web analytics

A very Tory Xmas

Written By: - Date published: 9:56 pm, December 21st, 2010 - 30 comments
Categories: ACC, humour, privatisation - Tags:

‘Twas the week before Christmas, and all through the House,
Nats announced policies, they’re usually scared to espouse.

Journos on holiday, Key out of reach on his Hawaiian vacation,
It was the time to let slip, their plan for ACC privatisation.

These lines hardly rhyme at all, but please heed and beware,
At risk is your workplace injury compensation and healthcare.

The Nats already deny cover with the greatest of ease
They just label your injury a degenerative disease

More court cases, less cover, won’t it be great!
When we let private insurers, compete with the State

The Aussie insurers will make 200 million, and that isn’t free
The ones who end up paying, are the suckers – that’s you and me

Private insurers make their money by not paying out
‘Too bad, you’re not covered!’, is what they do shout

Profits, lawyers, and marketing – how can all this be cheap?
We are about to get fleeced, like 4 million sheep

The Insurance Council has donated millions to the Nats
The stench that you smell is the odour of rats

So fight for your ACC, it’s one of a kind
To let the Nats steal this treasure, we’d be out of our mind

30 comments on “A very Tory Xmas ”

  1. ianmac from Prague 1

    Oi! Its just a way to save taxpayer money and open the door to a fault scheme to enable accident hunting lawyers to hunt you down and clutter the courts with litigation and cost the taxpayer zillions more. Oops? Save taxpayers money? Yeah right…. (wing zeal!)

  2. Pascal's bookie 2

    Instead of the shiny pap that occasionally falls in my letterbox from a LP whomever…

    this.

  3. LynW 3

    Perhaps this could be the catalyst, the tipping point? ACC has been a very successful model of care, available to all New Zealanders, so this change would effect a diverse population, from the medical practitioners to the end users. We are already seeing the problems experienced by some with the existing system ( wear and tear!) so it stands to reason it would far worse in private hands where the emphasis to make a profit is so much greater.

  4. M 4

    Small point – it should be ‘Twas, short for, It was.

    One of my siblings who has a permanent spinal injury had better prepare himself to do even more battle if this comes to pass.

  5. joe bloggs 5

    Under Labour’s Maryan Street, ACC made losses of 2.4 billion in 2007 and 4.8 billion in 2008.

    That’s an extra tax burden of $580 in 2007 and $1,100 in 2008 on every man, woman and child in NZ. Hardly successful management of a monopoly is it?

    Frankly I’d rather have a choice of service providers than continue to suffer under a poorly administered monopoly like ACC.

    And greater independence of the Disputes Resolution Service can only result in fairer decisions in dispute cases.

    • Is that you Nick Smith?

      You sure sound like him. You even have that annoying habit of repeating his sloganistic crap.

      You don’t believe it do you, like that lie that ACC made a loss whereas what happened was that its reserves increased but because of a change of accounting standards the estimated cost of future accidents increased.

      Do you really believe it?

      I have this bridge going cheap I would love to show you.

    • Marty G 5.2

      “Under Labour’s Maryan Street, ACC made losses of 2.4 billion in 2007 and 4.8 billion in 2008.

      That’s an extra tax burden of $580 in 2007 and $1,100 in 2008 on every man, woman and child in NZ. ”

      no it’s not. What happened is that the value of ACC’s reserves didn’t increase as fast as the future expenses of existing claims. This was mainly due revaluing the estimates of those future costs and the financial crisis wiping vast sums off the value of those reserves. Since then, ACC’s reserves have increased in value faster than expected as asset values have recovered.

      You’re mistaking a market cycle for a fundamental problem.

      Furthermore, you haven’t explained how private providers will cut costs.

      Insurance is a pretty straightforward business: you take in premiums/levies at one end and spit out payouts at the other. ACC spends just 16% of its costs on admin, the rest goes to payouts. Private insurers don’t come close to that. They spend huge amounts on denying claims because it saves them money and means more profits.

    • millsy 5.3

      Do you accept that privat insurancers will not pay out on claims whereas ACC has a LEGAL OBLIGATION TO PAY OUT ON EVERY CLAIM.

      No declined claims.

      Workers get the cost of their treatment covered, and are compensated for lost wages.

      Private insurers will just screw people over and not give that coverage, because profit comes first.

      Its part of a decent society that cares for its sick, if you dont like it, go to America

      • Lanthanide 5.3.1

        There was some health insurance company advertising on TV a while ago that they had a “98% claim approval rating”.

        The devil is in the details of course: if they suspect that your claim will be declined, then they use their process to ensure that you are kicked out of the process before you make the ‘official’ claim, which is what the stats are collected on and what they are reporting on.

        Similarly, many people are denied ACC claims due to “degeneration and normal wear and tear”, so for your claim that “ACC has a LEGAL OBLIGATION TO PAY OUT ON EVERY CLAIM” shows that ACC must be doing the same.

        Lies, damn lies and statistics, as always.

        • Pascal's bookie 5.3.1.1

          Would be interesting to see the value of that 2% that gets denied. I suspect that it’s quite a bit higher than 2% when you look at it in terms of the financials.

  6. Logie97 6

    In the vanguard of those beefing about ACC have been the self employed.
    Good luck to you brothers, because you managed your accounts too well and “paid” yourselves so little to avoid PAYE and ACC levies.

    Now try getting away with it with your beloved Multi-national Insurance companies.

  7. Bill 7

    An avalanche of rejected injury claims due to supposed underlying degenerative conditions.

    An accompanying avalanche of appeals choking the appeals process.

    Workers being unnecessarily forced out of the workforce

    Instances of WINZ stumping up thousands to pay for operations instead of ACC.

    Privatisation would interact with this deliberately engineered mess, how? Em…em…oh, yup, just fine. By following the ACC precedent and externalising costs.

    I’d have thought that the way to go if people’s health and well being was a priority would be to dispense with the dodgy distinction being made between degenerative conditions and those that arise solely by injury and have ACC deal with the whole lot.

    Far more efficient.

  8. Santi 8

    Good news. Time to dismantle this behemoth and sell it!

    • Colonial Viper 8.1

      Speaking of selling out workers, you get the Brownlee Award.

      • Santi 8.1.1

        C.V. thank you.
        I’m honoured to be the recipient of an award for selling something bloated like ACC (in Brownlee’s league). Competion will be good for consumers.

    • Judge Holden 8.2

      Um yeah, because all good tories just know that the private sector (cough HIH cough), does absolutely everything better than the state, and only commies rely on things like facts and evidence.

    • Clarke 8.3

      Good news! $200 million in profits exported to Australia rather than remaining in New Zealand!

  9. tsmithfield 9

    “It was the time to let slip, their plan for ACC privatisation”

    This is complete misinformation. The Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) is not being privatised just as public hospitals have not been privatised with the advent of private health care.
    ACC will still be a publicly owned organisation. What could be accurately said is that the public ACC organisation will be exposed to competition from the private sector.

    • felix 9.1

      Quite right tsmithfield, that was complete misinformation. You usually don’t announce it as such though, are you not feeling well?

      Anyway, you’re just engaging in sophistry as usual. The provision of service is what’s being privatised.

  10. Pascal's bookie 10

    All right then, I’ll ask the righties on this thread.

    Hypothetical.

    Let’s say you have some sort of terrible accident. The sort that makes accident insurance a necessity for any sort of life worth having. The sort of accident that getting a life back from, will cost millions over the term of that life.

    Would you want the lawyers looking over your insurance claim to:

    i) ultimately be working for a politician reliant on voters, or

    ii) ultimately be working for the insurance company’s shareholders.

    Be honest now.

  11. tea 11

    Espouse doesn’t rhyme with house,

    unless you are talking about the internet wife or the e-spouse

    edit: ahh you covered that in a later stanza…!

    • Lanthanide 11.1

      Lots of Eninem’s lyrics don’t rhyme when written on paper either. It’s all in how you pronounce it.

  12. Don 12

    “Tags: it’s poetry bitches”

    It isn’t even doggerel. It makes William McGonagall look like William Shakespeare.

    • Bright Red 12.1

      they’re well known for chucking in funny tags. have a sense of humour.

      check out tags like ‘lammingtons in the news’ or ‘goat issues’

  13. Glenn 13

    If you are opposed to this then register your opposition on the ACC Futures Coalition website http://issues.co.nz/accfutures/Support+Us

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Fast-tracked Northland water project will accelerate economic recovery
    The Government has welcomed the decision to approve a new water storage reservoir in Northland, the first of a number of infrastructure projects earmarked for a speedy consenting process that aims to accelerate New Zealand’s economic recovery from Covid-19.  The Matawii Water Storage Reservoir will provide drinking water for Kaikohe, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Tokelau Language Week reminds us to stay united and strong
    Staying strong in the face of challenges and being true to our heritage and languages are key to preserving our cultural identity and wellbeing, is the focus of the 2020 Tokelau Language Week. Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio, says this year’s theme, ‘Apoapo tau foe, i nā tāfea ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • NZ announces a third P-3 deployment in support of UN sanctions
    The Government has deployed a Royal New Zealand Air Force P-3K2 Orion (P-3) maritime patrol aircraft to support the implementation of United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions imposing sanctions against North Korea, announced Minister of Foreign Affairs Winston Peters and Minister of Defence Ron Mark. “New Zealand has long supported ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pacific trade and development agreement a reality
    Pacific regional trade and development agreement PACER Plus will enter into force in 60 days now that the required eight countries have ratified it. Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker welcomed the announcement that the Cook Islands is the eighth nation to ratify this landmark agreement. “The agreement represents ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Securing a pipeline of teachers
    The Government is changing its approach to teacher recruitment as COVID-19 travel restrictions continue, by boosting a range of initiatives to get more Kiwis into teaching. “When we came into Government, we were faced with a teacher supply crisis,” Education Minister Chris Hipkins said. “Over the past three years, we ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Border exceptions for a small number of international students with visas
    The Government has established a new category that will allow 250 international PhD and postgraduate students to enter New Zealand and continue their studies, in the latest set of border exceptions. “The health, safety and wellbeing of people in New Zealand remains the Government’s top priority. Tight border restrictions remain ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • First COVID-19 vaccine purchase agreement signed
    The Government has signed an agreement to purchase 1.5 million COVID-19 vaccines – enough for 750,000 people – from Pfizer and BioNTech, subject to the vaccine successfully completing all clinical trials and passing regulatory approvals in New Zealand, say Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods and Health Minister Chris Hipkins. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • International statement – End-to-end encryption and public safety
    We, the undersigned, support strong encryption, which plays a crucial role in protecting personal data, privacy, intellectual property, trade secrets and cyber security.  It also serves a vital purpose in repressive states to protect journalists, human rights defenders and other vulnerable people, as stated in the 2017 resolution of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Ministry of Defence Biodefence Assessment released
    The Ministry of Defence has today released a Defence Assessment examining Defence’s role across the spectrum of biological hazards and threats facing New Zealand. Biodefence: Preparing for a New Era of Biological Hazards and Threats looks at how the NZDF supports other agencies’ biodefence activities, and considers the context of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New Approaches to Economic Challenges: Confronting Planetary Emergencies: OECD 9 October 2020
    New Approaches to Economic Challenges: Confronting Planetary Emergencies: OECD 9 October 2020 Hon David Parker’s response following Thomas Piketty and Esther Duflo. Good morning, good afternoon, and good evening, wherever in the world you might be. I first acknowledge the excellent thought provoking speeches of Thomas Piketty and Esther ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • Kaipara Moana restoration takes next step
    A Memorandum of Understanding has been signed today at Waihāua Marae between the Crown, local iwi and councils to protect, restore and enhance the mauri of Kaipara Moana in Northland. Environment Minister David Parker signed the document on behalf of the Crown along with representatives from Ngā Maunga Whakahī, Ngāti ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • New Zealand and Uruguay unite on reducing livestock production emissions
    Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor and Uruguayan Minister of Livestock, Agriculture and Fisheries Carlos María Uriarte have welcomed the launch of a three-year project that will underpin sustainable livestock production in Uruguay, Argentina, and Costa Rica.  The project called ‘Innovation for pasture management’ is led by Uruguay’s National Institute of Agricultural ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • 3100 jobs created through marae upgrades
    Hundreds of marae throughout the country will be upgraded through investments from the Provincial Growth Fund’s refocused post COVID-19 funding to create jobs and put money into the pockets of local tradespeople and businesses, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones and Māori Development Minister Nanaia Mahuta have announced. “A total ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • Health volunteers recognised in annual awards
    Health Minister Chris Hipkins has announced 9 teams and 14 individuals are the recipients of this year’s Minister of Health Volunteer Awards.  “The health volunteer awards celebrate and recognise the thousands of dedicated health sector volunteers who give many hours of their time to help other New Zealanders,” Mr Hipkins ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago