The Green Party clarify their position on immigration

Written By: - Date published: 6:14 am, July 3rd, 2017 - 17 comments
Categories: greens, im/migration - Tags:

Speech to the Federation of Multicultural Councils AGM

James Shaw MP on Saturday, July 1, 2017 – 12:59

Kia ora kotou, nihao, namaste, annyong, kamusta, talofalava, bula, salam alaikum

And warm Pacific greetings – on this cold Dunedin morning – to you all.

***

It’s a privilege to be representing the Green Party at your AGM.

We in the Greens are deeply concerned that the debate about immigration policy in New Zealand has, over the course of time, come to be dominated by populist politicians preaching a xenophobic message in order to gain political advantage.

This ugly strain of political discourse is quieter at times of low net migration into New Zealand, but rises at times of when net migration is high – as it is now, and so, at this election, sadly, the xenophobic drum is beating louder.

Last year I made an attempt to try and shift the terms of the debate away from the rhetoric and more towards a more evidence-based approach.

We commissioned some research which indicated that immigration settings would be best if tied to population growth.

Unfortunately, by talking about data and numbers, rather than about values, I made things worse.

Because the background terms of the debate are now so dominated by anti-immigrant rhetoric, when I dived into numbers and data, a lot of people interpreted that as pandering to the rhetoric, rather than trying to elevate the debate and pull it in a different direction.

We were mortified by that, because, in fact, the Greens have the ambition of being the most migrant-friendly party in Parliament. And I am sorry for any effect it may have had on your communities.

Migrants are not to blame for the social and economic ills of this country.

Migrants are not to blame for the housing crisis.

Migrants are not to blame for our children who go to school hungry.

Migrants are not to blame for the long hospital waitlists.

Migrants are not to blame for our degraded rivers.

It is the government’s failure to plan for the right level of infrastructure and services that has caused this.

***

So today I am not going to talk about numbers, but about values.

And, in all honesty, I don’t think New Zealand will be able to talk about numbers and settings until we’ve had the conversation about values and principles.

Until we can agree on those, we’ll just lurch around responding to changing circumstances or the latest headline.

And what are the values that the Green Party stands for? We stand for an open, inclusive and tolerant Aotearoa New Zealand that welcomes people who want to make a contribution.

We stand for an Aotearoa that stands up to racism and scapegoating and xenophobia.

That’s what’s missing from the debate about immigration. The rhetoric and scapegoating around election year means that people miss the fact that ‘immigrants’ aren’t a sea of strange faces.

They’re people, families, individuals. With hopes and dreams and aspirations. With fears and anxieties and worries. Humans who need love and need to love.

New New Zealanders who love their new homes and want to do so much to give and to give truth to that love.

But New Zealand needs to be better at showing that love back. We haven’t always lived up to that Kiwi mythos of giving people a fair go and being welcoming to strangers.

We have a tendency to treat immigrants as economic units who are either a benefit or a threat to our narrow economic interests.

We tend not to think of immigrants as people in their own right, as people who come to this country for the promise of a better life – as all our ancestors once did.

***

Look at how we treat our migrant workers – often putting them through harsh conditions and low pay just for the privilege of coming here.

It’s shameful that although only 5% of the total workforce are migrant workers – about a third of prosecutions involving employment condition violations involve a migrant worker.

And MBIE doesn’t have enough resources to deal with the problem. We know from their 2016 annual report that they’re falling well short of doing the interventions they need (up to 1049 short) and that one in five investigations are taking longer than six months.

That’s unacceptable. We will invest more resources into the Labour Inspectorate so that we can have more proactive investigations and less migrant worker exploitation.

***

And look at how we treat non-Pakeha New Zealanders in this country. According to a report by the human rights commissioner – one-in-ten Pasifika and one-in-five Asians have faced discrimination in the last 12 months.

Having a non-Pakeha name means you’re 50% less likely to get a call-back for a job interview. Being a migrant means you’re more likely to be over-qualified and over-experienced in the job you do.

And we need to address these issues. The Greens want to trial ethnicity-blind and gender-blind CVs to address discrimination.

***

Look also at how we treat our multicultural associations and migrant centres. Last month the Canterbury Migrant Centre was forced to close due to lack of funding.

The value that your groups bring to New Zealand – not only in easing the settlement process for new migrants but for the diversity and social connections you bring to your areas has been underappreciated for far too long.

The Greens at the heart of government will initiate a funding review so that the valuable work you do is rewarded and recognized through a consistent baseline of funding – so you can get on with the job rather than having to constantly chase the next dollar.

***

Look at how we rip off foreign students with the promise of a so-called high-quality New Zealand education and a pathway to residency.

But then thousands, if not tens of thousands, of these students end up in terribly dodgy private training establishments, doing courses that get them a certificate barely worth the paper it’s printed on and of no value to being able to find a job.

And in the meantime they end up being exploited, working for below minimum wages, and unable to get decent accommodation at a price they can afford. I mean, what way is that to treat anybody, let alone a guest in our house? That’s just a rip-off.

***

I’m proud to lead a party that stands for the politics of love and inclusion, not hate and fear.

I’m also proud to be standing with the most diverse list of candidates we’ve ever put forward for an election. They include:

Two Pasifika candidates – Leilani Tamu, a former diplomat and Fulbright Scholar, and Teanau Tuiono, an climate change advocate for the Pacific Islands
Two Chinese New Zealanders – David Lee, a City Councillor, and Julie Zhu, a freelancer in the theatre and film industries
Raj Singh, an Indian lawyer and successful business owner
Rebekah Jaung, a Korean doctor, currently also doing her PhD
Ricardo Menéndez March, from Mexico, a migrant rights campaigner.
And of course, many of you will have already read about Golriz Ghahraman, who came to New Zealand as a nine-year old refugee from Iran, and who is now an Oxford-educated human rights lawyer who puts war criminals on trial at the International Court of Justice in the Hague.

These, our candidates for Parliament in this year’s election, represent our commitment to the journey of looking more like modern New Zealand and being able to advocate for all New Zealanders.

And we are the furthest along this journey that we have ever been – thanks to the efforts of my colleague Denise Roche, who has been reaching out to ethnic and migrant communities, with sixty-five meetings all over New Zealand, over the last three years.

But we do still have a long way to go.

We will continue to make sure that our party not only looks like modern New Zealand – but also reflects the needs of all New Zealanders.

We haven’t always gotten it right – and we won’t always in the future, either.

But I promise that we will listen to you and learn from our mistakes.

Openness, inclusiveness and tolerance must win out over racism and scapegoating and xenophobia.

Love and inclusion must win out over hate and fear.

We are only great, when we are great together.

17 comments on “The Green Party clarify their position on immigration”

  1. Sanctuary 1

    BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!

    Identity politics, the painfully liberal and middle class Greens can have it all.

    No idea who is going to want to vote for a party clinging to an ideology that has been clapt out and unelectable for at least a decade, though.

    • Carolyn_nth 1.1

      What part of:

      The government is responsible for,

      … the social and economic ills of this country.

      … the housing crisis.

      …. our children who go to school hungry.

      … the long hospital waitlists.

      … our degraded rivers.

      … the right level of infrastructure and services that has caused this.

      did you not understand?

      • Sacha 1.1.1

        Their crime was not including the word ‘comrades’. Think Rik the soft-handed revolutionary from The Young Ones. Up the workers!

    • Your brain can’t fathom it sanctimonious – oh dear what a pity. Go back to sleep then.

  2. Gavin 2

    A great speech, well researched and statesmanlike. It’ll be a pleasure to see a Labour-Greens govt in place from September.

  3. Doogs 3

    This is the most humane, reasoned and accurate approach to the immigration issue yet. This view is the one thing currently missing from the political churn we hear day after day. The fact is that we are talking about people – members of the world community of all colours creeds and races, and NZ has the absolute responsibility to be part of that. By all means, bring people to our country and welcome them in, but unless we have the schools, housing, jobs and all other aspects of a good life in place to support the successful integration of our brothers and sisters from other parts of our planet, then we are not doing our job as a member of the world community.

    This government looks at immigrants as widgets to be fitted in. If they bring lots of money, all the better. The sooner we turn around this heartless and business oriented view the better.

    • Draco T Bastard 3.1

      …but unless we have the schools, housing, jobs and all other aspects of a good life in place to support the successful integration of our brothers and sisters from other parts of our planet, then we are not doing our job as a member of the world community.

      And we’re not doing the job for ourselves either.

      ATM, we’re shirking our responsibility to those that we’re allowing to immigrate and to those who are already here.

      The inevitable result of that will be a lowering of living standards for everyone.

  4. patricia bremner 4

    Some very erudite members on offer. Soundly based policy. It is unfortunate migrants have been brought in as cheap labour, or as fodder for scams.
    The tendency to cut government services to the bone, in an effort to have a “surplus” has reached ridiculous outcomes, and a change is coming in September.
    Sanctuary, you are poorly named imo.

  5. Good speech. Yep the numbers are not the key VALUES are. Hope message cuts through the fear.

    Only thing – we are BI cultural first multicultural second. Don’t ever forget the treaty.

  6. Wainwright 6

    All that stuff about values would ring less hollow without the ‘sorry if you were offended’ bit at the start.

  7. Bill 7

    Good god! Pointing to the exploitation of over-seas students instead of scapegoating and targeting them? Unforgivable.

    And no talk of immigration targets in terms of raw numbers! What’re they thinking?

    A big plus for the Green Party in my book.

    https://www.greens.org.nz/page/immigration-policy

  8. DoublePlusGood 8

    So they aren’t going to do anything about population growth? So their platform fundamentally is an unsustainable approach, and thus they can’t really call themselves a Green party any more. A nice party with a lot of good policies and values, sure. But not a Green party.

  9. Ad 9

    A speech that does not say what if any policy the Green party would alter.

    Also a speech that does not say what if any difference the Green Party would make in government.

    Since they haven’t managed to do that in two speeches dedicated to the topic of immigration, they should now steer completely clear of the topic for the remainder of the campaign …

    …and relax knowing that immigration just wasn’t a Ministry with their name on the door.

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