web analytics

Super sized problem

Written By: - Date published: 10:32 am, February 6th, 2012 - 38 comments
Categories: benefits, national - Tags: ,

I feel a bit sorry for Key and co. The coming term isn’t going to be nearly as much fun as the first one. Here, for example, is one issue that they’d desperately like to go away. But Treasury have dumped it right in their laps:

Treasury warning over cost of super

The Treasury has warned Finance Minister Bill English the Government must start addressing the pressures of future superannuation costs and it makes a case for lifting the retirement age – one of Labour’s policies going into the election.

The government wants to do no such thing of course. That’s a hard problem, and they don’t do hard stuff.

It [Treasury] also argues the case for less variation in taxing capital – again similar to Labour’s election policy of a capital gains tax.

Yes, Labour’s policies actually realistically addressed the elephants in the economic room, and set out a clear way forward. Too late to cry abut it now though, that ship has sailed and we’ve got the Nats. If they can’t drill it, mine it or sell it they haven’t got an answer.

In the hard-hitting advice on superannuation, the Treasury says leaving the retirement income settings in place would have to lead to higher taxes, which would harm growth, or large cuts in spending on other areas such as health and education.

It says that as the baby-boomers move into retirement, New Zealand’s 65-and-over population is projected to grow nearly four times more quickly than the total population over the next 15 years, contributing to a rapid rise in health, aged care and New Zealand Superannuation costs. … It says the current acceleration in the growth of the older population makes it “a matter of priority for New Zealand”.

The Nats will ignore the issue. It isn’t going to explode in the next three years, so as far as they’re concerned it’s not their problem.

38 comments on “Super sized problem ”

  1. One Anonymous Bloke 1

    The National Party’s clients do not live in New Zealand. Why should they care what happens here?

    • mac1 1.1

      Then again there are the ‘patrons’ of the National party who have National as their clients. I wonder if they live in New Zealand?

      Now the ACT party is a client of National. They live here. So does the Maori party. And Dunne.

      All clients of Gaius Julius Keysar and his praetorian cohorts, Stevanius Serendipitas, Gerriander Cera Maximus and Bilius Anglicanus Apudipton.

      And then the rest of us plebs, fed on bread and circuses, or nowadays McDonalds and the Media.

      Time to join the Barbarians across the water, with the other Kiwi coloni, away from the Vesuvius to come.

  2. foreign waka 2

    How much of this statement reflects their peers benefits, perks and health service access? How much of it is researched about people who are in retirement or going to be in the next 10-15 years? A comparison will lead the treasury people, who undoubtedly belief that the little people need to be euthanized out of the budget sheet once “unproductive”, that the income of ordinary Nzlandears is too much to die and too little to life on. Elderly people in the next decade and beyond will die prematurely because healthcare will not be easily affordable and the best that some can hope for is over the counter painkillers. These were the people, who with their taxes have helped to build the infrastructure you benefit from and who had, to a large extend lost their life savings in speculative adventures of your kind, being left on the scrapheap and lectured to! How many you say or dare to promise a guaranty, will have any money in their retirement fund, the kiwi saver? Will they also be without a roof over their head when they reach 70 like you so nonchalantly propose to those who have paid taxes all their life? How undignified has one to be to work for your outfit, taxpayer funded no less?

  3. tc 3

    The Nats killed off 2 previous schemes that would’ve solved this and dicked with kiwisaver (wow another broken promise) so this is par for the course…..the Nats have never ever given a shite about resolving this issue.

  4. Roger 4

    The Nats at the time will have a few options when the time comes that they currently roll out at other times, these are:
    1. Blame the poor elderly by trying to sell us the line that they made poor choices by not saving much with their low wages.
    2. Find a way to blame a previous Labour government no matter how long a bow they have to draw.
    3. Push through the changes prescribed above a couple of decades too late and under urgency.
    4. On an individual level, National MPs could just resign and bugger off out of the country to hang out with their wealthy bludger mates.

  5. DH 5

    I read the Treasury briefing and what is missing from it is the issue of super being a universal benefit. Presently there’s some 550,000 OAPs collecting super. How many own +million dollar freehold properties and how many have a comfortable private income? Does anyone have the stats on income of people over 65?

    I’d think means testing etc would be more effective at reducing the super problem. Could fix it completely now that baby boomer property owners have seen their nett wealth more than double in the last decade.

    • foreign waka 5.1

      Age of client at the end of June Clients receiving New Zealand Superannuation1
      2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
      Under 60 years2 4,507 4,205 3,899 3,484 3,179
      60-64 years2 12,815 11,971 11,072 10,303 9,781
      65-69 years 127,786 135,322 144,867 153,900 158,186
      70-74 years 111,757 111,329 111,240 113,201 117,332
      75-79 years 94,098 95,021 96,754 97,382 97,581
      80 years or over 113,661 117,367 120,993 124,447 128,217
      Unspecified 0 0 0 0 0
      Total 464,624 475,215 488,825 502,717 514,276

      Info from Ministry of Social Development.

      Current weekly income Gross/Net (as I said to little to live on, too much to die):

      Category Weekly rate
      Gross Net
      Single, living alone $389.14 $339.92
      Single, sharing $357.40 $313.78
      Married person or partner in a civil union or de facto relationship
      $294.08 $261.48
      Married or in a civil union or de facto relationship, both qualify
      Total $588.16 $522.96
      Each $294.08 $261.48

      Now, even with an increase in age to lets say 67 (Why on earth we want to employ someone at 65 to take the workplace of a young person is beyond my comprehension) it would in the best of all worlds save the money of about 70 000 people of which about 2/3 will have to go on a benefit because of health reasons (also taxpayer money). Ending up with some 25 000 x 13.5k. Maybe this kind of money could be saved by means testing including Trust funds. But I doubt this greatly as it would mean to cut the money supply to exactly those people who suggest taking even more from the people who, in their eyes, ought to maintain them.

      • DH 5.1.1

        Those figures don’t mean anything, they’re just the stats on pensions (and the latest was 2008) The important bit is how much private income people over 65 are earning, plus how much actual wealth they have. I haven’t been able to find any statistics on that.

  6. foreign waka 6

    DH – try this
    http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/people_and_communities/Households/HouseholdEconomicSurvey_HOTPYeJun11/Data%20Quality.aspx

    Go to the end of the page – there is a spreadsheet: Household economic survey 2011. Have a look, maybe this is wath you are looking for?

    • DH 6.1

      Thanks I have that already & I can find nothing about incomes of people over 65.

      Keep in mind I’m not advocating means testing, I was pointing out that Treasury haven’t offered it as a possible option when it clearly is one. Why have they left it out, why pick age over means?

      • Colonial Viper 6.1.1

        You’re looking at the wrong thing. Forget about taxable income of those over 65. You need to look at net asset worth.

        • DH 6.1.1.1

          I have covered that, re my comment about baby boomer property owners doubling their nett worth in the last decade. Income is just a place to start, to find out how many OAPs are receiving private incomes and how much they earn.

          • Colonial Viper 6.1.1.1.1

            Sure, I suppose it is a start. No doubt you understand that the wealthy have set up their affairs so they have valuable economic services provided to them (e.g. housing and cars) by family trusts etc. which you will never be able to categorise as income.

            • RedLogix 6.1.1.1.1.1

              Better is the Universal Basic Income system which eliminates the problem at root. Retirement is a wholly artificial and clumsy notion anyhow… just get rid of it.

              • KJT

                Agreed. A GMFI or equivalent is preferable. Accepting that everyone has a right to live at a reasonable level.
                But the problem of superannuation affordability along with the affordability of a lot of social programs is easily solved by making progressive taxation the same as Australian levels. E,G, 45% over 150k. FTT and CGT would help make taxation fairer.
                Not only does this keep income in NZ, but it increases local spending.

                • KJT

                  The un-affordability of super, welfare etc is a right wing meme which Labour should never have bought into.
                  A good example of “repeat a lie often enough, even those who should know better begin to believe it”.

            • DH 6.1.1.1.1.2

              Yes I do understand, I also understand that family trusts can be busted wide open at the stroke of a legislators pen. They’re protected only by law and governments make the law.

              • KJT

                Private trusts should be illegal anyway. The prime purpose of the majority of trusts is to avoid legal obligations such as tax, alimony and paying contractors.

                • DH

                  Don’t get me started. The biggest fan of trusts is the mob who push personal responsibility and they set up trusts precisely to avoid it.

        • foreign waka 6.1.1.2

          I doubt that this will be easily to come by – privacy laws etc. If you look at table 6 you can see that taxable income for the over 65 was in the majority up to 21k pre tax (couple). Compare this with Table 6a and you can see the same under “not in labor force”. Any income derived from savings, shares etc is taxable and therefore included. Not included are assets such as family homes and other property, shares ex tax.
          From http://www.bigcities.govt.nz/standard.htm this comment:
          The top 10.0% of wealthy individuals own over half of the nation’s total net worth, while the bottom 50.0% of the population own just 5.2% of total net worth.

          • DH 6.1.1.2.1

            Thanks, I was looking at the wrong tables that one does have incomes. It shows 5% of OAPs are earning more than $78k. (the figures are for personal income, not couples)

            I don’t even know if super is still universal, do the likes of Fay still receive it? But if it is I think it’s time to accept we can’t keep paying super to those who don’t need it. Whether it’s a total solution I don’t know either but it needs to be examined. And Treasury haven’t even mentioned it, why?

            • foreign waka 6.1.1.2.1.1

              As far as I know it is still universal. The very wealthy can reject it, but would they? One has to be careful with these wishes as it could hit a pensioner who bought his/her property in the 60-70’s which is now worth many times what was paid for. This does not mean that this person is rich, it just means that the property becomes more and more unaffordable. It is called asset rich and cash poor.

              • DH

                What’s the difference between rich and asset rich? Rich is rich, what form the wealth takes doesn’t change whether they’re wealthy or not.

                There’s never any perfect solutions, raising the retirement age brings it’s own problems too. Fine for those who work in an office, not so great for those who worked in physical jobs all their lives. A lot of people are plain worn out by 65.

                • foreign waka

                  Totally agree with retirement age. As for Asset Rich – this is an expression only. I know of many who have to sell their homes because they can’t afford the rates and upkeep. Right now, this means their life savings have not grown but have been reduced. This is unfair as these people have saved for all their working lives to get there and have in 99% of cases have no other savings. This is called cash poor.

                  • DH

                    Unfair in what way? Some people who bought houses in the ’60s & ’70s have benefited greatly from urban sprawl in the main cities while others who paid similar sums have seen little real capital growth in their properties. It’s certainly not a nice prospect having to move when you get older but there has to be some reasonable balance struck here.

                    I don’t agree with the ‘solutions’ being proposed but I think we do have to face reality & accept that the numbers don’t lie. We can’t keep spending more & more on super without some radical changes somewhere. We don’t have the money to pay for it.

                    • foreign waka

                      DH – you are running into open doors on the issue of affordability of super spending. I have some time to go and have all sorts of nightmares regarding my “lifestyle” when its my turn. Still, it does not look desirable to work til I fall into the grave despite those poundings my treasury and media. Nonetheless, I am not agreeing on the notion that today’s retirees have to practice this nightmare to give me some satisfaction that hell is for everyone.

  7. RedLogix 7

    The fiscal implications are a bit of a side-show really. My father was forced into an early retirement in his late 50’s; he’s now 85. He’s been retired almost 30 years, and he could live another 10. That’s a retirement almost as long as his working life!!!

    If my health holds together and I don’t go gaga, I could easily continue to work in my current occupation into my 70’s.

    Yet overwhelmingly this entirely arbitrary figure of 65 mandates retirement. Now there are those who welcome it, well and good to them. And there are those who experience it as an overwhelming sense of loss and irrelevancy. In a society that can only measure things in commercial terms, being expelled from work implies that you have become worthless.

    I’m not sure that fiscally tinkering with superannuation policies is going to change much. If there is one thing we could learn from Asian and Polynesian societies is the real meaning of being elderly, and how these entirely natural and inevitable transitions in our life should really be managed.

  8. foreign waka 8

    RedLogix, The Polynesian and Asian population have not state pension hence the family is taking care of them. There social structure is different, always was. And so is for most their life expectancy. So what do you do in the western society that has not had this pattern, where families are much smaller and often not interested to take on the elderly? It is in most cases the women who do the deed and often have to drop their employment – who is helped by that? Add another 2 kids to the household and the caregiver is on permanent Ritalin. And what do you do when the elderly gets sick, maybe very seriously? Most in a very high age have dementia. Have you ever looked after an elderly person that cannot help themselves anymore but is not seriously sick?
    If my health holds together and I am not gaga with 65 I will be perfecting my hobby’s and volunteer when possible. Hallelujah, I will say the chores are done, I am free.

    • RedLogix 8.1

      Yes … I appreciate your perspective. I think that was the point I was trying, probably rather badly, that the current ‘one size fits all’ model of retirement is very clumsy. Everyone has quite different needs; their families are different, the community around them, their health, their attitude to work, the type of work they can do or are interested in… if any. A huge range of variables… yet the current system rather mindlessly has a single cut-off date and after that its ‘waiting to die’.

      Personally as I mentioned above, some form of Universal Basic Income that applied to all adults.. regardless of age… is the way forward here. That way the entire concept of retirement becomes meaningless and people would then have far more control over exactly how they managed their transition from working life to something else, whatever else they wanted to do.

      Have you ever looked after an elderly person that cannot help themselves anymore but is not seriously sick?

      umm… yes. Much of last year in fact. A whole story in itself, but not mine for the repeating.

      • foreign waka 8.1.1

        RedLogix, sorry to hear that you have a sick relative. Hope you have some support too as this is often needed. My best wishes.
        As to universal basic income – sounds like a good idea, but would it not greatly disturb the concept of measuring effort and achievement? I could see this applied by a certain age but not sooner. Which brings us back to the universal retirement payment.It is my opinion that there is a flaw in the way NZ distributes the pension.
        trust funds – should be illegal as they do only one thing, hide income from taxation and hence is fraud. Basic Income at a certain age, when sick and very important – when raising children to the age of 3: this should by allocated by individual not by single or couples. Tax is paid individually, benefit should apply the same way. There has to be some form of development in public policy that recognizes that women often do work commercially and in the household. The latter is not recognized as a contribution to society and yet without it we would be living in caves, I am sure of that.
        I really feel that one has to contribute first before any demands can be made. My feeling is that of an innate fairness on this as a balance between give and take has to be struck. Theoretically, one can argue that all people are equally involved when fear of no income is removed. I am thinking aloud when stating that perhaps some free ride on those who see pride on making an effort, believing they will contribute on their behalf. This in turn will not be taken kindly by those who do work. Unless one advocates an Amish society, freedom always comes with a price. Then again, I may be wrong. You certainly made my think about it.

        • RedLogix 8.1.1.1

          As to universal basic income – sounds like a good idea, but would it not greatly disturb the concept of measuring effort and achievement?

          That’s a great question. Just for clarity the kind of system that I have in mind (and that espoused by Gareth Morgan for instance) is something like an $11,000 pa UBI for all adults over the age of 18, a flat PAYE tax rate of something like 30-35%, and a modest capital gains tax in the order of 15%.

          At the same time you eliminate all benefits and superannuation. (I know there are complications here … but I’m keeping this brief.)

          The whole idea of “but would it not greatly disturb the concept of measuring effort and achievement” comes from earlier periods of human history when it was relatively easy to measure the contribution any person made. It essentially says that your only worth as a human being is your ability to work. That’s a very materialistic and narrow definition.. but one that was adequate first aproximation until recent times.

          If people didn’t have access to paid employment they could usually access some natural resource in the commons… dig for pipi, plant some kumara or the like. Anyone had the opportunity to fish and feed themselves…but that is far less true in the modern world. If you live in a city, or even in the many rural areas.. and if you are unemployed the opportunity to make a meaningful effort to support yourself in far more constrained than it was in the past.

          Moreover there is the larger idea that human beings are inherently worth more than simply what they contribute economically. This idea tells us that basic human dignity and justice demands that all people should by right be able to access some minimum needs for food, shelter and welfare. Because while a person may not be in paid work, many will be nonetheless contributing in some valued way to their family or community… but at present we largely fail to measure that effort, far less reward it.

          • foreign waka 8.1.1.1.1

            Thinking, have started to read up on it – i.e Carol Bateman. Still a bit uneasy about the concept as it reminds me on a soviet communist model. Thinking – will have to read more….you won’t win me with 11k pa. in retirement as this means I have to find a live in partner so that I can pay for heating in winter. Still thinking, PAYE 30-35% ??? Huh on 11k p.a as well as 110k, still not won over. Thinking, what about the person raising kids, maintaining the household – can be classified as social work? No income, still thinking… I have difficulties with the numbers now as well as the concept. Need to go away and read what Mr Morgan wrote about it. Thank you 🙂

            • RedLogix 8.1.1.1.1.1

              Lets see .. on an income of say $100k you’d pay $35,000 PAYE and receive $11,000 in UBI.. net about $24,000.

              At present Superannuation for a single person is about $16,000 IIRC. There are a variety of ways to bridge that gap; one is to simply top up the difference in cash. Another is to extend the Gold Card concept to wider range of services and costs..like electricity.

              Bear in mind these numbers are just examples… the whole idea can be fine tuned a lot closer than I’ve described here. Gareth Morgan’s book “The Big Kahuna” is the most recent and comprehensive version I’m aware of.

              The system combines the huge merits of a totally flat marginal tax rate at all income levels and circumstances, with the basic social justice requirements of being inherently progressive in terms of total tax.

              From an ideological pov both the right and the left can find things to like about it… and it makes many of the distortions and problems with our current tax system, simply dissapear.

              • foreign waka

                RedLogix, its late and I have to get to work early – getting up at 5am, so I just put some 5 cents in.
                Lets see .. on an income of say $100k you’d pay $35,000 PAYE and receive $11,000 in UBI.. net about $24,000. …
                Unfortunately, don’t earn that much but what I meant was that 110 k will pay as much tax as 11k – does not sit so well with me, maybe the fact that:
                Super for singles is $ 310 per week nett, too little to live on, too much to die might be the reason.
                Need to read more on that subject as at that stage I feel that I am not contributing to that conversation. Have a great evening. chiao.

            • KJT 8.1.1.1.1.2

              I think it should actually be higher. At least equivalent to today’s superannuation. With a lesser amount per person for children. And taxes on economically dysfunctional high incomes, and/or wealth, should be higher than 35%.

              Unlike Roger Douglas, Don Brash and Paula Bennet, I do not believe starving people actually motivates them to look for work. Neither does 80% abatement rates. Beneficiaries marginal tax rate, if they get part time work, is much higher than that for millionaires.

              When there was full employment, and benefits were comparatively high almost everyone still chose to work.
              Muldoon claimed to know them all by name.

              A lot of opposition is predicated on the Rights idea that people work only for money or status. That may be true for those on the right, but even many of them do unpaid work for charity or the community.

              Most people work because of the sense of meaning in their life and the sense of making a valued contribution.

              Almost all the, career changer, Teachers I trained with took a drop in income to teach.

              Even, the few, teenage dole bludgers I have known soon get sick of it and start to look for something meaningful.

              I can tell you about many people who do low paid or volunteer work, for our communities, for much less money than they could earn elsewhere with their skills.
              In fact our society could not function without these people.

              Those bringing up children, for instance.

              In fact our needs and even most luxuries can be met with most of us working less than 3 days a week.

              Entrepreneurship and social capital may well increase markedly when the penalty for failure or doing a period of volunteer community work is not so harsh.

              • Colonial Viper

                Unlike Roger Douglas, Don Brash and Paula Bennet I do not believe starving people actually motivates them to look for work.

                The top 0.1% need large pay rises, performance pay, expense accounts and stock options as incentives to work.

                Everyone else need hunger, deteriorating conditions and less income as their incentives to work.

                In other words bonuses for US, austerity for YOU

          • Kotahi Tane Huna 8.1.1.1.2

            The various levels (of UBI, income tax, capital gains) really come down to what we need to pay for – perhaps with a modest surplus for a rainy day or to save up for stuff we really want like a national cycleway 😉
            …or a major weather event.

            If whatever model was finally adopted also closed the income gap a bit that would probably lead to a reduced budget in the long term as our social indicators improved.

            No doubt there’s some entirely ideological reason why this is all wrong…

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Government provides support to flooded Nelson Tasman communities
    The Government is making an initial contribution of $200,000 to the Mayoral Relief Fund to help communities in Nelson/Tasman and Marlborough following prolonged heavy rain, flooding and high winds this week, Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty announced. “My thoughts are with everyone who has been impacted by severe weather ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • Working together on resilience and climate action in Niue
    Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta has wrapped up her first official visit to Niue, reaffirming Aotearoa New Zealand’s commitment to work together to strengthen resilience in the region and support climate action. During the visit, Nanaia Mahuta met Niue Premier Dalton Tagelagi and Cabinet, and was the first outside speaker to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Government ensures artists get resale royalties
    In line with Aotearoa New Zealand’s Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the UK and the EU, the Government is establishing an Artist Resale Royalty Scheme to ensure the creators of visual arts are recognised and rewarded when their work is resold on the secondary art market. “This is about fairness. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • Pacific regional businesses thrive with enterprise fund
    A total of 29 Pacific businesses located across regional New Zealand have received up to a $100,000 each from the Pacific Aotearoa Regional Enterprise Fund, said Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio. The Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment’s Kānoa - Regional Economic Development and Investment Unit, transferred $2 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Government responds to PM’s Chief Science Advisor’s report on commercial fishing
    Oceans and Fisheries Minister David Parker today released the Government’s response to the Future of Commercial Fishing in Aotearoa New Zealand report.  “The report has already been influential in shaping this Government’s approach to oceans and fisheries management,” David Parker said. The report calls for immediate evidence-based action and identified ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Kiwi technology safeguarding fish stocks offers global opportunity
    A Kiwi trawling innovation that enables most undersized fish to escape unharmed is going global with the help of government funding. “We’re supporting the further improvement of a fishing system that enables fish to swim freely and thereby allowing juveniles and non-targeted species to escape,” Oceans and Fisheries Minister David ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 hours ago
  • Investing in Māori success in the research, science and innovation system
    The Government is providing $6.5 million to a programme that will grow and retain the numbers of Māori in the research, science and innovation workforce. “Growing a research workforce where the perspectives and expertise of Māori are well represented is a key part of ensuring we have a thriving and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 hours ago
  • Govt’s mental health roll-out gains momentum – more funds and internships for clinical psycholog...
    The Government is increasing the number of funded clinical psychology internships and the payment interns receive on placement to support more students to choose clinical psychology as a career and address mental health workforce demand. By 2024 we will have increased the number of interns to 40 every year, along ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    8 hours ago
  • How the future RM Reform system will better protect the environment
    Environment Minister David Parker’s address on how the future resource management system will protect the environment Chateau on the Park, Christchurch  17 August 2022  Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you for coming here today to discuss the reform of the resource management system and in particular how the future system will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Wage growth best on record
    Workers’ have experienced their biggest pay hike on record, outstripping inflation. Stats NZ figures show median weekly earnings from wages and salaries jumped by 8.8 percent in the June year, the largest annual increase since records began in 1998 and well ahead of inflation at 7.3 percent. “This is an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Health Fund for Pacific communities now open
    Pacific community organisations are strongly urged to apply for the Pacific Community Health Fund, now open for applications. “Pacific communities know what works for our communities, and what will create positive changes to lift Pacific wellbeing for families,” said the Associate Minister of Health Aupito William Sio. “We only have ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government now serving up 1 million free lunches in schools a week
    Savings for a family with two children at school of up to $62 a week, over $2000 a year Lunches now reaching 220,000 kids at 950 schools every school day A million lunches delivered a week, over 63 million in total to date 2,361 jobs created or retained The Government’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Seaweed innovator wins Government support
    The Government is continuing to make regional economies stronger and more resilient with investment in a project that will likely create the world’s first commercial seaweed-based nanocellulose manufacturing plant. The innovative $1.5 million project in Paeroa in the Waikato is being supported with a $750,000 loan from the Government’s Regional ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • First community-led Oranga Tamariki partnership announced
    A new partnership strategy aimed at putting the decision-making and support for children in need in the hands of the community has been officially launched in Kaitaia by Minister for Children Kelvin Davis. TE ATATŪ, formed in partnership with Te Kahu Oranga Whānau and Oranga Tamariki, is the first such ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government partners with Germany to invest in green hydrogen research
    $6million investment in research into three green hydrogen projects New Zealand research teams now able to access European green hydrogen research facilities and expertise A green hydrogen research programme has been established with Germany will support Aotearoa New Zealand’s move towards a more sustainable, low-emissions economy, Research, Science and Innovation ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • $14.9m allocated to Māori boarding school upgrades
    Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson today announced the allocation of the remaining $14.9 million of the $20 million Budget 2021 investment into the Māori Boarding Schools initiative. The four Māori boarding schools play a significant role in the development of future Māori leaders. They have been long-standing, staunch advocates ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New High Commissioner to Kiribati appointed
    Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Andre Van Der Walt as New Zealand’s next High Commissioner to Kiribati. “As a Pacific nation we value our strong and enduring relationships throughout the region, especially with Kiribati,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “Our two nations share a strong partnership based on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • 85,000 new Kiwis provide certainty for New Zealand businesses
    More than a third of eligible migrants are now New Zealand residents thanks to the Government’s one-off, simplified path to residence, providing a way forward for migrant families and certainty for New Zealand businesses, Minister of Immigration Michael Wood has announced. “This is great news for our migrant families and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • NZ sends further significant deployment to support Ukraine
    New Zealand is making a further significant deployment of 120 New Zealand Defence Force personnel to the United Kingdom to help train Ukraine soldiers, as part of an international effort to help Ukraine continue to defend itself against Russia’s illegal war. It follows a completed deployment of 30 NZDF personnel ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Foreign Minister visit to Niue and Tonga
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta will visit Niue and Tonga this week to engage kanohi ki te kanohi with counterparts, and progress work on Aotearoa New Zealand’s Pacific Resilience and climate action priorities. “After the disruption caused by COVID-19 border closures, this is another opportunity to connect in-person with our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Creating sustainable public transport for all
    Our new approach to public transport will: Support ‘on-demand’ public transport services Allow councils to own and operate services in house Improve pay and working conditions Deliver routes and services that reflect community needs Incentivise the decarbonisation of the fleet Workers and public transport users are at the heart of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Welcome for Afghan human rights defenders, Government House Auckland
    As-salamu alaykum, Tena tatou katoa, Thank you all for being here today. To the Afghan human rights defenders and your family members, welcome to Aotearoa. And thank you Your Excellency for hosting us all here at Government House. We have with us today from Afghanistan, human rights advocates, journalists, judges, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech on tax changes for Build-to-Rent sector
    It’s my great pleasure to be able to speak with you about a really positive move for the Build-to-Rent sector. As you know, we announced changes last year to help steer property investors way from the existing pool of housing and toward solving New Zealand’s grave housing shortage - by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Tax incentives to boost long-term rental supply
    ·      Tax changes aimed at growing quality, secure rental supply ·      New and existing build-to-rent developments exempt from interest limitation rules in perpetuity, when offering ten-year  tenancies ·      Exemption to apply from 1 October 2021. The Government is encouraging more long-term rental options by giving developers tax incentives for as ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Govt marks 350th tower in push for improved rural connectivity
    The Government has marked another milestone in its push for better rural connectivity, welcoming the delivery of Rural Connectivity Group’s (RCG) 350th tower. Waikato’s Te Ākau, which sits roughly 50 kilometres out of Hamilton is home to the new tower. “The COVID 19 pandemic has highlighted the ever-increasing importance of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Joint Press Release: Trans-Tasman agriculture ministers discuss biosecurity co-operation
    Biosecurity co-operation topped the agenda when Australia and New Zealand’s agriculture ministers met yesterday. Australia’s Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Senator Murray Watt met with his New Zealand counterpart, Damien O’Connor, Minister of Agriculture, Biosecurity, and Rural Communities in a conference call, which had particular focus on foot and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Remote monitoring could give patients better care at home
    People could spend less time in hospital, thanks to a smart new remote device that lets patients be monitored at home, Health Minister Andrew Little says. “Technology has the potential to really change the way we do things – to do things that are  better for patients and at the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government supporting kids’ learning success
    Concrete steps to clarify inclusive, evidence-informed teaching practices Strengthen capability supports along the professional pathway  Enhance partnerships between the education system and whānau, iwi, communities Embed equitable additional learning supports and assessment tools that help teachers effectively notice and respond to the needs of students Improved student achievement is a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Supporting prevention, preparedness and response to global pandemics
    Aotearoa New Zealand has committed to strengthen global prevention, preparedness and responses to future pandemics with seed funding for a new World Bank initiative, Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta announced today. “We cannot afford to wait until the next pandemic. We must all play our part to support developing countries ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Overseas investors converting farms to forests must show benefit to New Zealand
    A law change to ensure that forestry conversions by overseas investors benefit New Zealand has passed its final reading in Parliament. Previously, overseas investors wishing to convert land, such as farm land, into forestry only needed to meet the “special forestry test”. This is a streamlined test, designed to encourage ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • International visitors boosting economic recovery
    International tourism recovery well underway with higher level of overseas visitor arrivals than previously expected UK and US card spend already back at pre-COVID levels Visitors staying in New Zealand longer and spending more compared to 2019 Govt support throughout pandemic helped tourism sector prepare for return of international ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Ministry’s inaugural Strategy paves way for ethnic communities
    The Ministry for Ethnic Communities has released its first strategy, setting out the actions it will take over the next few years to achieve better wellbeing outcomes for ethnic communities Minister for Diversity, Inclusion and Ethnic Communities Priyanca Radhakrishnan announced today. “The Strategy that has been released today sets out ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • World class aquatic centre opened in Hawke’s Bay
    The Prime Minister has officially opened the Hawke’s Bay Regional Aquatic Centre today saying it is a huge asset to the region and to the country. “This is a world class facility which will be able to host national and international events including the world championships. With a 10-lane Olympic ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Tulī Takes Flight winners take to the wing
    The Associate Minister of Education, Aupito William Sio, has today announced the recipients of the Tulī Takes Flight scholarships which were a key part of last year’s Dawn Raids apology. The scholarships are a part of the goodwill gesture of reconciliation to mark the apology by the New Zealand Government ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Govt supports free period products in over 2000 schools within one year
    96% of estimated menstruating students receive free period products 2085 schools involved 1200 dispensers installed Supports cost of living, combats child poverty, helps increase attendance Associate Minister of Education Jan Tinetti today hailed the free period products in schools, Ikura | Manaakitia te whare tangata, a huge success, acknowledging ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Govt boosts tourism transformation to strengthen workforce and improve outcomes
    The Tourism Industry Transformation Plan outlines key actions to improve the sector This includes a Tourism and Hospitality Accord to set employment standards Developing cultural competency within the workforce Improving the education and training system for tourism Equipping business owners and operators with better tools and enabling better work ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NZ earns another major digital investment
    Minister for the Digital Economy and Communications Dr David Clark welcomes Google Cloud’s decision to make New Zealand a cloud region. “This is another major vote of confidence for New Zealand’s growing digital sector, and our economic recovery from COVID 19,” David Clark said. “Becoming a cloud region will mean ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Changes to NCEA & University Entrance in response to COVID-19 disruptions
    A package of changes to NCEA and University Entrance announced today recognise the impact COVID-19 has had on senior secondary students’ assessment towards NCEA in 2022, says Associate Minister of Education Jan Tinetti. “We have heard from schools how significant absences of students and teachers, as a result of COVID-19, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • 60th Anniversary of the Treaty of Friendship between Aotearoa New Zealand and Samoa- “Lifelong Fri...
    Te Reo Māori tauparapara… Tapatapa tū ki te Rangi! Ki te Whei-ao! Ki te Ao-mārama Tihei mauri ora! Stand at the edge of the universe! of the spiritual world! of the physical world! It is the breath of creation Formal acknowledgments… [Your Highness Afioga Tuimalealiifano Vaaletoa Sualauvi II and Masiofo] ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New law passed to reduce gun harm
    The Government’s commitment to combatting firearms violence has reached another significant milestone today with the passage of the Firearms Prohibition Order Legislation Bill, Police Minister Chris Hipkins says. The new law helps to reduce firearm-related crime by targeting possession, use, or carriage of firearms by people whose actions and behaviours ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago