web analytics

A decent job with fair pay

Written By: - Date published: 11:36 am, April 15th, 2008 - 30 comments
Categories: labour, national, workers' rights - Tags: , ,

2That’s what the labour movement is all about: ensuring that people who want to work can find jobs and that they receive fair reward for their labour in decent conditions, so they can afford a good standard of living for themselves and their families. A job gives people a sense of purpose, a feeling that they are part of society, useful.

Good wages and conditions make people feel respected and enable a decent standard of living. With employment comes lower crime, fewer suicides, better health, and a dozen other better social outcomes. Work enables people to fulfill everyone’s most basic dream: a good life for themselves and the ones they care about.

The right-wing destroyed that dream for many New Zealanders in the 1980s and 1990s. From 1988, the number of New Zealanders with jobs started falling even as the population kept growing. Things got worse under National: it wasn’t until 1996 that the number of kiwis with jobs reached the same level as in 1988, there were many more unemployed. Those that did have jobs often had worse pay and conditions. National’s record on employment is pathetic; the number of jobs grew only 29,000 a year on average.

166,000 people were on the unemployment benefit when Labour came to power; 166,000 people whose potential was being wasted. The lead priority of the Labour-led governments has been fixing this problem; 47,000 jobs a year have been added. Wages have grown 25% after inflation in eight years. Reports from the Labour Party congress are that the biggest applause of all came when Helen Clark announced that the number of people on the unemployment benefit is now less than 20,000, the lowest number since 1979. An astounding achievement, of which Labour and the labour movement can be justifiably proud.

30 comments on “A decent job with fair pay”

  1. higherstandard 1

    Credit where credit’s due it is good news that there are less people on the unemployment benefit.

    SP do you have the figures for sickness and invalid and the DPB as well – and no I’m not trying to bait you I honestly don’t know which way these are moving and I believe it’s important to look at them all before forming an opinion.

    Just a link to where I can find them myself would be fine.

    Thanks

  2. Steve Pierson 2

    HS. Benefit faxsheets Dec 2007

    for some reason, the number under 20,000 (which must be march quarter) is not on the MSD site yet. I also saw somewhere, can’t remember where, that the number on sickness is fallen below 45,000.

    There’s a post looking at overall benefit numbers on kiwiblogblog – here it is

    [lprent: remind me at some stage to put a page up about how to post links. Fixed these so they don’t fall all over my screen.]

  3. Steve Pierson 3

    those kbb fellas love their graphs, here’s one on long-term beneficaires

  4. The right-wing destroyed that dream for many New Zealanders in the 1980s and 1990s. From 1988, the number of New Zealanders with jobs started falling even as the population kept growing.

    First of all, in the years 1984-90, Labour was in government, which proves that Labour is not so hot on the employment side of life as you would like your shallow-minded lefties to believe. Rather your analysis is insulting to independent and intelligent thought. Perhaps a more intelligent examination would actually have admitted that during the 1980s and 90s, the New Zealand economy was going through a bit of a fiscal slump and part of that is the unfortunate premise of that slump is high unemployment. No one is denying that unemployment is a bad thing, but really to blame National as the sole reason for unemployment is just pathetic.

    With employment comes lower crime, fewer suicides, better health, and a dozen other better social outcomes.

    Dude, you are so, so wrong here. If higher employment somehow miraculously equates to lower crime, lower suicides and better health then what the hell has gone wrong? Since Labour came into power in 1999 and the astonishing decrease in unemployment, violent crime has risen over 43%, grievous assaults up 93%, robberies up 65%; serious assaults up 53%, while sex crimes have risen by 18%; New Zealand has one of the highest rates of suicide in the OCED at a rate of 13.2 people in every 100,000 killing themselves; our health system is in pieces as waiting lists have grown longer, there are no beds and the extra $5 billion in spending has done nothing to assist the health crisis in New Zealand. So where exactly are the benefits you so wilfully scatter to your adoring mass of fellow unionists?

    166,000 people were on the unemployment benefit when Labour came to power; 166,000 people whose potential was being wasted.

    Yes, now their potential is being wasted on Sickness and Illness Benefits. Well done Labour. Worse still all your statistics are references to Clark’s speeches or other Standard posts, not to Statistics New Zealand or any other creditable source.

    Your post will be welcomed by pro-Labour friends and family, but it will do nothing to convince swingers or honest New Zealanders who have seen New Zealand deteriorate since the first Clark-led government.

    But no fear, she’ll be gone in a short while.

  5. Phil 5

    “Wages have grown 25% after inflation in eight years”

    Umm… No.

    I saw the previous post with the blue/red graph, but didn’t have time to do my own digging until now.

    From Sep quarter 1999 to Dec quarter 2007, real salary and wages (as measured by the Labour Cost Index and adjusted for inflation using the CPI) actually FELL 1.1%.
    However, the LCI is not a complete picture – it excludes salary and wages changes derived from “quality change”, things like increased performance of the employee, increased hours worked etc etc.

    So, my next step was to take a look at Average Hourly Earnings, as produced by the Quarterly Employment Survey. For the same period (Sep 99 to Dec 07) Average Hourly Earnings increased 6.9% – less than 1% per year under Labour.

    For the record, the same inflation adjustment to Ave Hrly Erngs for the period Sep90 to Sep99 shows a 7.4% increase, which indicates a minor victory to the Blue corner

  6. Tane 6

    HS, I’ve got a post I’ve been meaning to put up since last year on benefit numbers. I’ll get it together at some point…

  7. Scribe 7

    What Hoolian said.

    [lprent: This isn’t a blog for voting on anything, it is a forum for comment. Don’t waste bandwidth.]

  8. even 8

    That’s completely gaga.

    NZ society has continued to un-ravel under the labour govts mis-management.
    Our fastest growing industry is or close to the property market yet we are at historic lows in home ownership. Debt is rampent, finance holds controling aspects in every part of of society, work is not abut work and contributing to nz society, its about chasing debt based money and working longer hours.

    We should be a rich society, and a world leading democracy with a wide distribution of wealth and increasing leisure time.

    Labour havn’t rolled back the accelerated mis-management that started with Roger Douglas, in fact they have resorted to FTA’s with the worlds leading slave plantation in order to try and keep the books balanced.

    By Cullens, own admission back in the day-a skeleton he’s probably forgotten about, the monetary system is a con and makes fools out of the people.

    One of the few things going for labour is they arn’t National…..well we could find wiser leadership in a random sample from a kindergarten for that.

    DSC 08.

  9. Steve Pierson 9

    Hoolin. Ask any criminologist, sociologist or anyone who has studied the subject if unemployment and crime are related. In fact just think about it for a moment, who is more likely to commit a crime – someone with a job and an income or someone without one. In fact – go to stats.govt.nz – take the crime figures and the unemployment figures and see how they run together. as for the benefit numbers look at the links I gave HS on overall benefit numbers, you don’t know what you are talking about.

    phil. real incomes are up, don’t be silly. the labour cost index is about the most stupid metric you could choose to measure peoples incomes. for starters, it doesn’t reflect employment levels or work hours.

  10. Stephen 10

    Hoolian, I would say that “the years 1984-90, Labour was in government, ” WERE part of the er, “right wing dream”, it’s just that that version of Labour was carrying those policies out…

  11. Indeed unemployment has fallen significantly over the last 8 years. This however may well be in part explained by the large increase in emigration to Australia over the same period.

    It is also of interest that productivity has consistently dropped over the last 8 years after growing in the second half of the nineties. Higher productivity is what it takes to get higher wages.

  12. Stephen 12

    You’re saying it’s not skilled people, but the unemployed moving to Australia?

  13. Steve Pierson 13

    mawgxxxiv. provide some statistical proof.

    The number of employed people in New Zealand has risen dramtically under labour, having stagnated under National. It’s the subject of my next post.

    Productivity has not dropped, either. God, you’re living in an information vacuum filled only be farrar. The rate of productivity growth is lower but that’s inevitable when you are bringing in every worker and every piece of capital you can (including the lower quality ones) becuase the economy has grown so fast all the slack that National created in the 1990s is gone.

    Productivity gowth is a crappy measure of appropriate wage growth.

  14. “…productivity has consistently dropped over the last 8 years after growing in the second half of the nineties. Higher productivity is what it takes to get higher wages.”

    The reason for the rise in productivity over the 1990s was the rise in unemployment, combined with Pinochet-style labour laws. More unskilled/less skilled workers typically are the first to end up out of work when the economy slumps.
    There is only growth in the remaining employment sector because in eras of high unemployment the retained staff are more productive on average than the unemployed. I’m sure Robert Mugabe could say that his workforce had high productivity in exactly the same manner.

    To improve overall productivity requires investment in technology, staff, and operational procedure by both government and the private sector. National’s laseizz-faire style of government did much harm to overall productivity potentiality.

    When the Right pushes productivity as an excuse for low wages, it is astonishingly hypocritical because they have undertaken measures which restrict the growth of productivity in order to keep wages down – i.e. scrapping the old Apprenticeship scheme.

  15. Irrespective of whether it is skilled or unskilled people moving to Australia a reduction of the unemployment rate down to the levels we are seeing now means that those unemployed entering the workforce are likely to be the least skilled and therefore least productive. Given the Labour governments generous in-work benefit payments it is unlikely they are contributing anything to the tax-take. Given their low skill level it is unlikely they contributing very much to the overall wealth of the economy.

    Productivity is the important issue here not employment. More people creating less wealth and therefore earning less is not the answer to our economic woes. The Labour government by increasing the size of the unproductive core bureaucracy, increasing compliance costs and putting more of the tax burden onto the productive sector and individuals has stifled growth as indicated by the substantial fall in productivity.

  16. Steve Pierson 16

    so, mawg… is for higher unemployment?

    you forget that the economy is for society, not the other way around – jobs give people a sense of purpose and belonging, people with jobs are happier, they are less likely to beat their kids and more liekly to help them learn to read. People with an income and something to do with their time are less likely to steal, less likely to abuse drugs, etc etc.

    Work is a good in itself that leads to a whole lot of other good outcomes. It is not just people acting as cogs in a machine so that the machine can spin faster.

  17. r0b 17

    Hoolian’s post of 1:02 pm is chock full of nonsense.

    Re the claim: “With employment comes lower crime, fewer suicides, better health, and a dozen other better social outcomes” Hoolian writes Dude, you are so, so wrong here. If higher employment somehow miraculously equates to lower crime, lower suicides and better health then what the hell has gone wrong?

    Nothing has gone wrong Hoolian, it’s just that your claims are nonsense.

    Since Labour came into power in 1999 and the astonishing decrease in unemployment, violent crime has risen over 43%, grievous assaults up 93%, robberies up 65%; serious assaults up 53%, while sex crimes have risen by 18%;

    Although reporting rates for some kinds of crime are up (domestic violence, following strong advertising campaigns), crime overall is falling.

    http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20082702-16956-2.html

    Crime continues to fall

    New Zealand has one of the highest rates of suicide in the OCED at a rate of 13.2 people in every 100,000 killing themselves;

    The NZ rate is high but falling. Please do not perpetuate the lie that it is climbing, because that becomes part of the problem. Please actually read:

    http://www.chmeds.ac.nz/newsevents/articles/suicidedecline.htm

    our health system is in pieces as waiting lists have grown longer

    Our Health system is rated by international agencies as one of the best in the world, ahead of Australia, the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada. See the report here:

    http://www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/publications_show.htm?doc_id=364436

    166,000 people were on the unemployment benefit when Labour came to power; 166,000 people whose potential was being wasted.

    Yes, now their potential is being wasted on Sickness and Illness Benefits. Well done Labour.

    From memory the number on sickness benefits is less than 29,000. The unemployed have not just moved to other benefits, that is a lie. The number of working age people on benefits is at a low and still falling:

    http://kiwiblogblog.wordpress.com/2007/12/14/numeracy-for-nnickc/

    Worse still all your statistics are references to Clark’s speeches or other Standard posts, not to Statistics New Zealand or any other creditable source.

    Sorry Hoolian, all the above is backed up by independently sourced stats (follow back the sources in The Standard or KBB links). In short, Hoolian, social benefits are accruing around falling unemployment exactly as predicted. In your list of negativity I don’t know if you are lying or simply ill informed, but I do know that you are wrong wrong wrong.

  18. even 18

    The policy of increasing productivity and employment as the goal of an economic system is the real problem, and is a direct consequence of a disastrous and outdated financial system superceeded on to the actual physical economy which it hamstrings from providing for everyone.

    The scientific goal of a modern productive system would be that of consumption and the distribution of that consumption through out the whole society with an emphasis on decreasing the amount of time the individuals in society have to sub-ordinate themselves to the organisation of this which renders them inpersonal cogs.

    Only through replacing the debt based financial system with credit as a public utility, like water is for example, will it enable work to become a vocation for the worker. THen we will be able to achieve a society governed on natural consequences and not artificial reward/pusnishment systems and bureaucracy.

    Democrats for Social Credit.
    DSC 08.

  19. r0b 19

    My memory is faulty, the number on sickness benefits as of March this year is 45,676, but it is falling slowly, not rising (unemployed are not being moved to this benefit).

  20. Wage growth without an increase in productivity is inflation.

  21. Matthew Pilott 21

    Given the Labour governments generous in-work benefit payments it is unlikely they are contributing anything to the tax-take. Given their low skill level it is unlikely they contributing very much to the overall wealth of the economy.

    What are you trying to say here, mawgxxxxiv?

    The first part has some merit perhaps, if the worker has children, Labour’s generous WFF policy means that they are likely paying $0 tax if they are on a very low income. As a plus, they are not on a benefit – we can all agree that’s a good thing surely.

    As for the second point, you are either saying that companies employ people to dig holes and fill them in again, or that you have such an elitist attitude to those around you that you believe those performing menial/low income tasks are worthless.

    Which is a pretty scummy attitude to have, but you’re entitled to it.

    P.S have you fallen lock, stock and cranuim for Key’s “core bureaucracy” spin? For shame.

    And let’s not even start on compliance costs… (i.e. would we be the easiest counrty in the world to do business with otherwise? I think not.)

  22. Steve Pierson 22

    mag. not if the money for higher wages comes out of profits. (i can hear you gasp for breath)

    Fact is, in the rightwing economic revolution, the portion of GDP that went on wages decreased, allowing profts to increase. That injustice needs redressing through higher wages coming out of profits.

    captcha: ‘known, shunned’ – the public’s reaction to Roger Douglas’s reincarnation?

  23. Leftie 23

    mawgxxxxiv

    “Wage growth without an increase in productivity is inflation.”

    What do you call productivity increases without wage growth then? A bad employer?

  24. even 24

    NO, inflation is a concurrent rise in prices and income(money to spend side).
    It is simply a multi-plication of figures without altering the relation between money-to-spend and price, and it is a tax on savings.

    Now if you can accept that you didn’t know that…then you can accept that you don’t really know how the monetary system works, and that you are in the vast majority of the population for this gap of knowledge about something that is in front of everyone every single day and is the life blood of any economy.

    And then, mayby, your mind can be abit more open and you can competently do a bit more research about the subject.

    DSC 08.

  25. Hoolian 25

    Hoolin. Ask any criminologist, sociologist or anyone who has studied the subject if unemployment and crime are related. In fact just think about it for a moment, who is more likely to commit a crime – someone with a job and an income or someone without one.

    What makes you think that I am not a criminologist, sociologist etc? I’m not actually negating that fact, what I’m highlighting is that violent crime has risen despite unemployment dropping. While it may work in the theoretical circles of the Left, it doesn’t correlate in reality. Surprise, surprise.

    rOb

    Thank God for some real information. I totally disagree with you, but I admire your independent research. In reply to your points:

    CRIME
    Although reporting rates for some kinds of crime are up (domestic violence, following strong advertising campaigns), crime overall is falling.

    I have no idea why you think strong advertising campaigns are to blame for domestic violence, but whatever. So while crime is down, all other crimes are up.

    RE: ScienceAlert story: Julia Tolmie states “What has changed is that the amount of people who are being prosecuted and the sentences that they are getting have both increased.” So, this is debasing the claim crime is up, how? Basically she claims to defy Stats New Zealand whose data shows that crimes are up, and not with any data of her own, just a vast ‘difference of opinion’ i.e she claims rather than crime being up, just more people are going to jail. This appears to reinforce that crime is up.

    SUICIDE
    On your link to Uni of Otago’s Associate Professor Annette Beautrais: She says These significant reductions in suicide rates over the last decade are likely to have occurred because of strategic action based on robust research by Associate Professor Beautrais and others, the development of prevention and treatment strategies, and a focus particularly on youth suicide (15-24).

    What she does say is that suicides are reducing. I’ll give you that. I was misinformed, but she also says is that suicide rates have been dropping for a decade which takes us back into the anti-employment regime of National-led governments and she does not give low unemployment as a reason for a reduction in suicides rather other reasons. Thus, Steve Peirson’s original argument doesn’t stand up.

    HEALTH

    Your sidetracks to ‘independent’ information are a nice way of increasing knowledge but it does little to help your cause. According to the “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall” article and survey, NZ doesn’t do that well; the article only refers to New Zealand a handful of times and one of those times is bad news. “Across the indicators of effectiveness, the U.S. ranked first and New Zealand ranked last” Also, our health system is more like the Scandinavian countries and they do not feature in the survey, so poorly done.

    In addition to all my points of debate above, none of the information you have shown actually supports the argument that “With employment comes lower crime, fewer suicides, better health, and a dozen other better social outcomes.” In fact, all your sources prove the total opposite. See, isn’t independent information great? It doesn’t spin at the rate the Standard spider does.

    While I applaud your use of independent research, I detest your use of it to fashion it to fit your vision. I’m sorry that the reality is so much more frightening.

  26. Phil 26

    “phil. real incomes are up, don’t be silly. the labour cost index is about the most stupid metric you could choose to measure peoples incomes. for starters, it doesn’t reflect employment levels or work hours.”

    Sorry, I missed this one from you Steve… apparently the same way you missed the second half of my not too long post. I agree with you about the LCI (in fact, I even said as much…)

    I agree with you that real incomes are up, but the 25% that you claimed in the OP is plain and simple lies with no grounding in reality.

    Real average hourly have increased 6.9% during Labours time in power, compared to the National governments 7.4% in the 1990’s.

  27. r0b 27

    Thank God for some real information. I totally disagree with you, but I admire your independent research.

    OK Hoolian, appreciate your constructive attitude.

    CRIME

    I have no idea why you think strong advertising campaigns are to blame for domestic violence, but whatever.

    Please read what I wrote carefully. What we hear about is reported crime which bears some unknown relationship to real crime rates (reported and unreported). If reported crime goes up it may be because real crime goes up (with constant reporting) or it may be because the reporting rate goes up.

    The suggestion is that the current increase in reported domestic crime may have been prompted by the advertising campaign, which draws attention to the issue and highlights the fact that it’s not OK. It seems likely that this has increased reporting rates (it seems unlikely that it has increased the real underlying rate). See eg:

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/category/story.cfm?c_id=30&objectid=10501512

    So while crime is down, all other crimes are up.

    Ahhh, what? Crime rates are down as per my original post.

    SUICIDE

    What she does say is that suicides are reducing. I’ll give you that. I was misinformed, but she also says is that suicide rates have been dropping for a decade which takes us back into the anti-employment regime of National-led governments

    8.5 years of the last decade have been under Labour led governments, and suicide rates have been falling. I don’t think we can sensibly make a case either way about figures for the initial 1.5 years of “a decade”.

    and she does not give low unemployment as a reason for a reduction in suicides rather other reasons. Thus, Steve Peirson’s original argument doesn’t stand up.

    Of course she doesn’t give reasons, the article isn’t about reasons for suicide. Steve’s argument (that social indicators improve with falling unemployment) stands up fine (whether unemployment is explicitly mentioned or not).

    HEALTH

    NZ doesn’t do that well; the article only refers to New Zealand a handful of times and one of those times is bad news.

    NZ came second overall (ahead of head of Australia, the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada), but by all means pick the one scale that we did worst in and focus on that! Read past the Executive Summary and you will see that in sub scales of effectiveness we did very well (second best on “prevention’), and that in general the differences are minor – all the countries surveyed are effective at this level.

    Demand for health services is endless, the funding is limited, and so the system will never be perfect. But it is damned good. And all these attempts to beat up a “crisis’ and make political capital out of it should be recognised for exactly what they are.

    SUMMARY

    In fact, all your sources prove the total opposite.

    Ahhh – what? One of us has serious reading comprehension problems.

    While I applaud your use of independent research, I detest your use of it to fashion it to fit your vision.

    Hoolian, you are the one who has made a bunch of claims that aren’t true, not me. You started your post well, why are you descending into this kind of nonsense?

    I’m sorry that the reality is so much more frightening.

    Oh please. Grow a fact or two, or give it up.

  28. ak 28

    Well done rOb, especially on how you maintain your equilibrium with these people. I’m afraid my own patience doesn’t compare.

    Hoolian, by his own admission, looked at your link to the Commonwealth Fund report and cannot have failed to see the prominent table on the first page ranking NZ’s health system second in the world, yet had the temerity to immediately write “According to the “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall’ article and survey, NZ doesn’t do that well; the article only refers to New Zealand a handful of times….”

    Unbelieveable. I mean we’ve seen the whole gamut of ranting fruitcakes in this medium, but I have to say this really takes the biscuit for sheer, bare-faced, out-and-out lying.
    Congratulations Hoolian, you’ve raised even these crusty old eyebrows: I thought I’d seen it all but you make ravers like D4J and burt look like trustworthy pillars of respectability, and what’s worse I’ve seen you on other threads invoking christian values.
    And don’t bother to make up a reply: sorry old son, but I can no longer believe a single word you might say.

  29. r0b 29

    Well done rOb, especially on how you maintain your equilibrium with these people. I’m afraid my own patience doesn’t compare

    To tell you the truth ak it doesn’t take much effort. We deal with the same nonsense time after time here. I build up a library of useful text and links, then just paste it in by the numbers. Ho hum.

  30. Watching John Key questioning Helen Clark yesterday about fall in productivity growth under Labour it was interesting to note that that the measure of productivity used by Clark did not include the state sector. If the state is left out then the productivity numbers look much better however that appears to be a trifle misleading.

    Given that public service staff has increased from around 28,000 in 2000 to around 43,000 now it is hardly surprising that productivity growth has declined. Furthermore government imposed costs on business like ‘4 weeks annuual leave’ would have had further negative impacts on productivity.

    With all these additional state employees to support it is perhaps not surprising that the ‘tax burden days’ have increased by 20 since 2000. It is useful to compare this with Australia where the the ‘ tax burden’ has remained flat.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • PM comments on Auckland COVID-19 case
    After 102 days we have our first cases of Covid-19 outside of a Managed Isolation or Quarantine facility in New Zealand. Shortly I will ask Dr Bloomfield to set out the details of the case. While we have all worked incredibly hard to prevent this scenario, we have also planned ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    9 hours ago
  • Significant investment in Raukūmara Pae Maunga to prevent Raukūmara forest collapse
    An iwi-Crown approach programme to restore the Raukūmara forest on the East Coast of the North Island and boost employment opportunities for whānau, particularly rangatahi/young people, will receive $34 million funding, Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage has announced. “Raukūmara Pae Maunga is a partnership with Te Whānau-ā-Apanui, Ngāti Porou, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    19 hours ago
  • New partnership central to delivering more Māori housing
    Government agencies and partners are working closer together to provide more Māori Housing through the Te MAIHI o te Whare Māori – the Māori and Iwi Housing Innovation Framework for Action (MAIHI). MAIHI is a kaupapa Māori approach that drives a system change to give effect and impact on Māori ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    20 hours ago
  • Manawatū Gorge replacement highway drives forward
    Site work is soon to begin on Te Ahu a Turanga: Manawatū Tararua Highway, the project to replace the former SH3 route through the Manawatū Gorge, Transport Minister Phil Twyford said today. Phil Twyford was today in Woodville at the signing of a formal agreement by members of the Alliance ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    20 hours ago
  • Pacific Ministers meet to discuss regional economic priorities
    The Pacific Islands Forum Economic Ministers Meeting (FEMM) begins today and will focus on the major economic and social impacts of COVID-19 on the Pacific.  FEMM is an important congregation of Economic Ministers and senior officials from around the region, and for the first time, the annual meeting will be ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    21 hours ago
  • Formal apology and payment to George Nepata
    Cabinet has approved a formal apology and ex gratia payment to former soldier George Nepata, announced Defence Minister Ron Mark. This payment is to recognise the New Zealand Defence Force’s failure to provide Mr Nepata with a safe system of work in April 1989 when, as a result of an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Report into Iain Lees-Galloway’s expenditure
    A report undertaken by Ministerial Services into Iain Lees-Galloway’s ministerial expenditure has found no evidence of any inappropriate transactions or spending. Ministerial Services undertook a line by line review of all his expenditure, including staff and spouse expenses for the period 1 January 2019 to 30 June 2020.  “I commissioned ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Managed isolation charges to start 11 August
    Managed isolation charges for returnees will come into force from 12.01am Tuesday 11th August, after they passed their last cabinet milestone today, Housing Minister Megan Woods said. “The new charging system balances the rights of New Zealanders to return home and helps reduce pressure on the managed isolation and quarantine ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Update on New Zealand and the Cook Islands travel bubble
    The Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern and the Prime Minister of the Cook Islands Henry Puna have welcomed the completion of phase one in the establishment of a travel bubble between New Zealand and the Cook Island. Negotiations on the text of an ‘Arrangement to Facilitate Quarantine-Free Travel ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • One-stop ‘jobs and training’ shop goes live
    The Government has launched a new online, phone and onsite service to help New Zealanders connect to a range of employment support and products for workers and businesses affected by COVID-19, announced Minister of Education Chris Hipkins and Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni. Connected.govt.nz is a one-stop-shop for jobseekers, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • MSD security guards to be paid Living Wage
    Security guards contracted to the Ministry of Social Development will be paid at least the Living Wage from next month supporting the Government’s commitment towards fair pay and employment conditions, announced Minister for  Social Development Carmel Sepuloni.   “MSD was  among the first government agencies to pay its employees the living ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New strategy to ensure nature thrives
    The Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage today launched Te Mana o te Taiao, the Aotearoa New Zealand Biodiversity Strategy - a way forward that envisions Aotearoa New Zealand as a place where ecosystems are healthy and resilient, and people embrace the natural world. “Many of New Zealand’s plants and wildlife species ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Provider Languages Fund will support Pacific Wellbeing approach
    “Pacific languages, cultures and identity are essential to the health, wellbeing and lifetime success of our Pacific peoples and their communities in Aotearoa. The strength and resilience of Pacific Aotearoa is not only vital to their own prosperity but integral to the prosperity of all New Zealanders, and is particularly ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • COVID-19: More funding for schools and boost to construction sector
    ·       $38 million to help schools cover unexpected costs related to COVID-19 ·       $69 million upgrade for online learning ·       $107 million contingency funding to support school construction suppliers facing additional costs due to the lockdown. The Government is releasing $214 million from the COVID-19 response and recovery fund to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Stay safe on the tracks – Rail Safety Week
    Despite the Government installing safety upgrades around the country, people should still take care around rail crossings, said Transport Minister Phil Twyford launching Rail Safety Week. Phil Twyford said installing safety infrastructure is crucial, but we are encouraging people to be more careful around trains too. “We’re making good progress ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government backs Manawatū social housing project
    The Government is providing a cash injection to help Palmerston North City Council complete a programme to provide 78 social housing units for vulnerable tenants. The $4.7 million to build 28 units in the Papaioea Place redevelopment comes from the $3 billion set aside for infrastructure in the Government’s COVID-19 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Major funding boost for Predator Free Banks Peninsula
    A pest free Banks Peninsula/Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū is one step closer with a $5.11 million boost to accelerate this project and create jobs, announced Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage in Canterbury today. “This is a game changer for this ambitious project to restore the native wildlife and plants on Ōtautahi/Christchurch’s doorstep ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Major investment for indoor sports in Hawke’s Bay
    A Government grant of $6.4 million will expand the Pettigrew Arena in Taradale with new indoor courts of national standard. “The project is likely to take 18 months with approximately 300 people employed through the process,” Grant Robertson said. “The expansion will increase the indoor court space up to 11 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New infrastructure for Far North tourist town
    The Far North tourist destination of Mangonui is to receive Government funding to improve waterfront infrastructure, open up access to the harbour and improve water quality, Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones has announced. A total of $6.5 million from the $3 billion set aside in the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government remains committed to Women’s Cricket World Cup
    The Government has re-affirmed its commitment to supporting the hosting of the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup, which the ICC has delayed from 2021 to 2022. “This is obviously a disappointing decision for cricket players and fans around the world and for the White Ferns and their supporters here at ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Green light for Te Awa River Ride in $220m nationwide cycleways investment
    Cyclists and walkers will now have a safer way to get around Taupō, Tūrangi, and between Hamilton and Cambridge, with funding for shared paths and Te Awa River Ride, Associate Minister of Transport Julie Anne Genter announced today. “The Te Awa River Ride is the latest part of massive growth ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Six major ‘shovel-ready’ cycleways funded in Christchurch
    Six major cycle routes will be completed in Christchurch thanks to funding from the Government’s investment in shovel-ready infrastructure as part of the COVID-19 recovery Associate Minister of Transport Julie Anne Genter announced today. $125 million will be invested to kick-start construction and fund the completion of the following cycleway ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New Police facilities for Whanganui
    Plans are underway for a brand new state-of-the-art hub for Whanganui’s justice and social agencies, following confirmation the ageing Whanganui Central Police Station is to be replaced. Police Minister Stuart Nash has announced $25 million in new infrastructure spending to improve facilities for the wider community, and for staff who ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Relativity adjustment for Waikato-Tainui and Ngāi Tahu
    An adjustment payment has been made to Waikato-Tainui and Ngāi Tahu under the relativity mechanisms in their 1995 and 1997 Treaty of Waitangi settlements, Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little announced today. The latest payments to Waikato-Tainui and Ngāi Tahu are $2,700,000 and $2,600,000 respectively to ensure the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Auckland rail upgrades pick up steam
    Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Transport Minister Phil Twyford today kicked off the start of the Auckland NZ Upgrade Programme rail projects which will support over 400 jobs and help unlock our biggest city. Both ministers marked the start of enabling works on the third main rail line project ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • PGF support for Wairoa creates jobs
    The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) investment of $3.78 million in Wairoa will create much needed economic stimulus and jobs, Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. PGF projects announced today include: $200,000 loan to Nuhaka Kiwifruit Holdings Ltd (operated by Pine Valley Orchard Ltd) to increase the productivity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Public and Māori housing to trial renewable energy technology
    Tenants in public and Māori housing may be benefiting from their own affordable renewable energy in future – a fund to trial renewable energy technology for public and Māori housing has today been announced by Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods and Associate Minister for Housing (Māori Housing) Nanaia Mahuta. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • $2.7m for Hokianga infrastructure
    Hokianga will receive $2.7 million to redevelop four of its wharves and upgrade its water supply, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones has announced. Far North District Council will receive $1.8 million from the Provincial Growth Fund for the work on the wharves. “The work will include the construction of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New fund to support housing and construction sector
    A $350 million Residential Development Response Fund is being established to support the residential construction sector and to minimise the economic impact from COVID-19, the Housing Minister Dr Megan Woods has announced. “The Residential Development Response Fund will help to progress stalled or at-risk developments that support our broader housing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government investment to boost Auckland’s community recycling network
    As part of a broader plan to divert waste from landfill, the Government today announced $10.67 million for new infrastructure as part of the Resource Recovery Network across the Auckland region. “This key investment in Auckland’s community recycling network is part of the Government’s Infrastructure Reference Group ‘shovel ready’ projects ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Te Papa transformation starts at Cameron Road
    The Government is investing $45 million in the first stage of an ambitious urban development project for Tauranga that will employ up to 250 people and help the region grow, Urban Development Minister Phil Twyford announced today. Phil Twyford says the funding has been allocated out of the $3 billion ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Low-emissions options for heavy transport a step closer
    Getting low-emission trucks on the road is a step closer with investment in infrastructure to support hydrogen vehicles, the Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods has announced. The Infrastructure Reference Group has provisionally approved $20 million for New Plymouth company Hiringa Energy to establish a nationwide network of hydrogen-fuelling stations. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New training centre to upskill workers
    A new trades training centre to upskill the local workforce will be built in the South Waikato town of Tokoroa through funding from the Government’s COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, Education Minister Chris Hipkins and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones have announced. The Government will contribute $10.84 million from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Subsequent children legislation to change
    The Government has agreed to repeal part of the Oranga Tamariki Act subsequent children provisions, Minister for Children Tracey Martin announced today. “There are times when children need to go into care for their safety – the safety and care of children must always be paramount,” Minister Martin said. “But ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Funding to expand mental health support for Pacific peoples
    A $1.5 million boost to grow primary mental health and addiction services for Pacific peoples in Auckland, Hamilton and Canterbury will lead to better outcomes for Pacific communities, Associate Health Minister Jenny Salesa says.  Pasifika Futures has received funding to expand services through The Fono, Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Funding boost for sustainable food and fibre production
    Twenty-two projects to boost the sustainability and climate resilience of New Zealand’s food and fibres sector have been announced today by Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. The $18m funding will deliver practical knowledge to help farmers and growers use their land more sustainably, meet environmental targets, remain prosperous, and better understand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Mature Workers Toolkit launched on business.govt.nz
    Employment Minister Willie Jackson welcomes an initiative that assists employers to get mature workers into New Zealand small businesses. The disadvantages that older people face in the workplace was highlighted in the whole of Government Employment Strategy.  In order to address this, a Mature Workers Toolkit has been developed and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Trans-Tasman cooperation in a COVID-19 world
    New Zealand and Australia reaffirmed today the need for the closest possible collaboration as they tackle a global environment shaped by COVID-19, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters said. “In these challenging times, our close collaboration with Australia is more vital than ever,” said Mr Peters. Mr Peters and his Australian ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Pike recovery efforts now in unexplored territory
    The recovery and forensic examination of the loader driven by survivor Russell Smith means the underground team are now moving into an area of the Pike River Mine that has not been seen since the explosion, Minister Responsible for Pike River Re-entry Andrew Little said. “The fifth and last robot ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government confirms CovidCard trial to go ahead
    The Government has confirmed a community-wide trial of CovidCard technology as it explores options for COVID-19 contact tracing. “Effective contact tracing is a vital part of the COVID-19 response,” Minister of Health Chris Hipkins said. “While manual processes remain the critical component for contact tracing, we know digital solutions can ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago