web analytics

Nats’ war on education: cutting wages

Written By: - Date published: 10:00 am, October 19th, 2010 - 87 comments
Categories: education, national, wages - Tags: ,

For some reason that I can’t quite puzzle out, the Nats hate public education. Even an elitist fool should be able to see that a well-educated workforce is valuable and public education is the cheapest way to achieve it. Yet National is attacking education at every level from early childhood to tertiary. The latest ‘offer’ to the secondary teachers would have required them to take 2 years of after-inflation pay cuts.

The teachers were offered 0.5% this year, vs 1.5% inflation, and 1.9% next year, vs over 5% forecast inflation. So that’s more than a 4% real wage cut in two years. Two years in which the economy is (supposedly) growing.

Now, to be fair, there is a one-off $1,000 payment in addition to the wage increases. But it’s only a one-off. that’s an old trick employers use to try to placate workers while not permanently increasing wages. If teachers took that deal, they would be negotiating from an even lower base wage in real terms the next time round.

There’s also an additional 3000 middle management allowances worth $1000 each, which looks like nothing more than an attempt to wedge senior teachers from junior ones.

It’s all cheap nastiness from National. The Nats promised teachers (50% of whom, I hear, voted National) higher wages and now they’re screwing them over and trying to publicly vilify them.

At the same time as saying the cupboard is bare for the people who teach our kids, the Tories can find hundreds of millions of dollars for tax cuts for the rich and to bail-out South Canterbury Finance investors.

Teachers don’t want to strike but we can’t expect these vital workers to put up with pay cuts when they could earn much more overseas. The solution to this problem is in National’s hands.

87 comments on “Nats’ war on education: cutting wages ”

  1. Draco T Bastard 1

    But the only problem that the NACTs see is that they’re having to pay taxes at all.

    • Lanthanide 1.1

      That’s a good point, really. National see tax cuts as an alternative to wage increases for the public sector. Of course the actual tax cuts for most people won’t be more than 2 or 3% of their salary, while the fat cats at the top reap in huge amounts.

      By the same token, because of the tax cuts National can’t actually afford to give proper pay rises to the public sector. So I guess the tax cuts are truly diverting money that could’ve gone to teachers, doctors and nurses and directing it to MPs, ministers and CEOs (you know, “back office bureaucrats”).

      • Draco T Bastard 1.1.1

        Cut taxes, cut wages and still expect the services (in fact they expect more from those already over-worked as they cut staff). NACT really do seem to think that the services provided by government can be provided for nothing. That people can go to work and not need food or shelter. It’s as if NACT think that, outside of work, people don’t exist.

  2. Lanthanide 2

    English was quoted briefly on Morning Report this morning, talking about inflation. He said if people could “secure reasonable wage increases, they would be able to keep ahead and be better off” due to the low inflation of 1.5% (which while low, is higher than the RBNZ predicted, btw).

    I thought that was a bit rich, considering they are denying “reasonable wage increases” to teachers.

    I also suspect Key was playing loose with numbers when he said that inflation was 5.1% when Labour left office in 2008 – I don’t recall it officially getting over 4% at any point in the last 10 years, so probably its the dodgy ‘quarter to quarter’ comparison that Bill loves to do so much, rather than a true annualised figure.

    • Lanthanide 2.1

      Ahh, Marty posted a new article about this. It reached 5%, but only because of oil prices. I think I immediately discounted that at the time as being outside their control, so hence don’t remember it.

  3. Crumble 3

    Plus the one off payment will be given to all teachers and not just union members so it is a half assed attempt to break the union.

    • Colonial Viper 3.1

      These new younger Righties don’t have the stomach for a full scale union stoush as from the days of old. The sight of protestors filling the streets in an election year raising fairness at work issues (how the Government is taking it away) is something that National desperately want to avoid.

      The Right are dead scared of a return to Class Awareness in this country because that would mean that their game is up.

  4. smhead 4

    It’s good you labour types are starting to worry about inflation on wages, even though its the lowest in six years and inflation was twice what it was now under a labour government. What did labour do? Oh that’s right you fuelled inflation by spending government money the economy couldn’t afford.

    You also forgot that tax cuts mean teachers are better off even with a zero increase.

    Why don’t you tell younger new zealanders that they will have to pay off the debt eventually for labour’s promises.

    • Pascal's bookie 4.1

      What did labour do? Oh that’s right you fuelled inflation by spending government money the economy couldn’t afford.

      Meanwhile, on planet real, the last government ran fiscal surpluses, and were attacked for doing so.

    • Bright Red 4.2

      smhead. Labour ran surpluses every year. Surpluses are deflationary because they take demand out of the economy.

      What is inflationary is borrowing for tax cuts and putting GST up.

      The tax cuts don’t make teachers better off because the tax cuts are funded by the GST hike (except the tax cuts for the rishest Kiwis, which are funded by more borrowing). It’s called a ‘tax swap’ by Key and English, remember? That’s becaue the money didn’t magically appear out of English’s arse, the cuts were funded by tax increases and borrowing

    • Draco T Bastard 4.3

      The stupid – it huts

      We’ve always been conscious of inflation as we know that pay rises that are below inflation are a pay cut. Over the last government real wages (wages after inflation) increased. Under this government real wages are going down.

      Tax cuts + Tax increases = no better off. Throw in wage cuts due to inflation (which are probably more than the tax cuts anyway) and teachers are worse off.

      I’m already telling them that they’re going to have to be paying off the debt of Nationals promises to Nationals owners (The rich).

    • Bright Red 4.4

      and either you think we’re stupid or you are talking about debt.

      National is running a $13 billion deficit this year and the government’s net debt has risen by $15.5 billion since National came to power.

      Labour left the Crown with no debt debt for the first time in a hundred years.

      • bbfloyd 4.4.1

        B.R.. what was that about smhead thinking again? i admire your obvious charitable tendencies,, but assuming thought to some quarters is a “gift” too far…

  5. Jeremy Harris 5

    I think everyone in the public sector is taking effective paycuts, part of the problem of running $240,000,000 a week deficits…

    Many Eurpoean countries (hardly right wing bastions) have had big cuts across the board…

    We’re all having to pay for big government spending and government corporate welfare over the next 10 – 20 years…

    • Draco T Bastard 5.1

      Actually, we’re all having to pay for the greed of the wealthy.

      • Bored 5.1.1

        You are right in that the wealthy have cornered (as usual) the biggest chunk of the dosh.

        Now a criticism to ALL Standardistas in this argument (in unison jumping up and down for pay increases)….DEFLATION is what you can expect in the future (next 10-20 years) which means:
        * prices will fall overall particularly “asset” values such as houses.
        * the tax take will fall meaning the state sector (welfare / health / education etc) will be pinched.
        * wages across the board will have to fall to retain employment levels.

        This message is going to fly in the faces of two generations who have known nothing but growth and inflation, you wont accept it without a fight. It is caused by a sytemic failure in the growth model (thats another story altogether).

        The new fight will not be about wages for any sector like the teachers. It will be about how the pain of deflation and contracting economic activity is to be shared. On that note thank you Draco, you know the answer: the greedy have the dosh, we need to take it back.

        • Colonial Viper 5.1.1.1

          Bear in mind that both paper dosh and that dosh in electronic ledger entries is completely worthless. We can always print a new form of paper money and invalidate theirs. The ownership of hard, productive assets however – that is what we want.

          And they will likely not give it up without a major, nasty fight.

          • nzfp 5.1.1.1.1

            Hey CV,

            “We can always print a new form of paper money”

            We don’t need to print a new form of paper money – we just need to take control of the money in the first place.

            Australian economist Steve Keen has demonstrated that we are in a debt deflation right now – mainly because the money is not being spent on productive enterprise.

            Keens video “Why credit money crashes” explains the process in detail.

            What Keen also demonstrates is that money spent on infrastructure and other productive enterprises can forestall or prevent a crash. however in order for money to be spent – without incuring debt – on these projects, the Government must take back the power to print money – and do so.

            In New Zealand, the total money supply is “206,042” Billion NZ Dollars

            The New Zealand Government has printed and spent into the economy – without interest without debt – “3,938” Billion NZ dollars.

            The mainly Australian Private Banks have created – at interest as debt – the rest, which equals “202,104” Billion NZD.

            That means that 98.09% of all of the money in New Zealand is really debt incuring interest charges to the Australian banks.

            Source: http://www.rbnz.govt.nz/statistics/monfin/c3/data.html
            M3: “202,104”
            M1: “3,938”
            Note: M1 is created by the Reserve Bank – and is the only money created at zero interest without debt by the RBNZ.

            Therefore all we need to do is stop the banks creating our money and charging us interest to use it – and create it ourselves – as we do with the M1 and then spend it on the right stuff – Rail, Telcos, Health, Education etc…

            Hey Bored

            * the tax take will fall meaning the state sector (welfare / health / education etc) will be pinched.

            So what – I don’t mean that flippantly – I mean it in the sense that the Government should be funding all of it’s social and physical infrastructure requirements by printing money.

            As you see above, the Private banks have created as debt with interest 5,132% more money then the Government has. The vast majority has been created as Housing mortgages – “171,911” Billion dollars or 85% with a monthly weighted average interest rate of 6.84%.

            The result of this is massive asset price inflation on land brought about because the Government doesn’t control the money – the banks do – consequently the banks control the economy and the nation.

            Source: http://www.rbnz.govt.nz/statistics/monfin/c7/data.html
            Housing Total: 171,911 (Billion NZD)

            If we take away from the banks the capability – via legislation and progressive land and economic rent tax policy – the ability to create money and create asset price inflation – we can divert the money into the Governments fiscal responsibilities that are normally funded by tax revenue.

            So long as we have a Government willing to beat the banks – we don’t need to worry about lower taxes – in fact the Government could get rid of GST and income taxes entirely and replace it with a zero sum gain of land and Financial Transaction (bank) taxes – where – as you know – all of the classical economists state the tax burden should be.

            So how do we get there?

            Simple – vote for a party that has a monetary, economic and fiscal policy that can achieve this – like for example these guys.

            • Draco T Bastard 5.1.1.1.1.1

              We don’t need to print a new form of paper money – we just need to take control of the money in the first place.

              We don’t need to, no, but it does help create a psychological break from one form (interest bearing debt based) of money to the other (non debt based).

    • Colonial Viper 5.2

      Stupid monetary policy destroyed the productive economy in order to favour the bankers and financiers.

      Stupid stupid stupid.

      Government overspending – maybe, some. But most of the blame has to go on not generating the level of income that we needed.

  6. john 6

    The Act party nutters believe education in the future should be completely privatized!!! Refer the Listener where Deborah Coddington talks of a Prof who has studied private education in 3rd World Countries,he’s just been over here I wonder who paid his ticket?(If Nact have their way we will be a 3rd World Country!). Billionaires such as Oprah in disaster America are also buying this cause they don’t want to pay the TAXES(Scream very loudly now) that you must pay for public education!

    • nzfp 6.1

      Education is an example of a natural monopoly,

      If the Government makes good quality education free, the burden of recovering the costs for the education is moved from the entrepreneurs – in the form of necessarily increased wages to pay back student loans – to the state in general.

      Once the costs are on the state – the state can fund the costs – as with all infrastructure costs, whether human (health, education, etc…) or physical (roading, rail, state housing, hospitals, police, firemen, libraries etc…) via the RBNZ at zero interest with zero debt. Any inflation can be taken care of with taxes – such as land and Financial taxes.

      Good public education is a boom and a win for industry and business – why they cannot understand this I have no idea.

      Captcha:hanged – hmmmm what images this word conjures up.

  7. Peter Martin 7

    As the Dom-Post reported…’Secondary school teachers are to make a play for a 4 per cent pay rise and other terms that could cost taxpayers an extra $105 million a year. ‘

    Which is what?..nearly a fifth of what the Govt borrowed to finance the last tax cuts…

    I thought too, that Govt policy was to bring us all closer to Australia.

    Literally?

    ‘Starting salaries for principals in Australia are between 11-20% higher than for New Zealand principals. For teachers, starting salaries are up to NZ$20,000 higher in Australia, and the gap widens to as much as NZ$30,000 after five or ten years experience. It’s little wonder that New Zealand loses around 600 quality, trained teachers to Australia every year.’

    • smhead 7.1

      Oh yeah so let’s just close the wage gap with Australia but only for TEACHERS.

      Australians get paid 30% more than NZers. As a proportion of the median wage NZ teachers are very well paid by OECD standards.

      Only a hundred and five mill to pay teachers more you say. Glad you’re not the finance minister. Every greedy little self interest group with no accountability but a union behind them can come up with teh same argument and hey presto, suddenly you’ve got Labour’s economic policy.

      • Draco T Bastard 7.1.1

        Yep, still stupid. Oh well, can’t expect miracles in the morning.

      • Bright Red 7.1.2

        it’s funny how the right say they want higher wages and then oppose every group who wants even an inflation-matching wage round.

        no, not funny. what’s the word? Yeah hypocritical and decietful. You bastards shoudl just come out and say it – you oppose wage increases for all workers, because you want the money to go to the bosses.

        • smhead 7.1.2.1

          No, I oppose wage rises for public sector workers when we’re in recession and there’s no money to pay it.

          • KJT 7.1.2.1.1

            There is plenty of money. Just take some more taxes of the bludgers who get over $300k.

            Unlike them Teachers pay taxes and spend money within the NZ economy. What we need to get out of a recession. Not reducing taxes for overseas company shareholders.

          • Zorr 7.1.2.1.2

            By that same reasoning there shouldn’t have been tax cuts either? Can’t have your cake and eat it too.

            Either there is NO money, or you are spending it wrong.

            • KJT 7.1.2.1.2.1

              There should not have been tax cuts when we have to borrow for them. The US deficit was a direct result of tax cuts for the wealthiest.

      • Peter Martin 7.1.3

        No…it is Govt policy to close the wage gap for ALL New Zealanders. Surely you would want teachers to embrace Govt policy? Especially after the National Standards debacle.

        Yes just over a hundred million. The Govt borrowed nearly five times that amount to help finance the tax cuts. Frankly , I’m surprised the upsurge in economic activity that the cuts caused, won’t pay for the teachers claims.

        As for greedy…even were the Govt to front up and meet the teachers claims, the teachers would still be going backwards by at least two percent per year. No, greedy would be borrowing money for tax cuts that are needed.

    • SHG 7.2

      Newsflash, starting salaries for every employee in every job in every industry are higher in Australia than in NZ. That’s because Australia is a wealthier country than NZ.

      As a percentage of GDP Australia spends less than NZ on teacher salaries.

      • Colonial Viper 7.2.1

        Yes and remind me what exactly Bill and John are doing to famously ‘close the gap’ with Australia?

        Sweet FA, as far as I can see, apart from giving business owners and the wealthy big tax breaks to deprive the Government of needed revenue and increase public debt. Oh and put in place policies to lower ordinary workers’ wages.

        That’s the plan? Seriously?

        • SHG 7.2.1.1

          Well, it looks to me like they’re trying to put in place a national standards system like Australia has, for one. You know, the national standards system instituted by Australia’s Labor Government.

          • lprent 7.2.1.1.1

            Perhaps they have someone competent doing it over there? Anne Tolley surely is not competent at anything she has done over the last two years.

            You have to remember that measurement standards were slowly going into the schools over the last 6 years with a number of trials to figure out what worked and what didn’t. Anne Silly ignored all of the work that was done on those, picked up some ideas from offshore in a half-baked manner without comprehending the issues, and then attempted to shove her idiotic ideas down the throats of the educational profession on the basis that being elected as an MP made her more competent than the people trained in the profession.

            Needless to say, the unfortunate experiment hasn’t gone very well….

            • SHG 7.2.1.1.1.1

              The Australian National Standards program was Julia Gillard’s pet project when Minister of Education under Rudd.

              • lprent

                Precisely my point…

                In case you hadn’t realized, I have few objections to performance monitoring where it is a competent program AND where it is backed up by using training and resources to fix problem issues where they arise.

                Anne Tolley’s effort doesn’t fulfill either of those criteria from what I can see. Because of the half-arsed incompetent and utterly stupid way that it was conceived and then implemented, it will never work. Moreover she has probably screwed up any real chance of putting a useful scheme in for the next decade or so.

      • bbfloyd 7.2.2

        Newsflash….Stanley(key) campaigned on a promise of”closing the wage gap with australia”. do you have trouble remembering what you had for breakfast this morning? if so, i would accept your seriously flawed recollection now… otherwise you would just be talking shit for the sake of it… you wouldn’t do that, would you?

    • SHG 7.3

      @Peter Martin:

      It’s little wonder that New Zealand loses around 600 quality, trained teachers to Australia every year

      Yes, Australia, the country with a nice new national education standards system and school rankings published online for the public to view. Yet 600 quality trained teachers every year leave NZ to work as part of that system.

      It’s amazing how their “no national standards! for the good of the chiwdwen!” principles evaporate when a few dollars are waved in front of them.

      • Peter Martin 7.3.1

        ‘Australia, the country with a nice new national education standards system and school rankings published online for the public to view.’

        Interestingly, the PM there has decided to listen to those folk who have expertise in the area ( unlike our Min of Education) and pull in the site that releases the stats that allow the league tables to be formulated.
        http://www.smh.com.au/national/education/my-school-changes-aim-to-stop-league-tables-20101014-16lwq.html

        Maybe it’s the influx of kiwi teachers that have contributed to the change. *s*

        • SHG 7.3.1.1

          Pull in? Looks to me like they’re considering a proposal to include MORE information on myschool.edu.au.

          My point remains: the NZ teachers’ unions would lose their minds if a school-comparison site like myschool.edu.au was launched in NZ, yet it’s a good thing when Australia does it…?

          • lprent 7.3.1.1.1

            With some of the horror stories that I’ve heard about how frigging subjective the national standards are, I suspect that you’d just have a GIGO site. Garbage in = Garbage out.

            The real issue is that if you’re going to measure the performance of teachers and schools then the first thing you need is a robust verifiable measurement regime. We merely have Tolley and her faith that whatever she wants will work. For some reason that appears as inadequate to most people as she appears to be as Minister of Education.

            The second part of course is that if you are going to measure performance of teachers and/or schools, then what is the purpose of it? You could of course do nothing. That will result in a widespread movement of parents trying to get their kids into the ‘better’ schools. The inevitable result of that will be a self-fulfilling prophecy with some schools expanding to the point that their systems collapse whilst sucking up scarce resources to do that increase and other schools failing for lack of students.

            Ideally you’d want to improve the performance of teachers and schools to get a more even spread. Usually by transferring skills and and resource allocation methods from where they are best used, to where they are most needed. But that doesn’t appear to be anywhere on Tolleys (or the NACT)’s mindset). It would involve doing some substantive work – something they appear to be completely adverse to doing. Instead they appear to be intent more on breaking things to fulfill a moronic election slogan than they are at actually making anything work better. But that is about the only thing that NACT ever does well. Being a destructive pack of buggers…

          • bbfloyd 7.3.1.1.2

            SHG… “lose their minds”. yet another freudian slip by the maestro..

  8. Greg 8

    Teachers’ pay is too low. But thats by no means unique to teachers. New Zealanders in general are paid poorly. When you compare teachers pay to the average wage teachers in New Zealand are paid well compared to other western nations. The issue is productivity, the problem is how do we increase it?

    Have you looked into Christina Romer’s research? She produced a paper over in the US that suggested every dollar of tax cuts caused GDP to increase by $3 on average. If for arguments sake we apply that figure directly to NZ tax cuts seem like a pretty good solution.

    • Pascal's bookie 8.1

      She produced a paper over in the US that suggested every dollar of tax cuts caused GDP to increase by $3 on average.

      In which case we should expect to see it showing up empirically

      This guy took a look at what happens when you compare changes in the size of govt revenue as a percentage of GPD vs growth in real GDP , going back as far as the data will allow in the US…

      The graph shows that Presidents who cut the tax burden produced slower growth, on average, than Presidents who increased the tax burden.

      …and looks at it again in response to various critics’ objections with no real change to the result.

      http://www.presimetrics.com/blog/?p=92

    • Draco T Bastard 8.2

      And yet all we’ve seen over the last 3 decades of tax cuts and giving the wealth to the wealthy is less and less productivity increases. This would indicate that when she did her “research” she didn’t bother to check reality.

      • Colonial Viper 8.2.1

        Of course we got less wealth amongst ordinary peeps and we got less productivity.

        TAX CUTS ARE FREE MONEY. The Right long ago decided that it was easier to lobby Congress for an extra dollar back as opposed to actually generating a new dollar productively.

        And we see the results all around us. The top 5% massively wealthy, everyone else pretty much struggling, and the bottom 20% with no real, or even negative net worth.

        The middle class was virtually created using progressively higher taxes on the rich. One hundred years ago there was a yawning chasm between haves and have nots. And its coming back.

    • Bright Red 8.3

      Christina Roma? Who’s that? You want to look at Zandi’s testimony to congress on multipliers. Not some no-body’s dodgy numbers.

      the problem that causes NZ’s low wages is not low productivity. It is employee’s share of GDP. In Australia employee compensation is 47% of GDP. Here, it’s 43.5% and falling.

      If New Zealand workers’ share of the economy was the same as their Australian counterparts, that would close about half the wage gap right away.

      Why do Australian workers get a higher share of the economic output of their country? Because they have strong unions to demand a fair share.

      • Pascal's bookie 8.3.1

        It’s ‘Romer’.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina_Romer

        Her recent work (with David Romer) has focused on the impact of tax policy on government and general economic growth. This work looks at the historical record of US tax changes from 1945-2007, excluding “endogenous” tax changes made to fight recessions or offset the cost of new government spending. It finds that such “exogenous” tax increases, made for example to reduce inherited budget deficits, reduce economic growth (though by smaller amounts after 1980 than before).[10] Romer and Romer also find “no support for the hypothesis that tax cuts restrain government spending; indeed … tax cuts may increase spending. The results also indicate that the main effect of tax cuts on the government budget is to induce subsequent legislated tax increases.”[11] However, she notes that “Our baseline specification suggests that an exogenous tax increase of one percent of GDP lowers real GDP by roughly three percent.”

        And what she said is apparently a little different and more nuanced than “every dollar of tax cuts caused GDP to increase by $3 on average”

    • KJT 8.4

      Do you know who paid her?
      Reality has proven differently both in the States and here.

  9. Greg 9

    Draco do you know who Christina Romer is?

    Sorry here’s the link to the paper: http://www.econ.berkeley.edu/~cromer/RomerDraft307.pdf

    Take a look at her paper. She expressly refers to why she took an approach different to studies like the one you reffered to Pascal. A study like that is likely to suffer from severe endogenaity. Her analysis is also emperical Draco.

    • Bunji 9.1

      Her analysis also only supports tax cuts in a very limited set of circumstances – when the economy is going well for a start. But there is more learned commentary here and more commentary here. The Romers (David and Christina) seem to generally be more into spending than tax cuts as a means of stimulating an economy, thinking the multipliers are better there.

    • Draco T Bastard 9.2

      Any measure, including executive actions, that receives serious discussion is included in our enumeration. Measures that are referred to only in passing or are discussed only in lists of all measures that affected revenues over some period are excluded.

      Excluding tax changes because people didn’t talk about them doesn’t seem like a great way to determine what effects tax changes had on the economy. I’m sure that such well publicised changes would have had more of an effect than ones that weren’t talked about. By knowing that those changes are coming people plan for the “boost” to the economy that is expected and so you end up with a boost to the economy. Effectively it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.

      You may not get the same result from less known tax changes. You’d have to do a study using the same criteria (just reversed) to choose the selection on those to prove it. Essentially, if the unknown tax decreases have the same effect then it can be said that decreasing taxes boosts the economy. If they don’t, even over time, then there’s no evidence that decreasing taxes boosts the economy but that people planned for a boost because they were told that there was one coming.

      I’m still reading the rest of it but that bit was bugging me.

  10. Greg 10

    Sorry Bright Red, didn’t see your comment.

    Christina Romer is the head of Obama’s council of economic advisors, which probably makes her the most powerful economist in the world. Still thinks she’s a nobody? See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina_Romer

    • Bright Red 10.1

      you wrote Roma. Who is a nobody. You can understand the confusion.

      What Romer says is that if you raise $1 of tax and take that money out of the economy (ie you don’t spend it) then GDp is decreased by $3. That makes sense.

      But the idea that tax cuts increase GDP significantly is Reaganite bollocks. It didn’t work then, it won’t work now.

      And doing it wold mean taking the deficit to dangerous levels.

      • Colonial Viper 10.1.1

        Seriously why are people still talking about increases in ‘GDP’? Who gives a flying frak about GDP?

        GDP is a shite measure of economic activity, and not only because GDP can increase exponentially and unsustainably (hello Ireland, Iceland), but it also doesn’t say who that wealth is going to – or not going to.

        And if you build enough prisons and enough tanks using enough debt, you’ll also see wonderful increases in GDP. Something to strive for I guess.

    • Vicky32 10.2

      Because Obama is the Leader Of the Free World, right? Ma dai! It is to throw up..
      Deb

  11. Greg 11

    Urm actually I wrote Romer. Look up, but thats beside the point.

    Yes it is true that the corallary is not always correct and I apologise for misquoting Romer. But in this case I think its pretty clear that it is. Why wouldn’t putting money back into the economy have a similar GDP multiplier than taking it out of it? To refute that statement would suggest that if I legislated to increase tax by 1% GDP would fall 3% then reversing that change would not result in a similar change in the other direction, if that were the case GDP would never recover from a tax increase.

    • Pascal's bookie 11.1

      “Why wouldn’t putting money back into the economy have a similar GDP multiplier than taking it out of it? ”

      I guess it all depends on how the govt pays for the tax cut, and what people do with it.

      1)The govt cuts taxes by increasing the deficit rather than cutting spending, and people use that extra money to buy stuff at the shops. (might equal gdp 🙂 )

      2) Govt cuts taxes by decreasing spending, and people pay off their mortgages a little bit quicker. (might equal gdp 🙁 )

  12. Greg 12

    Oh and Viper, something Churchill said about democracy rings a bell here. GDP is shit measure, but at this point in time, it’s the best one we’ve got!

    Btw, going into debt to build stuff will boost GDP in the short term, but not in the long term. Thats why you look at GDP’s trend over time.

    • Colonial Viper 12.1

      GNP per capita is an alternative measure. So is green GDP. GDP is definitely *not* the only measure. At most it should be included in a basket of other measures.

      Politicians do not look at GDP’s trend over time. They have discovered that you can go into a lot of debt and play a lot of financial games to increase GDP before any one pays attention. And even then you can keep doing it more and more until you finally fall over (Ireland, Iceland, Greece).

    • bbfloyd 12.2

      Greg… “it’s the best one we’ve got”. you must be joking! it may have simplicity going for it, but that is also it’s major weakness… you understand, i’m sure, that oversimplifying complicated issues like measuring the wealth of a whole society would have to entail many different measures, and account for the many facets of modern living.. a countries economy is made up of almost countless different factors, and contributers.. using gdp as a measure of the overall wealth of a society is simply a tool for misdirection, or misinformation.

  13. burt 13

    Public education as we have it in NZ is great for union membership numbers – pity the kids are not paying union fees or the system might consider them important as well.

    • KJT 13.1

      If you considered them important you would be asking for a higher wage society. Not a future of boring Mcjobs as we sink to the same level as Somalia.

      Those who do not want to contribute to a fair and functional society should just move there and spare us their greed.

    • bbfloyd 13.2

      Burt.. are you trying to win some sort of competition to see who can say the stupidest thing today?

  14. Greg 14

    Your right its not the only measure. But GNP wold be incredibly difficult and expensive to calculate, plus I don’t see the argument for GNP when your concerned about domestic policy. Green GDP is effectively GDP but with a cost element to it, I’ve got no problem with that but its still essentially the same measure.

    I’m not defending the integrity of politicians here! Perhaps I should have said thats why ‘normal people’ look at GDP over time.

    Pascal I’m a little confused as to exactly what your saying but obviously you shouldn’t go into ridiculous amounts of debt just to cut taxes (although many seem willing to do it to fund infrastructure spending – which always confuses me). Funding tax cuts by cutting spending is much the same, you should do it only when the costs benefits outweigh the costs. The point I was making is the benefit actually seems to be a lot higher than what many people think it is.

    • Colonial Viper 14.1

      Who are you kidding too expensive? that’s what govts pay their statistics and treasury departments for. GNP was the main measure of economic activity right through the 1970’s and 1980’s until the neocon right wing turned up with their freemarket globalisation agenda and realised that GNP would signal the damage being done to individual countries’ economies way too early. So all of a sudden GDP became en vogue.

      Really very very concerned you keep pushing GDP as your main measure when it has been excoriated for its weaknesses for so many years now.

      And if you think Green GDP is a better measure why don’t you start using it.

      plus I don’t see the argument for GNP when your concerned about domestic policy.

      For setting domestic policy GNP is a far superior measure than GDP. GNP demonstrates the benefits that the citizens of a country are earning from their economic activity. GDP does not.

      Like I said, I’m now very suspicious of why you keep pushing GDP the way you do, it is a measure favoured primarily by free market neo-con Chicago School types.

  15. Nats cut public ed because it is not a market mechanism. They want natstandards, performance pay, and privatisation schools to introduce market signals and deliver cheapest skilled labour with fundy family morals (ha ha) cause works makes us free. Best and bright can user pays, and worst and dumbest can live in containers. Seth Key.

    • SHG 15.1

      they want natstandards, performance pay

      Yes, like Australia has. That country NZ is supposedly trying to catch up to.

      • Dan 15.1.1

        SHG, if Nat Standards are the linchpin of the bright new educational future, how come private schools in NZ do not have to do National standards??

        I am not sure what proportion of Nact ministers send their kids private, but I imagine there are quite a few.

        “National standards” implies the whole country. Or does it mean a lesser label for the munters who can’t afford private?

        • Bright Red 15.1.1.1

          and how come, if national standards are so great, the Maori Party got a special exemption so that maori language schools aren’t covered by the standards?

        • SHG 15.1.1.2

          SHG, if Nat Standards are the linchpin of the bright new educational future…(snip)

          I’m not saying that they are (although I personally favour them); I’m saying that it’s contradictory to say “we need to emulate Australia” and at the same time say “national standards are a terrible thing”. National standards have been adopted in Australia with almost universal community support.

          • Dan 15.1.1.2.1

            SHG, you haven’t answered my question!

            • SHG 15.1.1.2.1.1

              Dan, I assumed your question – predicated as it was on National Standards being “the linchpin of the bright new educational future” – was rhetorical.

              • Dan

                No, it was not rhetorical: why do the Nats insist on National standards for all except for their mates in private schools? Answer please SHG.

          • lprent 15.1.1.2.2

            National standards have been adopted in Australia with almost universal community support.

            Because they were done by a competent politician who listened to experts who knew what they were talking about. She talked to the educational community and the parent groups and ensured that there was a reasonable degree of buy-in by the various vested parties for a scheme that was a compromise.

            As far as I can tell Anne Tolley talked to her navel lint after reading the study that she considered to be comprehensive – the national party slogan on the subject. To ensure that she never heard anything different, she then proceeded to do sham consultations with carefully selected groups that told her what she wanted to hear.

            For some strange reason, the Anne Tolley approach didn’t work all that well.. Can you explain why that might be?

            • graham 15.1.1.2.2.1

              Because the ppta will opose any thing that national does full frigging stop
              It has become a branch of the labour party rather than a group representing teachers.

              • Draco T Bastard

                No, the PPTA only opposes that which is stupid. If there was a case for National Standards they’d support it. Even the person who suggested it to National in the first place, Hattie, doesn’t support National Standards in their present form. This should tell you something about Nationals implementation.

          • Colonial Viper 15.1.1.2.3

            Did you ever consider that’s because Tolley wasn’t in charge of signing off the final version the Aussies used, not for running the Australian implementation process?

            I’m saying that it’s contradictory to say “we need to emulate Australia”

            Who the hell is saying that we need to emulate Australia? John Key? If so that’s only PR spin, we know NACT are not serious about it.

  16. Dan 16

    And while I am seeking answers to a few mysteries, here is another question: how come since May the Minister, and now the Prime Minister are persisting with the mischief that police have very reasonably taken a 1.3% increase over two years? Where is the mainstream media to check these figures?

    My understanding, which may be erroneous, is that police automatically get 2% each year for not striking. This year they all got another $2000 in July (ie about 1.8% average), and next year get another $2000 plus 1.3%. In all, approximately 7% over two years.

    Are these figures correct?

    • Dan 16.1

      My digging has surfaced the following:

      NZPA NZPA
      Tuesday, 23 June 2009 – 5:28pm
      Bill English. Pic: NZPA
      Bill English. Pic: NZPA

      Wellington, June 23 NZPA – Finance Minister Bill English has criticised the Police Association for seeking a 4 percent pay rise for its members during the recession.

      He said in Parliament today police had probably the most secure jobs in New Zealand and the Government was strongly supporting the force.

      “We are pouring millions into more police to help them do the job, Tasers so that they can be safe, DNA testing to give them more capacity to resolve crimes — but I’m not sure the police are in step with the public in looking for a 4 percent pay increase,” he said during an economic debate.

      “The police get a 2 percent pay increase regardless.

      “That, by any standard in the rest of the community, is quite generous compared with people who are losing their jobs and taking pay cuts.”

      Mr English said the Police Association was claiming 2 percent above the pay rise its members were going to get.

      “It would do well for the association to check whether it is reflecting the views of its membership and the communities that those members are serving,” he said.

      End of article: Thank you Mr English. You might need to let the Minister aand the PM know the facts.

      And so: The police get an automatic 2% because they are not allowed to strike, so anything else they got would be on top of that. But I think the $1,000 would be a one-off payment and not added to their wage scale.

      I think they ended up with $1000 this year (not $2000) and 1.3% next year, but if they were already guaranteed 2%, that means 3.8% this year and 3.3% next year?? Which adds up to 7.1%.

  17. Vicky32 17

    And on 3 News right now, a bunch of moronic students at AUT, who say “I don’t know what it’s for” about their student union… 3 News are creaming their jeans about the abolition of compulsory student union membership… (It is relevant, I promise!) 🙂

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Cost of Government Southern Response proactive package released
    The Government has announced the proactive package for some Southern Response policyholders could cost $313 million if all those eligible apply. In December, the Minister Responsible for the Earthquake Commission, David Clark announced a proactive package for SRES claimants who settled their claims before October 2014. It trailed the judgment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    17 hours ago
  • New support to reduce emissions from public building and construction projects
    Government agencies are getting new support to reduce carbon emissions generated by construction of new buildings, with the release of practical guidance to shape decisions on public projects. The Ministers for Building and Construction and for Economic Development say a new Procurement Guide will help government agencies, private sector suppliers, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    21 hours ago
  • He Whenua Taurikura: New Zealand’s first Hui on Countering Terrorism and Violent Extremism
    The Prime Minister has opened New Zealand’s first hui on Countering Terrorism and Violent Extremism, which is being held in Christchurch over the next two days. The hui delivers on one of the recommendations from the report of the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the terrorist attack on Christchurch masjidain ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    22 hours ago
  • Speech to inaugural Countering Terrorism Hui
    E aku nui, e aku rahi, Te whaka-kanohi mai o rātou mā, Ru-ruku-tia i runga i te ngākau whakapono, Ru-ruku-tia i runga i te ngākau aroha, Waitaha, Ngāti Mamoe, Ngai Tahu, nāu rā te reo pohiri. Tena tātou katoa. Ki te kotahi te kakaho ka whati, ki te kapuia, e ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    22 hours ago
  • Campaign shines a light on elder abuse
    A new campaign is shining a spotlight on elder abuse, and urging people to protect older New Zealanders. Launched on World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, the Office for Seniors’ campaign encourages friends, whānau and neighbours to look for the signs of abuse, which is often hidden in plain sight. “Research suggests ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Farewelling sports administrator and philanthropist Sir Eion Edgar
    Sport and Recreation Minister Grant Robertson today expressed his sorrow at the passing of Sir Eion Edgar – a leading sports administrator and celebrated philanthropist who has made a significant impact both within and beyond the sport sector. “Sir Eion’s energy, drive and generosity has been truly immense. He leaves ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government to apologise for Dawn Raids
    The Government will make a formal apology for the wrongs committed during the Dawn Raids of the 1970’s. Between 1974 and 1976, a series of rigorous immigration enforcement policies were carried out that resulted in targeted raids on the homes of Pacific families. The raids to find, convict and deport overstayers ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Humanitarian support for Bangladesh and Myanmar
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced that New Zealand is providing NZ $8.25 million in humanitarian assistance to support refugees and their host populations in Bangladesh and to support humanitarian need of internally displaced and conflict affected people in Myanmar.  “Nearly four years after 900,000 Rohingya crossed the border ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Poroporoaki: Dame Georgina Kamiria Kirby
    E Te Kōkō Tangiwai, Te Tuhi Mareikura, Te Kākākura Pokai kua riro i a matou. He toka tū moana ākinga ā tai, ākinga ā hau, ākinga ā ngaru tūātea.  Haere atu rā ki te mūrau a te tini, ki te wenerau a te mano.  E tae koe ki ngā rire ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Feedback sought on future of housing and urban development
    New Zealanders are encouraged to have their say on a long-term vision for housing and urban development to guide future work, the Housing Minister Megan Woods has announced. Consultation starts today on a Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development (GPS-HUD), which will support the long-term direction of Aotearoa ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Clean car package to drive down emissions
    New rebates for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles start July 1 with up to $8,625 for new vehicles and $3,450 for used. Electric vehicle chargers now available every 75km along most state highways to give Kiwis confidence. Low Emission Transport Fund will have nearly four times the funding by 2023 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Progress towards simpler process for changing sex on birth certificates
    The Government is taking the next step to support transgender, non-binary and intersex New Zealanders, by progressing the Births, Deaths, Marriages and Relationships Registration Bill, Minister of Internal Affairs, Jan Tinetti announced today. “This Government understands that self-identification is a significant issue for transgender, non-binary and intersex New Zealanders, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Crown speeds up engagement with takutai moana applicants
    The Crown is taking a new approach to takutai moana applications to give all applicants an opportunity to engage with the Crown and better support the Māori-Crown relationship, Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Minister Andrew Little says. Following discussions with applicant groups, the Crown has reviewed the existing takutai moana application ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment (AODT) Court opens
    The Minister of Justice, Kris Faafoi, and the Minister for Courts, Aupito William Sio, have welcomed the opening of a new Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment (AODT) Court in Hamilton. The AODT Court (Te Whare Whakapiki Wairua) addresses situations where substance abuse and offending are intertwined. “New Zealanders have told ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • EU and UK FTAs top of list for first ministerial trip since COVID-19
    Trade and Export Growth Minister Damien O’Connor today announced details of his planned visit to the United Kingdom and European Union next week, where he will hold trade and agriculture discussions to further New Zealand’s economic recovery from COVID-19. The visit will add political weight to ongoing negotiations with both the EU ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Arihia Bennett to chair Royal Commission Ministerial Advisory Group
    Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu chief executive Arihia Bennett MNZM has been appointed chair of the newly appointed Ministerial Advisory Group on the Government’s Response to the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the terrorist attack on Christchurch mosques. “Twenty-eight people from diverse backgrounds across Aotearoa have been selected for the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Speech to the New Zealand Medical Association General Practitioners' Conference, Rotorua
    Ki ngā pou maha o te whare hauora o Aotearoa, kei te mihiTo the pillars of our health system I acknowledge/thank you Ki te ope hapai hauora o roto o tēnei rūma, kei te mihi To our health force here in the room today, I acknowledge/thank you He taura tangata, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Karangahape Road upgrades are streets ahead
    The upgrades to Karangahape Road makes the iconic street more pedestrian and cycle-friendly, attractive and environmentally sustainable, Transport Minister Michael Wood and Auckland Mayor Phil Goff said at the formal celebration of the completion of the Karangahape Road Enhancements project. The project included widening footpaths supporting a better outdoor dining ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Speech to APEC business event
    E ngā tumu herenga waka, ākina ā ngaru, ākina ā tai ka whakatere ngā waka ki te whakapapa pounamu, otirā, ki Tamaki o ngā waka Tena koutou katoa… To the great leaders assembled, who guided your waka through turbulent times, challenging waters and you continue to navigate your respective waka ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Pause on Quarantine Free Travel with Victoria extended
    Following an assessment of the COVID-19 outbreak in greater Melbourne, New Zealand’s Quarantine Free Travel pause with Victoria will continue for a further seven days, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says. There are now 93 cases associated with the outbreak in greater Melbourne, spread over four clusters. Contact tracing efforts ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Supplier Diversity Aotearoa Summit: Navigate 2021
    *** Check with delivery *** A mihi to all who have contributed to making today a success – starting with you! As you have explored and navigated government procurement today you will hopefully have reflected on the journey of our people so far – and how you can make a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Pukemiro School to close
    Pukemiro Primary School near Huntly will close following years of declining roll numbers, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. “I’ve consulted with the School Commissioner, and this decision acknowledges the fact that the few remaining students from last term are now settled at other nearby schools. “I want to thank ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Govt acts to protect NZers from harmful content
    New Zealanders will be better protected from harmful or illegal content as a result of work to design a modern, flexible and coherent regulatory framework, Minister of Internal Affairs Jan Tinetti announced today. New Zealand currently has a content regulatory system that is comprised of six different arrangements covering some ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Consultation on exemption of new builds from proposed tax rules
    The Government has today confirmed new builds will be exempt from planned changes to the tax treatment of residential investment property.  Public consultation is now open on details of the proposals, which stop interest deductions being claimed for residential investment properties other than new builds.   “The Government’s goal is to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech for Predator Free 2050 Conference
    Introduction E ngā mana E ngā reo E ngā iwi Tēnā koutou katoa   Ka huri ki ngā mana whenua o te rohe nei. Tēnā koutou He mihi hoki ki a tatou kua tau mai nei i raro i te kaupapa o te rā Ko Ayesha Verrall toku ingoa No ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New stock exchange to help grow small businesses
    A new share trading market, designed as a gateway to the NZX for small-to-medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), has been granted a licence by the Government. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister, David Clark said Catalist Markets Ltd will provide a simpler and more affordable ‘stepping stone’ for SMEs to raise capital. “This ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Visa extensions provide certainty to employers and 10,000 visa holders
    Changes to onshore visas will provide employers and visa holders with more certainty, Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi has announced. Around 10,000 Working Holiday visas and Supplementary Seasonal Employment (SSE) work visas due to expire between 21 June 2021 and 31 December 2021 will be extended for another six months to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Border class exceptions approved for more farm workers and vets
    The Government has approved border class exceptions for an additional 200 dairy workers and 50 veterinarians to enter New Zealand, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced today.  “It is clear from conversations with the dairy and veterinarian sectors that they are facing workforce pressures. These border exceptions will go a long ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • More freezers and South Island hub to support vaccine roll-out
    A South Island hub and 17 new ultra-low temperature freezers will help further prepare New Zealand for the ramp up of the vaccination programme in the second half of this year, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says. The new freezers arrived in New Zealand on 27 May. They’re currently being ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Speech at the release of Climate Change Commission's final advice
    Good morning – and thank you Prime Minister. Over the last three and half years we have been putting in place the foundations for a low-carbon Aotearoa that will be a catalyst for job creation, innovation, and prosperity for decades to come. In that future, many of our everyday tasks ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Achievable blueprint for addressing climate change released
    Report says Government making good progress on emissions reduction, but more action required Meeting climate targets achievable and affordable with existing technology Economic cost of delaying action higher than taking action now Benefits from climate action include health improvements and lower energy bills All Ministers to help meet climate targets ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Speech to release of Climate Commission final report
    A few years ago in a speech in Auckland, I compared climate change to the nuclear free movement of roughly four decades ago. And I did so for a few reasons. Firstly, because the movement of the 1980s represented a life or death situation for the Pacific, and so does ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Appointment of Judge of the High Court
    Auckland Barrister Michael Robinson has been appointed a Judge of the High Court, Attorney‑General David Parker announced today. Justice Robinson graduated with a BA and an LLB (Hons) from the University of Auckland in 1996, and commenced practice as a solicitor with Brookfields in Auckland.  In 1998 he travelled to London ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government takes action to improve protections for subcontractors
    The Construction Contracts (Retention Money) Amendment Bill – which provides greater financial protection for subcontractors, has passed its first reading today. The Bill amends the retention provisions in the Construction Contracts Act 2002 (CCA) to provide increased confidence and transparency for subcontractors that retention money they are owed is safe. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • 1 million more Pfizer doses to arrive in July
    Pfizer has scheduled delivery of an estimated 1 million doses of vaccine to New Zealand during July, COVID1-9 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “These consignments will double the total number of Pfizer doses we have received this year to more than 1,900,000 – enough to fully vaccinate almost 1 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Long-term home of the Independent Children’s Monitor identified
    The Independent Children’s Monitor (Te Mana Whakamaru Tamariki Motuhake), which is currently located within the Ministry of Social Development (MSD), will become its own departmental agency within Government. “Following the recommendations of several reviews, Cabinet agreed in 2019 to build a significantly expanded independent monitor for children in care,” Carmel ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Racing Integrity Board members announced
    The new Racing Integrity Board will be up and running from July 1 to ensure high standards of animal welfare, integrity and professionalism in the racing industry. Racing Minister Grant Robertson today announced the appointments to the new Board: Sir Bruce Robertson KNZM – Chair Kristy McDonald ONZM QC Penelope ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Govt crackdown on organised crime continues
    A major operation against multiple organised crime groups with international links will make a significant dent in drug harm and violent offending linked to organised crime networks, Police Minister Poto Williams says. “I want to take an opportunity to congratulate the Police for their role in Operation Trojan Shield. This ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Farm planning framework supports farmers into the future
    A new framework, agreed between Government and industry, will make it easier for farmers and growers to integrate future greenhouse gas emissions and freshwater regulatory requirements into their farm planning, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor said. “The Good Farm Planning Principles Guide out today, provides guidance for how farmers can organise ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Enhanced Task Force Green Approved for Canterbury
    The Government has activated Enhanced Taskforce Green (ETFG) in response to the Canterbury floods. The Minister of Social Development and Employment, Hon Carmel Sepuloni says $500,000 will be made available to help with the clean-up. The flooding in Canterbury has been a significant and adverse event damaging farmland, homes, roads ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago