web analytics

You can’t fix what is not broken – no need to change university councils

Written By: - Date published: 2:45 pm, May 8th, 2012 - 23 comments
Categories: Steven Joyce, tertiary education, uncategorized - Tags: ,

What exactly is the Minister of Tertiary Education trying to fix by radically changing the councils that govern our tertiary education system? In 2009 the National-led government ripped out staff, student, and community representatives from polytechnic councils and replaced them with four ministerial appointments (who appoint the remaining four additional board members). Now Steven Joyce is setting his sights on university councils. Why?

Is it to make university councils leaner and more efficient?

Joyce should take a quick look at what has happened under the new polytechnic council structure before he makes moves on university councils. The size of the polytechnic councils might have dropped but the costs of running them have not.

At Wintec for instance fourteen people sat on Wintec’s council before the reforms and collected $93,000 in council fees. Since the reforms eight councillors, appointed by either the Minister of Tertiary Education or the council itself, have had pay rises of between 17 and 131 percent, and collected just under $109,000,despite being half the size and less representative of their local community. At Unitec the 15 councillors in 2009 received a total of $99,000 (an average of $6,600 each). The eight councillors in 2010, who were appointed by either the minister or the council itself, received $116,000 (an average of $14,500 each). And NorthTec’s 2010 annual report shows that it spent over $500,000 more on consultants and legal fees than it did in 2009 – up 195 percent from $286,000 to $844,000. Meanwhile the 2010 Whitireia annual report shows an increase in consultants and legal fees of $52,000, up 18 percent on 2009.

So if saving taxpayer dollars is not behind the changes in tertiary education governance, does Minister Joyce see a way of improving decision making for our universities, their staff, students, and the communities they serve?

On this matter he might want to look to the world’s leading universities such as Harvard, Oxford, and Cambridge. The governance structures of world-class universities include staff representation, and in many cases student and community voices as well. Inclusion of professionals and grass-roots representatives is good practice because the ‘business of education’ requires not only ministerially-appointed financial and management experts, it requires experts in education to ensure the goals and strategies of the university meet teaching and learning needs.

Perhaps Mr Joyce feels an approach to education governance which values the voice of educational professionals and the communities is outdated (having worked for universities for hundreds of years), so he has turned to the cutting edge in the business world to model his approach to good governance, leadership, and management?

The financial collapse of 2008 quite rightly had the public doubting the way boards governed the world’s major corporations, and led to demands for greater transparency and oversight to meet the expectations of shareholders. Why? Not because this approach to good governance meant a better return to shareholders but because it meant something much greater:

Our examination suggests that almost universally, [transparency and oversight] matter a great deal in terms of corporate confidence, integrity, and the ability to manage risk and make sound decision – all of which are vital in the bigger picture to the health of global markets, our own nation’s economy, and to the companies themselves (Deborah Scally, 2011, Boardmember.com).

Another demand internationally has been the push to ensure  “diversity in the boardroom” because that leads to better decision-making. Look at what the New Zealand Institute of Directors said when seeking to get a student to join the board of Upstart, a business incubator based in Dunedin:

“The IoD backs the drive towards greater diversity in the boardroom – whether it is of gender, ethnicity, age or background” says Stuart McLauchlan, chair of the Otago Southland branch of the IoD.  ” In this case it not only makes business sense to hear the student viewpoint in board discussions, but finding and developing emerging talent represents an investment in the future”

It seems that the proposal to make university council’s smaller, ministerially-appointed boards cuts across all we know about good governance.

For the tertiary education sector best-practice models based on knowledge from world-leading universities and Fortune 500 companies would dictate that council members should come from a diverse range of backgrounds (including staff and student representation) and hold a diverse range of skills. Added to this it is clear that best-practice means the councils will be chosen and will operate in an open and transparent manner. Mr Joyce is proposing exactly the opposite for our currently well-run universities.

Dr Sandra Grey
TEU’s national president

23 comments on “You can’t fix what is not broken – no need to change university councils ”

  1. Kotahi Tane Huna 1

    Dr. Grey, you really need to get your head out of the sand. Steven Joyce wants to give jobs to his mates because that’s what he’s been paid to do. There is no rationale behind this: it is simply corruption at work.

    There is no rational argument that will sway him: you will need a New Zealand owned government for that.

    • bbfloyd 1.1

      It should also be recognizable that we are seeing yet another example of what has become an old game for the asset strippers…. Make public bodies, and institutions management unworkable so that the case for the full privatisation of any potentially profit making operations can be made with a background of dissatisfaction, and frustration with the performance of said bodies….. ACC is an excellent example of this method…

      This wouldn’t work, of course, if people were informed properly, and repeatedly, regarding the reasons behind the malfunctioning management…..But that isn’t what our fourth column is paid to do…and we seem to have become “comfortable” with the easy answers….

      I fail to understand why the debates are still focusing on anecdote, rather than the underlying agenda behind these seemingly “irrational” moves….We can argue the details forever, and while we are, the asset strippers are operating with impunity….Cut em off at the pass i say…. let’s have a long, loud debate as to why these things are being done…… let the shills bleat…. their opinions are worthless…..the more that “informed” commentators highlight the real issues, the better informed the “unwashed masses” are, the less likely snake oil salesmen like johhny “sparkles” will get away with fronting for the predators……

      • Puddleglum 1.1.1

        It could be argued that a similar process happened with the Christchurch City Council. The number of councillors were radically reduced, although the overall pay to councillors stayed the same.

        In effect, it is a strategy for reducing democratic representation and, correspondingly, making it easier for a small group of people to determine how an organisation operates. In other words, it’s a process of introducing a more authoritarian governance approach. Pretty much an introduction of the very form of governance that Geoffrey Palmer criticised in ‘Unbridled Power’.

        The Christchurch City Council, of course, also became very unpopular for its lack of transparency over decision making (Ellerslie Flower Show purchase, Dave Henderson bailout, etc. EDIT: all prior to the earthquakes).

        So it fits the pattern. 

        • Armchair Critic 1.1.1.1

          PG, do you know whether the Ellerslie Flower Show and Dave Henderson bailout were during Tony Marriott’s tenure, or beforehand?

        • bbfloyd 1.1.1.2

          Well spotted puddlegum…. It seems that if one looks hard enough, there are myriad examples of the incremental removal of the foundations of democracy…..

          the process seems to follow the same pattern regardless of what type of function is being undermined… as long as it is publicly funded, and staffed by representative boards, then it has become a target for the asset strippers….

          what i would like to ask those that are supposed to be good at finding, and exposing what has become a cancer on our society, is.. what is it going to take for them to actually do the job taxpayers spent large amounts of money training them to do…. or is replacing the whole fourth column the only realistic solution now?

    • Sadly, assuming the worst, even when it is accurate, is not a good way to convince National supporters this policy is wrong.

      • bbfloyd 1.2.1

        Quite right… which doesn’t say much for those people….. but those aren’t the ones that count… there are vastly greater numbers of people who, through either ignorance, or apathy, are allowing this behavior to go unchecked….. a properly informed, mobilised population would far outweigh, in numbers the hard core of nationals support…

        i wouldn’t be using the term “assuming” regarding this issue…. the historical records documenting the methods used previously would take “assumption” out of the picture to a large extent….

        might even be worth starting up a new blog site to correlate information on this method of asset stripping…. i can imagine it would get interesting once a recogniseable framework began to emerge….

        • Kotahi Tane Huna 1.2.1.1

          +1

        • I agree with you, even your criticism of my framing this as “just” an assumption, (when it is in fact an extrapolation from previous behaviour through a communitarian, grass roots democratic lense) but if our goal is to grow opposition to bad policy, then that’s not helped by requiring a framework of criticism that relies exclusively on analysis that only convinces people broadly on the ‘left’ of the political spectrum. If we can find a way to point out what’s going on using more universally acknowledged assumptions, then we can convince people who still support this failed government about how terrible it really is. 🙂

          • bbfloyd 1.2.1.2.1

            Quite right again mathew… i wouldn’t be espousing a broadly “left” or “right” approach, as i believe that those labels aren’t helpful….. It has been my experience that, when people are left to think things through for themselves, the term left, or right become meaningless…
            The only people i have come across as fitting into one category, or another are the narrow bigots who inhabit the fringes at either end of the spectrum….

            The people i allude to are the vast majority who’s politics are generally a mix of both left and right tenets…… They vote national, or labour, or whoever else depending on a range of factors at the time…

            Of course, how individuals respond/react to having accurate, properly timelined information is an utter lottery…. but i can predict that the processes going on now under the cover of “economic rationalisation”, if known, and understood, would be severely curtailed, or stopped altogether…

            it may be worth mentioning that i have known many old time tories who understood, and accepted that good governance in a democratic, egalitarian country requires adequate, competent representation free from political interference…. those are the “soft” national voters of today….fewer in number today admittedly, but they are still there…..

            i like the interpretation of “assumption” too…. i wish i had thought of that explanation…

  2. captain hook 2

    the last time the national government messed up the universities, was in the 90’s when winz was sending imbeciles to enrol and the members of the brt were on the council cherry picking out the businesses that could be hived off and sold to themselves.
    do we want the same thing to happen again?
    has joyce got some more maTES THAT NEED TO BE PAID OFF?

  3. Georgy 3

    This govt is HUGELY into fixing things that are not broken – they are going to fix and fix and fix the education system until our international ratings are down to those of countries whose politicians embrace corporate educational systems.

  4. Well Labour already broke the universities by introducing fees and cutting funding. Its been downhill since then. I can remember the massive student protests around 1989.
    The fix is that the corporates must pay for education since its a state subsidy to the cost of preparing a productive skilled workforce able to produce more surplus for the bosses profits.
    But they won’t so looks like we will have to socialise it and put it to good use in developing critical thinkers and skills for use in production for social need.

    • ghostwhowalksnz 4.1

      National introduced the fees system we have now and the student loan scheme that goes with it.
      And it was 1992 not 89

      http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/series/2555/33499/6
      Have you got Key/Banks memory loss ?

      • Malcolm 4.1.1

        Sorry, ghostwhowalksnz, but you have no idea what you are talking about.

        Labour introduced fees for tertiary education. Labour brought in fees of $1250 in 1990. They also deregulated the tertiary education sector and allowed universities to charge overseas students full fees of up to $24,000 a year. If it wasn’t for the massive student protests in 1989 they would have brought in the student loans scheme. In July 1989 more than 20,000 students took to the streets, the biggest student demonstrations ever seen in New Zealand, to protest Labour’s plans. 5000 in Dunedin occupied the Exchange and 7000 in Christchurch brought the centre city to a standstill.

        Since then Labour have consistently failed to support free education for all.

        • Malcolm 4.1.1.1

          I suggest taking a trip to your local library and reading the newspapers at that time.

          • ghostwhowalksnz 4.1.1.1.1

            So Im correct the fees of $3k + plus student loans was bought in by National.

            What has overseas students got to do with it ?

            • Malcolm 4.1.1.1.1.1

              Your comment was directed at Dave who you accused of having Key/Banks memory loss. Labour introduced fees and fully intended to introduce loans but backed down in the face of the massive student protests of …. 1989! So you were … wrong! Suck it up!

  5. muzza 5

    The key point that people appear to be missing is that if you “fix” the education system you are controlling the minds of the future even more than the education systems currently churn out non thinking fodder for the hamster wheels, now maquerading as the “developed” worlds slave work force.

    The “fixing” of the various levels of education is an attack on the minds, and taking control of the information flows, as well as research (tertiary)…There is nothing out of place here, it is simply the continuation of the theiving of the mental capacity for people to challenge the system in future!

  6. Mouse 6

    Abuse of power is the immediate thought that comes to mind…

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Govt backs business to vaccinate workforces
    Vaccination will be required for all workers at businesses where customers need to show COVID-19 Vaccination Certificates, such as hospitality and close-contact businesses. New law to introduce a clearer and simplified risk assessment process for employers to follow when deciding whether they can require vaccination for different types of work. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Winners of the 2021 Prime Minister’s Education Excellence Awards
    Frimley Primary School in Hawke’s Bay is the Supreme Award winner of the 2021 Prime Minister’s Education Excellence Awards, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “The past year has been a real test for teachers, schools and local communities. But out of the challenge of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Government provides greater assurance to homeowners
    The Government has provided greater assurance for homeowners with the introduction of a new code of ethics for Licensed Building Practitioners (LBPs), Building and Construction Minister Poto Williams announced today.   The Code of Ethics, which comes into force in October 2022, sets behavioural standards for LBPs to give both ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    20 hours ago
  • Primary sector returns strengthen export-led recovery
    Farmers’ hard work in leading New Zealand’s export-led recovery from COVID-19 is being rewarded with high prices forecast for milk and very strong returns for meat, says Trade and Export Growth and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. Fonterra announced today a record predicted milk price of $7.90 to $8.90 for the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    20 hours ago
  • Supporting economic resilience in the Indo-Pacific – Speech to the Asia Forum
    (Check against delivery) Ladies and gentlemen, distinguished guests, kia ora koutou katoa Thank you Farib. It is a great pleasure to be invited to speak at this event. I want to acknowledge the on-going work of the Asia Forum. Over many years – decades, in fact – you have been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    23 hours ago
  • RSI ‘state of the nation’ report published
    New Zealand’s FCR cited research ratio is twice the world average Investment in R&D is increasing Case studies underscore how a science based COVID-19 response helped save lives In 2019, Māori and Pacific people represented 5 per cent of PhD graduates. The latest research, science and innovation system report card ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    23 hours ago
  • Funding to translate science into real life solutions
    The Government is investing in ‘Te Tītoki Mataora’ the MedTech Research Translator, to deliver new medical tools - and meet both the demands of a global pandemic and of a growing and aging population. “COVID-19 has shown that we need to build a more resilient, productive, innovative and economically-sustainable health ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Tokelau champions language and culture
    COVID-19 continues to be a powerful reminder of the importance of language and culture to the wellbeing of our Pacific communities, said the Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio. “Our Tokelau community in Aotearoa has responded strongly to the challenges of the global pandemic by getting vaccinated and supporting ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Festival drug-checking services get a boost
    The Government is financially supporting drug-checking services to help keep young people safe at this summer’s large festivals and events, Health Minister Andrew Little says. “This is not about condoning drug use, but about keeping people safe,” Andrew Little said. “There is clear evidence that having drug-checking services at festivals ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Expanded vaccination order for health and disability, education and prison workers
    A newly-signed Order means most people working in three key sectors will very soon need to be vaccinated against COVID-19 for the sake of themselves, their workmates and their communities, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins has confirmed. The extended COVID-19 Public Health Response (Vaccinations) Amendment Order 2021 comes into effect ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • APEC finance ministers focus on inclusive, sustainable COVID recovery
    APEC finance ministers will continue to work together to respond to the effects of COVID-19 and ensure a sustainable and inclusive recovery while capitalising on the opportunity to build a more resilient future. The New Zealand Minister of Finance and Deputy Prime Minister Grant Robertson chaired the virtual APEC Finance ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Improvements to child and maternity facilities at Timaru Hospital on track
    Improvements to child and maternity facilities at Timaru Hospital are well underway, and the next stage of the project will begin next month. Health Minister Andrew Little visited Timaru Hospital today to view progress onsite. “The improvements are part of South Canterbury DHB’s four-year refurbishment project and will create a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Govt responds to independent review into WorkSafe
    The Government has clear expectations that WorkSafe must action the recommendations of the independent review into the regulator to improve its management of adventure activities following the tragedy at Whakaari White Island, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood says. The Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (MBIE) today released the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Prevention funding to reduce tamariki in care
    A new iwi-led prevention programme will receive funding from Oranga Tamariki to help reduce the number of tamariki and rangatahi coming into state care, Children’s Minister Kelvin Davis has announced. Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu (Te Rūnanga) will receive $25.9m of Oranga Tamariki funding over three years to improve outcomes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Transforming New Zealand’s mental health legislation
    Public consultation is now open for Aotearoa New Zealand to have a say on the repeal and replacement of the Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992. “’He Ara Oranga, the report of the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction’ made it clear that we needed to replace ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • COVID-19 Protection Framework
    Kia ora koutou katoa Today I’m speaking directly to all New Zealanders to share a plan that will help us stay safe from COVID-19 into the future. A future where we want to continue to protect people’s lives, but also to live our lives – as safely as possible. Our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Business boost to transition to new COVID framework
    We know that over the last twenty months the approach New Zealand has taken to COVID and Delta has saved lives and livelihoods. Along with one of the lowest mortality rates in the world, we have also had strong economic growth, low unemployment and one of the lower levels of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • COVID-19 funding boost to protect maōri communities
    Tēnā koutou katoa As you have heard from the Prime Minister, the new protection framework will support us to keep people safe especially our vulnerable communities and minimize the impact COVID-19 has on business and our day to day lives. If you want to protect yourself, your whanau and your ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New COVID-19 Protection Framework delivers greater freedoms for vaccinated New Zealanders
    New COVID-19 Protection Framework provides pathway out of lockdown and ability for businesses and events to re-open to vaccinated New Zealanders Simpler framework to minimise cases and hospitalisations without use of widespread lockdowns Auckland to move into the new framework when 90 percent of eligible population in each of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New fund to accelerate Māori vaccinations
    The Government has established a $120 million fund to accelerate Māori vaccination rates and support communities to prepare for the implementation of the new COVID-19 Protection Framework. The new Māori Communities COVID-19 Fund will directly fund Māori, Iwi, community organisations and providers to deliver local vaccination initiatives for whānau, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government extends hardship assistance for low income workers
    Income limits for Hardship Support through the Ministry of Social Development have been temporarily lifted so more people can recieve assistance. “Cabinet has agreed to make it easier for low income workers to recieve assistance for items such as food and other emergency costs,” Carmel Sepuloni said. “We know the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • More support for learners with highest needs
    Students most in need of extra help in the classroom are the focus of a new review that gets under way today, Associate Education Minister Jan Tinetti says. About 50,000-80,000 children and young people are expected to benefit from a Ministry of Education review into Highest Need Learners that will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Parts of Waikato to stay at Alert Level 3 for next six days
    The parts of Waikato that have been in Alert Level 3 will remain at that alert level till Wednesday, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “Based on the latest public health information, maintaining level 3 in those parts of the Waikato continues to be the most prudent course of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Hon Peeni Henare September 2021 Proactive Diary Release
    ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • NZ passes world-first climate reporting legislation
    New Zealand has become the first country in the world to pass a law that will ensure financial organisations disclose and ultimately act on climate-related risks and opportunities, Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Dr David Clark and Climate Change Minister James Shaw today announced today. The Financial Sector (Climate-related Disclosures ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Prime Minister NZ UK FTA opening remarks
    Tēnā koutou katoa. Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou katoa. I am delighted to announce today that following a conversation with Prime Minister Johnson last night, New Zealand and the United Kingdom have Agreed in Principle a historic high-quality, comprehensive and inclusive free trade agreement. I’m joined today by the Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Zealand secures historic free trade deal with the United Kingdom
    A boost of almost $1 billion to New Zealand GDP, unprecedented access for New Zealand exporters to the UK market UK to eliminate all tariffs on New Zealand exports, with over 97% being removed the day the FTA comes into force NZ exporters to save approx. $37.8 million per year ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Quarterly benefit numbers show more people in work
    Benefit figures released today show a year on year fall of 9,807 people receiving a Main Benefit in the September Quarter.  “The Government is working hard to tackle COVID-19 and it is clear our strong response to the initial outbreak has created a resilient labour market which is providing opportunities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Health reforms bill introduced to Parliament
    Legislation central to fixing the health system has been introduced into Parliament by Health Minister Andrew Little. “Rebuilding the public health system is critical to laying the foundations for a better future for all New Zealanders,” Andrew Little said. “We need a system that works for everybody, no matter who ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • NCEA and NZ Scholarship Exams to proceed
    NCEA and New Zealand Scholarship exams will proceed, including in areas where Alert Level 3 has been in place, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “The New Zealand Qualifications Authority, Ministry of Education and Ministry of Health have been working together to ensure exams can be managed in a safe ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Limited change to onsite learning – for senior secondary students – in Level 3 regions
    Onsite learning at schools in Level 3 regions will start from next week for senior secondary school students to prepare for end of year exams, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “Secondary schools in these regions will start onsite learning for years 11 to 13 on Tuesday 26 October,” Chris ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Guaranteed MIQ spots for health workers
    The Government is changing the way managed isolation is co-ordinated for health workers, guaranteeing 300 spots a month for the health and disability sector. “Our world-class workforce is vital in rebuilding the health system and dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic,” Andrew Little said. “Whether it’s bringing doctors or nurses in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Govt helps to protect New Zealanders digital identities
    Making it easier for New Zealanders to safely prove who they are digitally and control who has access to that information is one step closer to becoming law, Minister for Digital Economy and Communications, Dr David Clark said. The Digital Identity Services Trust Framework Bill passed its first reading today ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Red tape cut to boost housing supply
    New building intensification rules will mean up to three homes of up to three storeys can be built on most sites without the need for a resource consent New rules will result in at least 48,200 and as many as 105,500 new homes built in next 5-8 years Bringing forward ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Nationwide business partnership grows conservation jobs
    Further Government support for New Zealand’s longest-standing sustainable business organisation will open up opportunities for dozens of workers impacted by COVID-19 to jump start a nature-based career, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. Partnering to Plant Aotearoa, led by the Sustainable Business Network (SBN), is a collaboration with iwi, hapū and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand increases climate aid contribution
    Government commits $1.3 billion over four years to support countries most vulnerable to the effects of climate change At least 50 percent of funding will go to the Pacific as it adapts to the impacts of climate change The increase means New Zealand now meets its fair share of global ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Super Māori turnout for Super Saturday
    Māori have put a superb effort into mobilising to get vaccinated over Super Saturday, with thousands rolling up their sleeves to protect themselves, their whānau and communities from COVID-19, Associate Health Minister Peeni Henare says. “It was absolutely outstanding that 21,702 Māori got vaccinated on this one day alone with 10,825 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Language assists Tagata Niue to thrive
    Despite the uncertain times we face with the challenges of COVID-19, our cultural knowledge, values and language remain constant, helping us progress towards goals in life, said  the Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio. This year, the Niuean community in New Zealand decided on the theme, “Kia tupuolaola e ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand Ambassador to France announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Caroline Bilkey as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to France and the OECD. “Aotearoa New Zealand and France have a shared history, and enjoy a strong, collaborative partnership. This includes a strong trade and economic relationship, a shared commitment to support ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Govt welcomes nurses’ pay settlement
    The Government is welcoming news that a new employment agreement for nurses working in public hospitals has been settled. “I am very pleased that the hard work of the Nurses Organisation and District Health Boards has led to a settlement that both can support,” Health Minister Andrew Little said today. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago