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Bennett: a complete failure

Written By: - Date published: 11:06 pm, March 28th, 2010 - 72 comments
Categories: benefits - Tags: , , , ,

What a complete failure Paula Bennett is. If you could bear to sit through her interview on Q+A yesterday, you would have heard nothing but vacuous crap completely divorced from reality and her actual policies.

We learn now that not only do her policies unjustifiably breach human rights, they were opposed by Treasury because the cost to DPB families of the parent being forced into whatever part-time work they can get is not worth the pitiful monetary reward.

Thanks to the punitive rate that benefits are abated at, a person can earn as little as a dollar an hour if they move into part-time work while on a benefit. Even if you’re an ordinary person on a benefit and working on minimum wage, every dollar you earn over $80 a week gets 12.5% tax plus 70% abatement, a 82.5% effective tax rate, which means you walk away with $2.20 an hour. For $2.20 an hour, Bennett is going to make solo mums leave their kids alone during school holidays.

Add to that the concerns of the Ministry of Health. They say her sickness benefit policy will cause 49,000 more GP visits a year for little appreciable reason. Her overly prescriptive and stupid approach will see the health system clogged with GP visits that simply restate what is already known about the beneficiaries health.

The utter drivel that came out of Bennett’s mouth when confronted with Treasury’s and Healths’ criticism of her policy was mind-numbing. Just a bunch of empty motherhood and apple-pie nonsense. It’s clear that the complexities of administering a $20 billion a year system and understanding the consequences of her polices are simply beyond her and, worse, she is incapable of even being concerned by her own limitations.

Meanwhile, benefit numbers continue to rise.There are 67,000 more working age people on benefits than when Paula Bennett became minister.

National has no solution because they refuse to even consider the one real solution to benefit dependency, a full employment policy.

72 comments on “Bennett: a complete failure ”

  1. mcflock 1

    That’s a bit off – not the comments about Bennett, but fiddling with the scales on the graph. Not to mention the year gap between the Labour graph and NAct. During which time a recession was spreading, so I wouldn’t be surprised to see a bit of a spike during the last months of labour.

    Hey, I reckon just as much as the next guy that this govt is crap , but it should rest on facts, not fiddling with pretty pictures. Warts and all, not all and add a few warts that don’t exist.

    • Marty G 1.1

      There’s no year gap. The National one starts with Oct 2008 as the base. The Labour one ends in Oct 2008.

      Oh! you got confused because there aren’t labels on each month of the labour graph! Cute!

      But seriously, you can clearly see that it extends beyond the last (Nov 07) tick,

      I haven’t fooled with the scales – they show different things, read the titles.

      • Sarge 1.1.1

        mcflock: “During which time a recession was spreading, so I wouldn’t be surprised to see a bit of a spike during the last months of labour.”

        That’s a fair point. Whilst I too hate this govt as much as the next guy, two graphs showing the same thing would be a fairer comparsion (Yes, I realise the scale on the x-axis of Labour’s graph would have to be larger).

      • Ari 1.1.2

        While they may have different titles, they’re both tracking beneficiaries, and it’s a little confusing to have two graphs measuring similar things next to each other that operate on different scales.

      • Chris 1.1.3

        To make your point clearer, perhaps you could switch the order of graphs so that the Labour one is first followed by the National one.

      • mcflock 1.1.4

        Okay, so you have a chart where the tick marks on the axis, rather than the intervals betwwen the tick-marks, indicate the data points. You just haven’t labelled the last one, so it could go either way until I put a ruler against the monitor.

        Secondly, placing two similar, but subtley different, graphs side by side with different scales is misleading. Even when the titles are read and understood, the metamessage can be contrary to the actual data indicated. I read the titles. That’s why I think having a 30 degree gradient (or thereabouts, I’m not putting a protractor up to the screen as well) over the entire chart to represent a roughly 20% increase over one year is a bit off.

        Again, Nact are jerks. But this helps nobody because it looks either amateurish or just plain dodgy.

    • Mcdonalds 1.2

      Precisely why Bennett is asking the long term unemployed to get off their arses and at least try and find work so that the Social Welfare System can return what Savage intended them to be -safety nets for the unfortunate rather than lifestyle choices for the indolent.

  2. So is it a reflection of Key’s piss poor choice in appointing her or is there a serious lack of talent in Nationals ranks ?

    She must have talked a good game in opposition to have suckled her way into the trough but now that shes been found wanting, i’m wondering who the next lil piggy in line for her portfolio is and is it a real possibility that she’ll get shuffled back into the pack before long ?

    • Bill 2.1

      When you want to mindlessly fuck people over, you employ dumb fucks to do the fucking.

      • Janice 2.1.1

        And when she has finished fucking people over the boys will be all surprised at what she has done and sack her, but not unitl she has done their dirty work. Then they won’t change a thing.

        • A Nonny Moose 2.1.1.1

          And then those boys will say “Gosh darn it, look at how the poor little woman failed so miserable. Good example of why you never should have women in government. Ohhh shiney! Lookit that Woman’s Affairs office…let’s do something with that…”

  3. Peter Johns 3

    If Labour Greens is the alternative, then NZ is fucked. Labour had 9 years and produced squat for NZ.

    • r0b 3.1

      You mean squat apart from unemployment down to 30 year lows, crime down, numbers on benefits down, economy growing, Working for Families, superannuation increases, minimum wage raised every year, four weeks leave, 20 hours free early childhood education, fair rents, interest free loans for students, poverty / childhood poverty rates down, suicide rates down, cheaper doctors vists, modern apprenticeships, and employment law which stopped the widening wage gap with Australia. Not to forget, an independent and sane foreign policy, planning for the long term future via Cullen Fund and KiwiSaver, and strengthening the economy by paying off massive amounts of 70’s and 80’s debt (so reducing previously crippling annual interest charges), stimulating a booming rural economy, and with state owned assets (Air NZ, KiwiBank, KiwiRail, breaking up the Telecom monopoly, back to ACC).

      And they did it all without tearing up Schedule 4 conservation land.

      Bloody Romans Labour.

      • Zorr 3.1.1

        LMAO

        Damn you Rob beating me to it!

      • infused 3.1.2

        Yawn, Labour didn’t produce that. They had their finger up their ass. The global boom did this.

      • Jum 3.1.3

        Great Rob

        Keep the list going. I will carry it in my wallet. Can it be a growing thread on The Standard??? A list for National and a list for Labour might be useful.

        I always maintained that everything the last Labour did was positive and everything National did/are doing was negative. I’d be interested to know if that’s correct. Certainly looks like I’m right about positive Labour. National is still weaving its dream and we’re ending up with a nightmayor if all goes according to NAct’s plan.

    • Zorr 3.2

      Honestly, somewhere on the internet, there should be THE LIST – a document containing all the advances that Labour + Greens made for this country in the past 9 years that we can just drag out a link to every time one of these cretins makes this allegation.

      Wait, what I really mean is:
      “All right, but apart from the sanitation, medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, the fresh water system and public health, what have the Romans ever done for us?”

      • r0b 3.2.1

        Make a list, post it here! I have my own (as above) which I paste in every time some ninny makes this claim – saves heaps of time…

        • Skippybuckstrend 3.2.1.1

          Labour achievements or policies, with their positive effects and/or the reason they were good policies and then the ones that National has managed to screwup or has taken away so far.

          A pledge card in reverse…

      • Jum 3.2.2

        Sorry Zorr – missed your post. Plus I thought about acknowledging the MMP parties gains – very important if we support having MMP. The Act list will be priceless. The Greens will possibly be the only positive in a sea of negative on National’s list.

  4. B 4

    youve got the figures a bit wrong marty – for the dpb anyway – its secondary tax if you work while on a benefit so around 22% not 12.5% also abatement rate is 30% between $80 and $180 ,then 70% over$180. I think the sickness benefit might have steeper abatement not too sure on that.

    however you are absolutely right its a pretty crappy deal, some other factors are-

    beneficiaries don’t get to keep the first $80 of what they earn – its $80 gross so works out to around $60 – or less of you are on student loan rate.

    Take into account childcare and petrol it works out pretty much to a negative hourly rate after the first $80 ($60)

    • Marty G 4.1

      secondary tax is a withholding tax, it doesn’t change your ultimate tax liability for the year.

      • B 4.1.1

        Sorry about that Im not up on ird ins and outs, does that mean you get a refund at the end of the year? The figures I gave were from having worked part time while on the dpb myself – but dont remember ever getting that secondary tax back

      • JAS 4.1.2

        True Marty, but it does affect low income earners at the time its withheld.

        Theres a major flaw in that secondary tax [b]must[/b] be charged on income from wages, even if that is the greater income, as it cannot be charged on a benefit.

      • B 4.1.3

        anyway regardless – people have to live on what they get week to week – a refund at the end of the year is a little late for those who have hungry mouths to feed today

  5. I think you will also find that they also deduct all or a portion of housing allowance and possibly any child allowance which i think is an IRD thing. It would be nice if someone in the know fills us with some of the details because i expect it is way worse than what it may seem.

    • Zorr 5.1

      Well, I can give you all the figures if you want:

      DPB Solo Parents – can earn $80 before any abatement (can get up to an extra $20 added to this abatement for childcare costs associated with working). The next $100 is abated at 30c in the dollar. And after that it is at 70c. Most people who manage to pick up part time work on this abatement scheme (also includes Invalids beneficiaries) actually do end up quite a lot better off – if they earn $200 gross or less though.

      Sickness Benefit – $80 before any abatement but after that it is 70c in the dollar.

      The one thing to remember here though is that no matter what you earn, as long as you are still capable of receiving any part of a main benefit you will still be able to receive the full rates for the additional assistance such as Accomodation Supplement, Disability Allowance and Temporary Additional Support.

      Plus Family Tax Credits are an excellent incentive in this regard as it does take a significant amount of earning to have them decreased and if you are a sole parent and work 20hours or more a week you can get the $60 In Work Tax Credit.

      Any further questions?

      And yes, I just happen to know this stuff… =^_^=

      • B 5.1.1

        Temporary Additional Support is reduced dolar for dollar

        • Zorr 5.1.1.1

          Depends on the specifics of the situation. Often Temporary Additional Support is either granted or not granted. It also only lasts 13 weeks maximum before you have to reapply for it. It doesn’t quite fall in to the same category as the other two as far as ongoing assistance. It is specifically there to help those who are unable to meet their essential needs with all other assistance (including the other Work and Income options) tapped out. It is one of the last lines of assistance.

          So, in short, yes if you are working then you are unlikely to get Temporary Additional Support but if you aren’t working and require it then you are already in a difficult quandry. And working DOES pay A LOT better than the temporary additional support.

    • Chris 5.2

      Perhaps we could ask Bennett?

    • Ms X 5.3

      From memory I think that the accommodation supplement is safe – because you can get it as non-beneficiary – but the first $80 is the only bit that doesn’t affect the benefit (unless the dyname govt we have now keeps one of its promises and does move that threshold to $100 -wow). After that the rate is as stated above. Accommodation supplement would only abate on high income, as with Disability Allowance – but Temporary Additional support (which replace Special Benefit) goes quite quickly with additional income.

  6. JAS 6

    Dont forget any that are Housing NZ tenants also face a rent increase based on their income.

    • Zaphod Beeblebrox 6.1

      Good point, if they were truly interested in getting beneficiaries into work they’d stop penalising Housing NZ tenants when they start earning an income.

  7. BLiP 7

    Basher Bennett puts the boot in again . . . rinse and repeat.

    • MikeG 7.1

      Once again she manages to find one extreme example, but with the implication that it is one of many.

      • JAS 7.1.1

        I guess at least this time she didn’t name her example, but she also didn’t provide the entire story, her example could be someone who has saved the country the expense of foster care for children she took in etc etc.

        Of course the majority of NZ jumps to conclusions that shes deliberately popping out babes for the extra fortune she can grab from the govt, just like PB intended.

  8. Jenny 8

    Paula Bennet is the Sarah Palin of New Zealand politics.

    Now if we only had some really good comedy act, able to highlight her embarrassingly vacuous, and vicious nature.

    • Janice 8.1

      Not as well dressed or good looking though, certainly as dumb. Who was the comedian that used to take off Jenny Shipley? She should be good for the job, but who would screen it?

  9. Jenny 9

    Yay, Marty.

    “National has no solution because they refuse to even consider the one real solution to benefit dependency, a full employment policy.”

    Of course for National to consider”A full employment policy”, would mean National having to consider massive tax increases on the wealthy bankers and financiers to pay for it. But, Hey, aren’t they the ones who caused the recession in the first place. And it is not as if they couldn’t afford it.
    Maybe it is about time these sorts of people felt some of the pain of the recession as well.

    How about it Marty, what do you think?

    • goldenshower 9.1

      Why does there have to be a massive tax increase to pay for a full employment policy ………. why not work for the dole ?

  10. tc 10

    And I bet she received a stern examination and dissection of her comments on the publicly funded national soapbox TVNZ provides with it’s intelligent and independant panel………yeah right.

    Remember the day when polly’s were put on the spot by the msm media for poor performances……you’d have to look at Beaston 8.30 tuesday stratos for that now if they show up.

  11. Vivienne 11

    Do not forget the FACTS. It was the Labour-Progressive government which did all the great things. The Greens had a confidence and supply agreement with the government throughout the Clark-Anderton years. Many of these gains came from The Progressives for example Kiwi Bank, Four Weeks Annual Leave, Paid Parental Leave, Interest Free Student Loans, Modern apprenticeships and The Ministry Of Regional Economic and Industry Development driving The Jobs Machine. None of these were Green Party policy. Please ascribe credit were it is due and be honest.

    • mcflock 11.1

      Actually it was Labour-Alliance, right up until somebody in party leadership decided to make up policy as he went along (Afghanistan was the final straw). Then it was Labour-Anderton, during which time more Green policy got implemented that Anderton-whim. And so NZ is flooded with the mad criminals created by the evil NOS…

    • Jum 11.2

      Right Vivienne and these FACTS will be very important when fighting for a tweaked MMP (the tweaking of Act would be a good start.

      I’ve added those to my wallet list.

  12. h1 12

    …. a closet with a few awkward facts lurking within, inheritance anybody…how did the late legator come by the legacy, I mean….. all those trips home….from where…with what…diving gear…. ?

  13. Anne 13

    The drivel coming out of Paula Bennett’s mouth was too much for me. I tuned out. But not before I noted the stacking of the Q&A panel in Bennett’s favour. I’d be interested to know how much influence Holmes has on the selection of guest panellists. Last year he expressed his admiration for both Paula Bennett and Christine Rankin. “I don’t understand what people have against them” he said. He even gave Bennett the top ministerial score (8/10) in one of his HOS columns. One of the first things Bennett did when she became minister was to appoint Rankin to the Families Commission, so it came as no surprise she was picked for the panel. And the other panellist – to balance out the debate – was John Tamihere. Need I say more?

    • B 13.1

      Ill give you the highlights: Christine Rankin waxed lyrical on the power of the human spirit and what amazing things can happen when you tap into it. Tamahere was rambling. Arseneau was the voice of reason but as usual noone was listening.

  14. Ianmac 14

    Be fair. Look for the good aspects of people. Paula Benefit for example has in her favour support from John Key, Paul Holmes, Christine Rankin. And she now has ummm… super, brilliantly WHITE teeth!

  15. Anne 16

    Yeah, she’s been to the dentist and spent a few thousand having them whitened. Coming to think of it, so have Holmes and Rankin. 😀

  16. Anne 17

    On second thoughts they’ve all been to the dentist.

    Crosby/Textor instructions Nov. 2008:
    TOP PRIORITY.
    All National parliamentary teeth to be laser whitened. Essential for ‘smile and wave’ photo ops. and TV interviews. Cost (all up) $285,000 – to be reimbursed by tax-payer funded Parliamentary Services.

    • Ianmac 17.1

      Anne:
      Question in the House: “Is it true that the Ministers who have had teeth whitening, have done so at the taxpayers expense?”
      Answer from the PM: “Everyone knows that Phil Goff is not as sexy as I am, and when Labour was in power for 9 whole years they did nothing about discoloured teeth!” Applause from the Govt benches. Labour MP’s look crushed.

  17. Jum 18

    I was an advocate for people with benefit issues but the main thing that has always stuck in my mind, and which made me laugh out loud at Bennett’s breezy reply about quickly organising a same-day appointment, if the benefit was halved or stopped, to re-instate the benefit.

    On all the occasions I rang the local WINZ office to speak to the receptionist, I HAD TO LEAVE A MESSAGE! I thought receptionists were on duty all the time, with backup for breaks, in any business, otherwise why would you have them! I always had a reply… the following day.

    It was hard enough just linking up with the local office through the customer service number. You could get personal case manager numbers but they were not always available to me, and they were always on answer phone while assisting clients. (The Case Manager’s workload is back to back all day except for lunch and breaks).

    Hence my total disbelief at hearing Paula Bennett saying how simple it would be to get a same day appointment

    Next step; travel in using money you can ill afford (if you still have any) to spend to make an appointment you probably won’t get until tomorrow to get money you needed today…

    Absolutely, every appointment should be kept and I have no patience with those who think the world revolves around them, but let’s not pretend that number is large and certainly let’s not pretend that the Ministry of Social Development is there to support beneficiaries under this government.

    This is like the National Standards garbage, and an Auckland transport problem that became a supercity. A few people in each area that NAct uses to exploit and control the powerless.

    Why, when keyhole surgery would suffice, do they go in for open cast mining? Shock and awe if you will. Doesn’t bode well for the mining of New Zealand…

  18. Anne 19

    @ B
    Before I tuned out, I did notice that Arseneau was looking quite uncomfortable parked as she was between those two… 😀

  19. Anne 20

    @Ianmac.
    Watch parliament during Question Time tomorrow. Check the Nat women in particular. Most of them have sets of molars that would do a lighthouse proud. Maybe it’s true. They’ve been lasered as per Crosby/Textor instructions.

  20. Beth 21

    Paula Bennett is an incompetent fool. I loathe her. What really baffles me is the increased amount of medical certificates required for the sickness benefit. Doctors can select how long it should be before a person requires reassessment depending on their illness, it doesn’t make sense that a Govt department should over-ride that, especially when most of the case managers have no idea what most of the illnesses are and how it effects someone. Also, am I right thinking that a few months ago there was a huge MSD staffing cull? Are they planning on re-hiring those people to tackle the mountain of paperwork these changes are going to produce.
    Also, is the pressure on WINZ case managers to push people into work going to influence them to make unethical decisions to meet targets?

    I had an experience with a patient of mine, a 16 year old boy with severe psychosis, who applied for the Independent Youth Benefit (Sickness) with a medical cert clearing outlining his illness and how it effected him (including: ‘disoriented at times to time and place, delusional and grandiose causing serious risk to himself and others’) and a covering letter explaining that under no circumstances should he be forced into schooling/work at that time, and he left having being enrolled in the BOOT CAMP programme MSD runs!! He was pressured into enrolling by his case manager, who was either too thick to understand what psychosis is, or too lazy and negligent to read their own paperwork.
    I mean seriously, what the fuck is that? How many very vulnerable people, particularly those with chronic, long term illnesses and those with mental illness are going to be pressured into positions that will only make their problems worse?

  21. aj 22

    Anne, at one point Arseneau gave a spanking to Rankin, after a Rankin-esque put-down. Slightly gratify but Arseneaux is too polite for her role.

  22. Frank Macskasy 23

    Beneficiary bashing in this country is definitely becoming uglier by the day. It seems that Paula Bennet’s attacks on beneficiaries – seemingly condoned by the Prime Minister – has given prejudice free reign in the country. It is now permissable to demonise a vulnerable group in society based on the pretext of “ending bludging”.

    The SUNDAY STAR TIMES article “Solo mum racks up 36 years on benefit” (http://tinyurl.com/ydqe7mk, 28 March), was a grubby piece of pseudo-journalism. The article was critical in it’s tone of an un-named woman who has cared for children for 36 years. The article failed on every level of professional journalism to ask the basic questions; What, How, Why, and Who.

    For all we know, that woman has dedicated herself to raising unwanted children from broken families – children who might otherwise have ended up like Nia Glassie or James Whakaruru.

    But we don’t know.

    Because the SST took a few facts and figures (provided no doubt by a compliant Minister of Social Welfare) and presented them in a way to guarantee a moral outrage response.

    This is not journalism. This is propaganda. And though Dr Goebbels would have been pleased with it, I found it vile.

    As for the Q & A last night; we sat and watched with a mixture of horror and amusement (if the two can ever be mixed). Bennet’s statements became more outrageous every time she opened her mouth and god knows what Guyon Espiner must have thought of that grinning idiot.

    The most telling moment came when Espiner suggested that sickness beneficiaries would probably end up working for the equivalent of $1 an hour. Bennet blithly replied that it’s not all about money, it’s about other ‘benefits’ to working.

    I have three responses to that.

    1. Ms Bennet earns an $243,700 (http://tinyurl.com/yfxqkmj) plus perks plus generous retirement packages plus god-knows-what-else. So much for “it’s not all about money”.

    2. Five haunting words, taken from one of the darkest periods of the 20th Century: “Work will set you free”.

    3. John Key originally had more humane ideas about welfare, prior to the election;

    “Before I get into that, I want to talk a little more about welfare in general.

    You might ask why I use the word “welfare” when the vogue nowadays is to talk about “social development”. I unashamedly use the word welfare because I believe in the welfare state. I have a personal commitment to it. My father died when I was seven years old. My mother, my two older sisters, and I had no other family in New Zealand. For a period of time after my father died, my mother relied on the safety net provided by the Widows Benefit.

    My family was poor, and we knew it, but the benefit gave my mother enough security to keep us together and keep us focused on a time when things would improve. By having our most basic needs covered as a family, we were able to hold on to that most precious human emotion hope.

    Over time, my mother moved off the benefit and into work. The welfare system continued to support us, however, by providing us with a state house. It wasn’t flash, but it was home.

    I think almost all New Zealanders believe in the desirability of the welfare state. In particular, I think New Zealanders take it on trust that there will always be a safety net of social welfare benefits. We’re a compassionate and fair people whose instinct is to give a person a helping hand when they need it.

    National is committed to a benefit system that is a genuine safety net in times of need. We’re committed to a comprehensive system of benefits that provides temporary support to people as they return to independence, and also provides indefinite, compassionate support to people who are physically or mentally unable to support themselves.” – http://tinyurl.com/ykaqvob

    Yeah, right.

  23. Anne 24

    I think Frank Macskasy’s comments should be repeated as a “guest post.”

    • B 24.1

      I second that

      • felix 24.1.1

        Me 3.

        • blinded by the right 24.1.1.1

          Really? Even though he twice compares National to the Nazis?

          • lprent 24.1.1.1.1

            I think that we’ve all read No Minister, Clint Heine, WhaleOil and Halfdone with their uninteresting analogies to irrelevant past history. For that matter Tumeke and Ideologically Impure when they get wound up.

            At least Frank put both references exactly into context without much of the ridiculous assumptions used by others in the blogosphere…

          • Frank Macskasy 24.1.1.1.2

            Not quite, “blinded by the right”.

            My reference to Dr Goebbels was in regards to the Sunday Star Times’ article.

            As for comparing National to the Nazis – again, no. I used the statement, “Five haunting words, taken from one of the darkest periods of the 20th Century: “Work will set you free’.” to illustrate how the concept of enforced labour can be exploited and mis-used.

            At any rate, my criticisms in my writings are pretty mild and non-confrontation when compared to some of the vitriol I’ve seen on right-wing blogs (as lprent said); on other internet messageboards; or heard on talkback.

            Why is it, I wonder, that the Right wing will make quite nasty personal attacks on someone presenting an opinion – rather than address the opinion itself?

            Can it be that the Right have no answers to the criticisms expressed by the Left?

            Can it be that the Left deals in facts that are unpalatable to the Right, and the only way to respond is with naked fury unleashed at the individual, rather than the individual’s views?

            This isn’t directed at you, “blinded by the right”. More by what I read here: http://www.thestandard.org.nz/too-far/ the other day.

            Unbelievable, really.

            When we see comments and behaviour like that (irrespective of where it comes from), it shows that those who stoop to such gutter-levels are totally bankrupt in their philosophy and have alienated themselves from the mainstream of society…

            Just something to ponder.

  24. BLiP 25

    mainstream of society

    What’s that?

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    In the early 2000s, Argentinian victims of the Dirty War, denied justice due to a local amnesty, sought justice in Spanish courts, who obligingly convicted agents of that country's dictatorship of crimes against humanity under Spain's "universal jurisdiction" law. But Argentina wasn't the only country with a repressive dictatorship which ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 days ago
  • Climate Change: A good move, but not enough
    The government has announced that it will quadruple climate aid to developing nations, from $300 million to $1.3 billion over four years. This is good: "climate finance" - aid to developing nations to decarbonise and offset the damage caused by rich-country emissions - is going to be a flashpoint at ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 days ago
  • Too Much Say, Not Enough Do.
    When The Green Party Co-Leader Speaks, Does He Make Any Sound? James Shaw must know that neither New Zealanders, nor the rest of humanity, will ever take the urgent and transformative action that Science now deems necessary to stave-off climate catastrophe.POOR JAMES SHAW: He’s the man this government sends out ...
    2 days ago
  • Gordon Campbell on the perils of declaring premature victory
    Sure enough, Saturday’s Vaxathon was a barrel of fun and a throwback not merely to the Telethons of the past. It also revived memories of those distant days of early 2020, when we were all carefully wiping down our groceries, not touching our faces, washing our hands for 20 seconds ...
    2 days ago
  • NZ Politics Daily: 18 October 2021
    Today’s NZPD testimonial from Kim Gillespie, Editor NZME Newspapers Lower North Island & Communities “I find the daily email great for giving me an overview of each morning’s big issues across the media landscape, and really appreciate the huge amount of work that must go in to compiling it each day.” Anyone ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    2 days ago
  • Bryce Edwards: Political Roundup – Celebrating and critiquing 25 years of MMP
    Over the last week, MMP has been in the spotlight, given that it’s now been 25 years since the first general election was held under this proportional representation system. This has produced some important commentary and storytelling about the introduction of MMP and about the various pros and cons of ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    2 days ago
  • COVID-19 in Aotearoa: what does public health do now?
    Dr Belinda Loring, Dr Ruth Cunningham, Dr Polly Atatoa Carr* Public health activities have collectively made an incredible contribution to minimising the impact of COVID-19 in Aotearoa. But the work for public health is not over. As the situation in Auckland heralds a transition point in our approach to the ...
    SciBlogsBy Public Health Expert
    2 days ago
  • 2021 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #42
    Listing of articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, October 10, 2021 through Sat, October 16, 2021 The following articles sparked above average interest during the week: ‘This is a story that needs to be told’: BBC film tackles Climategate scandal, Why trust science?, ...
    3 days ago
  • Is injection technique contributing to the risk of post vaccine myocarditis?
    Recent misleading media headlines about vaccines being administered incorrectly in the absence of evidence do little to help public confidence in vaccines. Spoiler alert, vaccines are not being administered incorrectly. The topic of this blog is based on what could be an important scientific question – is one of the ...
    SciBlogsBy Helen Petousis Harris
    3 days ago
  • A Māori health expert reports from the Super Saturday frontlines
    Rawiri Jansen, National Hauora Coalition I write this as I charge my car, getting ready to head home at the end of a pretty good Super Saturday. It started with coffee and checking the news feeds as any good day should. Between 9 and 10 am as I drove to ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    3 days ago
  • Weddings and Leopards
    Could it be that the Herald is beginning to twig that an unremitting hostility to the government does not go down well with all its readers? The evidence for that is that, in today’s issue, two contributors (Bill Ralston and Steven Joyce) who usually enjoy sticking the knife in, take ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    3 days ago
  • The Chronicles of Kregsmal and Krunch: Volume I
    As noted previously, my weekly DND campaign with Annalax and Gertrude has been put on ice. I expect it to return eventually, but for now it is very much on hiatus. The remainder of the group have decided to run an entirely new campaign in the meantime. This ...
    4 days ago
  • Super Saturday recap: Patrick Gower doesn’t know what he’s supposed to do
    It was Aotearoa’s first national day of action in over ten years, the first since 2010, when Prime Minister John Key tried to inspire us to clean up our nation’s berms. It didn’t work. Today, New Zealand’s berms are worse than ever. But history is not destiny, and other cliches. ...
    The CivilianBy admin
    4 days ago
  • COVID-19 Worried about getting your vaccine or want a simple explanation?
    Worried about getting your vaccine? Let me tell you a secret. No-one likes getting a vaccine. People do it because they know they’re better off to. Let me tell you another secret, a weird one: the vaccine doesn’t really “do” anything. Confusing? Let me explain… Vaccines are a face at ...
    SciBlogsBy Grant Jacobs
    4 days ago
  • Delta puts workers’ power under the spotlight
    by Don Franks Foremost fighting the Delta virus are workers, especially in health, distribution, service and education sectors. Unionised members of these groups are centrally represented by the New Zealand Council of trade unions ( NZCTU). Political journalist Richard Harman recently noted:“Businesses are caught in a legal tangle if they ...
    RedlineBy Admin
    4 days ago
  • Faster transitions to clean energy are also cheaper
    This is a re-post from the Citizens' Climate Lobby blog Several clean energy technologies like solar panels have become consistently cheaper year after year as the industries have benefited from learning, experience and economies of scale. Falling solar costs are described by “Swanson’s Law,” much like Moore’s Law described the rapid and consistent ...
    5 days ago
  • Abstraction and Reality in Economics
    Sometimes high theory loses the human point of the exercise.One of the joys of teaching is you learn from your students. When fifty-odd years ago, I was at the University of Sussex, a student doing our first-year economics course, Jim, came to me, saying he was pulling out because it ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    5 days ago
  • What Happened to the Team?
    Last year, in the early stages of the pandemic, the Prime Minister’s “team of five million” performed well; team discipline was maintained and we all worked well together. This year, however, has been a different story; team discipline has weakened, and many people have on numerous occasions behaved badly and ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    5 days ago
  • Climate Change: Another legal victory
    Across the world climate change activists have been going to court, seeking to make their governments act to protect future generations. And hot on the heels of victories in the Netherlands and Germany, there's been another one in France: A French court has ordered the government to make up ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    5 days ago
  • Invasion Of The (Covid) Body Snatchers.
    It's Here! They're Here! We're Here! Help! It’s as if we’re all living through a Covid version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers. What has become of Jacinda? Where have they taken her closest Cabinet colleagues? The people on the stage of the Beehive Theatrette look the same, but they ...
    5 days ago
  • NZ Politics Daily: 15 October 2021
    Today’s NZPD testimonial from Associate Professor Grant Duncan, Massey University, Auckland “The NZ Politics Daily email is very helpful in giving me a quick overview of current events and opinion. It allows me to pick out important or informative columns that I may otherwise have missed. I recommend NZ Politics Daily to anyone ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    5 days ago
  • Missing From The Anti-Covid Action.
    The Invisible Man: Where has the NZ Council of Trade Unions been during the Covid-19 Pandemic? Why hasn’t its current president, Richard Wagstaff (above) become a household name during the pandemic? Up there with Ashley Bloomfield, Michael Baker, Shaun Hendy and Siouxsie Wiles? WHERE HAVE THE UNIONS BEEN during the Covid-19 ...
    5 days ago
  • “Go West, Young Virus”
    The Auckland Coronavirus Outbreak potters along, not helped by the perception that the Government is disturbingly enthusiastic about “managing the virus” or loosening the border. Health Minister Andrew Little said today he envisages 90% vaccination rates (which we don’t have) eventually leading to 5,000 cases in Auckland a week… ...
    6 days ago
  • Skeptical Science New Research for Week #41, 2021
    How to fill a glass and thereby drink— from a fire hose So far this year, New Research has published listings for 3,291 papers concerning climate change from one aspect or another. Each edition includes two dozen or so articles describing freshly and directly observed effects of global waming. These ...
    6 days ago
  • Climate Change: UKanians supports cuts
    The Guardian reports a study on emissions reduction policy from the UK, which found that UKanians overwhelmingly support stronger action than their government: The UK public backs a carbon tax on polluting industries, higher levies on flying and grants for heat pumps in order to tackle the climate crisis, ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    6 days ago
  • Media Link: “A View from Afar” on PRC-Taiwan tensions.
    In this week’s podcast Selwyn Manning and I discuss the upsurge in tensions between the PRC and Taiwan and what are the backgrounds to and implications of them. You can check the conversation out here. ...
    KiwipoliticoBy Pablo
    6 days ago
  • Labour’s 2023 election manifesto
    This morning Health Minister Andrew Little effectively unveiled Labour's 2023 election manifesto: 5,000 cases a week in Auckland alone: Thousands of people will be infected with Covid-19 every week even with vaccination levels at 90 per cent, and hospitals face being overwhelmed once restrictions are eased and borders opened, ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    6 days ago
  • Don't Blame James.
    Emissions Impossible! So, don’t be too hard on poor James Shaw. His pathetic little To-Do list is, indeed, totally inadequate to the crisis. But, you know what? He’ll be lucky to get half of the items ticked-off. There’s just too many entrenched interests – not the least of whom are ...
    6 days ago
  • The “Pulpit of Strewth”
    Barry Soper is one half of one of one of those right-wing husband-and-wife duos in which the Herald seems to specialise. In today’s issue, he has a piece that doesn’t quite reach the heights (or depths) of a Hoskings-style anti-government hostility, but which does provide an interesting example of the ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    6 days ago
  • Gordon Campbell on the epic fails of Kris Faafoi
    Ever since Winston Peters first breathed life into this government in 2018, its own branding has been all about social justice and how we all need to be “kind” to each other. Somehow, Kris Faafoi must have missed the memo. His performance in the immigration portfolio (in particular) has neither ...
    6 days ago
  • NZ Politics Daily: 14 October 2021
    Today’s NZPD testimonial from Mike Treen, Advocate, Unite Union “Please continue your incredible work compiling these news digests. As someone operating in the fields of advocacy for workers and the broader social justice areas it is invaluable to be able to check what is happening in the media relating to the issues I have to deal ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    6 days ago
  • Overconfident Idiots: Why Incompetence Breeds Certainty
    This is a re-post from the Thinking is Power website maintained by Melanie Trecek-King where she regularly writes about many aspects of critical thinking in an effort to provide accessible and engaging critical thinking information to the general public. Please see this overview to find links to other reposts from Thinking is Power. ...
    7 days ago
  • Climate Change: Abandoning ambition
    When Labour was first elected to power in 2017, they promised us "[an] ambitious plan to take real action on climate change". Four years and a lot of foot-dragging later, they've finally released that plan. And its not what was promised. Where to begin? Firstly, they've taken the Climate Change ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • Many e-cigarette vaping liquids contain toxic chemicals: new Australian research
    Alexander Larcombe, Telethon Kids Institute   From October 1, it’s been illegal to buy e-liquids containing nicotine without a prescription from a doctor everywhere in Australia, except South Australia. But vaping with nicotine-free e-liquids is not illegal in Australia (though in some jurisdictions the e-cigarette devices themselves are illegal). Vaping ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    1 week ago
  • Young adults worldwide have blunt message for governments: ‘We don’t trust you.’
    This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Karin Kirk Elizabeth Marks describes herself as “a psychologist who works on difficult problems.” Her past research aimed at helping people cope with challenging health conditions, apt training, it appears, for taking on climate change issues. A few years ago, she altered ...
    1 week ago
  • Making ‘Second Age’ Hobbits Work: Amazon Series Speculation
    Time for a good old-fashioned fandom furore. The Tolkien fandom hasn’t had a proper one of those since the Great Nudity Scandal of October 2020… so it clearly must be time to pontificate from on-high about a television series we still know vanishingly little about. This time the subject ...
    1 week ago
  • NZ Politics Daily: 13 October 2021
    Today’s NZPD testimonial from Dr Lara Greaves, Political scientist, University of Auckland: “I love the NZ Politics Daily emails as they help me to keep on top of current events. It’s incredibly easy to skim through and follow the links. I really appreciate these as it means that I am exposed to a ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    1 week ago
  • The Data and Statistics Bill and the OIA
    The government introduced a new Data and Statistics Bill today to modernise and replace the 45-year old Statistics Act. Part of the Bill re-enacts the existing confidentiality regime (with one exception), which while a secrecy clause isn't an especially controversial one. Another part is aimed at removing "outdated" (inconvenient) limits ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • Graham Adams: The debate over the $55 million media fund erupts again
    RNZ’s Mediawatch and a video clip viewed 42,000 times keep the topic of the Public Interest Journalism Fund fizzing. Graham Adams reports.   A week ago, the NZ Taxpayers’ Union posted a short video clip of the exchange in Parliament between Jacinda Ardern and Judith Collins in which the National ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    1 week ago
  • Multiple sclerosis: the link with earlier infection just got stronger – new study
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    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    1 week ago
  • Hit hard by the pandemic, researchers expect its impacts to linger for years
    Sora Park, University of Canberra; Jennie Scarvell, University of Canberra, and Linda Botterill, University of Canberra   The impacts of COVID-19 on Australian university researchers are likely to have consequences for research productivity and quality for many years to come. According to an online survey of academics at the University ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    1 week ago
  • Covid and free speech
    by Don Franks Some commentators have likened the struggle against Covid 19 to the world war experience. To those of us not alive in those times, that comparison can only be academic. What the anti virus battle reminds me of much more is an industrial strike. In my twenties and ...
    RedlineBy Admin
    1 week ago
  • “Angry Blowhards”
    In today’s Herald, their excellent columnist, Simon Wilson, takes to task those “shouty” people whom he further describes as “angry blowhards”. They are those whose prime reaction to the pandemic is anger – an anger they seamlessly (and perhaps unwittingly) transfer from the virus to the government. The basis for ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    1 week ago
  • Looking Forward To 2022.
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    1 week ago
  • Gordon Campbell on Covid mandates, and the Covid pill
    The cliché about “living with Covid” will not mean life as we’ve known it, Jim. Vaccination is fast becoming a condition of employment, and also a requirement to participate in aspects of social life, such as travel, attending bars, cafes, and concerts etc. These protective measures enjoy a high level ...
    1 week ago
  • NZ Politics Daily: 12 October 2021
    Today’s NZPD testimonial from Prof Alan Bollard, Professor of Practice at the School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington; Chair of the Infrastructure Commission: “NZ Politics Daily” provides a great public service – a quick and unbiased way to check policy announcements and analysis every morning.” Anyone can sign up to NZPD ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    1 week ago
  • Legal Beagle: A submission on the COVID-19 Public Health Response Amendment Bill (No 2)
    I have made a submission on the COVID-19 Public Health Response Amendment Bill (No 2).In preparing it, I looked at the Hansard for the first reading debate, and got name-dropped as someone likely to make a submission. So, of course I did. I focus on a small bit of the ...
    1 week ago
  • Hard News: More tales from the Medicinal Cannabis Scheme
    You may have read last week that two years after the publication of regulations for medicinal cannabis – and three years after the enabling legislation – two local products from a local manufacturer have finally met the minimum quality standards for prescription. You may also be interested to know that ...
    1 week ago
  • Climate Change: Real action requires government
    Over the weekend someone pointed me at a journal article on "The Poverty of Theory: Public Problems, Instrument Choice, and the Climate Emergency". Its a US law journal article, so is a) very long; and b) half footnotes (different disciplines have different norms), but the core idea is that the ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • Climate Change: Not doing our bit
    Last month the US and EU announced they would push an agreement to cut methane emissions by 30% (from 2020 levels) by 2030 at the upcoming climate change conference in Glasgow. The good news is that New Zealand is looking at joining it. The bad news is that that won't ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • Delta’s Week Of Doom.
    Classic Shot: Are the Prime Minister’s formidable communication skills equal to the task of getting her government’s anti-Covid campaign back on track?IF JACINDA ARDERN thought last week was bad, the week ahead promises to be even worse. Sixty community cases of Covid-19, one of the highest daily totals so far ...
    1 week ago
  • Urgent measures needed to allow the safe re-opening of Auckland schools
    Dr Rachel Webb, Dr Jin Russell, Dr Pip Anderson, Dr Emma Best, Dr Alison Leversha and Dr Subha Rajanaidu* In this blog we describe the range of urgent measures that are needed to facilitate a safe return to schools in Auckland and other regions of the country where there is ...
    SciBlogsBy Public Health Expert
    1 week ago
  • Children live online more than ever – we need better definitions of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ scree...
    Kathryn MacCallum, University of Canterbury and Cheryl Brown, University of Canterbury   The pandemic has fundamentally altered every part of our lives, not least the time we spend on digital devices. For young people in particular, the blurred line between recreational and educational screen time presents new challenges we are ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    1 week ago
  • Putting Aotearoa on the map: New Zealand has changed its name before, why not again?
    Claire Breen, University of Waikato; Alexander Gillespie, University of Waikato; Robert Joseph, University of Waikato, and Valmaine Toki, University of Waikato   Our names are a critical part of our identity. They are a personal and social anchor tying us to our families, our culture, our history and place in ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    1 week ago
  • Speaker: Yes, of course festival organisers will follow the law on vaccination
    On Tuesday 5 October the New Zealand Government announced that proof of COVID-19 vaccination would be a requirement to attend large events this summer.It took a few days for event owners to absorb the information and understand the implications. By the end of the working week, most of the big ...
    1 week ago
  • NZ Politics Daily: 11 October 2021
    Today’s NZPD testimonial from Jim Hubbard, Cartoonist “NZ Politics daily is a go to for cartoonists, or should be.  Political reporting enmasse like this gives cartoonists and political junkies a smorgasbord to get their teeth into. Essential and I daresay vital reading for those who care about the future of NZ.” Anyone can sign ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    1 week ago
  • 2021 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #41
    Listing of articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, October 3, 2021 through Sat, October 9, 2021 The following articles sparked above average interest during the week: VFX Artist Reveals how Many Solar Panels are Needed to Power the ENTIRE World, Will you fall ...
    1 week ago
  • The Night of Parmenides: accepted
    A bit of good news on the writing front. My 3900-word short story, The Night of Parmenides, has been accepted by SpecFicNZ for their upcoming Aftermath anthology, to be published in early 2022. This is my first published short story to be explicitly set in my home-town of ...
    1 week ago
  • The Virus, the Politician, and the gang member
    . . . . . References Newshub Nation: Gang leader Harry Tam denies Winston Peters’ claims he helped infected woman breach COVID boundary, sparking Northland lockdown Te Ao News: ‘Apologise!’ Mob leader slams Peters’ Covid, Northland allegations Stuff media: Covid-19 – Search for contact of Northland case ‘extraordinarily frustrating’ CNBC: ...
    Frankly SpeakingBy Frank Macskasy
    1 week ago
  • Rapid kits, responses, and openings: watch motivations, or catch something worse with Covid…
    Last week was probably a high point for many armchair “experts”, fresh from their high after some deep inhaling of the various musings and fumings, of an actually very smug, and very insualted John “Things all work for me…” Key, former Prime Minister and FOREX trader, had blitzed the ...
    exhALANtBy exhalantblog
    2 weeks ago
  • Bollocks
    It would appear we have an unwelcome presence in town.Positive wastewater results had been detected in Hamilton and Palmerston North on October 6 and 7. There are 26 cases in hospital, seven of these are in ICU or high dependency units (HDU).One of the people in hospital is in Palmerston ...
    2 weeks ago
  • World-leading?
    So, the Herald has found someone, as we can see from today’s issue, who is able to explain why we should not claim to have been “world-leading” in our response to the covid epidemic. It seems that we have been kidding ourselves when we celebrated our low total number of ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    2 weeks ago
  • Why Is Labour So Frightened Of “Mr Stick”?
    Force Multiplier: Why are Ardern and her ministers so loathe to put a bit of stick about? The “emergency” legislation eventually enacted to authorise the measures needed to combat the Covid-19 pandemic failed to confer upon the New Zealand Government the unequivocal authority that subsequent events showed to be so ...
    2 weeks ago
  • The Need for an Updated Strategic Approach to Covid-19 Control in Aotearoa NZ
    Prof Nick Wilson, Dr Jennifer Summers, Prof Michael Baker* The NZ Government appears to have drifted into an unclear strategic approach to Covid-19 control. In this blog we outline one potential way forward: a regional strategic approach that considers “regional suppression” and “regional elimination”. To maximise the success of this ...
    SciBlogsBy Public Health Expert
    2 weeks ago
  • Mairon: The Actual Source for the Blasted Name
    Long-time Tolkien geeks – or those bemused enough to run across a certain internet phenomenon – might know that ‘Sauron’ is not actually the real name of the Lord of the Ring. ‘Sauron’ is just an abusive Elvish nickname, meaning ‘the Abhorred.’ Sauron’s actual name, at least originally, ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Forced Re-entry
    The elimination of Covid strategy is not so much defeated but changing circumstances means that policy has to evolve. Our elimination stance was never sustainable or at least it would not be until the rest of the world also eliminated Covid-19. Elimination of the virus was a strategy we adopted ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    2 weeks ago

  • Health reforms bill introduced to Parliament
    Legislation central to fixing the health system has been introduced into Parliament by Health Minister Andrew Little. “Rebuilding the public health system is critical to laying the foundations for a better future for all New Zealanders,” Andrew Little said. “We need a system that works for everybody, no matter who ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 hours ago
  • NCEA and NZ Scholarship Exams to proceed
    NCEA and New Zealand Scholarship exams will proceed, including in areas where Alert Level 3 has been in place, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “The New Zealand Qualifications Authority, Ministry of Education and Ministry of Health have been working together to ensure exams can be managed in a safe ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Limited change to onsite learning – for senior secondary students – in Level 3 regions
    Onsite learning at schools in Level 3 regions will start from next week for senior secondary school students to prepare for end of year exams, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “Secondary schools in these regions will start onsite learning for years 11 to 13 on Tuesday 26 October,” Chris ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Guaranteed MIQ spots for health workers
    The Government is changing the way managed isolation is co-ordinated for health workers, guaranteeing 300 spots a month for the health and disability sector. “Our world-class workforce is vital in rebuilding the health system and dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic,” Andrew Little said. “Whether it’s bringing doctors or nurses in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Govt helps to protect New Zealanders digital identities
    Making it easier for New Zealanders to safely prove who they are digitally and control who has access to that information is one step closer to becoming law, Minister for Digital Economy and Communications, Dr David Clark said. The Digital Identity Services Trust Framework Bill passed its first reading today ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Red tape cut to boost housing supply
    New building intensification rules will mean up to three homes of up to three storeys can be built on most sites without the need for a resource consent New rules will result in at least 48,200 and as many as 105,500 new homes built in next 5-8 years Bringing forward ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Nationwide business partnership grows conservation jobs
    Further Government support for New Zealand’s longest-standing sustainable business organisation will open up opportunities for dozens of workers impacted by COVID-19 to jump start a nature-based career, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. Partnering to Plant Aotearoa, led by the Sustainable Business Network (SBN), is a collaboration with iwi, hapū and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand increases climate aid contribution
    Government commits $1.3 billion over four years to support countries most vulnerable to the effects of climate change At least 50 percent of funding will go to the Pacific as it adapts to the impacts of climate change The increase means New Zealand now meets its fair share of global ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Super Māori turnout for Super Saturday
    Māori have put a superb effort into mobilising to get vaccinated over Super Saturday, with thousands rolling up their sleeves to protect themselves, their whānau and communities from COVID-19, Associate Health Minister Peeni Henare says. “It was absolutely outstanding that 21,702 Māori got vaccinated on this one day alone with 10,825 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Language assists Tagata Niue to thrive
    Despite the uncertain times we face with the challenges of COVID-19, our cultural knowledge, values and language remain constant, helping us progress towards goals in life, said  the Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio. This year, the Niuean community in New Zealand decided on the theme, “Kia tupuolaola e ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Zealand Ambassador to France announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Caroline Bilkey as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to France and the OECD. “Aotearoa New Zealand and France have a shared history, and enjoy a strong, collaborative partnership. This includes a strong trade and economic relationship, a shared commitment to support ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Govt welcomes nurses’ pay settlement
    The Government is welcoming news that a new employment agreement for nurses working in public hospitals has been settled. “I am very pleased that the hard work of the Nurses Organisation and District Health Boards has led to a settlement that both can support,” Health Minister Andrew Little said today. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Judge of the High Court appointed
    Māori Land Court Judge Layne Harvey has been appointed a Judge of the High Court, Attorney‑General David Parker announced today. Justice Harvey graduated with an LLB from the University of Auckland in 1992 and commenced employment as a law clerk with Simpson Grierson in Auckland that same year. In 1997 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Kiwis to have their say on plan to reduce waste
    New Zealanders are invited to have their say on proposals for a new waste strategy and options for new waste legislation. “Reducing waste is one of the issues all New Zealanders – especially younger Kiwis - care deeply about,” Environment Minister David Parker said today “New Zealand is one of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Next steps in action plan for indigenous rights kicks off
    Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson has today meet with more than 30 national Māori organisations in an online hui, kicking off the process to develop a plan for New Zealand to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (the Declaration). The previous National Government signed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Iwi-led housing solutions build homes for the future
    Whai Kāinga, Whai Oranga will open on 20 October, to receive applications for investment through Te Tūāpapa Kura Kāinga – Ministry of Housing and Urban Development and Te Puni Kōkiri The $730m fund combines investment from Budget 2021 ($380m) and the Māori Infrastructure Fund ($350m) - the largest investment seen ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
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