web analytics

We are all socialists now

Written By: - Date published: 9:09 am, August 27th, 2011 - 64 comments
Categories: capitalism, john key, socialism - Tags:

Thanks to Wikileaks we now know that Key reckons that all New Zealanders have a “socialist streak”. It’s attracted a bit of media attention.  But I particularly liked a further Key admission yesterday, that cropped up at the end of  this acccount:

Key stands by ‘socialist streak’ comments

Prime Minister John Key is standing by his comment that New Zealanders have a “socialist streak”.

A WikiLeaks cable from 2007 reveals Key made the comment when he met with US charge d’affaire Glyn Davies.

Key said the comment came up in a conversation about “very right wing policies” and that even he himself has a socialist streak.

“I vaguely remember the conversation, it was years ago,” he said to media this afternoon.

“My basic point was, and that’s shorthand for, I think New Zealanders are a very caring country.

Got that comrades? Socialist is shorthand for caring.  And I guess by implication we can assume that capitalist is shorthand for not giving a toss. Spread the word…

64 comments on “We are all socialists now”

  1. Colonial Viper 1

    None of us get ahead in society unless we all get ahead.

    The wealth of elite segregation, gated communities and despising ordinary people on the street is the wealth of Banana Republics.

    Democratic socialism, FTW!!!

  2. Social policies do have a care for others aspect, but I don’t see how you arrive at your “guess by implication” unless it’s just an unfounded diss of the day.

    Do the capitalist policies of Labour mean you “don’t give a toss”? Does Labour “not give a toss” about small business people? That’s as easily “implied” but I hope it’s not accurate.

    • ghostwhowalksnz 2.1

      Capitalist policies of labour ? – name one!

      Can you give a concrete example of where they have introduced or proposed a policy that grows the capitalist class at the expense of the majority.
      ( Viper probably could – so dont make it too easy for him)

      Unfounded diss of the day ??

      • Pete George 2.1.1

        “Capitalist class”? Are you claiming Labour have never introduced or proposed a policy that would help anyone grow capital? Like their R&D policy?

        Let’s vote to own our future.

        Doesn’t this slogan sound a tad capitalist?

        • ghostwhowalksnz 2.1.1.1

          Its too silly for words. I would have thought that anything provided by the state was by definition socialist.
          But since you dont even know what ‘tax breaks’ are lets not go there.
          Interest free student loans- provided by the state
          Working for Families- provided by the state (didnt National and ACT brand it as communistic )

        • Colonial Viper 2.1.1.2

          Doesn’t this slogan sound a tad capitalist?

          Unsure why you believe a slogan promoting public, governmental ownership of critical assets is “capitalist”.

          You really have to go a bit deeper than how something “sounds” PG.

      • The Sound Book 2.1.2

        The Labour government sold most or the country’s assetts if I recall correctly Ghost.

        Who did that benefit?

        • Colonial Viper 2.1.2.1

          That wasn’t a Labour Government. That was the first ACT Government. Please be more accurate in future.

          • mik e 2.1.2.1.1

            That Act Douglas Government didn’t sell those assets they gave those assets away corporate welfare!

          • neoleftie 2.1.2.1.2

            Lead by a good man who didnt understand the marco economic policies…thats the trouble with our polies – treasury has too much sway.

  3. Stephen Franks was on the radio yesterday talking about the proposed alcohol legislation stating

    we need a left wing government to bring in more restrictive alcohol policy

    Now, I couldn’t work out his logic; was he saying on a left leaning government would care enough; was instead he meaning a left leaning government would be nanny state? or was he actually using a hidden agenda and saying that the Nats are afraid to act on things injurious to health because they only car about votes and not society?
    I was left dazed and confused!

    • mik e 3.1

      With France and Italy’s right wing governments increasing taxes on the wealthy maybe Key with his socialist streak could learn something unlikely though

    • mik e 3.2

      Maybe ACt realizes Labours policies are better for the economy if only they had the conviction to support policies that work and know they work instead of being a dogwhistle for National

  4. Sookie 4

    Clumsily worded as usual, I swear he’s the most inarticulate PM I can remember, but he does have a point. Most NZers believe in a fair go, they’re not particularly dog eat dog or ideological like nutty Americans, and therefore extreme RWNJ policy gets a chilly reception, so he’s not going to try it and will stick to the middle ground. He may look and sound like an embarrassing douche, but he’s actually very clever. And it will win him the election, alas. God help NZ if a real Nat nutjob takes over his job halfway through the term though.

    • Draco T Bastard 4.1

      …so he’s not going to try it and will stick to the middle ground.

      No he won’t. We’ve already seen hard right policy come from the current government and, if it gets another term, we’ll see a harder swerve to the right. Jonkey may have gone for a Labour-lite approach in 2k8 but he won’t be doing so in 2011.

      • Colonial Viper 4.1.1

        If the NATs get back in, will Key still be PM at the end of 2013. I say no way.

        The telltale sign IMO: English will be DUMPED as DPM before then, and Joyce will go up.

      • Reality Bytes 4.1.2

        If they go too hard right, they will kill their chances in 2014.

        I agree with Key here, that we kiwi’s have a socialist streak, and also that our socialist streak means we are compassionate. Credit where credit is due, good on him for recognizing and acknowledging that. And his recognition of that is why imo Nats won’t be too hard right, since they realize it’ll alienate too many folks and spell doom for them in 2014. These guys are in it to win it, they’ll flip and flop and chop and change to whatever gives them the best chance of getting re-elected.

        My prediction is they become even more lefty by 2014, because their out-dated trickle down capitalism-is-the-answer-at-any-costs mantras are getting worn out. They are simply unrealistic in their present form.

        I also predict they’ll lose the 2011 election 🙂 Hence their shift to the left.

        • millsy 4.1.2.1

          “Nats won’t be too hard right”

          WTF??!!

          Shrinking the state housing stock and kicking thousands of tenants on the state housing waiting lists, leaving them at the mercies of slum lords (one of the products of unfettered capitalism)

          Outsouring government department functions, including core funcions in the Defence Force (imagine Blackwater hoons roaring round Burnham in their humvees)

          Seeking to take an axe to labour law, which ensures the powerless are given protection from the powerful

          Etc

          Thats pretty hard right IMO. Not as hard right as Brash, but still hard right.

          • Reality Bytes 4.1.2.1.1

            I’m basing that opinion on them losing in 2011 mate. Hence my opinion of them flip-flopping and changing direction to what earns them votes.

            I’m trying to be positive here and hope for the best 🙂

            I wouldn’t mind National realizing their current direction is wrong, and shifting to the left. It’s just up to all of us to teach them that lesson at the polling booth!

            • Face Facts 4.1.2.1.1.1

              Considering you are the one with the “career” I think you are the biggest loser of them all, you fucked it up yourself and you never “made it”. You work like a fucking slave and what have you to show for it- NOTHING.

              I’m sorry to say this but your outcome will always be a million times worse than mine.

              • millsy

                I have a feeling that this ‘Face Facts’ person knows someone on here personally….

                • lprent

                  Doesn’t worry me until they start referring to them by name or enough detail that Trey could be identified by someone. 90% of the time they are wrong. 100% of the time they engage my ire as I scrub the names. Repitition or deliberate attempts at outing will just result in my kicking them out for considerable times.

                • Reality Bytes

                  If that’s me FF is referring to then, major lol, and no, completely random unexpected response. Possibly a case of mistaken identity?

                  I have no career. I work for no-one but myself. Self employed poor and struggling, but happy I’m not (too much of) a slave if I can help it.

                  Peace Face Facts, I think you have misinterpreted my musings 🙂

                  kind regards

                  • Colonial Viper

                    National’s corporate sponsorship has no interest in them moving to the left. They want as many state owned monopolistic assets sold off next term as possible, and they are not going to stop at 49%.

                  • rosy

                    Isn’t that identicon is showing up all over the place with random names and random comments?
                    e.g. as MirrorMirror here:

                    Farrar shills for NZ’s most racist academic

                    There also a couple of other names with the same (?) identicon, but I can’t remember quite where.

    • Terry 4.2

      Not clever at all, but very, very sly.

  5. mik e 5

    Then we will have a new motorway past every house in NZ As well as broadband more Debt and unemployment.Media works will get bailed out while TVNZ will be sold off to subsidize Media works

  6. aerobubble 6

    We’re all socialists now?!# Then we very lazy stupid ones.

    Its illegal to discriminate based on being in reciept of a benefit. Yet if someone
    pays someone else for doing nothing, pays then $200, then they would be
    discriminating against them for not forcing them also into work assistence
    lectures at WINZ. and let’s not even begi to talk about the pschological
    harm the humilating processes at WINZ.

  7. good to hear some one on the beehive talking sense

  8. Afewknowthetruth 8

    ghostwhowalksnz

    Helen Clark was desperate to promote money-lender-controlled international capitalsism a few years ago. I lost track of her tripping round the world promoting ‘free trade’ deals. And was it $30 million she gave to the rich boys’ club in connection with the America’s Cup? The hypocrisy just went on and on.

    A few years ago Labour was so far up the money-lenders and capitalists arse you could only just see the soles of Labour’s feet. And Phil Goff still is.

    Labour continues to peddle tainted goods, which is one of the many reasons why Labour is likely to do badly at the next election.

    • neoleftie 8.1

      all good points but in the real world we are tied into the system lock stock and every single bean. Better in the short term that labour utilises the system to stabilise and support the income and wellbeing of the masses and pray that an event come along that allows for a gradual system change

  9. Tangled up in blue 9

    Does having a “socialist streak” make someone a socialist?

  10. chris73 10

    Look on the brightside, at least come election night you’ll get a socialist party in power 🙂

    • Marjorie Dawe 10.1

      If that was true it would be great but I dont see Shonkey as anything near something which resembles a socialist. This is demonstrated by the removal of funds for social programmes, social housing, greener transport, adult education, the right to be innocent until proven guilty, 90 days and you can be sacked law, increase to GST, reduction of legal aid so anyone can have a fair trial, etc etc etc. The only socialist leanings I have seen relate to wealthy and corporate welfare e.g. Canterbury Finance investors, giving tax cuts to the rich etc etc etc.
      I actually think he meant that they should recognise social tendencies and then pretend to play the game. All of this has been aided and abeted by our media who have been watching backs and acting as apologists for the nats and also as Shonkey’s own personal press strategists.

  11. Jim Nald 11

    Hehe. We love this PM. We never tire of his bullshit.

    • Anne 11.1

      We never tire of his bullshit.

      Too right. Anyone who believes when Key made that ‘socialist streak’ comment to the US charge d’affairs, Glyn Davies that he meant it to mean “NZers are a caring people” must be gullible and naive. He used the term in it’s negative sense. He was essentially saying: we want to implement right wing, conservative policies like the US (Bush and co. were still in the hot seat) but we can’t because NZers still have a socialist streak running through them. We will have to go carefully until we’ve knocked it out if them.

      The charge d’affairs would have known this what he meant.

      • Puddleglum 11.1.1

        Agreed. Key was very likely expressing regret at the inability to push ahead too fast with ‘what was needed’. Now he presents it as some insight into the NZ character that he personally shares.

        I don’t think there was much room for expressing his ‘socialist streak’ at Merrill Lynch – yet he did very well there. 

  12. Jum 12

    John Key, cunning psychopathic Act closet host, really did say he had a socialist streak simply because he knew New Zealanders would be silly enough to believe him and to say ‘awww, he’s such a nice man’ just as he by cunning ‘mistake’ said ‘Labour leader’ instead of National leader – get some intelligence quotient please people.

    • Jim Nald 12.1

      Re IQ

      Back when Muldoon was famously quoted for his line in response to trans-Tasman migration, I would suggest that he got it partly right and partly wrong.

      He was right, in populist and voting terms for NZ, referring to the increase of IQ on this side of the Tasman. But here, IQ would have more appropriately stood for Inferiority complex Quotient.
      When the NZ workforce and voters are considered today, I have said and will say again that most of the A-list have left, fewer of the B-list are left, and we have to make do with what we have with the C-list. We try to import more of the A- and B-lists but their relationship with NZ end up as a transit-stop kind or the circumstances here affect them to downgrade or change gears.

      With the current government in power, there is little sign of any real mindshift and effort to change things for the better. At this rate, we can collectively allow ourselves to be fed and fattened up with more bullshit.

  13. Anne 13

    I bet Key and C/T went into damage control pronto when the wikileaks story broke Jum. Phones running hot. Mind you when you’ve got an acquiescent media who rarely question anything he says or does, it’s no wonder he gets away with it. Imagine the media uproar had it been an Helen Clark quote and was leaked while she was still PM.

    • Jum 13.1

      Anne, re media mice –

      Just spotted: Chapter 6 Public economic debate:confusion and manipulation (and in small print – inadequate information. Uncritical Media).

      Book titled: Prosperity mislaid, published 1994.

      ‘uncritical media’ – no change there.

      He might ‘get away with it’ but I also blame New Zealanders who just don’t understand that politics actually affects their lives.

      The scarier option is that they do understand and actually think turning New Zealand into some dumping ground for extreme rightwing experiments is okay. It wasn’t okay under Douglas and it wasn’t okay under Richardson. It’s still not okay under Key and his backers.

      It’s hard to soar with eagles when your government is run by turkeys. I just hope Christmas comes early for them – 26 November – nice day for turkey burgers roasted over a spit.

  14. Dr. X 14

    Hello chaps and chapesses.

    A few years back in Ireland, we had a taoiseach (PM) known to all and sundry as ‘Bertie’.

    He too informed us that he was really a socialist, while at the same time pursing the pro-capitalist agenda of the Celtic Tiger. . . by the time the final crisis of Irish capitalism had come down on us like a hammer, Bertie was long gone. . . and last seen doing the US lecture circuit, and advising Nigeria on how it, too, could join in the great global capitalist medley of extemporanea.

    Many brave hearts are asleep in the deep – so beware. Beware.

  15. Wayne Lo 15

    “Some of the things that we see take place in the rest of the world where there are overt signs of poverty and begging is not something that we want to see in New Zealand.”

    We are insulated from that, not so much because of socialistic policies but because New Zealand is still a relatively wealthy country.

    Wealthy Asian countries like Singapore, Japan, and even Taiwan and Hong Kong also have little signs of the overt poverty which Mr Key refers to.

    Of course countries like India and China have overt poverty – because they are in per-capita terms still poor. Not necessarily because they are not ‘caring’. Rapidly rising big countries like Brazil, India, China – have much inequality – probably unavoidable and much of it region against region, with the coastal areas doing better than the inland regions.

    The interesting thing though is the US still has a level of inequality which actually is almost the same as China’s, greater than Russia’s and India’s. The US of course is a long developed mature capitalist country – yet their level of inequality is still extremely high.

    In fact Japan and Korea both have very low Gini coefficients, Japan (24.9) and South Korea (31.6). Lower than New Zealand’s. New Zealand’s Gini coefficient of 36.2 is among the highest in the developed world. France, the Scandinavian countries, Germany, and Switzerland among many others all outperform NZ in terms of equality (remember the lower the number the more equal).

    And from the Gini coefficient alone it seems Japan is by far the most egalitarian country in the world (beating out even the Scandinavians). The gap between CEO and worker salaries in Japan is far less than it is in the West.

    http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/indicators/161.html

    So in terms of equality New Zealand does not perform particularly well at all compared to other developed economies, whether European or Asian (comparing NZ to developing countries is ludicrous, it is apples with oranges).

    New Zealand of course got an easy ride in the past when it was in the warm embrace of mother England. Wealth was taken off Asians and Africans and went to the West and this wealth was used to buy off the working class in the West. Thus in the West, for quite a long time there have not been any of the real class contradictions found in countries like China and Russia before their revolutions (although there was for a brief period in the US at the beginning of the 20th Century).

    But that could all change in the coming decades with globalisation. A tiny corporate elite which sees the entire world as its prey will care little whether those it sucks the blood out of are yellow, brown, black or even white.

    • Puddleglum 15.1

      Good analysis Wayne. I think you’re right that NZ has probably got away for a long time with a fortuitous lack of inequality rather than a ‘structural’ lack. Now the veneer is cracking.

      As soon as a guaranteed market went west (in the 70s), so did any tolerance for policies that might ensure some level of rough equality (in the 80s). Egalitarianism turned out to be cheap, superficial talk rather than a substantive trait of the ‘national character’.

  16. Mark 16

    In a way NZ was something of a socialist utopia, at least we had a caring society and a semblance of equality. Then came Roger Douglas, Ruth Richardson and Jim Bolger and we became the society of greed, inequality and short-sightedness. Then the ultimate insult – one of them gets a knighthood for doing it!

  17. I am amazed how much discussion this trivia has generated.

    Why doesn’t Labour confront the dark chapter in its history when it unleashed Douglas, Prebble etc on the lot of us and promise to unwind the most stupid elements of the “reforms”. I know a lot of middle of the road Kiwis who are opposed to much of what National currently represent particularly asset sales but there is nowhere politically for them to go. The entire “market” for infrastructure services like electricity, telecom and the like is only there to drain us all of wealth. We need to “unreform” these and return them to the public services they must be if we are to have a modern and equitable economy in the 21st century.

    This country is being run by losers for losers – we are being abused by our leadership and sold into slavery.

    Labour could win this election if it only had the vision and the courage.

    Having a flutter of indignation over whether JK is a socialist or not won’t cut it. Talking needs to stop and actions need to start and Labour needs to present a clear line of policies and actions to return us to a state with government that governs on behalf of us all.

    And why not start with learning from Solon

    http://resourceinsights.blogspot.com/2011/08/debt-bomb-net-energy-and-ancient-greeks.html

    • Bored 17.1

      I would dearly like to cancel all debt a la Solon, for Key it would mean his millions become worthless.

    • pollywog 17.2

      How much of the Lange/Douglas reforms were necessary ?

      Hadn’t Muldoon had come close to bankrupting the country with the ‘think big schemes’ so flogging off some state assets and breaking the power of the unions to hold industry to ransom was in some ways the only option ?

      What other choice did they have ? Can you counterfactualise what Labour in hindsight could now have done differently then ?

      • Jim Nald 17.2.1

        ….. and don’t forget Muldoon, on 15 Dec 1975, smashed the New Zealand Superannuation Scheme. Major loss of opportunity there. We would have been world leading savers and the envy of Australia which only introduced compulsory super in 1992.

  18. no loss – he got it by gaming the system not by hard work and entrepreneurship. It was taken from the people’s pocket probably best it goes back there.

  19. Interestingly enough it is the compulsory super schemes that are at the root of all of this – they take money from Joe Average and give it to a bunch of people who have to make a substantial return on it – this has generated vast capital flows that live in the speculative realm and fuel the Ponzi scheme. I read a commentator in the US recently who has finally twigged that when the Boomers cash up their savings there will be a huge capital draw down and a resultant loss of value as the number of buyers in the capital markets of the future will be far fewer than the number of sellers – and also they will be much poorer thanks to the boomer generation filling the world full of debt that our kids will have to pay back (if the system doesn’t collapse first).

    It doesn’t matter whether we fund our superannuation from taxes or capital returns in the end the same bunch (or kids) have to pay the cost either through increased taxes or increased prices. Taxes are likely to be both safer and more efficient. We should instead have been investing in infrastructure that would grow our economy but we spent the past three decades borrowing agianst it instead and spending up large.

    Helen C and Michael Cullen actually did more to get NZer’s into debt by allowing unfettered inflation of the property market etc than Muldoon did. At least Muldoon left us with a whole lot of useful infrastructure. Muldoon was the last Prime Minister to leave a legacy we would actually miss if it was to disappear. Imagine NZ without the Waitaki Power Scheme and without Manapouri and the Clyde Dam and the many other energy infrastructure assets built during that time. Muldoon did some awful things and some really stupid stuff too and he surrounded himself with dimwits and worse but he was the last prime minister we had who actually did anything useful as leader of the country. He just wasn’t good at organising it or selling it to the people of NZ.

    We canned him for the failures in his process but in doing so overlooked the logic in his purpose. We have had as a result nearly thirty years of government that is afraid of governing and who have left it to the “markets” to decide – and that is as responsible as a ships captain letting the wheel go and blowing before the wind – with the same end result – we end up on the rocks.

    Muldoon actually foresaw what is now occurring – he was just thirty years early – and was primarily spiked by the Americans destabilsing the oil market bby fostering an over supply that produced a twenty year glut of cheap energy. If oil had stayed at around $30 per barrel in 1980 dollars (which is where it should have been) all of those investments he made would have seemed very far sighted. They will be yet.

    • Jum 19.1

      Darkhorse,

      Labour has learned its lessons. If it hasn’t, I know where they live! Let’s get them back in shall we in a partnership with the more 21stC Greens and Jim of course with some damned good policy like Kiwibank and equitable dental care. We need Jim back in Parliament. This time every person knows what is required to bring our country back into some sort of civilized equality. It can only get worse for those that lie to us. It won’t just be marches in the street as it was in the 80s and the 90s and the march against mining our special places. We can be sure of that. Globally we all know what is at stake. It’s our spirit and it’s being destroyed at present by Key and Joyce.

      Christchurch’s mayoral loss is our gain. If they were silly enough to vote Parker the voice back in then they can look forward to their assets being sold off and everything else he is instructed to do by Gerry the Hut, or was it Hoot.

      • darkhorse 19.1.1

        Hi Jum

        Labour will need to come up with something bold in the next couple of months if it is going to make the grade. The Greens are doing better with the fresh thinking.

        How about putting all of our electricity generators back together as ECNZ II and return the power lines and the small generation that were stolen from communities to regional infrastructure trusts and restore the phones to a public utility, get the aussie banks out of NZ – we don’t need them if anyone is going to print money it might as well be our own government, and get our dollar down to an acceptable level so that we can live on what we export or make for ourselves and not what we can borrow. The answer takes courage and vision, not economic theory and more talk. We need to purge Roger D from our belief system – any idiot can organise a party if they don’t worry about the credit card. Roger and his henchmen squandered a century of hard work of community building by our forebears.

        Social policy is a waste of gods good air if we can’t afford it. And the more we can afford it the less we need it as there is no better social policy than plenty of employment for decent wages.

        Oddly enough Muldoon knew that too. The old PEP schemes, conceptually clumsy they may have been but they did a power of good when unemployment was high.

        Time to throw off the dogma’s – ours isn’t working, China’s is – we should examine those who have seen the flaws in our ideological model and used it against us. Most of our creditors were “developing countries” not that long ago and we were sending them aid. No reciprocity there!

  20. Gina 20

    To me a large part of socialism is that it acknowledges the massive amount of work women do raising children with no right to her husbands wages except for the legal right of support.
    Clearly the word partner is BS. Mothers working 120 hours per week in the home often struggle to even get the bare neccesssities provided and get sometimes nothing at all but some bills left to them.

    Capitalism without support of mothers who need to leave marriages is actually based on the slavery of women. It is based on the prostitution and sometimes the rape of mothers who cannot afford to leave their partners if they no longer say yes to sex.

    i.e. A woman who refuses her husband sex because she no longer loves her husband or other reasons is often told that she should not expect him to support her and their children. I.E. congugal rights must be provided or the woman and her kids should be thrown into destitution. To demand that a woman fulfils this criteria to remain in a marriage and keep support is really just making her a prostitute.

    Those who hate socialism may well be misogynists who want a complete return of female slavery.

    I use the word complete becuase we still have a sort of slavery and legal protections of the most questionable nature for mothers. I have even had a member of the National Party admit to me that women are slaves. Not that its hard to work it out but to get an admission from a right winger about anything is a bit of a feat I think.

  21. Gina 21

    Those whom want riddance of socialism want a system of female submission
    which is abusive in every way. Our governments through as lack of recognition of the problems
    faced by mothers condone the abuse of women in many ways. It is an integral part of our society and their are people who win from the losses of women i.e. business and men do not want to pay taxes to support mothers etc.
    Many men think they have the right to enslave them etc etc so its no surprise when men believe they have the right to rape women.

    This is not aimed at all men. many men do not abuse their wives however their is very little protection for a woman who finds herslf being coerced by her partner into say going out to work and shouldering almost the complete burden of runnig a houshold.. Her only choice is to leave and find her self doing it all anyway an being really poor also. This is why so many women put up with some degree of ill treatment in their marriages.

  22. ropata 22

    Good points Gina there is something sick about the capitalist philosophy that seeks to monetize everything including a woman’s body.

  23. Kleefer 23

    Socialism is shorthand for caring? Really? Try telling that to the 200 million-odd people who died during the 20th century when this vicious ideology was put in place.

    • Wayne Lo 23.1

      200 million? Absolute bollocks. Not even the ‘black’ book of communism claims that. They claim ‘only’ 100 million. Also a bunch of transparent lies.

      In any case I suppose you are referring to purported killings in the Soviet Union and China?

      ‘Communism’ was what dragged up these two peasant based, poverty stricken and illiterate nations, turning them into superpowers in a blink of an eye in historical terms.

      ‘Capitalism’ would not have brought high living standards to the West without the control of a large part of the world’s resources through invasion and violence. Still now the US controls a large part of the world’s resources, and like a mafia family dispenses violence at will to maintain that control.

      In 1917 Russia’s GDP was about 1/15th that of the US. By the time of the demise of the Soviet Union it was 1/2.

      China’s life expectancy in 1949 was 35. China was the poorest place on earth – poorer in per capita GDP than India, Ethiopia at the time. By the time of 1976, the year of Mao’s death, it was 65 (higher than that of India today). Literacy in China is among the highest in the developing world – after Cuba.

      It is absolutely incorrect to say that ‘communism’ (actually socialism) was a failure, a murderous ideology. It had its appalling bits,but also its successes. The successes part probably was responsible for saving and improving more lives in the 20th century than any other political and economic system.

      And note that even that anti-communist hack writer, Rudy Rummel now admits to a minimum 50 million victims of capitalist-imperialism in the 20th Century. He says even this appalling number is a conservative estimate.

      • Colonial Viper 23.1.1

        Oh noes, inconvenient facts!

        BTW life expectancies in specific US towns and counties will start falling over the next 20 years. Falling a lot. Hows that for capitalism!

        The bottom line is that collapse is never pretty.

  24. Does the paradox that these communist nations have got wealthier while we have got poorer not strike you all as odd?

    Maybe they had more visionary and courageous leadership?

    What you will find really odd is that most one party nations have healthy current account balances and the free market democracies are all virtually bankrupt

    For the facts on that read http://howdaft.blogspot.com/2011/06/sad-state-of-new-zealand-economy.html

    We have an ideological problem and useless politcal leadership

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Justice Minister represents New Zealand at Berlin nuclear disarmament summit
    Justice Minister Andrew Little will travel to Berlin tomorrow to represent New Zealand at a high-level summit on nuclear disarmament. This year, the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) celebrates 50 years since it entered into force. “New Zealand’s proud record and leadership on nuclear disarmament is unwavering, so it’s important we are present ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Prime Minister to visit Fiji and Australia
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will visit two of New Zealand’s most important Pacific partners, Fiji and Australia, next week. The visit to Fiji will be the first by a New Zealand Prime Minister in four years and comes during the 50th anniversary of Fijian independence and diplomatic relations between our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Next steps in Criminal Cases Review Commission announced
    Justice Minister Andrew Little and New Zealand First MP Darroch Ball, have today announced the appointment of the Chief Commissioner of the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), the location, and the membership of the Establishment Advisory Group. Colin Carruthers QC has been appointed Chief Commissioner of the CCRC for an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Horticultural Ahuwhenua Trophy finalists announced
    Māori Development Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta and Agriculture Minister Hon Damien O’Connor co-announced the first horticultural finalists for the Ahuwhenua Trophy celebrating excellence in the Māori agricultural sector.  The three finalists are Ngai Tukairangi Trust from Mt Maunganui, Otama Marere Trust from Tauranga, and Hineora Orchard Te Kaha 15B Ahuwhenua ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New support for students with dyslexia
    A new kete of resources to strengthen support for students with dyslexia will provide extra tools for the new Learning Support Coordinators (LSCs) as they start in schools, Associate Education Minister Tracey Martin announced today. The Minister launched the kete in Wellington this morning, at the first of three induction ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Rental reforms progress to select committee stage
    The Government continues to make progress on a fairer and more secure rental market for renters and landlords with the First Reading of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill and its referral to the Social Services and Community Select Committee.  “Now is the opportunity for landlords, tenants and others who want ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Papua New Guinea Prime Minister to visit New Zealand
    Papua New Guinea’s Prime Minister Hon James Marape will visit New Zealand from 21-25 February, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. “New Zealand and Papua New Guinea have a warm and friendly relationship. I look forward to welcoming Prime Minister Marape here and strengthening the relationship between our two countries,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Free school lunches served up to thousands
    Thousands of children have begun receiving a free lunch on every day of the school week, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said. The Government’s free and healthy school lunch programme is under way for 7,000 students at 31 schools in Hawke’s Bay / Tairāwhiti and Bay of Plenty / Waiariki, extending ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Social Wellbeing Agency replaces Social Investment Agency with new approach
    The Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni today announced a new approach that continues to broaden the Government’s social sector focus from a narrow, investment approach to one centred on people and wellbeing. Minister Sepuloni said redefining the previous approach to social investment by combining science, data and lived experience ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government to strengthen protections for whistleblowers
    The Government is strengthening the Protected Disclosures Act to provide better protection for whistle blowers, Minister of State Services Chris Hipkins said today. “The Protected Disclosures Act is meant to encourage people to speak up about serious wrongdoing in the workplace and protect them from losing their jobs or being ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • PM speech at Parliamentary Chinese New Year celebration 2020
    Nǐn hǎo (Hello in Mandarin). Xīn Nián Kuài Lè (Happy New Year in Mandarin) Néi Hóu (Hello in Cantonese). Sun Nin Fai Lok (Happy New Year in Cantonese) Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa. Thank you for your invitation to attend this celebration today. I would like to acknowledge ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • IPANZ Annual Address
    Kia ora. Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou katoa. Nau mai haere mai ki te Whare Pāremata. E ngā mana whenua ki tēnei rohe Taranaki Whānui, Te Upoko o Te Ika, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ngāti Raukawa – kei te mihi, kei te mihi, kei te mihi. E ngā mana, e ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • 2020 IPANZ Annual Address
    Kia ora. Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou katoa. Nau mai haere mai ki te Whare Pāremata. E ngā mana whenua ki tēnei rohe Taranaki Whānui, Te Upoko o Te Ika, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ngāti Raukawa – kei te mihi, kei te mihi, kei te mihi. E ngā mana, e ngā ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Tougher penalties for gun crime a step closer
    Tougher penalties for gun crime are a step closer with the passage of firearms reform legislation through another stage in Parliament. The Arms Legislation Bill has tonight passed its Second Reading. “The changes have one objective - to prevent firearms falling into the wrong hands,” said Police Minister Stuart Nash. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Arms Legislation Bill: Second Reading
    Introduction Mr Speaker We all know why we are here today. It has been a long journey. The journey did not actually begin on 15 March 2019. It began on 30 June 1997. Almost 23 years ago, Justice Sir Thomas Thorp told us what was wrong with our firearms legislation. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New era for vocational education
    The Government’s work to put trades and vocational education back on the agenda took another major step forward today with the passing of the Education (Vocational Education and Training Reform) Amendment Bill, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said. “This is a watershed day for trades and vocational education. These law changes formalise ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Bill to Amend the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act
    Speeding up the return of Christchurch regeneration activities to local leadership is behind the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Amendment Bill introduced to Parliament today by Minister Megan Woods. “As we approach nine years since the February 2011 earthquake in Canterbury, and with the transition to local leadership well underway, the time ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Milford Track to partly reopen after storm damage
    Hundreds of New Zealanders and international visitors will be able to get back out into nature with the Milford Track partially reopening next week, after extensive assessments and repairs, the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage announced today. The popular Great Walk has been closed since 3 February after an extreme ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government drives low-emissions transport momentum
    Up to 110 new EV chargers nationwide in cities and regions 50 electric vehicles for ride-sharing The Government is helping deliver more infrastructure and options for low emissions transport through new projects, Energy and Resources Minister Dr Megan Woods says. Tauranga, Nelson, Levin, New Plymouth and Oamaru are just some ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Kiwis better off under Coalition Government
    New Zealanders are increasingly better off under this Government as wages rise and families have more disposable income, Finance Minister Grant Robertson says. Stats NZ reported today that average household disposable incomes after housing costs rose 4.9% in 2019. This was the highest rise in four years and came as ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Another step towards restoring rights for screen production workers
    All New Zealanders need to have their voices heard at work to ensure we have an inclusive and productive economy. Today we introduce a Bill to do this for workers in the New Zealand screen industry, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Iain Lees-Galloway says. “The Screen Industry Workers Bill will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Enhanced Taskforce Green for Southland and South Otago
    The Government has announced further help for the Southland and Otago regions to speed up recovery efforts from the floods.  “I’ve approved Enhanced Taskforce Green (ETFG), making $500,000 available to help with the clean-up in Fiordland, Southland, and the Clutha district in Otago,” Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni said.  ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Employers and Industry take the lead to connect students to vocational education
    Following the announcement that more than 340 schools will be funded to run events promoting vocational education, the Government has announced it will fund a further 257 events to be run by employers and industry. “These industry-run events will allow more than 30,000 students to connect with more than 2,000 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Rental reforms a step closer with the introduction of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill
    Today the Government is making progress on a fairer and more secure rental market for renters and landlords with the introduction of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill in Parliament.  “This Bill includes a series of reforms to improve the wellbeing of the 609,700 households that live in rented homes, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Biosecurity Minister announces world first eradication of pea weevil
    A Government programme to wipe out pea weevil has achieved a world first, with Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor today announcing the successful eradication of the noxious pest from Wairarapa. This means the nearly four-year ban on pea plants and pea straw was lifted today. Commercial and home gardeners can again grow ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Temporary Accommodation Service activated for Southland flooding
    Southland residents hit by flooding caused by heavy rainfall can now access help finding temporary accommodation with the Government activating the Temporary Accommodation Service, Minister of Civil Defence Peeni Henare announced today. “The Temporary Accommodation Service (TAS) has been activated by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to help ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Bridges: Over-hyped and under-delivered
    “Is that it?” That’s Finance Minister Grant Robertson’s response to Simon Bridges’ much-hyped economic speech today. “Simon Bridges just gave the most over-hyped and under-delivered speech that I can remember during my time in politics,” Grant Robertson said. “It’s not surprising. Simon Bridges literally said on the radio this morning ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Police to trial eye in the sky in Christchurch
    A trial deployment of the Police Eagle helicopter in Christchurch will test whether the aircraft would make a significant difference to crime prevention and community safety. “The Bell 429 helicopter will be based in Christchurch for five weeks, from 17 February to 20 March,” said Police Minister Stuart Nash. “The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Momentum of trade talks continues with visits to promote Pacific and Middle East links
    The Government has kept up the pace of its work to promote New Zealand’s trade interests and diversify our export markets, with visits to Fiji and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) by Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker. Building momentum to bring the PACER Plus trade and development agreement ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Coalition Govt’s investment in Customs nets record drugs haul: 3 tonnes stopped at borders in 2019
    The Coalition Government’s investment in a strong border and disrupting transnational organised crime produced record results for stopping drugs in 2019, says Minister of Customs Jenny Salesa. The illegal drugs were seized at the New Zealand border by Customs, and overseas by Customs’ international border partners before the drugs could ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Separated scenic cycleway starts
    Transport Minister Phil Twyford today kicked off construction of a separated cycleway alongside Tamaki Drive. A two-way separated cycleway will be built along the northern side of Tamaki Drive, between the Quay Street Cycleway extension and Ngapipi Road. There will be a separate walking path alongside. Phil Twyford said giving ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Earthquake-Prone Building loan scheme: eligibility criteria announced
    Owner-occupiers of unit and apartments living in earthquake-prone buildings will have certainty about the financial support they’ll be eligible for with the release of criteria for an upcoming assistance scheme, Minister for Building and Construction Jenny Salesa says. The Residential Earthquake-Prone Building Financial Assistance Scheme will help unit owners facing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Travel restrictions to remain in place as coronavirus precaution
    Temporary restrictions on travel from China will remain in place as a precautionary measure to protect against the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus. The restrictions which prevent foreign nationals travelling from, or transiting through, mainland China from entering New Zealand have been extended for a further 8 days. This position ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Over $1 million to help Tairāwhiti youth into employment
    Employment Minister Willie Jackson announced today that Tairāwhiti rangatahi will benefit from an investment made by the Government’s He Poutama Rangatahi (HPR) scheme. The funding will go to the Tautua Village, Kauneke programme and the Matapuna Supported Employment Programme which will fund 120 rangatahi over two years. “Both programmes work ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • School attendance has to improve
    All parents and caregivers need to ensure that their children go to school unless they are sick, Associate Education Minister Tracey Martin said today. “The school attendance results for 2019 show, across the board, a drop in the number of students going to school regularly,” the Minister says. “Apart from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Crown and Moriori sign a Deed of Settlement
    A Deed of Settlement agreeing redress for historical Treaty claims has been signed by the Crown and Moriori at Kōpinga Marae on Rēkohu (Chatham Islands) today, Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little has announced. Moriori have a tradition of peace that extends back over 600 years. This settlement ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Waikato Expressway driving towards completion
    Transport Minister Phil Twyford today with Māori King Tuheitia Pōtatau Te Wherowhero VII officially opened the country’s newest road, the $384 million Huntly section of the Waikato Expressway. The 15km four-lane highway with side and central safety barriers takes State Highway 1 east of Huntly town, across lowlands and streams ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • 3400 New Zealanders treated in first year of new hepatitis C treatment
    The rapid uptake of life-saving new hepatitis C medicine Maviret since it was funded by PHARMAC a year ago means the elimination of the deadly disease from this country is a realistic goal, Health Minister David Clark says. Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus which attacks the liver, proving fatal ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Kaupapa Māori approach for homelessness
      Kaupapa Māori will underpin the Government’s new plan to deal with homelessness announced by the Prime Minister in Auckland this morning. “Māori are massively overrepresented among people experiencing homelessness, so, to achieve different outcomes for Māori, we have to do things very differently,” says the Minister of Māori Development ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government steps up action to prevent homelessness
    1000 new transitional housing places delivered by end of year to reduce demand for emergency motel accommodation. Introduce 25% of income payment, after 7 days, for those in emergency motel accommodation to bring in line with other forms of accommodation support. Over $70m extra to programmes that prevents those at ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago