web analytics

Cynical denialism will cost us all

Written By: - Date published: 1:21 am, March 18th, 2010 - 36 comments
Categories: capitalism, climate change - Tags: , ,

David Farrar is not stupid. Like everyone with a brain, he knows that climate change is a real and dangerous threat caused by human greenhouse gases emissions. Yet he persists in making denialist dog-whistles to his readers, always being careful never to outright deny climate change himself. He and all the leaders of denialism are telling what they know to be lies to people they know to be idiots.

We know why the leaders of the Right continue to dish up denialist nonsense and try to make huge scandals over every small fault in marginal areas of climate science. It is inconvenient for their short-term interests that the truth be widely acknowledged and the steps taken to confront the problem. It is not in the economic interests of the capitalist class, whose wealth is based on the exploitation of (amongst other things) fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases.

What gets me angry is that climate change isn’t like work rights, or minimum wages, or public services, or taxes, where the Right will lie and say they’re advocating for what will be in the interests of everyone when really they’re just advancing the cause of the ruling capitalist class. Climate change is far more serious. It is not something that we can afford to play political games over. This is the living standards and lives of billions of humans, not to mention the rest of nature, at stake. Our species might not be in peril but our civilisation is.

Yet, the leaders of the Right pour what they know to be lies into the gullible ears of their useful idiots so that action on climate change is delayed one more year, one more quarter, so they can keep getting richer in the short-term, so they can continue basking in the heat as they set the world ablaze.

And it’s working. It’s working so well that 110 years after Svante Arrhenius identified the possibility of increasing the world’s temperature with higher carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, 50 years after rising levels were first detected in Hawaii, and 20 years after the world’s governments agreed to do something about it, emissions are still rising as are temperatures and we are dooming ourselves to catastrophe by inaction.

We will all pay the price for the selfish short-term actions of the leaders of denialism like David Farrar. Ultimately, they and their children will pay the price along with us.

36 comments on “Cynical denialism will cost us all ”

  1. SHG 1

    I don’t recall David Farrar being the world’s largest consumer of coal and opening coal-fired power stations at a rate of one per week. That would be China.

    • mummybot 1.1

      Nice troll on stating the obvious to get a fallacious argument in. The fact that you are raising China’s carbon emissions is the exact dis-ingenuity the article is decrying as the catastrophe. Go read a bit and stop wasting database space:

      The Economist: Chinese cities are greener than American cities

      The Economist: Trading down, Industry’s move from the rich to the poor world is confusing the carbon accounts

    • Chris 1.2

      Our desire for cheap Chinese products (take a look around you SHG, and everyone else! – look at your computer, made in China mostly. The pens? Made in China. Your underwear? Made in China of course) essentially means that we **export** pollution and **import** goods.

      The pollution associated with manufacturing the computer you wrote your comments on SHG has been exported to China, when in fact, it is **your** desire for the computer that caused the pollution in the first place. You OWN that pollution.

      So, given Farrar’s propensity for dog-whistling, and being bat-shit crazy, and using the internet to do it in, it is more than likely that he is responsible for at least ONE coal-fired power station.

  2. Bored 2

    We can focus on Farrar and the right wing nutjobs who deny climate change, the Nact type politicians and the money baggers around the globe who are in denial. By focusing on the right you miss the complicity of the rest of us.

    Go to the Warehouse and see the big people movers roll in with a load of fatties (fed too many calories by oil based agro industry) ready to fritter the cash on cheap imported goods (made by excess calorie burning petro based industry)…..and you wonder why Farrars message falls on a receptive audience?

    • QoT 2.1

      Going oh so well until the inevitable fat-hate, Bored. Props for finding a way to justify your prejudice by aligning people’s fatness with non-renewable energy sources.

      Before anyone starts with ZOMG OBESITY CRISIS BOOGA BOOGA, let’s reflect:

      Go to the Warehouse and see the big people movers roll in with a load of fatties (fed too many calories by oil based agro industry) ready to fritter the cash on cheap imported good

      Fat people: poor (shopping at the Warehouse), lazy (driving big cars, OOH! bonus “evil emissions-makers) and stupid (“fritter the cash). Nope, no societal prejudices HERE.

      • Bored 2.1.1

        Hey QoT, go to the Warehouse and have a look. I dont talk class, race or any of that crap…thats your spin. I open my eyes and see the human condition as it really is.

        Take off the sunnies and have a look at the train wreck are all headed for….and tell me that any of us left or right, pink brown gay straight fat thin etc etc are any less caught up in this and culpable for our own little bit of the action.

        Or capable of doing a little bit of remediation off our own back.

        • jcuknz 2.1.1.1

          Bored is right, and likely I’m one of them, its hard to break the habit. My reaction to DPF is not the hysterics of Marty G but rather the acknowledgement that the warn-ers tend to over state the case [ TV commercials banded for exageration etc]. I also share Iprent’s wonder that I read below as I write this.

          • Bright Red 2.1.1.1.1

            “[ TV commercials banded for exageration etc]. ”

            so what? It that some people over state things does not mean the problem is not very very serious.

        • QoT 2.1.1.2

          I open my eyes and see the human condition as it really is.

          What utterly pretentious wank, Bored. “Human condition”? You dogwhistle poor/fat/consumerist/large-car-driving and you’re going to cite some Higher Consciousness of the Nature of Man?

          You just don’t like fat people, Bored. Admitting you’re prejudiced and judgemental is the first step.

  3. lprent 3

    The right are into sort-term thinking in a big way. DPF, clueless, and the rest of that mob do not exactly induce a sense of awe at their level of insight. More a sense of wonder about how they like to consume now and push the debt on to their kids.

    This shows in everything from not prepping superannuation systems for the baby boomers, through to effectively cutting all second chance education, cutting the fast forward ag r&d, and of course their tepid response to the clear science of anthrogeneric climate change.

    Basically they are just screwing over their kids, while of course telling them it is for their own good. Yeah right.

    • Bored 3.1

      I think you have hit the nail on the head, short term is what the right does so well. Do something / anything to whats immediately infront of you, act without any questioning whats behind whatever it is. Its a bit like the Forrest Gump saying, “stupid is as stupid does”…..

  4. freedom 4

    “stupid is as stupid does’

    The new National Party letterhead?

  5. coolas 5

    Marty G is right. David Farrar is not stupid, but like so many on the Right, he has little imagination, and obviously cannot envisage the catastrophes global warming will bring, or see the economic opportunities offered by International cooperation in reducing CO2 emissions.

    Complacent and glib are these people, like Farrar, because their smug self satisfaction makes them insincere and shallow. They don’t care about the Earth in 2090. They won’t be here. So what!

    • Bored 5.1

      You are right about Farrars lack of ability to imagine anything beyond today….he like most of us expects tomorrow to be just like today….and if the change is so subtle and incremental he (and we) wont notice it. Its also why its so hard to convince people to act, its so easy to put off. And we all hate Jeremiahs.

  6. Bill 6

    We need a witch hunt.

    Anybody guilty of denying climate change merely as an expression or extension of an anti-government regulation ideology?

    Hound them out of all spheres of influence. Ostracise them from society as completely as is possible. In short, be done with them.

  7. Bill 7

    We need liberals to disavow themselves of the essentially denialist notion that by the simple act of continuing on in our present ways in a ‘nicer’ and more conscientious fashion that things will be basically okay.

  8. peterthepeasant 8

    Excuse me, climate change has been occurring constantly long before us modern humans existed. It will occur long after we have disappeared off the planet.

    It is quite wrong to assert that “climate change is a real and dangerous threat caused by human greenhouse gases emissions.”

    It may well be that climate change is as catastrophic as alleged.

    How much human activity contributes to climate change, and in what direction is an unresolved debate.

    It may or may not be mitigated by our actions now. That is the real debate.

    Some 1000 years ago Greenland was colonised by cattle herding Danes. Fat chance these days of raising cattle there.

    Some 500 years ago the river Thames was freezing so solid in winter it was used as a market place and thoroughfare. Fat chance these days.

    By all means attack Farrar, if you must, (I do not care one way or another) but please do not use climate change as your “stalking horse”.

    Get your facts right, human activity does not cause climate change. It happens anyway.
    Human activity may exacerbate or mitigate it but “Dame Nature” is not going to pay a lot of attention to either MARTY G, or David Farrar.

    • lprent 8.1

      …climate change has been occurring constantly long before us modern humans existed. It will occur long after we have disappeared off the planet.

      Yes, and if we were still homo sapien sapien hunter gatherers recently departed from Africa it wouldn’t be an issue. However in your extensive (yeah right – shows all of the signs of a 10 minute search and no thinking) searching of the effects of previous climate change and its effects on humans, did you discover

      • That humans have only had effective agriculture for the last 10 thousand years
      • That humans with agriculture have managed to increase their numbers from probably only a few million, to over 6 billion and still rising.
      • That our agricultural technology is based on having the relatively stable climate that has existed for the last 10 thousand years, and tends to fall apart whenever there is severe climate change – as in the Greenland example that you cited, or the Sahara (the romans bread basket), and innumerable other examples.
      • That the current rate of global temperature change over the last century is the fastest that we can see in the geological record. Both the entire billion years that we have some kind of record of, and the last few million years that we have reasonably good proxies for. That is despite a high proportion of the last centuries heat being buffered into the deep ocean currents (which won’t last).
      • And don’t give me any of the regional climate bullshit from Europe – it is crap from someone who has never bothered to study anything outside of the Gulf Stream area. North Atlantic is a weirdo area for climate as well as the inhabitants. Read my post on the subject – Those childish people of Northern European descent.
      • That the most common cause of wars amongst humans can be traced ultimately to problems with lack of resources – especially food
      • Warfare is a bit dangerous with the number and type of weapons currently available
      • That the issue isn’t if the planet and biosphere survives, but if we (humans) do.
      • That on this issue, you are a pious fool with about as much understanding as a plank. David Farrar is about as thick. Neither of you understand the basis of the science – both of you are stupid enough to imagine that you do.
      • Therefore neither of you have any idea of the risks. DPF reads the executive summary of the IPCC reports, but has clearly managed to avoid reading the nasty bits about risk levels in part one of the report. The bits with large hooks in.
        And at least David can read, unlike you…

      Have I made my reaction to your level of stupidity clear? My BSc in earth sciences may be almost 30 years old, but it clearly is better informed than than ‘peterthepissant’

      • peterthepeasant 8.1.1

        My post was objecting to the comment “climate change is a real and dangerous threat caused by human greenhouse gases emissions.’

        It is simply untrue.

        Climate change happens.

        One does need a degree in anything to understand that.

        To attribute the current alterations in in climatological measurements entirely to “human greenhouse emissions is sheer stupidity.

        Perhaps we could have some sane, rational discussion? Please?

        I think your language reveals your logic very well.

        I am very glad I did not get my degree from the same faculty you did.

        • lprent 8.1.1.1

          Ok peter the pissant. I can see that you don’t address any of points about the danger of climate change to humans, Just wander off to stupidity stating the earths climate has changed in the past – which anyone with even a basic understanding of paleo-climate has been aware of for a century.

          The problem is that humans are now changing the climate inadvertently, and in a way that is liable to undermine the basis of our civilization. It is pretty simple physics that even you should be able to grasp if you were willing to use your brain when you look at effects of the near doubling of CO2 in less than a century from fossil fuel burning (easy to demonstrate if you look at isotopic mixes of carbon). And of course you don’t even offer an alternative mechanism that can with the regional temperature rises in areas like the Antarctica peninsula or the north polar areas.

          But it is clear that you really aren’t willing to do so. Looks like you’re just another stupid CCD running on faith rather than rationality, like so many before. You are a waste of comment space

          • the sprout 8.1.1.1.1

            Hmm… yeah, I wonder why he can’t actually argue the argument could it be because it’d be a hiding to nowhere perhaps?

          • peterthepeasant 8.1.1.1.2

            Read my posts carefully
            Your reactions are quite out of proportion.
            Are you suggesting that without humanity climate change would not happen.
            I was not debating any argument, there were no points to address,as you suggest.

            • lprent 8.1.1.1.2.1

              Climate change is always happening, In the last 10k years it has been relatively stable. While all visible human civilization has happened.

              Now it is shifting rapidly. The carbon ratio is dropping in the rapidly risisg CO2 mix is shifting – indicating fossilized carbon release being released. What do you care? You like SUV’s.

              There are no points to address – you couldn’t give a shit for descendants, or even the rest of your life….

              Hey – you’re a callous monkey…

        • jaymam 8.1.1.2

          Good on you peterthepeasant. I don’t think I can be bothered answering the warmists’ misinformation in here, but somebody should.

          To the warmists:
          “Ok peter the pissant.” It’s typical of warmists to abuse others, because they have no convincing arguments.

          “deny climate change”: Will you PLEASE stop using the term “climate change” when you mean “human caused climate change” (which is in fact insignificant).

          Unlike the warmists, I have actually looked at raw data around the world. i.e. real temperature records in actual reliable weather stations. Anyone who has not done that is unqualified to discuss climate in any way. There is no evidence of catastrophic warming at any of those stations.

          Here’s the real reason for the warmists’ propaganda war – money – lots of it.
          The WWF and its partners hope to share the selling of carbon credits worth $60 billion:
          http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/jamesdelingpole/100030769/there-is-nothing-cuddly-about-the-wwf/

          • lprent 8.1.1.2.1

            Here’s the real reason for the warmists’ propaganda war money lots of it.

            That is utter bullshit, for two main reasons.

            First, that amount is pitiful compared to the amount that polluting industries are likely to lose under any credible scheme for putting a cost on emissions. Which is why those companies are spending so much money fighting these pathetic rearguard actions trying to delay any action for as long as possible, regardless of the risks and consequences to everyone else.

            Secondly, most of the work pushing forward climate change is done by tens of thousands of scientists who are largely employed at universities, and by millions of people like myself and others here. In neither of those cases is there any possible way that we could share in any possible payout from some hypothetical dividend from climate change legislation. Since most of us (unlike you from your statements here in the past) appear to know some science, we’re doing it on the basis of the evidence supporting a viable theory. To me, you appear to do it from some crackpot conservative sense that the world isn’t allowed to change on you.

            Grow up. Use your brain and learn some basic science. Then maybe you’ll be worth talking to.

            But don’t accuse people of doing things for monetary gain unless you can support your pathetic insinuations.

            Since you accused me as part of the ‘warmists’ – I’m going to take that accusation personally on behalf of all of the ‘warmists’ here. You’re now going to have to show that linkage for me or withdraw the statement. Adding you to moderation until one or the other happens (and my patience is finite).

            • jaymam 8.1.1.2.1.1

              lprent, you said “humans are now changing the climate inadvertently, and in a way that is liable to undermine the basis of our civilization”.
              That is a warmist or climate alarmist argument. What would you like to be called if not warmist?
              I am saying that the WWF and other organisations, with their huge finances, are driving the climate change hysteria by constant advertising, such as the Earth Day nonsense.
              Have you looked at any raw data yet? That will show that there has been insignificant warming in the last 100 years.

              [lprent: You ignored my question. Exactly how am I expected to get a monetary return from being a ‘warmist’ as you asserted. Being able to substantiate an assertion when requested is a requirement here. Not even attempting to answer is something I ban for because it starts stupid flamewars (and why I intervene). This encourages people to debate rather than making unsubstantiated assertions. You get exactly one more chance. If you can’t support the statement then take responsibility for yourself and say so.]

              • jaymam

                I accused the warmist WWF of making a huge amount of money by selling carbon credits, not individual warmists such as yourself.
                If you are going to ban members of the Labour Party such as me, there’s no point in anyone reading The Standard.

                [lprent: No – what you said in a complete sentence was:-

                Here’s the real reason for the warmists’ propaganda war money lots of it.

                That was a direct assertion / slur against all ‘warmists’. It is equivalent to saying that all labour supporters are communists or that all national supporters would like to drive all socialists into concentration camps for a final solution.

                You then provided an example of a journo asserting something against the WWF, which had what looks at first glance to be a paranoid fantasy worthy of Ian Wishart. However even if was true, that didn’t provide support for your first sentence asserting a claim about implicitly all ‘warmists’. That is what I called you on.

                What I look at on this site is behaviour. In this case I saw a really stupidly broad statement that was sure to stir up a flame-war after it got noticed, and stepped in to educate you (and to prevent others from getting stuck in). That is a concession to the fact you have actually debated before and have a history of being moderately rational sometimes. Normally I’d just do a pre-emptive ban or a very sarcastic tear-off before dropping you into moderation for behaviour modification. In this case you got a short taste of what I’d expect the response to be. Read the policy about how I view flamewars and the people who start them.

                So now – does that sentence stand or not?

                BTW: I really couldn’t give a damn for whatever party people claim they’re in. I’m mainly concerned with behaviour and comments that are liable to lead to unreadable threads. I think I’ve banned people of every possible political denomination at one time or another. The bias tends towards the right, but that is mostly because they don’t like the site existing and it affects their behaviour. ]

  9. Yeah yeah but whats the solution ?…it’s not voluntary reduction or cap and trade, thats also back asswards looking.

    Look to the future and what do you see ?

    • Bill 9.1

      “Look to the future and what do you see ?”

      lousy science fiction

      • pollywog 9.1.1

        no bright future huh ?…all doom and gloom !

        Gov’t’s can’t regulate big business to reduce pollution, they cant even regulate banks to reduce risk taking ‘investments’, meaning we’re looking at an environmental and financial meltdown of apocalyptic proprtions ?

        …so we may as well party like theres no future for tomorrow we die and fuck the problems our kids will endure as our legacy. Let them deal with it…yeah. It’ll build character ?

      • Bill 9.1.2

        Or change the trajectory that leads us to the lousy science fiction future.

        A revolution. Only problem would be that no base or movement is in existence from whence to launch such positive change as is needed…yet.

  10. Descendant Of Smith 10

    The difficulty that I see is that the denial means that not enough is being done to be able to work out how we will survive in those circumstances and what new mechanisms, tools, equipment, might be needed to survive.

    It seems quite clear that change is coming – it seems equally clear that we are ill prepared for it both at a local and a global scale.

    Having lots of dead people will no doubt be a useful way of adjusting and reducing our impact on the planet. No doubt many of those dead will be in places we don’t live.

    The Greenland example is only marginally interesting because they, the Vikings, were very reliant on imported materials to maintain their existence there. Their big problems came with the freezing of the straight that gave their ships access. It wasn’t so much the impact of climate change directly on Greenland itself. It for instance already had poor soils and few minerals.

    At the same time they did not wish to drop their standard of living e.g. by eating seal meat that may have enabled their survival.

    I guess the lesson is, is that we may need to reduce our dependency on imports and that we may need to be prepared to accept a drop in our standard of living as climate change happens.

    But look we already are likely to have to accept a lower standard of living with our aging population and we’ve can’t even plan properly for that – and that is totally predictable.

    I also don’t remember asking as a consumer that clothing jobs be moved from New Zealand to China I think that was a push by private enterprise who wanted to make more profit. I think they also wanted tariffs removed so they could remove any protection for our industries. I didn’t know I could actually buy a computer completely manufactured in New Zealand – let me know where I can find one – not just assembled but made and built component by component.
    I can also find plenty of rich fat people who shop at Kirkcaldie and Stains. Are those people not even more culpable because at least they have the financial freedom of choice about what products they buy.

    Equally, and if I can find the reference I will, didn’t the sugar industry play a crucial role in preventing a maximum sugar level in food items from being put in WHO guidelines. This was recommended by the scientists involved in the report but missing from the final version.

    Applying this maximum would be a good start. Taking the high level sugar out of food would be a much better step forward than berating the consumers if we really wanted to make a difference. Trouble is we don’t want to because free market reigns supreme.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • NZ secures new Pfizer COVID-19 medicine
    New Zealand has secured supplies of another medicine to treat COVID-19, Health Minister Andrew Little announced today. “In October, New Zealand was one of the first countries in the world to make an advance purchase of a promising new antiviral drug, molnupiravir,” Andrew Little said. “Today I am pleased to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    9 hours ago
  • Strong Pipeline for Construction Sector
    Strong pipeline ahead for the construction sector Infrastructure activity forecast to reach $11.2 billion in 2026 Construction sector now the fourth biggest employer with more than 280 000 people working in the industry Residential construction the largest contributor to national construction activity. Minister for Building and Construction Poto Williams says ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    11 hours ago
  • Regenerative agriculture research receives Government boost
    The Government continues to invest in farm sustainability, this time backing two new research projects to investigate the impacts of regenerative farming practices, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. Soil health and regenerative agriculture “We’re contributing $2.8 million to a $3.85 million five-year project with co-investment by Synlait Milk and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • David McLean appointed as KiwiRail chair
    David McLean has been appointed as Chair of KiwiRail Holdings Ltd, the Minister for State Owned Enterprises Dr David Clark and Minister of Finance Grant Robertson announced today. “Minister Clark and I are confident that David’s extensive business knowledge and leadership experience, including his time as former Chief Executive and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Ambassador to Turkey announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Zoe Coulson-Sinclair as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to Turkey. “Aotearoa New Zealand and Turkey’s relationship is one of mutual respect and underpinned by our shared Gallipoli experience,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “Turkey is also a generous ANZAC Day host and has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Announcement of new Consul-General in Guangzhou
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Rachel Crump as New Zealand’s next Consul-General in Guangzhou, China. “China is one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s most significant relationships – it is our largest trading partner, and an influential regional and global actor,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “As the capital of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government marks International Day of Persons with Disabilities
    The Government joins the disabled community of Aotearoa New Zealand in marking and celebrating the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, Minister for Disabilty Issues Carmel Sepuloni said. The theme for this year’s International Day of Persons with Disabilities is “Leadership and participation of persons with disabilities toward an inclusive, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Deputy Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, and Advisory panel member appointed
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has announced the appointments of Graeme Speden as the Deputy Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, and Ben Bateman as a member of the Inspector-General’s Advisory Panel.  “These are significant roles that assist the Inspector-General with independent oversight of New Zealand’s intelligence agencies,” Jacinda Ardern said. “While ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Five million COVID-19 tests processed
    Associate Minister of Health, Dr Ayesha Verrall has congratulated testing teams right around New Zealand for reaching the five million tests milestone. Today, an additional 31,780 tests were processed, taking the total since the beginning of the pandemic in 2020 to 5,005,959. “This really is an incredible and sustained team ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Funding for extra ICU capacity
    Care for the sickest New Zealanders is getting a major boost from the Government, with plans to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on expanding intensive care-type services, Health Minister Andrew Little announced today. “Through good planning, we have avoided what the COVID-19 pandemic has done in some countries, where ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • “THE LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF NEW ZEALAND’S FIGHT AGAINST COVID.”
    Speech to the New Zealand Centre for Public Law Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you for providing this opportunity to speak with you today as Attorney General. I’m here to talk about the constitutional consequences of Covid -19. I love the law. The way it exists with the consent of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • The legal and constitutional implications of New Zealand’s fight against COVID
    Speech to the New Zealand Centre for Public Law Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you for providing this opportunity to speak with you today as Attorney General. I’m here to talk about the constitutional consequences of Covid -19. I love the law. The way it exists with the consent of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Pharmac Review interim report released
    Health Minister Andrew Little has released an interim report by an independent panel reviewing the national pharmaceuticals-buying agency Pharmac. Pharmac was established in 1993 and is responsible for purchasing publicly funded medicines for New Zealanders, including those prescribed by GPs or administered in hospitals. The review, chaired by former Consumer ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Appointment to Network for Learning board
    Former MP Clare Curran has been appointed to the board of Crown company Network for Learning (N4L), Education Minister Chris Hipkins says. Hon Clare Curran served as a Member of Parliament for Dunedin South from 2008-2010. During this time, she held a number of ministerial portfolios including Broadcasting, Communications and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Putting home ownership within reach of Pacific Aotearoa
    Pacific community groups and organisations will get tools to help them achieve home ownership with the implementation of the Ministry for Pacific Peoples (MPP) Pacific Housing Initiative, said Pacific Peoples Minister Aupito William Sio. In July 2021, MPP launched the Pacific Community Housing Provider Registration Support programme and the Pacific ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Coastal shipping will help keep New Zealand’s supply chain buoyant
    Transport Minister Michael Wood today welcomed the release of the Coastal Shipping Investment Approach State-of-Play report as an important step towards a more sustainable coastal shipping sector, which will further diversify New Zealand’s supply chain. “This Government is committed to strengthening our domestic supply chain by making coastal shipping a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Response to Human Rights Commission's reports into violence towards disable people
    Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa.   Thank you for that introduction Hemi and thank you for inviting me to respond on behalf of Government to the release of these two important reports (Whakamanahia Te Tiriti, Whakahaumarutia te Tangata -Honour the Treaty, Protect the Person and Whakamahia te Tūkino kore ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Law change strengthens petroleum decommissioning regulation
    Petroleum permit and licence holders operating in New Zealand will now have an explicit statutory requirement to carry out and fund the decommissioning of oil and gas fields after a new law was given Royal assent today, says Energy and Resources Minister Dr Megan Woods. Once in effect The Crown ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New Zealand Response to assist peace and stability in Solomon Islands
    The New Zealand government has announced that it will deploy Defence Force and Police personnel to Honiara to help restore peace and stability. “New Zealand is committed to its responsibilities and playing its part in upholding regional security,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said.  “We are deeply concerned by the recent ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Continued growth in volume of new home consents
    In the year ended October 2021, 47,715 new homes were consented, up 26 per cent from the October 2020 year. In October 2021, 4,043 new dwellings were consented Canterbury’s new homes consented numbers rose 31% to higher than post-earthquake peak. New home consents continue to reach remarkable levels of growth, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Saddle up for summer with cycle trail funding
    New investment will keep the best of New Zealand’s cycle trails in top condition as regions prepare to welcome back Kiwi visitors over summer and international tourists from next year. “Cycle tourism is one of the most popular ways to see the country ‘off the beaten track’ but the trails ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New Zealand provides additional funding to COVAX for vaccine delivery
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced additional funding will be provided to COVAX to support vaccine delivery in developing countries. “New Zealand remains cognisant of the dangers of COVID-19, especially as new variants continue to emerge. No one is safe from this virus until we all are and this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • COVID-19 Community fund providing support for 160 organisations focused on women and girls
    Minister for Women Jan Tinetti today announced financial support will be allocated to the 160 successful applicants for the COVID-19 Community Fund, to support organisations helping women/wāhine and girls/kōtiro in Aotearoa New Zealand affected by the pandemic. “COVID-19 has had a disproportionate effect on women around the world including in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government delivers reactivation package as Aucklanders reconnect for summer
    A new support package will help revive economic, social and cultural activities in our largest city over summer, and ensure those in hardship also get relief. The Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni and the Economic and Regional Development Minister Stuart Nash have announced a Reactivating Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Mobile services and broadband come to Chatham Islands for first time
    World class mobile and broadband services have been switched on for the 663 residents of the Chatham Islands, Minister for the Digital Economy and Communications, David Clark and Minister for Economic and Regional Development, Stuart Nash announced today. “This eagerly awaited network will provide fast broadband and mobile services to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Crown accounts reflect strong economy amid pandemic
    The Government’s financial accounts continue to reflect an economy that has performed better than expected, despite the latest Delta COVID-19 outbreak. The Crown accounts for the four months to the end of October factors in the improved starting position for the new financial year. Core Crown tax revenue was $2.5 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Applications open for new 2021 Resident Visa
    The first round of applications for New Zealand’s new 2021 Resident visa open today (6am). “This one-off pathway provides certainty for a great many migrant families who have faced disruption because of COVID-19 and it will help retain the skills New Zealand businesses need to support the economic recovery,” Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • More Vietnam Veterans to receive compensation for Agent Orange Exposure
    Minister for Veterans, the Hon Meka Whaitiri announced today that two new conditions associated with Agent Orange exposure have been added to the Prescribed Conditions List. Under the 2006 Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Crown and representatives of Vietnam veterans and the Royal New Zealand RSA. Vietnam veterans in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government commits to international effort to ban and regulate killer robots
    Minister of Disarmament and Arms Control Phil Twyford announced today that New Zealand will push for new international law to ban and regulate autonomous weapons systems (AWS), which once activated can select and engage targets without further human intervention. “While the evidence suggests fully autonomous weapons systems are not yet ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New freedom camping rules – right vehicle, right place
    Tougher freedom camping laws will be introduced to prevent abuse which has placed an unfair burden on small communities and damaged our reputation as a high quality visitor destination. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has confirmed that new legislation will be introduced to Parliament following an extensive round of public consultation ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government invests to support a classic Kiwi summer
    Vaccinated New Zealanders can look forward to Kiwi summer events with confidence, while artists and crew will have more certainty, following the launch of details of the Arts and Culture Event Support Scheme, Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “The Government recognises that the arts and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Grace period for expired driver licences cruises into 2022
    Due to the ongoing Delta outbreak and extended lockdowns, all New Zealand driver licences and licence endorsements that expired on or after 21 July 2021 will now be valid until 31 May 2022, Transport Minister Michael Wood announced today. “This further extension to the validity of driver licenses recognises that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Delivered: 1,000 extra transitional homes
    A further 1,000 transitional homes delivered  New housing development starts in Flaxmere, Hastings  The Government has delivered the next 1,000 transitional housing places it promised, as part of its work to reduce homelessness. Housing Minister Dr Megan Woods is marking the milestone in Hastings at a new development that includes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Traffic light levels announced
    The levels at which different parts of New Zealand will move forward into the COVID-19 Protection Framework this Friday have been announced. Northland, Auckland, Taupō and Rotorua Lakes Districts, Kawerau, Whakatane, Ōpōtiki Districts, Gisborne District, Wairoa District, Rangitikei, Whanganui and Ruapehu Districts will move in at Red The rest of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Financial support to move to traffic light system
    A new transition payment will be made available particularly for affected businesses in Auckland, Waikato and Northland to acknowledge the restrictions they have faced under the higher Alert Levels. Transition payment of up to $24,000 as businesses move into traffic light system Leave Support Scheme and Short Term Absence Payment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Ambassador to Russia announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Sarah Walsh as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to Russia. “Aotearoa New Zealand and Russia have a long-standing relationship, engaging on a range of regional and global interests including disarmament and Antarctica issues. We also work together as members of the East ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Permanent Representative to the UN announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Carolyn Schwalger as Permanent Representative to the New Zealand Permanent Mission to the United Nations in New York. “Aotearoa New Zealand is a founding member of the UN and we have worked hard to ensure our stance on human rights, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Further COVID-19 economic support for Cook Islands and Fiji announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced a further package of support for the Cook Islands and Fiji for COVID-19 economic support and recovery. “Aotearoa New Zealand remains committed to supporting our Pacific fanau and vuvale to respond to the impacts of COVID-19 on their economies, and move towards long-term ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New law will clear the air for tamariki in vehicles
    From today, it’s illegal to smoke or vape in most vehicles carrying children aged under 18 years old - whether the vehicle is moving or not. “Second-hand smoke poses an unacceptable risk to our tamariki and rangatahi,” Associate Minister of Health Dr Ayesha Verrall said. “We know children in vehicles ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Nine countries designated very high risk
    Nine southern African countries are being added to the very high risk countries list following public health advice around the newly discovered COVID-19 variant Omicron, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said. This afternoon, a public health risk assessment was carried out to assess the emerging evidence and any risk to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago