat to Shonky is not maintained and unless his person protection budget increased again those companies might go out of business and the retired SIS and police that work for them would be out of work.

      Sorry couldn’t resist –

      While I agree that there are grounds for concern and understand (and do not judge) if people choose not to post here out of fear I am reminded of an old saying: “to live in fear is not to live at all”
      That is the unstated goal of a police state and the government that promotes it – a world of fear. People that are afraid are easy to control. Don’t hand them their twisted dream (and our doom) on a plate.
      A grain of sand is tiny, yet the beach which it is a part of tames even an angry sea.

  8. Anthony 8

    The whole thing seems pretty complicated tbh. Tried to follow it and still don’t necessarily understand the problems.

    Is it that the police weren’t getting warrants for surveillance or that all surveillance some how infringes on the bill or rights?

    Was the evidence legal under whatever original terrorism laws (that no longer apply as they can’t be charged under it)?

    Seems like a minefield for Labour to wade into.

    • framu 8.1

      its pretty simple

      surveillance with a warrant is fine.

      Trespassing on private property to carry out surveillance in the hope you (the police) get some evidence, even though you knew back in 2007 that is was illegal isnt

      then when you get found out, getting the govt to override the juduciary isnt fine either

  9. vanakast 9

    The nanny-statists complaining about the big brother. How rich.

    • Colonial Viper 9.1

      National Nanny State Criers being the biggest paternalists of them all, with food stamps for the young and big brother looking over your shoulder illegally.

      vanakast = hypocrite

    • Pascal's bookie 9.2

      Not as rich as big brother complaining about nanny state.

  10. grumpy 10

    “No-one’s saying those being surveilled are angels. It’s not about them”

    Is this the start of Standardistas distancing themselves from the accused???????

    [lprent: Nope. It is saying that the issue about this bill isn’t about any particular case, but is about the underlying legal principle. Of course if you don’t understand that, then I would question your abilities to indulge in any kind of abstract discussion. We’d be looking at the beauty of a beach and you’d be comparing each grain of sand. ]

    • prism 10.1

      @grumpy
      “No-one’s saying those being surveilled are angels. It’s not about them”
      Is this the start of Standardistas distancing themselves from the accused???????

      Very witty. But the matter is too serious to have little RW-LW potshots about it. The thing to be concerned about is whether we have a police force that can restrain itself to acting within the law, or one that will just go ahead and do what seems good at the time, and then can strongarm the politicians, who are supposed to be those in control of the police not the other way round, to bring in retrospective legislation to make everything okay. “The end justifies the means, Your (not very, fingers-crossed-behind-back) Honour-ed.”

    • Blighty 10.2

      It’s clearly a reference to the 40 cases that Key is talking about, not the people who have had their charges dropped.

  11. Draco T Bastard 11

    (even the Greens voted for CERRA, the Canterbury Enabling Act 1)

    Yeah and remember the backlash they and Labour got over that. When political parties vote for something obviously wrong people notice.

  12. AAMC 12

    “Labour’s in a tough place. If they make a principled stand they risk the media calling them soft on crime 10 weeks from an election, ….
    then Labour can safely stand up for principle, maybe even score a political win. Unfortunately, being a political party, especially a major political party, often means voting for things that you oppose”

    I don’t buy it, if Labour is opposed to this, they NEED to “stand up for priciple” and win the debate against Nat & the Media. It’s this running scared trying to second guess the media which currently gives Key his advantage.

    Call him out, win the fight, at least give it a shot. At the moment, what have Labour got to loose? And what do they stand to gain from a principled stance and a performance like we saw from Goff in the House the other day.

  13. RedLogix 13

    Interesting Kathryn Ryan interview with Jonathon Temm the President of the Law Society this morning.Basically he deplored this governments ‘knee-jerk’ responses to controversial cases to make fundamental changes to the legal system that always have the effect of increasing the power of the state against the individual.

    He listed the Weatherston case resulting in the removal of the defence of provocation; the Waihopai case resulting in the removal of the ‘greater good’ defense; and the Kahui twins case leading to severe curtailment in the ‘right to silence’. In three short years the fundamental balance has been substantially shifted against the defendant with one govt’s populist response to public controversy.

    These balances and checks have long been part of our legal system for good reason; abolishing them in thoughtless haste, simply to appeal to an often underinformed public prejudice is very, very poor governance. And now we are seeing exactly the same populist response to illegal police evidence gathering. This is not a one off; it is part of a clear pattern of behaviour on the part of this government.

    Bear in mind that Temm is not some wingnut on a blog; he is a heavy-weight legal figure leading one of the most conservative professions in this country, and a profession with absolute expertise in these matters. When people of this kind of stature start to speak out, on purely professional grounds …. you KNOW you have a problem.

    • MrSmith 13.1

      Here Here Redlodgix; this lazy excuse for a government has always taken the easy option on just about every issue, thats what happens when you are surrounded by your marketers, you play the percentages, take the easiest options, move on without discussion, just keep it rolling along, they know most people only see things out the window of the bus!

    • Puddleglum 13.2

      I’ve noticed that same trend, RL.

      It’s part of the National Party’s (Key’s?) general strategy of sniffing the wind for public sentiment on issues that are peripheral to the fundamental economic agenda and then making a show of enacting special legislation (often under urgency or just very speedily – ironically, with the result of leaving other legislation such as the Surveillance bill on the backburner) or executive decisions – typically with Key making the announcements.

      It’s legislation and decision making subordinated to the PR and spin strategy. Not a pretty sight. 

  14. lefty 14

    Whats tough about doing the right thing?
    If Labour made a habit of it instead of trying to second guess the media, it would soon become second nature.
    They would win support sometimes and lose it other times. Thats what happens anyway, even when they try to slavishly follow so called public opinion or listen to focus groups.
    If they started doing the right thing all the time people might eventually start trusting them.
    Wouldn’t that be something?

  15. alex 15

    I never thought I’d say this, but GO ACT!!! They announced they wouldn’t support this law change under urgency, meaning it will have a chance of being defeated in the proper parliamentary channels. Take that National, your right wing has said this is too extreme a step. Maybe time to shelve the policy then?

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Apartments give new life to former Trade Training hostel
    A building that once shaped the Māori trade training industry will now revitalise the local community of Ōtautahi and provide much needed housing for whānau Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson announced today. The old Māori Trade Training hostel, Te Koti Te Rato, at Rehua Marae in Christchurch has been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    13 hours ago
  • Major step to pay parity for early learning teachers
    Certificated teachers on the lowest pay in early education and care services will take another leap towards pay parity with their equivalents in kindergartens, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said in a pre-Budget announcement today. “Pay parity for education and care teachers is a manifesto commitment for Labour and is reflected ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    13 hours ago
  • New Zealand Wind Energy Conference
    Tēnā koutou katoa Tēnā koutou i runga i te kaupapa o te Rā No reira, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tatou katoa  Thank you Grenville for the introduction and thanks to the organisers, the New Zealand Wind Energy Association, for inviting me to speak this morning. I’m delighted that you ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Speech to New Zealand Drug Foundation 2021 Parliamentary Drug Policy Symposium
    Speech to Through the Maze: On the road to health New Zealand Drug Foundation 2021 Parliamentary Drug Policy Symposium Mōrena koutou katoa, Tēnei te mihi ki a koutou, Kua tae mai nei me ngā kete matauranga hauora, E whai hononga ai tatau katoa, Ka nui te mihi! Thank you for the opportunity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    17 hours ago
  • Govt to deliver lower card fees to business
    Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister David Clark has today announced the Government’s next steps to reduce merchant service fees, that banks charge businesses when customers use a credit or debit card to pay, which is estimated to save New Zealand businesses approximately $74 million each year. “Pre COVID, EFTPOS has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    17 hours ago
  • Government support boosts Arts and Culture sector
    Government support for the cultural sector to help it recover from the impact of COVID-19 has resulted in more cultural sector jobs predicted through to 2026, and the sector performing better than forecast. The latest forecast by economic consultancy ‘Infometrics’ reflects the impact of Government investment in keeping people in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Govt takes further action against gang crime
    The Government will make it illegal for high risk people to own firearms by introducing Firearms Prohibition Orders (FPOs) that will strengthen action already taken to combat the influence of gangs and organised crime to help keep New Zealanders and their families safe, Police Minister Poto Williams and Justice Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Thousands of MIQ spaces allocated to secure economic recovery
    Five hundred spaces per fortnight will be allocated in managed isolation facilities over the next 10 months, many for skilled and critical workers to support our economic recovery, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor say. “The Trans-Tasman bubble has freed up more rooms, allowing us to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand Sign Language Week a chance to recognise national taonga
    This week (10 – 16 May 2021) is New Zealand Sign Language Week (NZSL), a nationwide celebration of NZSL as an official language of New Zealand. “We’re recognised as a world leader for our commitment to maintaining and furthering the use of our sign language,” says Minister for Disability Issues ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Economic resilience provides more options in Budget 2021
    Securing the recovery and investing in the wellbeing of New Zealanders is the focus of Budget 2021, Grant Robertson told his audience at a pre-budget speech in Auckland this morning. "The economy has proven resilient in response to COVID-19, due to people having confidence in the Government’s health response to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Pre-Budget speech to BNZ-Deloitte Auckland Breakfast Event
    Thank you for the invitation to speak to you today, and to share with you some of the Government’s thinking leading into this year’s budget. This will be my fourth time delivering the annual Budget for the Government, though the events of the past year have thrown out that calculation. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Rotuman Language week affirms language as the key to Pacific wellbeing
    The first Pacific Language Week this year  makes it clear that  language is the key to the wellbeing for all Pacific people said Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio. “This round of language  weeks begin with Rotuman. As I have always  said language is one of the pillars of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Budget delivers improved cervical and breast cancer screening
    Budget 2021 funds a more effective cervical screening test to help reduce cervical cancer rates A new breast screening system that can proactively identify and enrol eligible women to reach 271,000 more people who aren’t currently in the programme. Budget 2021 delivers a better cervical screening test and a major ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • NZ-France to co-chair Christchurch Call Leaders’ Summit
    New Zealand and France will jointly convene the Christchurch Call Community for a leaders’ summit, to take stock of progress and develop a new shared priority work plan. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and President Emmanuel Macron will co-chair the leaders’ meeting on the 2nd anniversary of the Call, on 14 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New South Wales travel pause to be lifted tomorrow
    COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says the current travel pause with New South Wales will lift tomorrow – subject to no further significant developments in NSW. “New Zealand health officials met today to conduct a further assessment of the public health risk from the recently identified COVID-19 community cases in Sydney. It has been determined that the risk to public ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • March 15 Collective Impact Board appointed
    The voices of those affected by the March 15 mosque attacks will be heard more effectively with the establishment of a new collective impact board, Associate Minister for Social Development and Employment Priyanca Radhakrishnan announced today. Seven members of the Christchurch Muslim community have been appointed to the newly established Board, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • More young Kiwis supported with mental health and addiction services
    Nearly quarter of a million more young New Zealanders will have access to mental health and addiction support in their communities as the Government’s youth mental health programme gathers pace. New contracts to expand youth-specific services across the Northland, Waitematā and Auckland District Health Board areas have been confirmed, providing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New hospital facilities mean fewer trips to Auckland for Northlanders
    Northlanders will no longer automatically have to go to Auckland for lifesaving heart procedures like angiograms, angioplasty and the insertion of pacemakers, thanks to new operating theatres and a cardiac catheter laboratory opened at Whangārei Hospital by Health Minister Andrew Little today. The two projects – along with a new ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Fair Pay Agreements to improve pay and conditions for essential workers
    The Government is delivering on its pre-election commitment to implement Fair Pay Agreements which will improve wages and conditions, as well as help support our economic recovery, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood announced today. Fair Pay Agreements will set minimum standards for all employees and employers in an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Establishment of the new Māori Health Authority takes first big step
    Sir Mason Durie will lead a Steering Group to provide advice to the Transition Unit on governance arrangements and initial appointments to an interim board to oversee the establishment of the Māori Health Authority. This Group will ensure that Māori shape a vital element of our future health system, Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Cycle trails move up a gear in Central
    Work on new and upgraded cycle trails in Queenstown, Arrowtown and Central Otago is moving up a gear as two significant projects pass further milestones today. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has announced new funding for the Queenstown Trails Project, and will also formally open the Lake Dunstan Trail at Bannockburn ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government gives households extra help to reduce their power bills
    Nine community energy education initiatives to help struggling New Zealanders with their power bills are being given government funding through the new Support for Energy Education in Communities (SEEC) Programme.   “Last year we committed nearly $8 million over four years to establish the SEEC Programme. This funding will help ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Picton ferry terminal upgrade consent fast-tracked
    The planned upgrade of the Waitohi Picton Ferry terminal has been approved under the fast-track consenting process.  Environment Minister David Parker today welcomed the decision by the expert consenting panel to approve the Waitohi Picton Ferry Precinct Redevelopment Project.    The project will provide a significant upgrade to the ferry facilities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Quarantine Free Travel with New South Wales paused
    COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins has announced his intention to pause Quarantine Free Travel from New South Wales to New Zealand while the source of infection of the two cases announced in Sydney in the last two days is investigated.  Whole genome sequencing has linked the case yesterday to a recent ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Covid-19 immigration powers to be extended
    The passing of a bill to extend temporary COVID-19 immigration powers means continued flexibility to support migrants, manage the border, and help industries facing labour shortages, Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi said. “Over the past year, we’ve made rapid decisions to extend visas, vary visa conditions and waive some application requirements ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • “Supporting a Trade-Led Economic Recovery”
    Trade Policy Road Show SpeechManukau, Auckland   Kia ora koutou – nau mai, haere mai ki Manukau, ki Tāmaki.   Good morning everyone, and thank you for this opportunity to discuss with you current global challenges, opportunities and the Government’s strategy in support of a trade-led recovery from the economic ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Building consent numbers at an all-time high
    A record 41,028 new homes have been consented in the year ended March 2021 March 2021 consent numbers the highest since the 1940s Record number of new homes consented in Auckland The number of new homes consented is at an all-time high, showing a strong and increasing pipeline of demand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Whānau-centred support for parents and tamariki
    Up to 60 whānau in Counties Manukau will be supported through the first three years of their parenthood by a new whānau-centred model of care, said Associate Health Minister, Hon Aupito William Sio. “Providing this support to young parents is something we have to get right. It’s a priority both ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • NZ backs moves to improve global access to COVID vaccines
    New Zealand welcomes and strongly supports the announcement made by the United States Trade Representative to work for a waiver of IP protections on COVID-19 vaccines at the WTO, Trade Minister Damien O’Connor said. “New Zealand supports equitable access to COVID vaccines for all. No one is safe from the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Tourism communities: support, recovery and re-set plan
    TIHEI MAURI ORA Tuia te whakapono Tuia te tumanako Tuia te aroha Tuia te hunga ora Ki te hunga ora Tihei Mauri ora Ka nui te mihi ki a koutou Tena koutou, tena koutou, tena koutou katoa. Thank you, Hilary and thank you, Chris, and everyone at TIA for this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Support, recovery and re-set plan for tourism communities
    Five South Island tourist communities targeted for specialist support Pressure on Māori tourism operators and Conservation facilities recognised Domestic and international-facing tourism agencies put on more secure footing Long-term plan to re-set tourism with a focus on sustainability, industry standards and regional economic diversification A plan to ensure the immediate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Speech on NZ Rail Plan
    Check against delivery E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā karanga maha o te wa, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa. Ki ngā mana whenua o Taranaki Whānui anō nei aku mihi ki a koutou. Nōku te hōnore kia haere mai ki te whakanuia tēnei huihuinga whakahirahira. Nō ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government hits massive milestone in Violence Prevention & Elimination
    Minister for Family and Sexual Violence Marama Davidson announced a major milestone at a hui in South Auckland today, with the launch of the national engagement process on the prevention and elimination of family and sexual violence. “There is no room for violence in our lives – there is no ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Fee waiver extended for conservation tourism businesses
    Tourism businesses operating on public conservation land will have another six months of fees waived to help them adjust to the downturn in international visitors in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Acting Minister of Conservation Dr Ayesha Verrall has announced. "We acknowledge it has been a difficult year for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • ‘Lua Wave’ to future-proof Pasifika Festivals in Aotearoa
    Pasifika festival organisers will receive additional support to adapt to the COVID-19 environment thanks to the Government’s newly launched ‘Lua Wave’ component of the Pasifika Festivals Initiative, Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “This initiative has not only been to support festival organisers to recover from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Crown accounts show confidence in Govt economic plan
    The Government’s financial accounts continue to reflect the resilience of the economy and confidence in the Government’s economic recovery plan. The Crown accounts for the nine months to the end of March 2021 show both OBEGAL and the operating balance remain better than forecast in the Half Year Economic and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Energy Trusts of NZ Autumn Conference
    It’s a pleasure to be here today. Thank you Karen [Sherry] for the introduction and thanks to the Energy Trusts Executive for inviting me to speak at tonight’s event. It is an exciting time to come to speak to trustees of distribution companies. For many decades the electricity industry was ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New partnership to grow Māori success in STEM
    A new partnership with the Pūhoro STEM Academy will support thousands more rangatahi Māori to participate and succeed in the fields of science, technology, and innovation, Associate Education Minister Kelvin Davis announced today. Since 2016, Pūhoro has worked with Māori students to build their capability and create pathways to employment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Rail builds platform for economic recovery
    Transport Minister Michael Wood and State-Owned Enterprises Minister Dr David Clark today released the Government’s long term vision for a sustainable rail network that supports our economic recovery. New Zealand Rail Plan lays out how the Government is building a resilient, reliable and safe network, as well as the indicative ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • NZ and UK agree to lift the pace of free trade talks
    New Zealand and the United Kingdom have agreed to rapidly lift the tempo of talks, as the two countries enter a new phase in free trade negotiations, Trade and Export Growth Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. “UK Secretary of State for International Trade, Liz Truss, and I spoke today about ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago