web analytics

Bureaucracy cutters call for more bureaucrats

Written By: - Date published: 4:00 pm, January 28th, 2009 - 33 comments
Categories: national/act government, public services - Tags:

Today on Radio NZ, Health Minister Tony Ryall’s razor gang for the health sector was discussed. One of its proponents argued there was bound to be bureaucrats to cut, problem is there is insufficient measurement of productivity. He said Stats NZ should invest in measuring health sector productivity better… Hmm, seems to me he is saying there are currently insufficient bureaucrats to adequately measure what is happening and more are needed to make the system less wasteful.

Meanwhile, Education Minister Anne Tolley is crying that the truancy stats are not comprehensive enough (not that this stopped her from increasing the fines for truancy under urgency last year). Well, stats don’t grow on trees, Anne. Seems to me that if you want stats put together, you’re going to have to employ the bureaucrats to do the job.

After years of trying to demonise public servants as lazy, do-nothing drains on the public purse, National is now finding out that if you want to make good policy leading to better front-line services you need good information. And to do that you need a well-resourced public service.

[Also, Anne, you’re Minister of Education now. So, try to cut out sentences like this one: “Every child that’s not in school is one child too many”. “Every” child that’s not in school is not one child; you mean ‘each’ child.]

33 comments on “Bureaucracy cutters call for more bureaucrats”

  1. randal 1

    who needs bureaucrats when the market will decide?

  2. but who will tell us what the market is saying without bureaucrats? oh noes!

  3. BLiP 3

    Don’t be suckered – this is the thin end of the wedge for the privatisation of the gathering of government statistics

  4. Tim Ellis 4

    SP I doubt that the Minister of Education reads your posts. They might be less hysterical if you didn’t address them to a non-existent audience.

  5. Felix 5

    Yeah but you could print it out for her couldn’t you Tim?

    captcha: cut minimize

  6. Noddy (used to be Dr.No) 6

    Steve, had you considered the possibility that exicting public servants could be assigned for tasks that differ from what they do today? A concept those working in the productive sectors of the economy live with on a day to day basis. Things change, priorities come and go, some things are seen as more important than others… Typical left-leaning thinking – need something done = then just get more bums on seats. As displayed to perfection by the last government…

  7. Tim Ellis 7

    I suppose I could, Felix, and maybe send it freepost to Wellington.

    SP, you are clutching at straws when you try to correct Tolley’s use of English. Fair enough for perfectionists like Robinsod, but you don’t have a whole lot of authority on that count.

  8. Tim. You’ld be surprised who reads these posts. You’ld be surprised what shows up in my inbox in response to some of them.

    Also, addressing Tolley personally is a rhetorical device.

    Now, I know my spelling ain’t always so hot – it’s what they call one of them there learning difficulties – but I know the difference between every and each.

  9. J 9

    “Also, addressing Tolley personally is a rhetorical devise.”

    At least you are acknowledging that she wouldn’t bother to listen to you.

  10. Kerry 10

    Oh Dr No… I do enjoy reading your posts…..its a sure cure for constipation!!!

  11. toad 11

    To be pedantic, it should really be “Each child who’s not in school…”.

  12. tsmithfield 12

    I was reading the Southland Daily Times while on a business trip awhile ago. There was an article that mentioned the staffing for the local health board. It was something like 90 support staff to 30 frontline staff. If that was a private business, it would not survive very long.

  13. Quoth the Raven 13

    tsmithfield – Yes there are absolutely no corporations with a bloated middle management doing work that workers could do themselves. You live in a fantasy world tsmithfield.

  14. Pascal's bookie 14

    Tsmithie, how’d they define frontline staff?

    That ‘support staff’ thing makes me suspicious that people like cleaners, orderlies, reception, kitchen staff and the like are being referred to as being support for the medical staff. That’s ok, but it’s not bloated management.

  15. tsmithfield 15

    Quoth said “Yes there are absolutely no corporations with a bloated middle management doing work that workers could do themselves.”

    Pascal: “I am sure there are. Two wrongs don’t make a right though.
    That ‘support staff’ thing makes me suspicious that people like cleaners, orderlies, reception, kitchen staff and the like are being referred to as being support for the medical staff.”

    I am sure that is the case. However, in a private corporation there is also need for such things. However, it would be rare to find a corporation where administrative staff outweighed productive staff three to one.

  16. tsmithfield 16

    Sorry, some of my posts seem to be screwing up for some reason. The post above should have read:

    Quoth said “Yes there are absolutely no corporations with a bloated middle management doing work that workers could do themselves.’

    I am sure there are. Two wrongs don’t make a right though.

    Pascal: “That ‘support staff’ thing makes me suspicious that people like cleaners, orderlies, reception, kitchen staff and the like are being referred to as being support for the medical staff.’

    I am sure that is the case. However, in a private corporation there is also need for such things. However, it would be rare to find a corporation where administrative staff outweighed productive staff three to one.

  17. Janet 17

    Tony Ryall has been on Campbell tonight promising to create residential care facilities for anorexics, and rubbishing the last government’s work in the area. Considering that anorexia is one of the hardest illness to treat and is extremely intensive and expensive, it will be interesting to see just what happens.

  18. Felix 18

    However, it would be rare to find a corporation where administrative staff outweighed productive staff three to one

    That’s a rather meaningless distinction unless you define the difference between “productive staff” and “administrative staff”.

  19. Tim Ellis 19

    Janet wrote:

    Tony Ryall has been on Campbell tonight promising to create residential care facilities for anorexics, and rubbishing the last government’s work in the area. Considering that anorexia is one of the hardest illness to treat and is extremely intensive and expensive, it will be interesting to see just what happens.

    I watched the Campbell clip as well, Janet. Ryall pointed out that the Health Ministry has been working on this for the last ten years, with no results. Currently DHBs send people to Australia for treatment, at a cost of $750 a night.

    Sounds like it could be done much more efficiently in New Zealand.

  20. tsmithfield 20

    Felix “That’s a rather meaningless distinction unless you define the difference between “productive staff’ and “administrative staff’.”

    Productive staff= people providing direct health care to patients (doctors, nurses, surgeons, specialists etc)

    Administrative staff= everyone else.

    Surely it is a good thing to try and maximise the former and minimise the latter so long as the optimal ratio is achieved for providing the very best health care possible to New Zealanders.

    That being the case, why is it an issue that a government would investigate the efficiency of the health system? Surely they would be negligent if they did not do so. Would there be such an issue on this site if a Labour governement did exactly what National is now doing?

  21. @ work 21

    One might suggest the “productive” staff might not stay productive for very long without the help of the administrative staff.

    On positive note it is very commendable of Ryall to put some money into anorexia treatment, there are some very good anorexia services here, but such limited places in them.

  22. higherstandard 22

    “One might suggest the “productive’ staff might not stay productive for very long without the help of the administrative staff.”

    Yes one might ….. one might also suggest exactly the opposite.

  23. Stephen 23

    A concept those working in the productive sectors of the economy live with on a day to day basis. Things change, priorities come and go, some things are seen as more important than others

    No one else has addressed this, but it’s exactly what I was thinking as I read the post. I will go no further as I really don’t have much a clue what Stats NZ gathers data on at the moment.

  24. @ work 24

    higherstandard
    January 29, 2009 at 9:17 am
    “One might suggest the “productive’ staff might not stay productive for very long without the help of the administrative staff.’

    Yes one might .. one might also suggest exactly the opposite.

    The hospitals would run better if all the doctors did an hour of scrubbing toilets and cleaning windows after thier shifts? I’m sure that would go down great.

    There could be a discussion on the finer points of the structure of staff in hospitals, but alarmist headlines giving ratios of medical staff to non medical staff and labeling all the non medical staff “useless bureaucrats” is not a particularly rational way to proceed. Are there any specific jobs in the health system that in your opinion are not required? Or do you just want a less alarmist headline?

  25. tsmithfield 25

    @work: “One might suggest the “productive’ staff might not stay productive for very long without the help of the administrative staff.”

    Couldn’t agree more. In my previous post, I suggested the staffing should be at the optimum ratio of productive to administrative to provide the most effective service possible to taxpayers. Do you disagree with this sentiment? Do you think we have the optimum ratio now?

  26. @ work 26

    In the most part I agree with you, I’m not sure a ratio is the best way to look at it though. We should look to maximise the numbers of medical staff and have an appropriate number of administrative staff to cope with the rest of the goings on. Basically not everything in a hospital is in proportion to the number of medical staff working there (security and clearners for example would depend on the size of the building not the number of medical staff inside it). But yes I do agree with you.

    I have absolutely no problem with a review of hospitals ect, I’m just wary of peolpe saying in general we need less staff in hospitals.

  27. tsmithfield 27

    @work: “But yes I do agree with you.

    I have absolutely no problem with a review of hospitals ect, I’m just wary of peolpe saying in general we need less staff in hospitals.”

    Thanks for that @work. I would actually have no problem with a bipartisan approach to health. What really annoys me is the constant restructuring of health that occurs each time there is a change of government. Health becomes a political football that must have costed taxpayers billions in restructuring costs over the years. It would seem sensible and in the best interests of taxpayers to have an agreed strategy between the parties, given that governments do tend to change from time to time whether we like it or not.

  28. @ work 28

    Indeed, Health really is one of those political football things, health, education and prisons, the perennial talk back topics. Health of course has the advantage that unlike prisons people aren’t mortified every time there’s an increase in funding. Were also lucky that the sharp end of funding, the “who lives and who dies’ decisions, generally don’t have a huge deal of fuss made about them. I suspect though the public doesn’t realize how expensive things get at that top end, how much of the health budget is spent on a very few number of people.

    Really there shouldn’t need to be a lot of political interference in it, really what should be guiding them is international best practice in medicine and cost effective decisions within a set budget. This doesn’t leave much room for political interference. In ministries like Health, Corrections, Education, where their roll is quite focused (Compared to say MFaT, or MED, where work is more general, covering a range of different programs), there is a lot of science and other literature on the topic, which should really take precedence over politics.

    It would be nice to see a move towards less scope for political interference in some ministries, or at least a requirement that ministers have a bloody good reason for over riding the advice of their advisors. Mainly so that when the government does change, the operation of the health system should remain largely unchanged.

  29. HS. I’m betting you have at least as many administrative staff as medical staff in your private practice (don’t forget to include cleaners etc, they are included in the numers of adminstrators National harps on about).

    I’m betting you don’t waste any more of your highly valuable time doing admin tasks than you have to when you could be doing the work you are trained for.

  30. higherstandard 30

    at work

    For ‘administrative” staff read ‘management” I and I’m sure virtually everyone has no issue with support staff within the DHBs.

    The administrative staff however tend to come up with brilliant plans such as this.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10553187

    and then spend their time on such cak as this

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/4830782a11.html

    The health system would be better off spending the money we waste with these buffoons on support and medical staff.

    Edit

    Steve – I think I’ve defined my opinion of the relative merit of support and administrative staff above. I don’t think you are so naive to suggest there’s not wastage within Vote Health.

    and Edit again at work of course their should be political interference in health it is one of the governments largest cost centres……. people working in the sector just wish it was useful political interference as the current idiots are probably going to be just as moronic as the last several Ministers of health.

    • I’m not suggesting there’s no waste. There’s waste in any large system.

      Re your definition of admin staff – that’s not the one that National its allies have used to hype the numbers – they’ve counted any non-medicial staff

  31. hmm. we have a reply function for comments in the backend now, but it never seems to work.

    Anyhoo. HS. Your definition of admin staff is all well and good but when National and its allies are hyping the number of admin staff they are counting all non-medicial staff.

  32. Felix 32

    tsmithfield,

    The definitions are crucial here and hs’s is substantially different from yours. For example where do you place a cleaner in your model? An orderly? A hospital dietitian? The person who fixes the machine that goes “bing”?

    I’m not disputing that things should be more efficient and I don’t have the experience or specific knowledge of the industry that others do, but if we use numbers to make a point we must be clear what those numbers represent if the discussion is to be of any use.

    It seems that hs is talking about too many managers vs medical staff, which is quite different to your distinction of medical / non-medical staff.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Govt supports Southland farmers in sustainability
    Healthier waterways, better productivity and farmer wellbeing are front and centre in a new project involving more than 1000 Southland farmers and growers. Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor today announced that the Thriving Southland Change and Innovation Project is the first region-wide extension programme supported by the $229 million Sustainable ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • Flood of support for Top of the South catchment
    Work to look after nature and restore freshwater quality in Te Hoiere/Pelorus River catchment is getting a significant boost, thanks to new Government funding support Minister for Conservation Eugenie Sage announced in Canvastown today. “Every New Zealander should be able to swim in their local river without getting sick, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 hours ago
  • Eight Queen’s Counsel appointed under new criterion
    Eight Queen’s Counsel have been appointed under a process that includes the new criterion of a commitment to improving access to justice, Attorney-General David Parker announced today. “The new criterion was included this year. It emphasises that excellence and leadership in the profession can be seen through a wider, community ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Major expansion for Wellington’s Onslow College
    Onslow College in Wellington will get 20 new classrooms for more than 400 students, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. The much-needed investment will relieve growth pressure the school has been experiencing for some time. Seven existing classrooms which have deteriorated over time will also be replaced, bringing the total ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Talented young Kiwis awarded PM’s Scholarships to Asia and Latin America
    More than 250 young New Zealanders will add international experience to their education, thanks to the latest Prime Minister’s Scholarships for Asia (PMSA) and Latin America (PMSLA), Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. This round of scholarships supports 252 recent graduates or current students to undertake study, research or internships ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government to improve competitiveness and transparency in the retail fuel market
    Consumers will benefit from a more competitive, transparent retail fuel market as a result of changes the Government will be making in response to the findings of the Commerce Commission’s study of the fuel sector. “We accept the Commission’s findings and, as the Prime Minister has said, we’re ready to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • More cancer medicines for more people
    Five new cancer medicines have now been funded this year, meaning thousands of people have more treatment options PHARMAC has today announced that it has approved two new medicines for funding – fulvestrant for breast cancer and olaparib for ovarian cancer. This follows earlier decisions on advanced lung cancer treatment alectinib, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government acts to sort out electoral ‘coin toss’ problem
    The Minister of Local Government, Hon Nanaia Mahuta says the Government will consider making changes to local electoral legislation before the 2022 elections to fix the problems that have arisen where elections are settled by a coin toss.  The Minister says the recount process in the Murupara- Galatea ward at ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • NZ to Join IMO Convention to Reduce Ship Emissions
    New Zealand will sign up to new international maritime regulations to reduce ship emissions and lift air quality around ports and harbours, Associate Transport Minister Julie Anne Genter announced today. Subject to completion of the Parliamentary treaty examination process, New Zealand will sign up to Annex VI of MARPOL, an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Bill to empower urban development projects
    New legislation to transform our urban areas and create sustainable, inclusive and thriving communities will tomorrow be introduced to Parliament, Urban Development Minister Phil Twyford said. “The Urban Development Bill gives Kāinga Ora-Homes and Communities the tools it needs to partner with councils, communities, mana whenua and private developers to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Early Learning Action Plan to kickstart long term change
    Today’s launch of He taonga te Tamaiti: Every child a taonga: The Early Learning Action Plan 2019-2029 provides the foundation for long-lasting changes to early learning, Education Minister Chris Hipkins says.   “Early learning will be one of the Government’s top education priorities going into 2020,” Chris Hipkins said.   ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Climate change lens on major Government decisions
    Major decisions made by the Government will now be considered under a climate change lens, Minister for Climate Change James Shaw announced today. “Cabinet routinely considers the effects of its decisions on human rights, the Treaty of Waitangi, rural communities, the disability community, and gender – now climate change will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Tertiary Education Commission Board announced
    Education Minister Chris Hipkins today announced the appointment of Māori education specialist Dr Wayne Ngata and Business NZ head Kirk Hope to the Board of the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC). Dr Alastair MacCormick has been reappointed for another term. “Wayne Ngata, Kirk Hope and Alastair MacCormick bring a great deal ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Next phase of Pike River recovery underway in time for Christmas
    The next phase of the Pike River Re-entry project is underway, Minister Responsible for Pike River Re-entry Andrew Little says. “Fresh air will be pumped into the Pike River Mine drift this week, following acceptance of the plan for re-entry beyond the 170m barrier by New Zealand’s independent health and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Insurance contracts to become easier to understand and fairer for consumers
    New Zealand consumers will have greater certainty about their insurance cover when they need to make claims as a result of proposed government changes. “Insurance is vitally important in supporting consumers and businesses to be financially resilient when unexpected events happen,” Minister of Commerce and Consumer Affairs Kris Faafoi said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • A new opportunity for Ngāpuhi collective and regional negotiations
    The Crown is providing an opportunity for the hapu of Ngāpuhi to rebuild its framework from the ground up for collective negotiations to deal with its historical Treaty claims, Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little and Minister for Māori Development Nanaia Mahuta announced today. The Crown is also ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Referendums Framework Bill passes third reading
    A Bill enabling referendums to be held with the 2020 General Election has passed its third reading. Justice Minister Andrew Little says the Act is important for upholding the integrity of New Zealand’s electoral process. “The Government has committed to holding a referendum on legalising recreational cannabis at the next ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Referendums website and initial cannabis Bill launched
    The first release of public information on the two referendums to be held at next year’s General Election was made today with an informative new Government website going live. Additionally, the draft Cannabis Legalisation and Control Bill has been released, showing the strict controls on cannabis that will apply if ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government to ban foreign donations
    The Government is taking action to protect New Zealand from foreign interference in our elections by banning foreign donations to political parties and candidates, Justice Minister Andrew Little announced today. Legislation will be introduced to Parliament this afternoon and passed under urgency. “There’s no need for anyone other than New ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Governments and tech converge to strengthen joint response to online terror events
    Governments and tech companies are holding a two-day workshop, hosted by YouTube/Google in Wellington, to test the Christchurch Call Shared Crisis Response Protocol. The workshop aims to refine and strengthen the response in the event of a terrorist attack with online implications. Companies, governments, civil society experts and NGOs will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Cancer Control Agency to drive improved care
    The new independent Cancer Control Agency has formally opened today, delivering on the Government’s plan to improve cancer care in New Zealand.         Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Minister of Health David Clark marked the occasion by announcing the membership of the Advisory Council that will be supporting ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Supporting small business to prosper
    Small businesses who deal with government departments are set to be paid faster and have improved cash flow as a result, under a new strategy released today. The Government is backing recommendations from the Small Business Council (SBC) and has agreed to implement three initiatives immediately to support business and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Bill has biggest education changes in decades
    The Education and Training Bill 2019, introduced in Parliament today, proposes the biggest education changes in decades and is an important step towards improving success for all our learners, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said. “The Bill’s rewrite of education legislation is long overdue. Indeed one Education Act, parts of which ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Bali Democracy Forum to focus on democracy and inclusivity
    Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio will travel to Bali to represent New Zealand at the 12th Bali Democracy Forum that will be held on the 5-6 December. “The Forum is a valuable opportunity for Asia-Pacific countries to share experiences and best practice in building home-grown democracy and fostering ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Innovative technology and tools to better manage freedom camping
    A package of new and expanded technology and other tools will encourage responsible camping and help communities and local councils better manage freedom camping this summer, Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis announced today. “Our Government has been investing to improve the freedom camping experience for everyone because we want to support ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Improving wellbeing by understanding our genes
    The government is laying the groundwork to understanding our genes – work that can help us tackle some of our biggest health challenges, like heart disease and diabetes, says Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods. $4.7 million has been invested in the Genomics Aotearoa Rakeiora programme. The programme will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government investing to future proof school property
    Nearly every state schools will receive a capital injection next year valued at $693 per student to bring forward urgent school property improvements, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today.  The one-off cash injection is the first project to be announced from the Government’s infrastructure package ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Infrastructure investments to be brought forward
    The Government has decided to bring forward major investments in New Zealand’s infrastructure to future proof the economy. “Cabinet has agreed to a significant boost to infrastructure investment. I have directed the Treasury to help bring together a package of projects that can be brought into the Government’s short and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Future-proofing New Zealand
    It is a great pleasure to be with you today in Whanganui. Like the Prime Minister I grew up with the TV clip of Selwyn Toogood booming “What do you say Whanganui, the money or the bag?” to an unsuspecting ‘It’s in the Bag’ audience. For those under the age ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Zealand’s newest Great Walk, the Paparoa track opened – an asset for the West Coast
    New Zealand’s newest Great Walk, the Paparoa Track, was officially opened in Blackball today by the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage alongside the family members of the Pike 29 and Ngāti Waewae.  Local mayors and MP for the West Coast Hon Damien O’Connor were also in attendance. “Paparoa National Park ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • P-8A Poseidon base works commence
    Minister of Defence Ron Mark turned the first sod of earth on the infrastructure works for the new P-8A Poseidon fleet at RNZAF Base Ohakea today. “The Coalition Government’s investment in Ohakea will ensure the Royal New Zealand Air Force can manage, maintain and task the new fleet efficiently ahead ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Launch of the National Emergency Management Agency
    Civil Defence Minister Hon Peeni Henare today announced the establishment of the new National Emergency Management Agency from 1 December 2019.  The National Emergency Management Agency will replace the Ministry of Civil Defence & Emergency Management. It will be an autonomous departmental agency, hosted by the Department of the Prime ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NASA 2020 Internship applications open
    New Zealand tertiary students with top grades and a passion for space will once again be offered the opportunity to work with the world’s best and brightest at NASA, Economic Development Minister Phil Twyford announced today. Recipients of the New Zealand Space Scholarship are nominated by the Ministry of Business, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand to send more medical staff and essential supplies to Samoa
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has announced further support to Samoa in the wake of an ongoing measles outbreak in the country. Additional medical supplies and personnel, including a third rotation of New Zealand’s emergency medical assistance team (NZMAT), further nurse vaccinators, intensive care (ICU) specialists and Samoan-speaking medical professionals, will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Cost less of a factor for Kiwis seeking GP care
    Health Minister Dr David Clark says new data showing a sharp drop in the number of people who can’t afford to visit their GP is a sign of real progress. One year after the Government made it cheaper for about 600,000 Kiwis to visit their doctor, results of the New ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Trade for All Board releases recommendations
    The Trade for All Advisory Board has released its recommendations for making New Zealand’s trade policy deliver for all New Zealanders.  The report was today welcomed by Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker.  “Trade is crucial to this country’s economy and well-being, and the benefits need to flow to all ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Porirua housing partnership to improve housing in the city
    A partnership signed today between the Crown and local iwi, Te Rūnanga o Toa Rangātira (Ngāti Toa), will improve the quality of state housing in western Porirua, says the Associate Minister of Housing, Kris Faafoi. Contracts have been signed at a ceremony at Takapūwāhia Marae, in Porirua, between Ngāti Toa, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Prime Minster Delivers Erebus Apology
    E aku manukura, tēnā koutou. He kupu whakamahara tēnei i te aituā nui i Te Tiri o Te Moana, i Erebus I runga i tētahi maunga tiketike i riro atu rā tētahi hunga i arohanuitia E murimuri aroha tonu ana ki a rātou.  Kua titia rātou ki te manawa, mō ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • PGF backing Southland skills
    The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) is supporting an initiative that will help Southlanders into local jobs, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced in Invercargill today. “I’m pleased to be in the great South today to announce PGF support of $1.5 million for Southland Youth Futures. This initiative is all ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Ten Southland engineering firms get PGF funding
    Ten engineering firms in Southland are receiving Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) investment to lift productivity and create new jobs, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones said today in Invercargill. Minister Jones announced over $4 million of PGF support for projects in the engineering and manufacturing, and aquaculture sectors and for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago